Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Break   Listen
verb
Break  v. i.  (past broke, obs. brake; past part. broken, obs. broke; pres. part. breaking)  
1.
To come apart or divide into two or more pieces, usually with suddenness and violence; to part; to burst asunder.
2.
To open spontaneously, or by pressure from within, as a bubble, a tumor, a seed vessel, a bag. "Else the bottle break, and the wine runneth out."
3.
To burst forth; to make its way; to come to view; to appear; to dawn. "The day begins to break, and night is fled." "And from the turf a fountain broke, and gurgled at our feet."
4.
To burst forth violently, as a storm. " The clouds are still above; and, while I speak, A second deluge o'er our head may break."
5.
To open up; to be scattered; to be dissipated; as, the clouds are breaking. "At length the darkness begins to break."
6.
To become weakened in constitution or faculties; to lose health or strength. "See how the dean begins to break; Poor gentleman! he droops apace."
7.
To be crushed, or overwhelmed with sorrow or grief; as, my heart is breaking.
8.
To fall in business; to become bankrupt. "He that puts all upon adventures doth oftentimes break, and come to poverty."
9.
To make an abrupt or sudden change; to change the gait; as, to break into a run or gallop.
10.
To fail in musical quality; as, a singer's voice breaks when it is strained beyond its compass and a tone or note is not completed, but degenerates into an unmusical sound instead. Also, to change in tone, as a boy's voice at puberty.
11.
To fall out; to terminate friendship. "To break upon the score of danger or expense is to be mean and narrow-spirited." Note: With prepositions or adverbs: -
To break away, to disengage one's self abruptly; to come or go away against resistance. "Fear me not, man; I will not break away."
To break down.
(a)
To come down by breaking; as, the coach broke down.
(b)
To fail in any undertaking; to halt before successful completion; as, the negotiations broke down due to irreconcilable demands.
(c)
To cease functioning or to malfunction; as, the car broke down in the middle of the highway. "He had broken down almost at the outset."
To break forth, to issue; to come out suddenly, as sound, light, etc. "Then shall thy light break forth as the morning." Note: often with into in expressing or giving vent to one's feelings. "Break forth into singing, ye mountains."
To break from, to go away from abruptly. "This radiant from the circling crowd he broke."
To break into, to enter by breaking; as, to break into a house.
To break in upon, to enter or approach violently or unexpectedly. "This, this is he; softly awhile; let us not break in upon him."
To break loose.
(a)
To extricate one's self forcibly. "Who would not, finding way, break loose from hell?"
(b)
To cast off restraint, as of morals or propriety.
To break off.
(a)
To become separated by rupture, or with suddenness and violence.
(b)
To desist or cease suddenly. "Nay, forward, old man; do not break off so."
To break off from, to desist from; to abandon, as a habit.
To break out.
(a)
To burst forth; to escape from restraint; to appear suddenly, as a fire or an epidemic. "For in the wilderness shall waters break out, and stream in the desert."
(b)
To show itself in cutaneous eruptions; said of a disease.
(c)
To have a rash or eruption on the akin; said of a patient.
To break over, to overflow; to go beyond limits.
To break up.
(a)
To become separated into parts or fragments; as, the ice break up in the rivers; the wreck will break up in the next storm.
(b)
To disperse. "The company breaks up."
To break upon, to discover itself suddenly to; to dawn upon.
To break with.
(a)
To fall out; to sever one's relations with; to part friendship. "It can not be the Volsces dare break with us." "If she did not intend to marry Clive, she should have broken with him altogether."
(b)
To come to an explanation; to enter into conference; to speak. (Obs.) "I will break with her and with her father."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Break" Quotes from Famous Books



... so savagely that the boy started to run; but the grip upon his shoulder tightened, and he was forced back against the bars of the gate. "Now, just you look here, messmet. You're such a little un that I don't like to hit yer for fear you should break; but don't you haggravate me by talking as if I was ...
— The Powder Monkey • George Manville Fenn

... Charlie looked at each other in amazement. They had fully expected that there would be all sorts of amusements to break the monotony of their long voyage, and their disappointment was great. However, when they found that in consequence of their being the only passengers each might have a cabin to himself, their discontent quickly passed away. ...
— Chatterbox, 1905. • Various

... you have chopped the bones which were separated from the meat, and those which were left from the roast meat of the day before. Remember, as was before pointed out, that the more these are broken, the more gelatine you will have. The best way to break them up is to pound them roughly in an iron mortar, adding, from time to time, a little water, to prevent them getting heated. It is a great saving thus to make use of the bones of meat, which, in too many English families, we fear, are entirely wasted; for it is certain, as previously ...
— The Book of Household Management • Mrs. Isabella Beeton

... suffered enough from the prostration of France and the predominance of Charles; and he was anxious now that neither should be supreme. So, when the imperial ambassador came expecting Henry's assent, he, Cromwell and the rest of the council were (p. 351) amazed to hear the King break out into an uncompromising defence of the French King's conduct in invading Savoy and Piedmont.[981] That invasion was the third stroke of good fortune which befel Henry in 1536. As Henry and Ferdinand had, in 1512, ...
— Henry VIII. • A. F. Pollard

... east to dispossess the older inhabitants, and if, in some places, the Bronze men and the Stone men seem to have gone on for a time side by side, the general characteristic of the change is that of a sudden break." We have shown that it was carried to England by an invasion, and it was, perhaps, so introduced into Denmark, but in other countries of Europe ...
— The Prehistoric World - Vanished Races • E. A. Allen

... the case in Asia, or to apply it for the institution of colonies, as was done in Africa, and which became afterwards a fundamental principle of law under the empire. From him proceeded the tactics, whereby demagogues and tyrants, leaning for support on material interests, break down the governing Aristocracy, but subsequently legitimize the change of constitution by substituting a strict and efficient administration for the previous misgovernment. To him, in particular, are traceable the first steps towards such a reconciliation ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... so much that I actually heard other sounds, but that I expected to hear them; this was what stole the other half of my listening. There was neither wind nor rain to break the stillness, and certainly there were no physical presences in our neighbourhood, for we were half a mile even from the Lower Farm; and from the Hall and stables, at least a mile. Yet the stillness was being continually broken—perhaps disturbed is a better word—and it was to ...
— The Empty House And Other Ghost Stories • Algernon Blackwood

