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Bush   Listen
verb
Bush  v. i.  To branch thickly in the manner of a bush. "The bushing alders."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... found them girls and boys, Addict to nothing as to childish toys. Wherefore, good reader, that I save them may, I now with them the very dotterel[10] play; And since at gravity they make a tush, My very beard I cast behind a bush; And like a fool stand fing'ring of their toys, And all to show them they are girls and boys. Nor do I blush, although I think some may Call me a baby, 'cause I with them play. I do't to show them how each fingle-fangle On which they doting are, their souls entangle, As with a web, a trap, a ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... their state of life; they fancy that, by changing their condition of life, they shall fare better: yes, provided they changed themselves. Would to God they were sworn enemies of these useless, dangerous, and bad desires! God wills to speak to them amidst the thorns, and out of the midst of the bush (Exod. iii. 2), and they will Him to speak to them in "the whistling of a gentle air."—(III Kings, xix. 12.) They ought, then, to remain on board the ship in which they are, in order to cross from this life to the other; and they ought to remain there willingly, and with affection. Let them ...
— Public School Education • Michael Mueller

... on further. He had now to report himself to their worships at the community-house, which he accomplished without any beating about the bush by simply ...
— A Hungarian Nabob • Maurus Jokai

... bush, though entirely out from its protection. As the drizzling rain settled down thicker and thicker about them, Agatha tried again. Slowly she coaxed James to his knees, and slowly, she helped him creep, as she had crept toward him in the night, ...
— The Stolen Singer • Martha Idell Fletcher Bellinger

... Beckons me on, or follows from behind, Playmate, or guide! The master-passion quelled, I feel that I am free. With dun-red bark The fir-trees, and the unfrequent slender oak, Forth from this tangle wild of bush and brake Soar up, and form a melancholy vault High o'er me, murmuring like a distant sea. Here Wisdom might resort, and here Remorse; Here too the love-lorn man, who, sick in soul, And of this busy human heart aweary, Worships ...
— Poems of Coleridge • Coleridge, ed Arthur Symons

... and dropped a package near the bridge. Guess they was in a hurry. Smart trick that, cutting the telephone wires. I couldn't get connection with no place, up or down. This morning, though, I heard that they broke into the office at Cedar Bush and got fifty dollars in stamps besides some money. Guess they was making a ...
— The Hilltop Boys - A Story of School Life • Cyril Burleigh

... say that he has a rooted objection to anything that isn't rags in the way of clothes. He entirely declined to take me across the river till I had rolled up my lace cloak and put it in a bush. And he won't really be friends with me again till we have both got back to the scarecrow garments we ...
— Sir George Tressady, Vol. I • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... down, and did on her foot-gear, and then sprang lightly over the rivulet; and then the twain of them went side by side some half a furlong thence, and sat down, shadowed by the boughs of a slim quicken-tree growing up out of the greensward, whereon for a good space around was neither bush nor brake. ...
— The Wood Beyond the World • William Morris

... to keep it out of the way; he had on a crimson velvet cape that came no lower than his elbows; on his head he had a tall felt thing like a thimble, with a feather it its jeweled band that stuck up like a pen from an inkhorn, and from under that thimble his bush of stiff hair stuck down to his shoulders, curving outward at the bottom, so that the cap and the hair together made the head like a shuttlecock. All the materials of his dress were rich, and all the colors brilliant. In his lap he cuddled a miniature greyhound that snarled, ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... having been found a snake entirely similar (of which the doctor has a drawing, which he showed us) near Lake Champlain in the time of the late war. He mentioned the situation of this snake if it was traveling among bushes, and one head should choose to go on one side of the stem of a bush and the other head should prefer the other side, and neither of the heads would consent to come back or give way to the other. He was then going to mention a humorous matter that had that day occurred in the convention in consequence of his comparing ...
— True to His Home - A Tale of the Boyhood of Franklin • Hezekiah Butterworth

... they do not grow so naturally. If plucking is commenced too early and continued, the energies of the plants are weakened, and they are long in attaining any size, and consequently there is a great loss of produce in a given number of years. To make this more plain, I will suppose a bush that has been properly treated to be eight years of age. It may then be yielding from two to three pounds of tea per annum, while another of the same age, but not a quarter of the size, from over-plucking, is not giving more than ...
— The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom • P. L. Simmonds

... pride as her daughter appeared, watched the meeting between the two girls. Mary Ann's dress was very much overtrimmed, her hair was frizzed into a spiky bush across her forehead, and her somewhat freckled face was composed into an expression of serene self-complacency. She was the only girl in the village who was at a boarding-school; not even Hunter's Marjory, with all her airs, could boast this advantage, she thought; and Mary Ann felt her superiority, ...
— Hunter's Marjory - A Story for Girls • Margaret Bruce Clarke

... their station in front, whence they kept up a scattering fire. As to Wyeth, and his little band of "down easters," they were perfectly astounded by this second specimen of life in the wilderness; the men, being especially unused to bush-fighting and the use of the rifle, were at a loss how to act. Wyeth, however, acted as a skilful commander. He got all the horses into camp and secured them; then, making a breastwork of his packs of ...
— The Great Salt Lake Trail • Colonel Henry Inman

