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Bush   Listen
verb
Bush  v. t.  (past & past part. bushed; pres. part. bushing)  
1.
To set bushes for; to support with bushes; as, to bush peas.
2.
To use a bush harrow on (land), for covering seeds sown; to harrow with a bush; as, to bush a piece of land; to bush seeds into the ground.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bush" Quotes from Famous Books



... a gentle rise, from which the ground, that was sprinkled with bush and rocks, sloped downwards to where, some miles below us, the river ran, bounding the enormous flanks of the Mountain. When we had travelled a little way down this slope we were obliged to turn in order ...
— Ayesha - The Further History of She-Who-Must-Be-Obeyed • H. Rider Haggard

... doomed to spend a soul-killing two and a half years on that desolate, microscopical strip of sand! Had I done so I must have gone raving mad. It was an appalling, dreary-looking spot, without one single tree or bush growing upon it to relieve the terrible monotony. I tell you, words can never describe the horror of the agonising months as they crawled by. "My island" was nothing but a little sand-spit, with here and there a few tufts of grass struggling through ...
— The Adventures of Louis de Rougemont - as told by Himself • Louis de Rougemont

... and view it, All desolately sunk, The circle of the Druid, The cloister of the monk; The abbey boled and squalid, With its bush-maned, staggering wall; Ask by whom these were unhallow'd— Change, change ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... garlands with mimosa, the pink flowers of the caper bush and white cockles. Then we threw them in the green water to ward off evil spirits; and we laughed like mad things when a great snorting hippopotamus raised his swollen head and we bombarded him in glee until he had to plunge back again ...
— Atlantida • Pierre Benoit

... only to apply at my former hotel, La Clef de Surete. And gay as a hunchback who's just drowned his wife! Gautruche, called Gogo-la-Gaiete, egad! A pretty fellow who knows what's what, who doesn't beat about the bush, a good old body who takes things easy and who won't give himself the colic with that fishes' grog!" With that he took a bottle of water that stood beside him and hurled it twenty yards away. "Long live the walls! ...
— Germinie Lacerteux • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt

... through the parlor door they went and on through the folding doors into the sitting-room where Mrs. Brady stood among her plants. She had just cut two lovely roses from the same bush, and one she pinned on her husband's coat and the other on ...
— The Widow O'Callaghan's Boys • Gulielma Zollinger

... often molested by the presence of guests, and he found it as quiet and lifeless as an uninhabited island of the sea. Leaving his horse hitched in the shade of the corn-crib, he first came upon Giles, stretched out under the holly-bush, and fast asleep, with his head upon his jacket. The door and window of the family-room were open, and Dr. Deane, walking softly upon the thick grass, saw that Old-man Barton was in his accustomed seat. His daughter Ann was not visible; she was at that moment occupied in taking out ...
— The Story Of Kennett • Bayard Taylor

... shall we go?" she asked in a whisper. "To the forest? There were eyes in the forest last night, not the great, still, solemn eyes that stare at Margery every night, but eyes that glowed like coals, and moved from bush to bush. Margery was afraid, and she left the forest, and sat by the water side all night, listening to what it had to say. A star shot, and Margery knew that a soul was on its way to Paradise, where ...
— Prisoners of Hope - A Tale of Colonial Virginia • Mary Johnston

... Mr. President, Vice President Bush, Vice President Mondale, Senator Baker, Speaker O'Neill, Reverend Moomaw, and my fellow citizens: To a few of us here today, this is a solemn and most momentous occasion; and yet, in the history of our Nation, ...
— United States Presidents' Inaugural Speeches - From Washington to George W. Bush • Various

... hatred of a dog, and when they saw the Yellow Cur coming bounding toward them, their tails and noses went up; they sniffed angrily, then closed up ranks, and led by the Cow that owned the Calf, they charged at the Dog, while Jack took refuge under a low thorn-bush. The Dog swerved aside to attack the Calf, at least the old Cow thought he did, and she followed him so fiercely that he barely escaped from that field ...
— Animal Heroes • Ernest Thompson Seton

... of a flowering bush they embraced each other as do those who know not whether they will ever kiss again, and, the hour of sunset having come, parted ...
— Fair Margaret • H. Rider Haggard