... calls; for he will make such as are willing welcome at the eleventh hour; him that cometh he will in no case put away, John vi. 37. Nor can they object their changeableness, that they will not stand to the bargain, but break and return with the dog to the vomit; for Christ hath engaged to bring all through that come unto him; he will raise them up at the last day, John vi. 40; he will present them to himself holy and without spot or wrinkle, or any such ...
— Christ The Way, The Truth, and The Life • John Brown (of Wamphray)

... Is't possible? Bru. Heare me, for I will speake. Must I giue way, and roome to your rash Choller? Shall I be frighted, when a Madman stares? Cassi. O ye Gods, ye Gods, Must I endure all this? Bru. All this? I more: Fret till your proud hart break. Go shew your Slaues how Chollericke you are, And make your Bondmen tremble. Must I bouge? Must I obserue you? Must I stand and crouch Vnder your Testie Humour? By the Gods, You shall digest the Venom of your Spleene Though it do Split you. For, from this day forth, Ile vse you for my Mirth, ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... the same, and every clause, matter, and thing therein contained." Two days after the signing of the Treaty, a French fleet arrived in the Shannon, with 3,000 soldiers, 200 officers, and 10,000 stand of arms. Sarsfield was strongly urged to break faith with the English; but he nobly rejected the temptation. How little did he foresee how cruelly that nation would break faith ...
— An Illustrated History of Ireland from AD 400 to 1800 • Mary Frances Cusack

... zeal. I advised him what to read and study, was considerably amused at his receiving instruction from a young lieutenant who knew the company and battalion drill, and could hear him practise in his room the words of command, and tone of voice, "Break from the right, to march to the left!" "Battalion, halt!" "Forward into line!" etc. Of course I made a favorable report in his case. Among the infantry and cavalry colonels were some who afterward rose to distinction—David Stuart, Gordon Granger, ...
— The Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman, Complete • William T. Sherman

... at the marshalling of the clan, two had dared to break the rules, so strictly laid down, surprise was momentarily ...
— Lady Rosamond's Secret - A Romance of Fredericton • Rebecca Agatha Armour

... I thought to myself "This man has sworn an oath which he intends to break: for the preservation of my own life, therefore, I shall ...
— Hindoo Tales - Or, The Adventures of Ten Princes • Translated by P. W. Jacob

... influence of the Major's incessant attacks, Derrick had just then a hard time of it. He never complained, but I noticed a great change in him; his melancholy increased, his flashes of humour and merriment became fewer and fewer—I began to be afraid that he would break down. ...
— Derrick Vaughan—Novelist • Edna Lyall

... were the only robbers in Malwa whom under no circumstances travellers could trust. There are oaths of a sacred but obscure kind among those that are Rajputs or who boast their blood, which are almost a disgrace to take, but which, they assert, the basest was never known to break before Mandrup Singh, a Bhilala, and some of his associates, plunderers on the Nerbudda, showed the example. The vanity of this race has lately been flattered by their having risen into such power and consideration that ...
— The Tribes and Castes of the Central Provinces of India - Volume II • R. V. Russell

... to town in that exalted state with which courageous women face adversity. In her excitement Antigone tried hard to break off her engagement to Grevill Burton. She was going to do typewriting, she was going to be somebody's secretary, she was going to do a thousand things; but she was not going to hang herself like a horrid ...
— The Return of the Prodigal • May Sinclair

... of marque were issued to privateers which made many captures, and offered some compensation for the losses inflicted on the coasting and fishing interests by the same class of American vessels. In 1814 it was decided by the imperial authorities to break the truce which had practically left Maine free from invasion, and Sir John Sherbrooke, then governor of Nova Scotia, and Rear-Admiral Griffith took possession of Machias, Eastport, Moose, and other islands ...
— Canada under British Rule 1760-1900 • John G. Bourinot

... humbly. "It would break my heart to go, but I think I ought, for Leonard's sake. I know I ought." She was crying sadly by this time, but Mr Benson knew the flow of tears would ease her brain. "It will break my heart to go, but I know ...
— Ruth • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... man, and that there is a period in his life beyond which he cannot go. But he may shorten this period, for "bloody and deceitful men do not live half their days," and many people commit suicide, and break one of God's commands. Does God determine the number of suicides? Yes, if Calvinism is true; for, according to it, He hath "foreordained whatsoever comes ...
— The Doctrines of Predestination, Reprobation, and Election • Robert Wallace

... peat moss, it is undoubtedly acid, but it is beneficial in its water-holding properties and in the comparatively slow release of its nutritive elements. Lime added to the peat will break it down rapidly and make it more available as a fertilizer, but until the decomposition reaches a certain point; its effect is to impoverish rather than to enrich the mixture. This seeming paradox can perhaps best be explained by some experiments I have been ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association Thirty-Fourth Annual Report 1943 • Various

... to believe or disbelieve what she heard, before the maid returned, with "Mam, Mizz Hodges haz hur best love to you, mizz—and please to walk up—There be two steps; please to have a care, or you'll break your neck." ...
— Tales And Novels, Volume 1 • Maria Edgeworth

... habit; I dare say you are right," said Congreve gladly. "I mean to break off soon. But what I wanted to ask you was: Do you know your way ...
— The Tin Box - and What it Contained • Horatio Alger

... and they were deemed so noxious, that the burning of all copies extant in the country was earnestly asked for by the Cortes. To destroy a passion that had struck its roots so deeply in the character of all classes of men, to break up the only reading which, at that time, was fashionable and popular, was a bold undertaking, yet one in which Cervantes succeeded. No book of chivalry was written after the appearance of "Don Quixote;" and from that ...
— Handbook of Universal Literature - From The Best and Latest Authorities • Anne C. Lynch Botta