... Christmas story happened long before, when they weren't robin red-breasts but only robins. It is a merry, tender sort of story. They twitter it in a chuckling fashion to their children. If you prefer to hear it first-hand, creep out to the nearest holly-bush on almost any Christmas Eve when snow has made the night all pale and shadowy. If the robins have chosen your holly-bush as their rendezvous and you understand their language, you won't need to read what I have written. Like all true stories, it is much better told than read. It's the story of the ...
— Christmas Outside of Eden • Coningsby Dawson

... within thirty yards of the shore an eddy assisted him, and he made sure of success; but when within ten yards, a counter current again caught him, and swept him down. He was now abreast of the very extreme point of the islet; a bush that hung over the water was his only hope; with three or four desperate strokes he exhausted his remaining strength, at the same time that he seized hold of a small bough, It was decayed—snapped asunder, and Newton ...
— Newton Forster - The Merchant Service • Captain Frederick Marryat

... last hairpin left its mooring and slipped down to earth. The loosened golden hair streamed back on the wind like hands of despair wildly clutching for help, and the jaunty green riding cap was snatched by the breeze and hung upon a sage-bush not fifty feet from the cabin gate, but the pony rushed on with the frightened girl still clinging to ...
— The Man of the Desert • Grace Livingston Hill

... surprised, my dear Michael, to hear some news I have to tell you? I am engaged to Mr. Blake. I will tell you all about it presently, just as though you were my father-confessor; I will not hide one little thing from you. But I was never one to beat about the bush, and I hope my abruptness has not made you jump; but oh, Michael dear, I am ...
— Lover or Friend • Rosa Nouchette Carey

... addressing; in another moment his request was granted. Jack came at him like a tiger, put all the force of his outraged feelings into a heavy right and left, and Raymond Fosberton disappeared with a great crash into a laurel bush. ...
— Soldiers of the Queen • Harold Avery

... to call her by her proper title—was a dark-browed slut, wi' eyes like sloes, an' hair dragged over her face till she looked like an owl in an ivy-bush. As for the gown o' her, 'twas no better'n a sack tied round the middle, wi' a brave piece torn away by the shoulder, where one o' the men ...
— Noughts and Crosses • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... an idea and began to trudge sturdily off in the direction of Mother Lemon's cottage, Topaz following close. The memory of the latter's recent mishaps was too clear in his doggish mind to make him willing that a single bush should come between ...
— Jewel's Story Book • Clara Louise Burnham

... thing that we are longing for when the beauty of nature makes us feel sad with a longing we know not for what. I thought it would change life's dusty paths into golden pavements, and earth's commonest bramble-bush into ...
— The Farringdons • Ellen Thorneycroft Fowler

... seem to be an exhaustive process to the trees, as the trees of a sugar-bush appear to be as thrifty and as long-lived as other trees. They come to have a maternal, large-waisted look, from the wounds of the axe or the auger, and that is ...
— In the Catskills • John Burroughs

... won't you? Wood-thrush came from north, where the tailoring began; and he saw it, and told you. It is a sign for him to be up and flying. He thought it would be his excuse for declining your invitation, instead of which you all went thrusting your heads into a bramble-bush. ...
— Our Young Folks, Vol 1, No. 1 - An Illustrated Magazine • Various

... only of the chances," he said, after some beating about the bush, "if I am right in supposing that it is only that which withholds Colonel Sullivan from ...
— The Wild Geese • Stanley John Weyman

... Where do we finer strokes and colours see Of the Creator's real poetry, Than when we with attention look Upon the third day's volume of the book? If we could open and intend our eye, We all like Moses should espy Even in a bush the radiant Deity. But we despise these his inferior ways Though no less full of miracle and praise; Upon the flowers of heaven we gaze, The stars of earth no wonder in us raise, Though these perhaps do more than they The life of mankind sway. ...
— Cowley's Essays • Abraham Cowley

... water-course and walked along the edge of the wall. I followed him: we both of us had our pieces of rope in our hands with which we tied the faggots. Of a sudden his foot slipped, and he rolled down to the edge of the rock, but catching hold of a small bush which had fixed its roots in the rocks, he saved himself when his body was ...
— The Little Savage • Captain Frederick Marryat

... curiosity to me as an ornithorhynchus. Doubtless something approaching to the phenomenon can be found; for a young Scotchman, a friend of mine, who was appointed to take the census of a secluded district, came to me after visiting it, and gave me an account of the people he had found in the bush, answering pretty nearly to Mr. Carlyle's description. But though he had been in the island from a boy, he spoke of it with something of the surprise attending a new discovery. I should state, however, that my residence was in a district mostly occupied by small ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 1, July, 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... has a marked influence on Tactics owing to the restrictions it imposes on view and on movement. Forest, jungle, and bush, mountains and ravines, rivers and streams are natural obstacles, while cultivation adds woods and plantations, fences and hedges, high growing crops, farm houses, villages and towns, with sunken roads below the ...
— Lectures on Land Warfare; A tactical Manual for the Use of Infantry Officers • Anonymous

... The evening was drawing-in, cold and windy; and suddenly remembering that he must be back by tea-time, he rose up to return. The motion displaced his straw hat, and the next moment the breeze had carried it a little way over the edge of the cliff, where it was caught in a low bush of tamarisk. It rested but a few feet below him, and the chalky front of the cliff was sufficiently rough to admit of his descent. He climbed to it, and had just succeeded in disengaging it with his foot, when before he had time to seize it, it again fell, and rolled down some thirty feet. ...
— St. Winifred's - The World of School • Frederic W. Farrar