... "The patent bush has got loose in the hub," he resumed. "I took the pin out and then saw I might have trouble if the wheel came off. It has been threatening to play this trick ...
— The Girl From Keller's - Sadie's Conquest • Harold Bindloss

... is matter of easy demonstration, that setting the characters of typical beauty aside, the pleasure afforded by every organic form is in proportion to its appearance of healthy vital energy; as in a rose-bush, setting aside all considerations of gradated flushing of color and fair folding of line, which it shares with the cloud or the snow-wreath, we find in and through all this, certain signs pleasant and acceptable as signs of life and enjoyment in the particular individual plant itself. Every leaf ...
— Modern Painters Volume II (of V) • John Ruskin

... hinted, however remote, was enough to stop her short, actually and mentally. Considering, she stood still, with a face of distaste. The hush before sunset flooded the quiet road. A bird called plaintively from some low bush, was still, and called again. From the river came the muffled, mellow note of a boat horn. Two ponies looked over the brick wall, shook their tawny heads, and galloped to the field with a joyous affectation of terror. Nina! By ...
— Harriet and the Piper - (Norris Volume XI) • Kathleen Norris

... Nearly everybody has it and is actually proud of it. When a young man is first afflicted with the tender passion; when he is in the throes of the mysterious mental aberration that would cause him to climb a mesquite bush and lasso the moon for his inamorata if she chanced to admire it, he is apt to think it love that makes the world go round. Later he learns that Gall is the social dynamics—the force that causes humanity to arise and ...
— Volume 12 of Brann The Iconoclast • William Cowper Brann

... and a crackling of undergrowth warned her of the presence of the savage creatures she had summoned. The deep blue eyes were alert and watchful, but she showed no signs of fear; nor did she move. Suddenly a less stealthy and more certain crackling of the bush made itself heard; and the roving eyes became fixed in one direction. Beneath the shadow of the laden boughs a tall grey figure appeared moving towards her. But this was not all, for several slinking, stealing forms were moving about amongst the barren ...
— In the Brooding Wild • Ridgwell Cullum

... are afraid to put forth buds, And there is timidity in the grass; The plots lie gray where gouged by spuds, And whether next week will pass Free of sly sour winds is the fret of each bush Of ...
— Moments of Vision • Thomas Hardy

... stockades. Axes were plied vigorously—some seized the timbers and hauled them down, and a breach being made, in they rushed and drove the enemy before them. The fort was gained, the blacks fled out of it into the thick bush in the rear, and all the guns were spiked. While this work was being accomplished, a party of the blacks had come down and, attacking one of the boats, had carried her off along the beach, hoping probably to make their escape in her. A party pursued them on discovering ...
— The Three Midshipmen • W.H.G. Kingston

... to melt, the sage hen builds in the bush a nest of sticks and reeds artistically matted together, and lays from a dozen to twenty eggs, rather larger than those of the domestic fowl, of a tawny colour, irregularly marked with chocolate blotches on the larger end. When a brood is strong enough to travel, the parents lead their ...
— The Western World - Picturesque Sketches of Nature and Natural History in North - and South America • W.H.G. Kingston

... ridge along the neck, and a bare stump projecting behind, were all that remained of the flowing honors with which they had come gallivanting down to "bear away the bell" at Hickory Creek, or, in the emphatic language of the country, "to take the rag off the bush." ...
— Wau-bun - The Early Day in the Northwest • Juliette Augusta Magill Kinzie

... others to be strewed about the market place, that the people may stumble upon them, when they little expect such a sight. This gives a grandeur to my customs, far beyond the display of fine things which I buy; this makes my enemies fear me, and gives me such a name in the Bush.[9] Besides, if I neglect this indispensable duty, would my ancestors suffer me to live? would they not trouble me day and night, and say, that I sent no body to serve them? that I was only solicitous about my own name, and forgetful of my ancestors? White men ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Vol. I. Jan. 1916 • Various

... public rumor of irregularities in office. A customs employee having been discharged for spreading the rumor, called on the collector and invited him to a meeting outside; and the two adjourned to the bush, where shots were exchanged and young Morales was wounded in the leg. The aggressor was immediately seized by the general commanding the military forces in Sanchez and carried to the town cemetery, a ...
— Santo Domingo - A Country With A Future • Otto Schoenrich