... she now knew—the voice that haunted Romayne. Not the words that had pleaded hunger and called for bread—but those other words, "Assassin! assassin! where are you?"—rang in her ears. She entreated Madame Marillac to break the unendurable interval of silence. The widow's calm voice had a soothing influence which she was eager to feel. "Go on!" she repeated. "Pray ...
— The Black Robe • Wilkie Collins

... once tinged in transport's dye; The sad reverse soon starts to view, And turns the past to agony. E'en time itself despairs to cure Those pangs to every feeling due: Ungenerous youth! thy boast how poor, To win a heart, and break it too! ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... fright, as all were washing and dabbling in the water. I came away. A man said, "The Christian must not go to the well in the morning, but only in the evening." There seems to be a tacit understanding, that from day-break to a couple of hours afterwards, the women shall have possession of the well, for purification purposes, according ...
— Travels in the Great Desert of Sahara, in the Years of 1845 and 1846 • James Richardson

... be at rest with him. Do you hear those terrible waves beat against the vessel? They will break her in pieces in a ...
— Work and Win - or, Noddy Newman on a Cruise • Oliver Optic

... drop the meat for the sake of the shadow, but she was not sure of M. de Cymier, notwithstanding all that Madame de Villegry was at pains to tell her about his serious intentions. On the other hand, she would have been far from willing to break with a man so brilliant, who made himself so agreeable at her ...
— Jacqueline, Complete • (Mme. Blanc) Th. Bentzon

... labours. Caldigate had become so intimate with the family, that it seemed as though a new life had sprung up for him, and that as he had parted from all that he then had of a family at Folking, he was now to break away from new ties under the doctor's roof. They had dined early, and at ten o'clock there was what Mrs. Shand called a little bit of supper. They were all of them high in heart, and very happy,—testifying their affection to the departing ones by helping ...
— John Caldigate • Anthony Trollope

... never be," she expostulated. "How can you expect me to be your wife after all that you have made me suffer? Do you think I could ever love you as a wife should do? You would be miserable; and I—I—should break my heart." She burst into tears as she concluded, and wrung ...
— Under False Pretences - A Novel • Adeline Sergeant

... the cozy corner the school-teacher had made with a portiere and some cushions, and I saw she was about ready to break down and cry. I went over to her and took her hand, for she was my own niece, although she didn't suspect it, and I had never had a child ...
— The Case of Jennie Brice • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... end of song from door R., looking white and worn, without noticing Fel.; she crosses slowly to window L., enters the recess, opens casement, and looks out. The Villagers, who are supposed to be enjoying themselves in the court below, break off their singing as Kate appears and cry ...
— The Squire - An Original Comedy in Three Acts • Arthur W. Pinero

... that under better influences Charlie will redeem himself because his impulses are good and this his only vice. I can hardly blame him for what he is, because his mother did the harm. I declare to you, Rose, I sometimes feel as if I must break out against that woman and thunder in her ears that she is ruining the immortal soul for which she is ...
— Rose in Bloom - A Sequel to "Eight Cousins" • Louisa May Alcott

... trembled, the ponderous hinges creaked, as fifty or more repulsive-looking wretches, the majority of them clad in rags, hurled themselves against the gate, uttering shrieks of baffled rage. One would have supposed them wild beasts trying to break from ...
— Which? - or, Between Two Women • Ernest Daudet

... to brave his minister, gaining strength in jests, the better to break his yoke, insupportable, but so difficult to remove. He almost thought he had succeeded in this, and, sustained by the joyous air surrounding him, he already privately congratulated himself on having been able to assume the supreme empire, and for the moment ...
— Cinq Mars, Complete • Alfred de Vigny

... asylum it afforded to defenceless Protestants flocking thither from all quarters. When the minds of the Roman Catholics had become exasperated by nine or ten months of civil war, they formed a settled determination to break up this "nest of Huguenots." Accordingly the Baron de la Garde—Captain Poulain, of Merindol memory—brought an order, in the king's name, from the Duke of Guise, at that time before the walls of Orleans, commanding Renee to leave ...
— History of the Rise of the Huguenots - Volume 2 • Henry Baird

... tinware from door to door; he is so eager to earn an honest dollar for a wife, a daughter, perhaps for a son at college; so eager to find him a home like that of the earlier non-Jewish immigrants who buy his wares; yet why must he overstrain his virtues before them, break through the ice, as the saying goes, and clear himself—why? for being a Jew. Evidently, others are taken as good until they prove themselves bad; the Jew is bad until he proves himself good. Should some other Jewish trader come to the same locality ...
— The Menorah Journal, Volume 1, 1915 • Various

... narrower and more secluded, winding up a steep hill between high banks. Half way up, where the road made a sharp turn, a break in the side next to the creek opened a rough way down to the water. As they neared this, a woman coming down the hill caught sight of the two horsemen around the bend, and made a swift movement toward this opening in the bank, as ...
— Winning the Wilderness • Margaret Hill McCarter

... better as it was! With a great pang mercifully spared me, I could take back to my heart my childish prayer to be all he had so brightly shown himself; and there was nothing to be undone: no chain for me to break or for him to drag; and I could go, please God, my lowly way along the path of duty, and he could go his nobler way upon its broader road; and though we were apart upon the journey, I might aspire to meet him, unselfishly, innocently, ...
— Bleak House • Charles Dickens

... a failure. Voltaire, when asked what he thought of it, replied,—"Il n'y a rien a dire; il est ecrit en langue du pays." But twenty years afterwards it was revived with prodigious success; for the truth which was in it flashed out then, forerunner of the storm which was soon to break over France. Again, when Florian, whom we are to remember always for his "Fables," banished in 1793 by the decree which forbade nobles to remain in Paris, taking refuge at Sceaux, was arrested and thrown into prison, he consoled his captivity by composing his drama of "Guillaume ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 7, Issue 41, March, 1861 • Various