... In the immense bush forests that cover an unexplored country or continent the first man who attempts to make a track through them has the hardest task. He has to guess the right direction, to cut down the first trees, to 'blaze a trail,' to help every one who follows him to find the way a little more easily. ...
— A Book of Quaker Saints • Lucy Violet Hodgkin

... hands spread flat on either side of her she raised herself to a sitting posture. Her face, framed in its bush of hair, had a look of strained, ...
— Treasure and Trouble Therewith - A Tale of California • Geraldine Bonner

... and over river, Through bush, and brake, and forest, Ran the cunning Pau-Puk-Keewis; Like an antelope he bounded, Till he came unto a streamlet In the middle of the forest, To a streamlet still and tranquil, That had overflowed its margin, To a ...
— The Song Of Hiawatha • Henry W. Longfellow

... carrying him along with it. At first he thought it very good fun, and began snapping his fingers and pretending to dance, but whilst he was looking round at us the terrapin carried him against a prickly pear-bush, and over he went sprawling on the ground, to the great ...
— Peter Trawl - The Adventures of a Whaler • W. H. G. Kingston

... these places in my locality, for the caterpillars feed on leaves found there, and enter the ground to pupate; so of course the moth of June begins its life in the same location. Mr. Pettis found the mated pair he brought to me, on a bush at the edge of a swamp. They also emerge in cities under any tree on which their caterpillars feed. Once late in May, in the corner of a lichen-covered, old snake fence beside the Wabash on the Shimp farm, I made ...
— Moths of the Limberlost • Gene Stratton-Porter

... strokes of nature" against "the nice touches and embellishments of art," and complains that "our British gardeners, instead of humoring nature, love to deviate from it as much as possible. Our trees rise in cones, globes, and pyramids. We see the marks of the scissors upon every plant and bush. I do not know whether I am singular in all its luxuriancy and diffusion of boughs and branches, than when it is thus cut and trimmed into a mathematical figure." See also Spectator, 477, for a pretty ...
— A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century • Henry A. Beers

... billiard table, stood at the right of the queen's crimson throne; and behind it, perched in a high chair, and wearing a long, solemn, black robe, sat a small, thick personage, whose skin Sir Norman would have known on a bush. He glanced at the lower throne and found it as he expected, empty; and he saw at once that his little highness was not only prince consort, but also supreme judge in the kingdom. Two or three similar black-robed gentry, among whom was recognizable the noble duke who so narrowly ...
— The Midnight Queen • May Agnes Fleming

... west. Unnamed, unknown, remain, and still remain, the bravest soldiers. Our manliest—our boys—our hardy darlings; no picture gives them. Likely, the typic one of them (standing, no doubt, for hundreds, thousands,) crawls aside to some bush-clump, or ferny tuft, on receiving his death-shot—there sheltering a little while, soaking roots, grass and soil, with red blood—the battle advances, retreats, flits from the scene, sweeps by—and there, haply with pain and suffering (yet less, ...
— Complete Prose Works - Specimen Days and Collect, November Boughs and Goodbye My Fancy • Walt Whitman

... they, whipper-in, or any one of the other three demoniacs, have time to look in one another's splashed faces, he is torn into a thousand pieces, gobbled up in the general growl; and smug, and smooth, and dry, and warm, and cozey, as he was an hour and twenty-five minutes ago exactly, in his furze bush in the cover,—he is now piece-meal, in about thirty distinct stomachs; and is he not, pray, well off ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 12, Issue 330, September 6, 1828 • Various

... none of us wounded," reflected Gideon, wiping a streak of blood from his face. "Leastways, not wounded serious. An' that sniper hidden in the bush yonder must ha' picked off quite a dozen of the Injuns. I'm hopin' he'll show up, now, an' let us ...
— Kiddie the Scout • Robert Leighton

... glided along sand-banks, the resting-places of innumerable aquatic birds; at others they passed around wooded islands in midflood; and otherwhiles, again, their course lay through the vast plains of Illinois and Iowa, covered with magnificent woods or dotted with clumps of bush ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 12 • Editor-In-Chief Rossiter Johnson

... sometimes less; and so is this righteousness, even according to the degree or clearness of the sight of faith. 7. The bow is of that nature, as to make whatever you shall look upon through it, to be of the same colour of itself, whether that thing be bush, or man, or beast; and the righteousness of Christ is that that makes sinners, when God looks upon them through it, to look beautiful, and acceptable in his sight, for we are made comely through his comeliness, and made accepted in the Beloved (Eze ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... Mr. Beecher, who, attracted by the enterprise of the two boys, sent them with letters of introduction to a few of his most influential parishioners, with the result that the pair soon had a sufficient financial backing by some of the leading men of Brooklyn, like A. A. Low, H. B. Claflin, Rufus T. Bush, Henry W. Slocum, Seth Low, Rossiter W. Raymond, Horatio C. King, ...
— The Americanization of Edward Bok - The Autobiography of a Dutch Boy Fifty Years After • Edward William Bok (1863-1930)