... he was in the garden Duncan was nearer him. He could see the little figure in a blue jersey marching along the paths with a wheelbarrow, very important because he was helping his father. He had called the big clump of azaleas "the burning bush." ... He had always been a ...
— Penny Plain • Anna Buchan (writing as O. Douglas)

... glimpsed beyond the cypress hedge and bordering the cotton fields, the pond-shadows cast by the live oaks at noon had become river shadows, flowing eastward; the murmur of bees filled the air like a haze of sound, and here and there as they passed a bush coloured flowers detached themselves ...
— The Ghost Girl • H. De Vere Stacpoole

... Immaculate Conception, the Resurrection, the Ascension—what's your child-mind that knows the old stories for inventions going to say to those? Are they easier to believe? The Creation or the Conception? The Flood or the Resurrection? God speaking out of a burning bush or the Ascension to Heaven? The pillar of cloud and the pillar of fire or the Three in One of the Trinity? Oh, I wonder if Modern Thought has any thought to spare for that side of the business—or for its results ...
— This Freedom • A. S. M. Hutchinson

... as they called it, a "pinfold," made by driving stakes into the sand so as to inclose a circular space about six feet in diameter. On the side toward the open water an aperture was left; and a big bush was made ready to close this up when the proper time came. Then the fishermen waded into the water, carrying with them great birch bushes. Sweeping the water with these, they slowly advanced toward the pinfold, ...
— Stories of New Jersey • Frank Richard Stockton

... days in the early summer, usually in a tree, but sometimes in a room, if the window is open, and often in a bush, quite close to the ground. When they swarm in a tree you would think a black snow-storm was raging all around it. Every moment the cluster of bees grows larger and larger, until, after half an hour or so, ...
— What Shall We Do Now?: Five Hundred Games and Pastimes • Dorothy Canfield Fisher

... that about the time when that little witch, Ada Vere, came here, and turned both the boys' heads, and carried off poor Willy, and half broke Arthur's heart? H'm! Well, I don't know what I can do about it. Hum! pretty it all looks here! If there isn't the strawberry bush, grown out of all knowledge! We were big children, Vesta and I, before we gave up hoping that it would bear strawberries. How we ...
— Mrs. Tree • Laura E. Richards

... have their home in Central and Southern Asia), also the Guinea fowls (African forms), and the turkeys and curassows, which are American representatives of the order. Besides these may be mentioned partridges, grouse, black-cock, the capercalzie and quails, and, lastly, the megapodius or bush-turkey of Australia. This last is the only bird which hatches its eggs by artificial heat, depositing them in a mound of earth and decaying vegetable matter, wherein they are hatched fully-fledged, so that they can fly away immediately on leaving the egg. All ...
— The Contemporary Review, Volume 36, September 1879 • Various

... with her head held high and her eyes cold and determined. "What do you want me to do? Please don't beat about the bush ...
— One Man in His Time • Ellen Glasgow

... twenty-second, a lark flew impudently past his head and perched upon a bush near by and sang straight at him. As a general thing Luck loved to hear bird songs when he rode abroad on a fine morning; but he came very near taking a shot at that particular lark, as if it were personally responsible for the sunny days that had brought it out scouting ...
— The Phantom Herd • B. M. Bower

... treachery and surprise. But the presence of the danger should make the feast more enjoyable too, by the moderation it enforces, and by the contrast it affords—as to sailors on shore, or soldiers in a truce. Joy may grow on the very face of danger, as a slender rose-bush flings its bright sprays and fragrant blossoms over the lip of a cataract; and that not the wild mirth of men in a pestilence, with their 'Let us eat and drink, for to-morrow we die,' but the simple-hearted gladness of those who have ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... is strewn with roses, While one looks bleak and bare, With now and then a berry-bush, And a violet ...
— Mother Truth's Melodies - Common Sense For Children • Mrs. E. P. Miller

... Paris. I only tell monsieur what I have heard. Ah! it is very easy to be mistaken in Paris, monsieur. Take, for instance, the lady in deep mourning, with the two little girls, over there at the table under the lilac bush." ...
— A Village of Vagabonds • F. Berkeley Smith