... having won the battle of Trafalgar. There is a Mr. Walker, who, I think, is an Attorney at Bristol, who has written a pamphlet against Mr. Hunt, in which pamphlet he argues thus: 'Mr. Hunt has, by quitting his wife to live with another woman, broken his plighted vows to his own wife; a man who will break his promises in one case will break them in another case; and, therefore, as Mr. Hunt has broken his promises to his wife, he will break his promises to the people of Bristol.' These are not Mr. Walker's ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 3 • Henry Hunt

... because, in that case, he should make a point of returning to Mansfield at any time required by the party: he was going away immediately, being to meet his uncle at Bath without delay; but if there were any prospect of a renewal of Lovers' Vows, he should hold himself positively engaged, he should break through every other claim, he should absolutely condition with his uncle for attending them whenever he might be wanted. The play should not be lost ...
— Persuasion • Jane Austen

... become a Christian, and felt sorry for her poor people who were still in the darkness of paganism, and determined to break the spell that bound them. So she announced her intention to visit the crater of Kilauea, and call upon the goddess to do her worst. Her husband and many others endeavored to dissuade her, but she was not to be moved from ...
— Scenes in the Hawaiian Islands and California • Mary Evarts Anderson

... Ideas of "mine" and "thine" are much less strong than with the Briton or American. It has been said of the Spaniard that he makes excellent laws, but ever considers that he personally has a right to break them. This sentiment becomes very evident in America: yet not only with the Spanish-American, for it is a marked characteristic of the United States, and of all American republics, where licence is often indulged in under the ...
— Mexico • Charles Reginald Enock

... that time was Fernando de Bobadilla. Paquian Bactial, king of Jolo, as soon as he heard of the proposed abandonment, plotted to kill all the Spaniards in Zamboanga, and make it his own capital; he asked Corralat to aid in this enterprise, but the latter refused to break his peace with the Spaniards. Royal decrees at various times ordered that fort to be again occupied; but this was not done until 1718, under the rule of Governor Bustamente. (See Murillo Velarde's Hist. ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898, Volume XXXVI, 1649-1666 • Various

... is no father who can force me to break my faith to you, and I could resolve to leave my country, and even to die, rather than be separated from you. Without having seen her, I have already conceived a horrible aversion to her whom they want me to marry; and although I am not cruel, ...
— The Impostures of Scapin • Moliere (Poquelin)

... suddenly, in one of the pauses of the music, "were any of our ancestors tramps or gypsies? Seems to me they must have been, or I wouldn't feel the 'Call of the Road' so strongly. Don't you feel it? As if it beckons and you must break loose and follow, to find what's waiting for you around ...
— Mary Ware's Promised Land • Annie Fellows Johnston

... William, and Juno felled the trees, and brought them on the wheels to the side of the stockade, all ready cut to their proper lengths, Ready was employed in flooring the house with a part of the deal planks which they had brought round from the cove. But this week they were obliged to break off for two days, to collect all their crops ...
— Masterman Ready - The Wreck of the "Pacific" • Captain Frederick Marryat

... especially when compelled to hide it from one, whom love induced her to treat with peculiar confidence, and who often complained of her reserve, and asked the meaning of those embarrassed looks, that impatience to break from him, and those thousand mysterious contrivances upon petty occasions, which were so new to her character, and might have awakened jealousy in ...
— The Loyalists, Vol. 1-3 - An Historical Novel • Jane West

... himself acteth our part, being, indeed, the Head and Mediator of the body; wherefore, God doth not count that the covenant is broken, though we sin, if Christ Jesus our Lord is found to do by it what by law is required of us. Therefore he saith, 'If his children break my law, and keep not my commandments, I will visit their sins with a rod,' &c. But their sins shall not shake my covenant with my Beloved, nor cause that I for ever should reject them. 'My covenant will I not break, nor alter the thing that ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... at once. Polly is bright. It would break her heart to know we had such a thought. I believe it got knocked off the dresser some way and will be found sooner or later; but I wanted to give it to Elsie to-day. I'm all ...
— Polly of the Hospital Staff • Emma C. Dowd

... believing himself strong enough to perform the service consigned to him, fell down the river by night, and passed to the other side, with the intention of surprising Frazer. The plan was to attack the village a little before day-break, at the same instant, at each end; whilst two smaller corps were drawn up to cover and support ...
— The Life of George Washington, Vol. 2 (of 5) • John Marshall

... aware that many will object to plowing up old grass land, and I do not wish to be misunderstood on this point. If a farmer has a meadow that will produce two or three tons of hay, or support a cow, to the acre, it would be folly to break it up. It is already doing all, or nearly all, that can be asked or desired. But suppose you have a piece of naturally good land that does not produce a ton of hay per acre, or pasture a cow on three acres, if such land can be plowed without great difficulty, I ...
— Talks on Manures • Joseph Harris

... rate, the total result in 1520 was that Henry was in separate alliance with Francis on one side and with Charles on the other; alliances which neither could afford to break, but on ...
— England Under the Tudors • Arthur D. Innes

... "They are not men. Men live, as I say, rejoicing from age to age in something fresher than progress—in the fact that with every baby a new sun and a new moon are made. If our ancient humanity were a single man, it might perhaps be that he would break down under the memory of so many loyalties, under the burden of so many diverse heroisms, under the load and terror of all the goodness of men. But it has pleased God so to isolate the individual soul that it can only learn of all other souls by hearsay, and to each one goodness and happiness ...
— The Napoleon of Notting Hill • Gilbert K. Chesterton

... "Ted, you may go for the necessaries. Sue, you must be my bridesmaid and Johnny shall be best man. Come, we'll go into the house and break ...
— Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1907 to 1908 • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... the outbuildings of the Aumone.[836] A crowd of people hasten to the spot; they see the hole and a piece of the wall which had been restored, with two loop-holes; they fail to understand, and think themselves sold and betrayed into the enemy's hands; they rave and break forth into howls, and seek the priest in charge of the hospital to tear him to pieces.[837] A few days after, on Holy Thursday, a similar rumour is spread abroad: traitors are about to deliver up the town into the hands of the English. The folk seize their weapons; soldiers, ...
— The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2) • Anatole France