... I'd put Alonzo and Ben Sutton out of the way and wondering when the show would begin—Beryl Mae in her high, innocent voice had just said to the poet: 'But seriously now, are you sincere?' and I was getting some plenty of that, when up the road in the dusk I seen Bush Jones driving a dray-load of furniture. I wondered where in time any family could be moving out that way. I didn't know any houses beyond the club and I was pondering about this, idly as you might say, when Bush Jones pulls his team ...
— Somewhere in Red Gap • Harry Leon Wilson

... and when on the edge they sat down to rest; then they saw far down the mesa four mountain sheep, and the brothers commanded the youth to kill one for them. They said, "Our meat is dry; your legs are fresh, so you will kill the sheep." The youth succeeded in heading off the sheep by hiding in a bush (Bigelovia Douglasii(9)) sometimes called sage brush but it is not the true sage brush. The sheep came directly toward him; he aimed his arrow at them, but before he could pull the bow his arm stiffened and became dead and the sheep passed by. All the sheep passed him, but he again headed ...
— Ceremonial of Hasjelti Dailjis and Mythical Sand Painting of the - Navajo Indians • James Stevenson

... bit of marshy ground, up a slight hill, and came suddenly to the edge of a little clearing. One glance into it sent me headlong behind a bush, and I tripped up Spiltdorph ...
— A Soldier of Virginia • Burton Egbert Stevenson

... foot of a rose bush she crouched to thrust the key into a hole in the loose earth, covering the top and drawing ...
— The Fortieth Door • Mary Hastings Bradley

... emigrant and government trains across the Western Plains, when "Plains" meant wilderness, with nothing to encounter but wild animals, and wilder, hostile Indian tribes. When every step forward might have spelt disaster, and deadly danger was likely to lurk behind each bush or thicket ...
— Chief of Scouts • W.F. Drannan

... Wherefore look'st thou sad, When euery thing doth make a Gleefull boast? The Birds chaunt melody on euery bush, The Snake lies rolled in the chearefull Sunne, The greene leaues quiuer, with the cooling winde, And make a cheker'd shadow on the ground: Vnder their sweete shade, Aaron let vs sit, And whil'st the babling Eccho mock's ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... New Caledonia, Foley remarks, the successful coquette goes off with her lover into the bush. "It usually happens that, when she is successful, she returns from her expedition, tumbled, beaten, scratched, even bitten on the nape and shoulders, her wounds thus bearing witness to the quadrupedal attitude she has assumed amid the foliage." (Foley, Bulletin de la Societe ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 3 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... in the service to know that some die whose names never get on any return, and so some are reported dead who decline to be buried. Let us not beat about the bush as to what I mean. We are each doing our best to obtain possession of this lovely creature, but the father holds to his promise to the long-legged noodle, and, if he is alive, our suits are hopeless. So let them ...
— Janice Meredith • Paul Leicester Ford

... lamentations, the captain launched out in praises of the charming little town, and had us conveyed to land. We visited the town, as well as the bathing establishment and the lighthouse, and afterwards actually proceeded as far as a place called the "Bush," where, as we were told, we should find a great abundance of strawberries. After wandering about, over fields and meadows, for a good hour in the glowing heat, we found the Bush, it is true, but instead of strawberries, discovered ...
— A Woman's Journey Round the World • Ida Pfeiffer

... here a couple of months," Reuben's host, who was standing beside him, replied. "They bought that station of Anderson's. He was a chicken-hearted young fellow, and sold out because of the bush rangers. There is a man, his wife, and her sister, I believe. I fancy they have got a pretty fair capital. They took Anderson's stock, and have been buying a lot more. That's why the bush rangers are going to ...
— A Final Reckoning - A Tale of Bush Life in Australia • G. A. Henty

... intelligence nor philosophic enlightenment will explain this phenomenon. The acute observer, if faith have cleared his eye or opened an inner one, will go back for the explanation to an old and unforgotten promise, and will exclaim when he sees the Church struggling, but triumphant, like the fire-girdled bush at Horeb, "God is in the midst of her, she shall not be moved; God shall help her, and that right early." And not only in the preservation from her enemies but in her unfailing progress among men in every age, has God shown that his purpose is to build up the spiritual house. The rapid spread ...
— The Wesleyan Methodist Pulpit in Malvern • Knowles King

... Finally, this endless skirmish with an invisible foe became so harassing that the Americans sent out a flying column of six hundred picked men under Colonel Boerstler on June 24 to break up FitzGibbon's post at the Beaver Dams and drive the Indians out of the intervening bush altogether. ...
— The War With the United States - A Chronicle of 1812 - Volume 14 (of 32) in the series Chronicles of Canada • William Wood

... with personal abuse,—ABUSE,—the only word,—that would damage the sale of any review at this day. The very reverse of its present management. There would not now be the inclination for such rascal bush-fighting; and even then, or indeed at any period of the Magazine's career, the stalwart and noble mind of John Wilson would never have made itself editorially responsible for such trash. As to him of the "Quarterly," a thimble would have been "a mansion, a court," ...
— Atlantic Monthly Volume 7, No. 39, January, 1861 • Various

... his hope that Cecilia would often favour her by visiting them, without waiting to have her visits returned, as she was entitled by her infirmities to particular indulgencies. He was continuing in this strain, receiving from Cecilia hardly any answer, when suddenly from behind a thick laurel bush, jumpt up Mr Morrice; who had run out of the house by a shorter cut, and planted himself there to ...
— Cecilia vol. 2 - Memoirs of an Heiress • Frances (Fanny) Burney (Madame d'Arblay)