... again he asked for her. She went to him, but she wouldn't go in without my lady went with her. He was lying quite still, but after a minute he opened his eyes and said, 'Phil, darling! where have you been? There is a nest in the holly-bush. I'll show it you after breakfast.' Of course it was just rambling talk, but the doctors said that the fact of his knowing her was a ...
— East of the Shadows • Mrs. Hubert Barclay

... moment irresistible, grasped my fowling-piece, and struggled to wrest it from me. I called to my companion, and the two other natives ran away, unwilling to become the accomplices in this attack. In the struggle, our feet were entangled in a bush, and we both fell together; but the native, seeing he could not gain his point, and perhaps dreading the arrival of Dr Sparrman, got up before me, and took that opportunity of running off. My friend joined me immediately; and we concluded, that if there ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 14 • Robert Kerr

... flight with its melancholy, petulant cry, deepened the sense of stillness. He knew the solitary pines, dwarfed, tufted, vigorous, that sang to every lost wind, travelers like the gypsies who pitched their bush-like tents beneath them; he knew the shaggy ponies, with foals like baby centaurs; the chattering jays, the milky call of the cuckoos in the spring, and the boom of the bittern from the lonely marshes. The ...
— The Man Whom the Trees Loved • Algernon Blackwood

... 10. A woodcut of the Kallima is given by Mr. Wallace in 'Hardwicke's Science Gossip,' September 1867, p. 196.) of a common Indian and Sumatran butterfly (Kallima) which disappears like magic when it settles on a bush; for it hides its head and antennae between its closed wings, which, in form, colour and veining, cannot be distinguished from a withered leaf with its footstalk. In some other cases the lower surfaces of the wings are brilliantly coloured, and yet are protective; ...
— The Descent of Man and Selection in Relation to Sex • Charles Darwin

... think a man ought to throw away his life. You're young. You could start over again, and you ought to have tried. Your father made his own money, and so did my father—why, look at the Sally M. mine, that has given me my own fortune. Do you suppose that grew on a bush to be shaken off? So why couldn't you go out in the same way and do something in the world—I don't mean just make money, you know, but do something? That's what a girl likes. And you were able enough. You are young and strong, and you have your education; and I've heard my father say, before ...
— The Lady and the Pirate - Being the Plain Tale of a Diligent Pirate and a Fair Captive • Emerson Hough

... do we finer strokes and colours see Of the Creator's real poetry, Than when we with attention look Upon the third day's volume of the book? If we could open and intend our eye, We all like Moses should espy Even in a bush the radiant Deity. But we despise these his inferior ways Though no less full of miracle and praise; Upon the flowers of heaven we gaze, The stars of earth no wonder in us raise, Though these perhaps do more than they The life of mankind sway. Although ...
— Cowley's Essays • Abraham Cowley

... hit me here—" Mr. Swift laid gentle finger-tips upon his arm near the shoulder—"so I couldn't. I saw it was Jack Allen shooting and coming towards us from a clump of bushes off to the right of us. He shot again, and Texas Bill fell. I ducked behind a bush and started for help, when I met the Captain and a few others coming out to see what was the matter. That," finished Mr. Swift, "is the facts of the case, just ...
— The Gringos • B. M. Bower

... he heard the sound of crying in the field beside him, and he looked over the wall. And there he saw a young girl sitting under a bush of white hawthorn, and crying as if her heart would break. Her face was hidden in her hands, but her soft hair and her white neck and the young look of her, put him in mind of Bridget Purcell and Margaret Gillane and ...
— Stories of Red Hanrahan • W. B. Yeats

... my watch. It was one o'clock and there was not a berry-bush in sight. The drive had made me hungry, and I'd have eaten a rabbit that looked like Mr. Wiggins and called me by name if I'd had it. But there was absolutely no use going back for the one we'd seen on ...
— Tish, The Chronicle of Her Escapades and Excursions • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... stripping himself, that he might not be known, joined the natives, and put them on their guard; after which, he returned, and seeing the governor go past with some officers, whilst he was hid in a bush, he afterwards showed himself to an officer's servant, and asked where the governor and the soldiers were going, and being told, he laughed, and said they were too late, for ...
— An Historical Journal of the Transactions at Port Jackson and Norfolk Island • John Hunter