... the Atlantic, and felt in great violence at Tristan d'Acunha, where H.M.S. Lily foundered with all hands in consequence, and several vessels at St. Helena have been driven from their anchors and wrecked. These waves roll in from the north, and do not break till they reach soundings, when they evince terrific power, rising from 5 to 15 feet above the usual level of the waters. A connection with volcanoes has ...
— The Sailor's Word-Book • William Henry Smyth

... never turned his back but marched breast forward, Never doubted clouds would break, Never dreamed, though right were worsted, wrong would triumph, Held we fall to rise, are baffled to fight better, ...
— Browning as a Philosophical and Religious Teacher • Henry Jones

... Augustine says (De Trin. xiv, 7). Therefore, first and chiefly, the image of the Trinity is to be found in the acts of the soul, that is, inasmuch as from the knowledge which we possess, by actual thought we form an internal word; and thence break forth into love. But, since the principles of acts are the habits and powers, and everything exists virtually in its principle, therefore, secondarily and consequently, the image of the Trinity may be considered ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I (Prima Pars) - From the Complete American Edition • Thomas Aquinas

... are you going to give this news to the world at large—to the United States authorities—are you going to brand Margaret's father as a counterfeiter, or a passer of queer money? If you do that, even if you clear Margaret, you'll break her heart." ...
— The Mansion of Mystery - Being a Certain Case of Importance, Taken from the Note-book of Adam Adams, Investigator and Detective • Chester K. Steele

... nuffin 'bout my poor dear babyship—ladyship, I mean; only my head is so 'fused! Oh, lor', don't go break away from me! don't, ...
— Self-Raised • Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth

... train pulled up at the town from which our residence is about two miles distant. It was now evening; but it was summer, and the days were long. Hiring a horse at the nearest hotel, I set off at a break-neck gallop. ...
— In the Track of the Troops • R.M. Ballantyne

... swells strikes the Mandarin, and, true to her character, she responds by rolling and pitching about in the trough of the sea in a manner that fills the mules with consternation, and ends in their utter collapse and demoralization. Planks break and give way as the whole body of mules are flung violently and simultaneously forward, and before midnight the mules are piled up in promiscuous and struggling heaps, while tons of water come on deck and wash and tumble them about ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle Volume II. - From Teheran To Yokohama • Thomas Stevens

... the United States and thus swell the Northern and free states of the Union. Cotton interests and trade became the dominant British commercial tie with the United States, and the one great hope, to the British minds, of a break in the false American system of protection. Thus both in economic theory and in trade, spite of British dislike of slavery, the export trading interests of Great Britain became more and more directed toward the Southern States of America. ...
— Great Britain and the American Civil War • Ephraim Douglass Adams

... of the churrion had learned to smile at his recent apprehensions; but the wild life of the hato had already thrown around him its subtle fascination, and the sprightly youth of Araure had become a naturalized son of the Plains. Soon few were able like young Jose to break an untried steed; few wielded more dexterously the lasso, or could drive with more unerring force the jagged lance into the side of a galloping bull. Clad in poncho and calzones, he scoured the vast plain of La Calzada, acquiring, at the same time with manual dexterity and physical ...
— Atlantic Monthly Vol. 3, No. 16, February, 1859 • Various

... Brown's Raid, 1859.—While in Kansas John Brown had conceived a bold plan. It was to seize a strong place in the mountains of the South, and there protect any slaves who should run away from their masters. In this way he expected to break slavery in pieces within two years. With only nineteen men he seized Harper's Ferry, in Virginia, and secured the United States arsenal at that place. But he and most of his men were immediately captured. He was executed ...
— A Short History of the United States • Edward Channing

... search for all remaining provisions, iron-work, canvas, ropes, and blocks. These were placed aft, ready for lowering on to the raft as soon as one could be put together. Sailors naturally feel it a somewhat melancholy task to break up a ship. It seems as if all hope of its being of further use is gone, but probably the party did not trouble themselves with any sentimental ideas on the subject just then; all they thought of was the best, way to tear up the planking, and to secure as much timber as possible. ...
— The Three Admirals • W.H.G. Kingston

... on as,' as the Irish would say, Mallard," and he placed it in the toilet basin in its covering of blanket. "Now move your lazy self and break a piece off with your knife, whilst I open this bottle of Kinahan's and some soda. I trust the cultured family will not object to the sound of a cork popping at ...
— Chinkie's Flat and Other Stories - 1904 • Louis Becke

... been given, and the frigate now simply went on by her own momentum. The darkness was then profound, and, however good the Canadian's eyes were, I asked myself how he had managed to see, and what he had been able to see. My heart beat as if it would break. But Ned Land was not mistaken, and we all perceived the object he pointed to. At two cables' length from the Abraham Lincoln, on the starboard quarter, the sea seemed to be illuminated all over. It was not a mere phosphoric phenomenon. ...
— Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea • Jules Verne

... Heaven which preceded it, is finely describ'd by Ovid, in his war of the Titans against Jupiter; casting mountain upon mountain, and hill upon hill (Pelion upon Ossa) in order to scale the Adamantine walls, and break open the gates of Heaven; till Jupiter struck them with his thunder-bolts and overwhelm'd them in the abyss: Vide Ovid Metam. new ...
— The History of the Devil - As Well Ancient as Modern: In Two Parts • Daniel Defoe

... the pocket of her dress, then again she caught hold of the verandah post, and supported herself by it, while the light of the sun appeared to fade visibly out of the day before her eyes and to replace itself by a cold blackness in which there was no break. He was dead!—her lover was dead! The glow had gone from her life as it seemed to be going from the day, and she was left desolate. She had no knowledge of how long she stood thus, staring with wide eyes at the sunshine she could not see. She ...
— Jess • H. Rider Haggard