... sniffed; louder, perhaps, than he had intended. "Beautiful that rose-bush smells," he remarked, as his friend turned and ...
— Short Cruises • W.W. Jacobs

... around him comparing this strange situation with another that he remembered, when a real terror had come, a tangible terror in the shape of a countryside gone mad with blood lust. He smiled toward the bush where the armed men lay concealed and toward the gate where the other armed man was standing. It was all so like a situation out of an opera bouffe ...
— The Vagrant Duke • George Gibbs

... he saw a Fisherman come out of the cave, a Fisherman so ugly that Pinocchio thought he was a sea monster. In place of hair, his head was covered by a thick bush of green grass. Green was the skin of his body, green were his eyes, green was the long, long beard that reached down to his feet. He looked like a giant lizard with ...
— The Adventures of Pinocchio • C. Collodi—Pseudonym of Carlo Lorenzini

... time, the two lieutenants conferred for a few moments, and had decided to put back, when a rattling chorus of pistol reports sounded from the depths of the woods. It died away; then was heard a crashing of bush and branch, and out upon the sands sprang a figure—a long, weird figure in black frock of clerical cut. Into their midst it sped with mighty bounds, and sinking down, lifted a glad face to the heavens with the groaning utterance: "O God, I thank thee. Protect me, gentlemen—protect ...
— "Where Angels Fear to Tread" and Other Stories of the Sea • Morgan Robertson

... say: sometimes the tangle descends on us like a net of blight on a rose-bush. There is then an instant choice for us between courage to cut loose, and desperation if we do not. But not many men are trained to courage; young women are trained to cowardice. For them to front an evil with plain speech ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... cloud, and fire, and came and set down his throne on Sinai, accompanied with innumerable angels? Deut. xxxiii. 2, Acts vii. 53. It was Jesus Christ that spoke to Moses in the mount, and in the bush also, Acts vii. 35, 38. Is it then the Mediator's law, whose office it is to preach glad tidings, and the day of salvation? Sure then it needs be dreadful to no man. For if he wound, he shall heal, and he comes to bind up the broken hearted. ...
— The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning • Hugh Binning

... inside, and the top of the coach was covered as thick as robins on a sumac-bush. The Bishop mounted the step and surveyed the situation. The seat assigned him was between two Mexican women, and as he sunk into the apparently insufficient space there was a look of consternation in their faces—and I was not surprised ...
— California Sketches, Second Series • O. P. Fitzgerald

... to be construed as if it meant the rest of inactivity; but it was the rest of continuous action. God's rest and God's work are one. Throughout all the ages preservation is a continuous creation. The divine energy is streaming out for evermore, as the bush that burns unconsumed, as the sun that flames undiminished for ever, pouring out from the depth of that divine nature, and for ever sustaining a universe. So that there is no Sabbath, in the sense ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - St. John Chapters I to XIV • Alexander Maclaren

... prolonged itself with renewed effort, rose to its height, and ended. From a bush in the thicket farther up the road a liquid answer came. And Mount Dunstan's laugh at the sound of it was echoed by another which came apparently from the bank rising from the road on the other side of the hedge, and accompanying the laugh was a ...
— The Shuttle • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... related by a naturalist. An Englishman saw a bird flying around about his dog's head, down in the grounds, and uttering cries of distress. He went there to see about it. The dog had a young bird in his mouth—unhurt. The gentleman rescued it and put it on a bush and brought the dog away. Early the next morning the mother bird came for the gentleman, who was sitting on his veranda, and by its maneuvers persuaded him to follow it to a distant part of the grounds—flying a little way in front of him and waiting ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... tingeing the eastern horizon of the gray, cloudy sky. At his left extended the flat, dull-brown coast line, which seemed to be lower than the turbid waves of the restless sea. The cold morning wind was blowing light mists over the absolutely barren shore. Not a tree, not a bush, not a human dwelling was to be seen in this dreary wilderness. Wherever the eye turned, there was nothing but sand and water, which united at the edge of the land. Long lines of surf poured over the arid desert, and, as if repelled by the desolation ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... for the wing of the sparrow, The bush for the robin and wren, But always the path that is narrow And straight for the children ...
— A Master's Degree • Margaret Hill McCarter

... he returned to Elizabethtown, Ky., and proposed marriage to a widow, Mrs. Sally Bush Johnston. The proposal must have been direct, with few preliminaries or none, for the couple were married next morning. The new wife brought him a fortune, in addition to three children of various ages, of sundry articles of household furniture. Parents, ...
— The Life of Abraham Lincoln • Henry Ketcham

... smiling explanation, her astonishment gave place to the liveliest interest and curiosity. The carriage was forthwith stopped and sent around to the stables, while the two friends went on foot through the village. Every house, every fence-corner, every lilac-bush or clump of hollyhocks, or row of currant-bushes in the gardens, suggested some reminiscence, and the two old ladies were presently laughing and crying at once. At every dwelling they lingered long, and went ...
— Miss Ludington's Sister • Edward Bellamy

... of all united in the song as the canoes swept away around a little promontory, crowned with three pine-trees, which stood up in the blaze of the setting sun like the three children in the fiery furnace, or the sacred bush that burned ...
— The Golden Dog - Le Chien d'Or • William Kirby