... and assuring himself that Bill was well off, Fred began an advance, working his way from bush to bush until convinced he could ...
— Down the Slope • James Otis

... the dainty prints of fresh butter were all exquisite "after rancid pork and garlic," and he declares that they ate for two hours and consumed "some half gallon of thick cream and half a bushel of new laid eggs." Under their window bloomed a rose bush in full flower. Murray ...
— A Canadian Manor and Its Seigneurs - The Story of a Hundred Years, 1761-1861 • George M. Wrong

... us so profoundly. Whether we consider Sumerian sculpture or pre-dynastic Egyptian art, or archaic Greek, or the Wei and T'ang masterpieces,[1] or those early Japanese works of which I had the luck to see a few superb examples (especially two wooden Bodhisattvas) at the Shepherd's Bush Exhibition in 1910, or whether, coming nearer home, we consider the primitive Byzantine art of the sixth century and its primitive developments amongst the Western barbarians, or, turning far afield, we consider ...
— Art • Clive Bell

... seized their sticks. They moved towards the door, but already Nickie had begged to be excused, and passed into the night. The stillness and mystery of the bush enveloped him. ...
— The Missing Link • Edward Dyson

... don't think that man as Halsey saw was the ghost, what do you s'pose 'ee was doin' there?" asked Betts, "and where did he go? Halsey went right round the farm. The hill just there is as bare as my hand. He must ha' seen the man—if it wor a man—an' he saw nothin'. There isn't a tree or a bush where that man could ha' hid hisself—if he wor ...
— Harvest • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... are small thickets of low trees and bushes, and when singing they select the highest branches of the bush. They are passionately fond of flies and insects and also ...
— Birds Illustrated by Color Photograph [January, 1897] - A Monthly Serial designed to Promote Knowledge of Bird-Life • Various

... the barberry bush, or saffron, steeped in water, and set with alum, will colour a bright lemon, drop in a little gum-arabic to make ...
— Young's Demonstrative Translation of Scientific Secrets • Daniel Young

... "it is too hard upon him. Aunt Roxy, please pick some roses off the bush from under the window and put in the vases; let's have the room as sweet and cheerful as we can. I hope God will let me live long enough to comfort him. It is not so very terrible, if one would only think so, to cross that river. All looks so bright to me now that ...
— The Pearl of Orr's Island - A Story of the Coast of Maine • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... though not very important in itself, is interesting as combining some of the features of three distinct classes of folk-tales. One of these is the anti-Jewish series, of which Grimm's story of the Jew in the Bramble-Bush is one of the most typical examples. According to these tales, any villainy is justifiable, if perpetrated on a Jew. We find traces of this feeling even in Shakespeare, and to this day Shylock (notwithstanding the grievous wrongs which ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... she receives more particular news of the chest, that it had been carried by the waves of the sea to the coast of Byblos, [Footnote: Not the Byblos of Syria (Jebel) but the papyrus swamps of the Delta.] and there gently lodged in the branches of a bush of Tamarisk, which, in a short time, had shot up into a large and beautiful tree, growing round the chest and enclosing it on every side, so that it was not to be seen; and farther, that the king of the country, amazed at its unusual size, had cut the tree down, ...
— Egyptian Ideas of the Future Life • E. A. Wallis Budge

... encountered another portage of one thousand and seventy-five yards, terminating at a second lake named Clary's Lake. This portage lies over an open pine ridge, from which the timber has been chiefly burned. The shrubs and plants are young bush poplars, whortleberries, shad-bush, brake and sweet fern. Both ends of it are skirted with bog. The highest grounds exhibit boulders. About five o'clock the canoes came up, and we embarked on the lake and crossed it, and, striking the portage path, went four ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... the new spring, When early birds on the green branches sing. When rising herbs and buds begin to hide, Their naked mother, with their short-liv'd pride, Chloe is ripe, and as the autumn fair, When on the elm the purple grapes appear, When trees, hedge-rows, and every bending bush, With rip'ning fruit, or tasteful berries blush, Lydia is in the summer of her days, What wood can shade us from her piercing rays? Her even teeth, whiter than new yean'd lambs, When they with tender cries pursue ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753) - Vol. III • Theophilus Cibber