... Hall burst into flames. The spikes of fire rose and fell and rose again. Showers of sparks went upward. A pall of smoke would form and cloud the moon, waver, break and pass. There was the mutter and rumble and roar of great guns. There was the groan of wounded and the gasp ...
— Private Peat • Harold R. Peat

... tears, lamentations, prayers, and ejaculations. In vain he tempted her with promises; she should eat out of gold, she should be a great lady, he would buy houses and lands for her. Oh! if she would only let him break one lance with her in the sweet conflict of love, he would leave her for ever and pass the remainder of his life according to her fantasy. But she, still unyielding, said she would permit him to die, and that was the only thing he could do ...
— Droll Stories, Complete - Collected From The Abbeys Of Touraine • Honore de Balzac

... immensely old, numbering, it is said, five centuries, so that Petrarch may almost have rested beneath their shade on his way to Avignon. These veterans are cavernous with age: gnarled, split, and twisted trunks, throwing out arms that break into a hundred branches; every branch distinct, and feathered with innumerable sparks and spikelets of white, wavy, greenish light. These are the leaves, and the stems are grey with lichens. The sky and sea—two blues, one full of sunlight and the other ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete - Series I, II, and III • John Symonds

... longing recollection and affectionately cherished tradition of Greece, elevated in the conception of the multitude into god-like heroes. But above all no development of national poetry took place in Latium. It is the deepest and noblest effect of the fine arts and above all of poetry, that they break down the barriers of civil communities and create out of tribes a nation and out of the nations a world. As in the present day by means of our cosmopolitan literature the distinctions of civilized nations ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... almost at right angles, the swordfish sheered too, and he hit us a sounding thud somewhere foreward. Then he went under or around the bow and began to take line off the reel for the first time. I gave him up. The line caught all along the side of the boat. But it did not break, and kept whizzing off the reel. I heard the heavy splash of another jump. When we had turned clear round, what was our amaze and terror to see the swordfish, seemingly more tigerish than ever, thresh and tear and leap at us again. He was flinging bloody spray and wigwagging his ...
— Tales of Fishes • Zane Grey

... bird, for, generally speaking, the female of a given grade exhibits rather more pigment than the corresponding male. The examination of a number of birds bred in this way might quite well suggest that in this case we were dealing with a character which could break up, as it were, to give a continuous series of intergrading forms between the two extremes. With the constant handling of large numbers it becomes possible to recognise most of the different grades, though even so it is possible to make mistakes. Nevertheless, ...
— Mendelism - Third Edition • Reginald Crundall Punnett

... skilful Reporter than I did on this occasion. Hour after hour passed away, and found my borrowed eloquence still flowing, and my companion still hanging on my lips with unwearied interest. It was customary in those days to break the journey (only forty miles) by dining on the road, the consequence of which was, that we both became rather oblivious; and after we had reentered the coach, the worthy Quaker felt quite vexed and disconcerted ...
— Memoirs of the Life of Sir Walter Scott, Volume I (of 10) • John Gibson Lockhart

... to break out to day it would not content itself with the barn only," thought Paul and then it occurred to him that he must send a reminder to the agent, to hasten the insurance. "For one never knows what might happen during the night. I will go to sleep"—he concluded his reflections—"to morrow ...
— Dame Care • Hermann Sudermann

... the paved streets, he went home, and turning Frau Krause out of his room, sat down at the piano to scales and exercises. Not until he felt suppleness and strength coming back to his fingers, did he allow his thoughts to wander. Then, however, they leapt to Louise; after this break in his consciousness, he seemed to have been ...
— Maurice Guest • Henry Handel Richardson

... is intended to break the abruptness with which the pointed roof rises between the two spires. These spires are different in design, the southern tower being much earlier than that at the north. The southern spire, in its austere simplicity and exquisite proportions, is certainly the finest I have ...
— Seeing Europe with Famous Authors, Volume 3 • Various

... the first to break the silence. "Cousin Louis, we were wrong in following the course of the stream; I fear we shall never ...
— Canadian Crusoes - A Tale of The Rice Lake Plains • Catharine Parr Traill

... gone from Flosston, Rose?" Mary Furniss inquired, just as the little procession was about to break ranks for ...
— The Girl Scout Pioneers - or Winning the First B. C. • Lillian C Garis

... "last night as I was going home at Twenty-third and Sixth. Sashayed up, so he did, and made a break. I turned him down, cold, and he made a sneak; but followed me down to Eighteenth, and tried his hot air again. Gee! but I slapped him a good one, side of the face. Then he give me that eye. Does it look real awful, Til? I should ...
— The Four Million • O. Henry

... she thought. "Charley would know, if he was in, but he wasn't. He was in mischief, somewhere or other, she had no doubt. Boys always were. He would break his neck some day, she knew"; so saying, she quietly spat upon her fresh iron, to test its heat, and then ...
— Mary Barton • Elizabeth Gaskell

... Five Towns human nature is reported to be so hard that you can break stones on it. Yet sometimes it softens, and then we have one of our rare idylls of which we are very proud, while pretending not to be. The soft and delicate South would possibly not esteem highly our idylls, as such. Nevertheless ...
— Helen with the High Hand (2nd ed.) • Arnold Bennett

... in kind one from another. If the knowledge of the Creator is in a different order from knowledge of the creature, so, in like manner, metaphysical science is in a different order from physical, physics from history, history from ethics. You will soon break up into fragments the whole circle of secular knowledge, if you begin the mutilation ...
— The Idea of a University Defined and Illustrated: In Nine - Discourses Delivered to the Catholics of Dublin • John Henry Newman

... England had all promised not to invade Belgium, because it was the safest way of invading France. But Prussia promised that if she might break in through her own broken promise and ours she would break in and not steal. In other words, we were offered at the same instant a promise of faith in the future and a proposal of ...
— New York Times, Current History, Vol 1, Issue 1 - From the Beginning to March, 1915 With Index • Various