... after Will had been flunked out of college, he was standing on the lawn whittling. I happened to be looking out of the window. I saw Uncle Jim crawling across the grass under cover of a rhododendron bush to a position just behind Will. He was carrying under one arm an enormous fire-cracker, with the fuse lit. He rolled it out on the grass behind Will, and when it went off, Will went, too. He landed seventeen feet from the ...
— Through stained glass • George Agnew Chamberlain

... of Noma. He had not been a witch-doctor till he grew old for nothing. Oh! he was evil!—he was cunning as a jackal, and fierce like a lion.. He had planted me by him like a tree, but he meant to keep me clipped like a bush. Now I had grown tall and overshadowed him; therefore ...
— Nada the Lily • H. Rider Haggard

... in the stone wall. "This was about the best place I could think of for experiments, partly because it's such a lonesome place, and partly because there is a clear open space of several hundred yards back here without a tree or bush on it." ...
— Grace Harlowe's Sophomore Year at High School • Jessie Graham Flower

... stamped in the church. All inventions are emptied here, and not a few pockets. The best sign of the Temple in it is that it is the thieves' sanctuary, who rob more safely in a crowd than a wilderness, while every pillar is a bush to hide them. It is the other expense of the day, after plays and taverns; and men have still some oaths to swear here. The visitants are all men without exceptions; but the principal inhabitants are stale knights and captains out of service, men of long rapiers and short purses, who after ...
— Old Saint Paul's - A Tale of the Plague and the Fire • William Harrison Ainsworth

... be dull without complaining. That is my notion about the plants; they are often bored, and that is the reason why some of them have got poisonous. What do you think?" Gwendolen had run on rather nervously, lightly whipping the rhododendron bush ...
— Daniel Deronda • George Eliot

... spirits that the soldiers spent their last night on board the transport, lying in New York harbor. On Wednesday morning, May 28th, the troops debarked at Pier 6, Bush Terminal, Brooklyn. Only a few of the friends and relatives got to see the soldier boys at the terminal. While the soldiers lingered at the terminal, partaking of refreshments furnished by the Red Cross and the welfare associations, ...
— The Delta of the Triple Elevens - The History of Battery D, 311th Field Artillery US Army, - American Expeditionary Forces • William Elmer Bachman

... reached the other side of the wood they separated. She went towards the White House and he went back. When he passed the juniper-bush where they had both been sitting all seemed to him like a dream, and henceforth it always remained so to him. Two or three days elapsed before he dared to say anything of his adventure to his mother, but then he could contain himself no longer; he ...
— Dame Care • Hermann Sudermann

... They were at work in the field, the man cutting his crop of wheat and pulse, and the woman gleaning after him, with the child sitting on the grass. Suddenly, there rushed into the family party, from behind a bush, a gaunt wolf, and seizing the boy by the loins, ran off with him to a neighbouring ravine. The mother followed with loud screams, which brought the whole village to her assistance; but they soon lost sight of the wolf and his prey, and the boy was heard ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 446 - Volume 18, New Series, July 17, 1852 • Various

... wide-brimmed, soft felt hat. Sacrificing comfort to ceremony, he generally puts on a collar, but he often kicks at a tie: he finds he must draw a line somewhere. But there is something so redolent of the bush about him, that one would not have him otherwise; the slop clothes even become picturesque from the cavalier fashion in which he wears them. Note that his pipe never leaves his mouth, while the city man does not venture to smoke ...
— Town Life in Australia - 1883 • R. E. N. (Richard) Twopeny

... middle of June to the middle of October, we had abundance of wild fruit; first, strawberries, almost white, small but very sweet; then raspberries, both red and orange color. These grow on a bush sometimes twelve feet in height: they are not sweet, ...
— Narrative of a Voyage to the Northwest Coast of America in the years 1811, 1812, 1813, and 1814 or the First American Settlement on the Pacific • Gabriel Franchere

... But as they drew nearer the mass of the routed army, it became apparent that the spirit of the enemy was by no means broken. Stubborn men fired continually as they lay wounded, refusing to ask for quarter—doubting, perhaps, that it would be granted. Under every bush that gave protection from the lances of the horsemen little groups collected to make a desperate stand. Solitary spearmen awaited unflinching the charge of a whole squadron. Men who had feigned death sprang up to fire an unexpected shot. The cavalry began to suffer occasional casualties. ...
— The River War • Winston S. Churchill

... through the hedge I thought that I might keep ahead, or that the smugglers would not venture to follow me. To ascertain how far off they were I gave a glance over my shoulder. This was fatal to my success, for my foot caught in a low bush and down I came. In vain I endeavoured to regain my feet. Next instant I found myself in the grasp ...
— Dick Cheveley - His Adventures and Misadventures • W. H. G. Kingston

... the old Turnpike leads up over the rolling hills to Richmond the sun was pouring down a flood of heat. The 'pike was ankle deep with dust and the fine, white powder, churned into floury softness by artillery and the myriad iron heels of war, had settled down on roadside bush and tree and vine till all the sweet green of summer hung its head under the hot weight and longed for a cooling shower which ...
— The Littlest Rebel • Edward Peple

... to retire as a preliminary to disrobing—in other words, before going to bed, she flung wide the casement (opened the window) and perceived (saw) the face of Lord Ronald. He was sitting on a thorn bush beneath her, and his upturned face wore ...
— Nonsense Novels • Stephen Leacock