... over dales he fled, As if the wind him on his wings had borne; Nor bank nor bush could stay him, when he sped His nimble feet, as treading still on thorn; Grief, and Despite, and Jealousy, and Scorn, Did all the way him follow hard behind; And he himself himself loath'd so forlorn, So shamefully forlorn of womankind, That, ...
— Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Vol. 2 • Leigh Hunt

... grew larger, the sycamores massed together in their full leafiness, bringing visions of a sugar bush in the time of leaves; they were mingled with the delicious green of the newly-leaved beech. The round-headed chestnuts, with their clustered leaves, were covered with tall spikes of blossom like the tapers on an overgrown Christmas tree. The ash and oak are shaking out their ...
— The Letters of "Norah" on her Tour Through Ireland • Margaret Dixon McDougall

... side of the path the spring blossoms were coming up, tulips and crocuses and hyacinths. Against the background of the gray house, an almond bush flung its branches of pink and white, ...
— Judy • Temple Bailey

... twig or branch from the elder hedge which surrounded my grandfather's garden. We were told at the time, as a reason for this prohibition, that it was poisonous; but we discovered afterwards that there was another reason, viz., that it was unlucky to break off even a small twig from a bourtree bush. In some parts of the Continent this superstitious feeling is so strong that, before pruning it, the gardener says—"Elder, elder, may I cut thy branches?" If no response be heard, it is considered that assent has been given, and ...
— Folk Lore - Superstitious Beliefs in the West of Scotland within This Century • James Napier

... barn, and hay stack were close in front, with only a narrow strip of garden between, for there was not much heed paid to flowers, and few kitchen vegetables were grown in those days, only a few potherbs round the door, and a sweet-brier bush by the window. ...
— Under the Storm - Steadfast's Charge • Charlotte M. Yonge

... and with heads uncovered they went through the house into the open air. The garden was but a strip of ground, bounded by walls of four feet high; in the midst stood a laburnum, now heavy with golden bloom, and at the end grew a holly-bush, flanked with laurels; a border flower-bed displayed Stephen Lord's taste and industry. Nancy seated herself on a rustic bench in the shadow of the laburnum, and Horace stood before her, one of the ...
— In the Year of Jubilee • George Gissing

... waist cloth with the left and circling her neck with the right hand, hoisted her off the ground with both; whereupon the old woman strove to free herself and, in so doing fell on her back arsiversy, with her legs high in air and her hairy bush between them showed manifest in the moonshine; furthermore she let fly two great farts[FN166] one of which blew up the dust from the earth's face and the other steamed up to the gate of Heaven. Sharrkan ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... blue water running green and sandy in the shallows, and a flock of wheeling gulls to possess it; before me rose the great crag of the Castle Rock, each plane and angle of its twisted slate pile cut sharply in light and shadow, and against this sullen grey background a newly flowered gorse bush ...
— Lynton and Lynmouth - A Pageant of Cliff & Moorland • John Presland

... beating round the bush, old fellow," thought du Tillet, and as the words crossed his mind he came back to his original project, and vowed to bring that virtue low, to trample it under foot, to render despicable in the marts of ...
— Rise and Fall of Cesar Birotteau • Honore de Balzac

... Sarah Bush Lincoln, his stepmother, was good to him and he to her. Above all she encouraged him in his early studies, to which a fretful housewife could have opposed such terrible obstacles. She lived to hope that he might not be elected President for fear that enemies ...
— Abraham Lincoln • Lord Charnwood

... Western music, but its effects are wonderful. One of our writers has thus described music he once heard: "Softly, as the murmur of whispered words; now loud and soft together, like the patter of pearls and pearlets dropping upon a marble dish. Or liquid, like the warbling of the mango-bird in the bush; trickling like the streamlet on its downward course. And then like the torrent, stilled by the grip of frost, so for a moment was the music lulled, in a passion too deep for words." That this famous description of the effects of music which I have ...
— America Through the Spectacles of an Oriental Diplomat • Wu Tingfang