... as usual. The fact was that the captain had been out of humour for some time past. Romata and he had had some differences, and high words had passed between them, during which the chief had threatened to send a fleet of his war-canoes, with a thousand men, to break up and burn the schooner; whereupon the captain smiled sarcastically, and going up to the chief, gazed sternly in his face while he said, "I have only to raise my little finger just now, and my ...
— The Coral Island • R.M. Ballantyne

... was replied, "the life of a seamstress does not take off the keen edge of a natural reserve—or, to speak more correctly sensitiveness. I dislike to break in upon another's household arrangements, or in any way to obtrude myself. My rule is, to adapt myself, as best I can, to the family order, and so not disturb anything ...
— All's for the Best • T. S. Arthur

... you," said Sprawley. "To-morrow Father and Mother Bear are going hunting, and all of us little cubs are to go with them. I suppose this strange fairy cub will go with us, and when we stop to rest I'll get him away from the others and near the edge of the water. You must come under the ice and break off the piece he is standing on, and float him far, far away toward the South until ...
— The Counterpane Fairy • Katharine Pyle

... dust out in the street. Their houses, built of nipa and bamboo, do not set back on a green lawn, but stand as near to the hot, dusty street as possible. To get inside the houses, which are built on posts, the babies have to scramble up a bamboo ladder, where they might fall off and break their necks. At this age they have learned to stuff themselves with rice until their little bodies look as though they were about to burst. A stick of sugar-cane will taste as good to them as our best peppermint or lemon ...
— The Great White Tribe in Filipinia • Paul T. Gilbert

... yes, good enough!" and with that she flung herself down on the floor, and, putting her head on Peter's knee, cried as if her heart would break. For Kitty was never in the habit of carrying her pain off into solitary places: when she cried it must be with her head on ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - April, 1873, Vol. XI, No. 25. • Various

... public were allowed to break off and steal the prow of the Dumbuck canoe, it is plain that no guard was placed on the sites. They lay open for months to the interpolations of wags, and I think, for my own part, that one of them is likely to have introduced the ...
— The Clyde Mystery - a Study in Forgeries and Folklore • Andrew Lang

... maiden rejoined, 'I am not inauspicious or ugly. I am every way worthy of being enjoyed. I am a celestial maiden of rare beauty; I desire thee for my husband. Refuse me not, O king.' To this Pratipa answered, 'I am, 'O damsel, abstaining from that course to which thou wouldst incite me. If I break my vow, sin will overwhelm and kill me. O thou of the fairest complexion, thou hast embraced me, sitting on my right thigh. But, O timid one, know that this is the seat for daughters and daughters-in-law. The left lap is for the ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 1 • Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... with me," he declared. "I don't know why I let you go on flouting me." He reached over and caught her arm with a grip that made her wince. The sudden leap of passion into his eyes quickened the beat of her heart. "I could break you in two with my hands without half trying—tame you as the cave men tamed their women, by main strength. But I don't—by reason of the same peculiar feeling that would keep me from kicking ...
— North of Fifty-Three • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... decidedly monotonous!" he exclaimed, still speaking French. Then rapidly recovering his consciousness as the full horror of the situation began to break on his mind, he went on muttering audibly: "Have they really hopped the twig? Bah! Fudge! what has not been able to knock the life out of one little Frenchman can't have killed two Americans! They're all right! But first and foremost, let ...
— All Around the Moon • Jules Verne

... crouching in a corner of the big gaudy salon where a parrot was screaming in a gilded cage, a forlorn miserable child, with her face hidden in her hands and crying as though her little heart would break. ...
— Wee Wifie • Rosa Nouchette Carey

... circle. The whole circle then balance with their arms three times three, that is, they raise their arms and let them fall upon their knees three times in concert, after a short pause three times more, and after another pause three times more. Then all break into squads of three and raise the living arch. This is done by each companion taking his left wrist in his right hand, and with their left hands the three grasp each other's right wrists, and raise them above their heads. This constitutes the living arch, under which the ...
— The Mysteries of Free Masonry - Containing All the Degrees of the Order Conferred in a Master's Lodge • William Morgan

... ultimately and in very deed prove a far more prolific source of disguised infidelity. Doubts repressed as they arise, but not solved, silenced but not satisfied, gradually accumulate in spite of all external precaution; and at length (like streams pent back by some temporary barrier) break forth at once to an utter discarding of all authority, and an irrecoverable rejection of the Christian faith. From unlimited acquiescence in a guide whom our associations have invested with infallibility, the step is very short, and frequently taken, ...
— Primitive Christian Worship • James Endell Tyler

... keeper of the king's peace, both by common law and special commission, he is the first man in the county, and superior in rank to any nobleman therein, during his office[p]. He may apprehend, and commit to prison, all persons who break the peace, or attempt to break it: and may bind any one in a recognizance to keep the king's peace. He may, and is bound ex officio to, pursue and take all traitors, murderers, felons, and other misdoers, and commit them to gaol for safe custody. He is also to defend his ...
— Commentaries on the Laws of England - Book the First • William Blackstone

... said airily; "that ain't nothing special! But the worst indication was them flowers she wore on her bosom every day—Old Heck bought 'em!" he finished dramatically, leaning over and speaking tensely as though it pained him immeasurably to break the news to Parker while he fixed on Old Heck's rival a look he imagined was one ...
— The Ramblin' Kid • Earl Wayland Bowman

... "Wait till we break up," lady Feng answered laughing, "and we'll go and let some off in our garden. I can fire them far better than any ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book II • Cao Xueqin

... old basket-maker finished his naval song in time, for his voice was about to break in tears, but too soon, surely, for the farm-hands, for, without moving, with their heads intent and lips parted, long after the song had ceased, ...
— Frederic Mistral - Poet and Leader in Provence • Charles Alfred Downer

... him but this wife, sold a very good farm which he possessed on a creek of the river, and withdrew to another situation, remote and less advantageous. At the same time a notorious offender, James Barry, was tried for attempting to break into a settler's house at the Ponds with an intent to steal, the proof of which was too clear to admit of his escape. He was sentenced to suffer one thousand lashes, and on the Saturday following received two hundred and ...
— An Account of the English Colony in New South Wales, Vol. 1 • David Collins