... generally conceded that the theological writers of this country are among the ablest of modern times, and the diversity of sects, a curious and striking fact in our social history, is fully illustrated by the literary organs of each denomination, from the spiritual commentaries of Bush to the ardent Catholicism of Brownson. The works of Moses Stuart (1780-1852), Edward Robinson, Francis Wayland, and Albert Barnes are standard authorities with all ...
— Handbook of Universal Literature - From The Best and Latest Authorities • Anne C. Lynch Botta

... this way, Juba thought, that men seem strong, because they have no knowledge of their own weaknesses. But it is only a seeming strength, since it stems from ignorance, and the flower of it falls early from the bush. ...
— Step IV • Rosel George Brown

... ye happy under the flower-bush varied in hue as the quetzal bird; listen to the quechol singing to the gods; listen to the singing of the quechol along the river; hear its flute along the river in the ...
— Rig Veda Americanus - Sacred Songs Of The Ancient Mexicans, With A Gloss In Nahuatl • Various

... for all things, 'Twas others drank the wine, I cannot now recall things; Live but a fool, to pine. 'Twas I that beat the bush, The bird to others flew; For she, alas, hath left me. ...
— A History of English Literature - Elizabethan Literature • George Saintsbury

... bird, in rather a curious way. We were on the march, plodding along through as heavy a tropic downpour as it was our ill fortune to encounter. The sariema, evidently as drenched and uncomfortable as we were, was hiding under a bush to avoid the pelting rain. The dog discovered it, and after the bird valiantly repelled him, Miller was able to seize it. Its stomach contained about half a pint of grass-hoppers and beetles and young leaves. At Vilhena there was a tame sariema, much more familiar ...
— Through the Brazilian Wilderness • Theodore Roosevelt

... arrived at the brink of what seemed to be a precipice. The presence of this told Hugh plainly the nature of the task that awaited him. Someone had undoubtedly fallen over the brink, and was, even then, hanging on desperately to some jutting rock or bush that represented the only hope of safety from a serious fall. He threw himself down and thrust his head out over the edge. What Hugh saw was enough to give any boy a thrill of horror. Some ten feet below the top a human figure sprawled, ...
— The Chums of Scranton High on the Cinder Path • Donald Ferguson

... while. But to look at him you would conceit he was as sound as a trout. First he was moody, moping about the place, and no way wishful for company. Hours he would spend below at the butt of the meadow, nearby the water, sitting under the thorn bush and he playing upon the fideog. Then he began to lose the use of his limbs, and crying he used to be within in the room. Some of the people who have knowledge say he is lying under a certain influence. He cannot speak now. The ...
— Waysiders • Seumas O'Kelly

... business with the go between, if you can with the principal. Remember, the two young men are the persons to arrange with after all. They must be poor, and therefore easily dealt with. For, if poor, they will think a bird in the hand worth two in the bush of ...
— Night and Morning, Volume 4 • Edward Bulwer Lytton

... on a field of battle are two wrestlers. It is a question of seizing the opponent round the waist. The one seeks to trip up the other. They clutch at everything: a bush is a point of support; an angle of the wall offers them a rest to the shoulder; for the lack of a hovel under whose cover they can draw up, a regiment yields its ground; an unevenness in the ground, a chance turn in the landscape, a cross-path encountered at the right moment, ...
— Les Miserables - Complete in Five Volumes • Victor Hugo

... Beskift, shove off, Bested, beset, Betaken, entrusted, Betaught, entrusted, recommended, Betid, happened, Betook, committed, entrusted, Bevered, quivered, Board, sb., deck, Bobaunce, boasting, pride, Boishe, bush, branch ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... in order to produce a good, sturdy animal, while the character or mind of the animal is a part of the fundamental species already created. In other words, no matter how much care you bestow upon a rose bush, its flower will still be a rose,—it may be a better rose, a stronger, sturdier rose, a better smelling and a more beautiful rose, but ...
— The Eugenic Marriage, Volume I. (of IV.) - A Personal Guide to the New Science of Better Living and Better Babies • W. Grant Hague, M.D.

... over dales he fled, As if the wind him on his wings had borne; Nor bank nor bush could stay him, when he sped His nimble feet, as treading still on thorn; Grief, and Despite, and Jealousy, and Scorn, Did all the way him follow hard behind; And he himself himself loath'd so forlorn, So shamefully forlorn of womankind, ...
— Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2 • Leigh Hunt

... lived in considerable danger, and in still greater dread of capture, if not of assassination. His imagination, excited by endless tales of ambush and half-discovered conspiracies, saw armed soldiers behind every bush; a pitfall in every street. Had not the redoubtable Alva been nearly made a captive? Did not Louis of Nassau nearly entrap the Grand Commander? No doubt the Prince of Orange was desirous of accomplishing a feat by which he would be placed in regard to Philip on ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... stare up the street of broken shop fronts. One of these diverted his attention from the nurse. Above its door protruded a bush, its leaves long since withered. He knew this for the sign of a wine shop, and with much effort regained his feet to hobble toward it. He went far enough to note that the bush broke its promise of refreshment, for back of it was but ...
— The Wrong Twin • Harry Leon Wilson

... the clothing of dead men; coarse blouses, water-soaked; the delicate garments of women and children; patrician vestments, hacked and stabbed and stained with red; a hat that was crushed and bloody. On a slanting stone lay a drowned man, naked, swollen, purple; clasping the fragment of a broken bush with a grip which death had so petrified that human strength could not unloose it —mute witness of the last despairing effort to save the life that was doomed beyond all help. A stream of water trickled ceaselessly over the ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain



Words linked to "Bush" :   bracelet wood, stingaree-bush, raspberry bush, corkwood, silver-bush, bush baby, Comptonia peregrina, Lambertia formosa, Francoa ramosa, Mahonia aquifolium, quail bush, Grewia asiatica, cat's-claw, leadwort, crape jasmine, bush tit, silverbush, honeyflower, Eriodictyon californicum, sugar-bush, Mahonia nervosa, quince bush, coville, Cordyline terminalis, cherry laurel, bristly locust, kei apple, black greasewood, kei apple bush, fringe bush, dog hobble, cajan pea, hiccup nut, lentisk, desert willow, honey-flower, leatherleaf, bush out, Aristotelia racemosa, coca plant, scrub, Erythroxylon truxiuense, Dalea spinosa, rabbit bush, Kolkwitzia amabilis, bushman's poison, Datura arborea, Vannevar Bush, cotoneaster, Mahernia verticillata, Japanese angelica tree, Cyrilla racemiflora, Aralia elata, bean trefoil, Australian heath, Geoffroea decorticans, Lavatera arborea, bush honeysuckle, grevillea, crepe myrtle, dewberry bush, feijoa bush, hoary golden bush, chanal, blue cohosh, Acocanthera spectabilis, George Bush, buckler mustard, boysenberry bush, Brassaia actinophylla, hawthorn, Jupiter's beard, jujube bush, Desmodium gyrans, blueberry, Flacourtia indica, blackthorn, glandular Labrador tea, Canella-alba, oriental bush cherry, Irish gorse, Euonymus americanus, maleberry, Malosma laurina, bush clover, Desmodium motorium, chanar, dombeya, Erythroxylon coca, fetter bush, Caulophyllum thalictroides, castor-oil plant, Japanese andromeda, Cineraria maritima, Halimodendron halodendron, Conradina glabra, Anagyris foetida, barilla, pubic hair, Datura suaveolens, goldenbush, daphne, alpine azalea, Brunfelsia americana, Chilean hazelnut, Acocanthera oppositifolia, Lycium carolinianum, chaparral pea, bitter pea, hamelia, saltbush, bush-league, abelia, Cestrum diurnum, Cytesis proliferus, guinea flower, belvedere, lomatia, capsicum pepper plant, California redbud, flat pea, bush poppy, black haw, bitter-bark, kali, highbush cranberry, caper, Clethra alnifolia, ephedra, Aralia stipulata, carissa, honeysuckle, Christmas berry, castor bean plant, African hemp, flame bush, brittle bush, clianthus, Comptonia asplenifolia, Canella winterana, groundsel tree, bush nasturtium, spicebush, coyote brush, Kochia scoparia, blueberry root, gastrolobium, angel's trumpet, haw, Eryngium maritimum, Caulophyllum thalictrioides, forsythia, andromeda, day jessamine, Fabiana imbricata, Colutea arborescens, fool's huckleberry, cyrilla, crepe jasmine, mountain fetterbush, kudu lily, smoke bush, Ledum groenlandicum, cinquefoil, Baccharis halimifolia, impala lily, Codiaeum variegatum, cotton-seed tree, Hercules'-club, Lyonia ligustrina, Christ's-thorn, Lysiloma sabicu, daisy bush, Ledum palustre, Chinese angelica tree, blackberry bush, camellia, Georgia bark, beauty bush, Caesalpinia decapetala, Leycesteria formosa, Benjamin bush, Camellia sinensis, artemisia, East Indian rosebay, Hakea laurina, consumption weed, Caesalpinia sepiaria, dog laurel, bird's-eye bush, bridal wreath, feijoa, Himalaya honeysuckle, frangipanni, Jacquinia armillaris, crepe gardenia, George Walker Bush, Lepechinia calycina, Chamaecytisus palmensis, heath, catjang pea, Chilean flameflower, Diervilla sessilifolia, mimosa bush, leatherwood, crowberry, camelia, Dubyuh, bush vetch, butcher's broom, gardenia, barbasco, creosote bush, joint fir, Aspalathus cedcarbergensis, daisybush, crape myrtle, boxwood, needle bush, beach plum bush, butterfly flower, Acocanthera venenata, bush jacket, helianthemum, fuchsia, George W. Bush, honeybells, bushy, makomako, Acalypha virginica, beat around the bush, laurel sumac, glasswort, Chinese holly, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, dahl, Aralia spinosa, blolly, render, capsicum, Hakea lissosperma, Leucothoe racemosa, currant, Ilex cornuta, hog plum bush, Adenium obesum, Genista raetam, Apalachicola rosemary, frangipani, Catha edulis, croton, marmalade bush, Adam's apple, Leucothoe fontanesiana, bush pea, Codariocalyx motorius, black-fronted bush shrike, Jacquinia keyensis, bush willow, Ardisia escallonoides, ringworm bush, banksia, coronilla, Bassia scoparia, fire thorn, flowering hazel, corkwood tree, mallow



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