... "Yes, an even break. They met in front of Abe's. I saw the meeting. Neither was surprised. They stood for a moment watching each other. Then they drew—only Snap was quicker. Larsen's gun went off as he fell. That trick you taught Snap saved his life again. Larsen was ...
— The Heritage of the Desert • Zane Grey

... royal word, sire, for free entrance and safe egress," answered Almamen. "Break it, and Granada is with the Moors till the Darro runs red with the blood of her heroes, and her people strew the vales ...
— Leila, Complete - The Siege of Granada • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... did," he said. "I heard a little lad saying the things that are in the blood and bone of the men money can't buy and corruption can't break. I heard him plead like a lawyer and argue his case straight. I lent a hand when his eloquence failed, got him his deserts, then let him go! I did have an impulse to keep him. I did call after him. But ...
— Michael O'Halloran • Gene Stratton-Porter

... dead a rattlesnake, And off his scaly skin to take, And through his head to drive a stake, And every bone within him break, And of his flesh mincemeat to make, To burn, to sear, to boil, and bake, Then in a heap the whole to rake, And over it the besom shake, And sink it fathoms in the lake— Whence after all, quite wide awake, Comes back that very ...
— Abraham Lincoln: A History V1 • John G. Nicolay and John Hay

... to tell what happened. The way I make it out is that Phil jumped him right in the act, so sudden that he shot without thinkin'; you know how he acts quick that-a-way. An' then he seen what he had done, an' that it was more than an even break that Phil wouldn't live, an' so figgered that his chance was better to stay an' run a bluff by comin' for help, an' all that. If he'd tried to make his get-away, there wouldn't 'a' been no question about it; ...
— When A Man's A Man • Harold Bell Wright

... to the earth. Then he called out to his sons and slaves, saying, "Light the bonfire, and whoso falleth of the Kafirs do ye dress him and roast him well in the flame, then bring him to me that I may break my fast on him!" So they kindled a fire midmost the plain and laid thereon the slain, till he was cooked, when they brought him to Sa'adan, who gnawed his flesh and crunched his bones. When the Miscreants saw the Mountain-Ghul do this deed they were ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 7 • Richard F. Burton

... disappointed; the "Ione" was soon again at sea, and had reached the latitude beyond which his commander had authority to capture all dhows with slaves on board. A bright look-out was kept aloft, from the first break of day until darkness covered the face of the deep, for any dhows sailing northward, but day after day passed by and none were seen. The ship was then kept further off the land, the commander suspecting that the Arabs and slave traders had ...
— Ned Garth - Made Prisoner in Africa. A Tale of the Slave Trade • W. H. G. Kingston



Words linked to "Break" :   tea break, conk, disperse, fragmentise, abandon, surpass, armed forces, crash, occurrent, interpellation, buy the farm, disrespect, break dancing, spring break, discontinue, compression fracture, barracking, smashing, stop, tell, cease, peach, change of integrity, dampen, conform to, splinter, misfunction, become, dash, military, come out, rest period, convert, develop, designate, finish, wait, scissure, fragment, express emotion, give up, fail, invalidate, alter, violate, perish, postponement, crumble, let out, sprint, schism, secede, get out, blunt, crack, hold on, bring out, bewray, collapse, discover, give, crush, dance, fly, lessen, give the gate, dead air, hold, caesura, figure out, go, holdup, closed fracture, contravene, intermit, freeze, trip the light fantastic toe, give the bounce, break loose, implode, cave in, kick downstairs, ruin, pop off, interposition, strike-slip fault, come out of the closet, take ten, injure, faulting, break of the day, stroke, happening, pocket billiards, tennis, muckrake, kick the bucket, breathe, fly in the face of, talk, fall, disruption, commute, buckle, chance event, exchange, time out, inclined fault, gaolbreak, hurt, detach, accident, breaking off, exit, reclaim, outdo, flop, tattle, abatement, halftime, heckling, nullify, capillary fracture, flee, cracking, conk out, run afoul, die, transgress, turn, frazzle, incomplete fracture, penetrate, ladder, deaden, fatigue fracture, cut off, make, interpolation, chipping, spring, intrude, disunite, snap off, break short, unwrap, breakage, depute, express feelings, change, hairline fracture, spread out, dislocation, fault, interrupt, end, crevice, break wind, offend, break someone's heart, dissipate, come about, fortuity, flight, babble out, better, shift, puncture, coffee break, emerge, fall apart, break open, leak out, break off, terminate, stress fracture, service break, impoverish, boob, give-up the ghost, blunder, San Andreas Fault, break one's back, harm, conflict, happen, break through, avoid, dissociate, let the cat out of the bag, interjection, breakout, blackwash, disrupt, chip, fall in, break-in, go bad, wear, compound fracture, split up, break camp, bog, occultation, work out, wound, damage, fragmentize, recess, happy chance, check, injury, rupture, go off, shoot, diphthongize, good luck, break water, erupt, break-axe, trip the light fantastic, pass off, break seal, prison-breaking, chink, destroy, sing, disassociate, burn out, breakup, divide, go on, punctuation, modify, complete fracture, escape, fray, abruption, hap, fall out, go down, diphthongise, trespass, change state, billiards, drop dead, blow, armed services, deafen, get, outmatch, open fracture, solve, displaced fracture, falling out, jailbreak, surmount, lay off, blab out, let on, lapse, respite, fracture, croak, prisonbreak, take place, break dance, rest, break-dance, relegate, time-out, suspension, take a breather, pause, quash, suspend, shatter, rift, demote, comminuted fracture, drop the ball, choke, break of day, modification, natural event, delay, lawn tennis, pass, divulge, break away, slump, score, separation, cash in one's chips, shot, keep, weaken, bust, sin, vary, delegate, breach, puzzle out, occur, expire, work, divorce, splintering



Copyright © 2019 Diccionario ingles.com