... up the game when his brother's spirit appears. He feeds it, but food comes out of its anus as fast as it eats. He flees and is pursued by the spirit until, by chance, he runs among alangtin bushes. The spirit dislikes the bush and leaves. ...
— Traditions of the Tinguian: A Study in Philippine Folk-Lore • Fay-Cooper Cole

... afraid of, then? Tell me plainly, without any more beating about the bush," said the prince, exasperated by ...
— The Idiot • (AKA Feodor Dostoevsky) Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... fed the tomtits with a cocoanut, suspended on a stick outside my window, and they came greedily. This year I forgot all about it, but, hearing a clamour in a fuchsia-bush outside my study window ... I found myself besieged by an army of tomtits ... Was it memory, or association of ideas, or both?"—Rev. F.G. Montague ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 99., Dec. 20, 1890 • Various

... leg dragged behind him as he slowly worked along and every moment was torture. Sometimes it caught in a bush, and the resulting wrench almost caused him to swoon. But he ...
— Army Boys on the Firing Line - or, Holding Back the German Drive • Homer Randall

... wanted to establish him on a stock farm down Salisbury way, but Peter was an independent devil and would call no man master. He took to big-game hunting, which was what God intended him for, for he could track a tsessebe in thick bush, and was far the finest shot I have seen in my life. He took parties to the Pungwe flats, and Barotseland, and up to Tanganyika. Then he made a speciality of the Ngami region, where I once hunted with him, and he was with me when I went ...
— Greenmantle • John Buchan

... was all before us, where to choose our place of rest, and the bustle of the transport of goods and chattels to the site in the thick forest invisible from the sea began at once. Before sunset, tents were pitched among the trees, and a few yards of bush surrounding then cleared, and we were ...
— The Confessions of a Beachcomber • E J Banfield

... rubbing all the hair off their tails and sides in patches against the stable walls or the trunk of a tree. Indeed, the clever way G——'s miserable little Basuto pony actually climbs inside a good-sized bush, and sways himself about in it with his legs off the ground until the whole thing comes with a crash to the ground, is edifying to behold to every one except the owner of the tree. Tom, the Kafir boy, tried hard to persuade me the other day that the pony was to blame for the destruction of a ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - Vol. XVII, No. 102. June, 1876. • Various

... island within so few miles of the equator; that is, beautiful and prolific in the extreme. The cinnamon fields are so thrifty as to form a wilderness of green, though the bushes grow but four or five feet in height. The cinnamon bush, which is a native here, is a species of laurel, and bears a white, scentless flower, scarcely as large as a pea. The spice of commerce is produced from the inner bark of the shrub, the branches of which are cut and peeled twice annually. The plantations resemble ...
— Foot-prints of Travel - or, Journeyings in Many Lands • Maturin M. Ballou

... after a stand, he budges, And sets to work and solemnly trudges, Out from a bush there springs full tilt His ...
— The Vagabond and Other Poems from Punch • R. C. Lehmann

... a nest, Held there by the sideward thrust Of those twigs that touch his breast; Though 'tis gone now. Some rude gust Caught it, over-full of snow,— Bent the bush,—and robbed ...
— Rose and Roof-Tree - Poems • George Parsons Lathrop

... would cruise by fairy islands where the gaudy parrot screeches And the turtle in his soup-tureen floats basking in the calms; We would see the fire-flies winking in the bush above the beaches And a moon of honey yellow ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 152. January 17, 1917 • Various

... mother, I looked behind the mulberry bush And saw you standing there. You were all in white With a star ...
— Poems By a Little Girl • Hilda Conkling

... my bedroom window this morning. It was a bright, beautiful autumn day, the grass still quite green. Some of the trees changing a little, the yellow leaves quite golden in the sun. There are many American trees in the park—a splendid Virginia Creeper, and a Gloire de Dijon rose-bush, still full of bloom, were sprawling over the old gray walls. Animals of all kinds were walking about the court-yard; some swans and a lame duck, which had wandered up from the moat, standing on the edge and looking about with much interest; ...
— Chateau and Country Life in France • Mary King Waddington

... know," I grunted as we cut into Montgomery, negotiated the corner onto Bush Street's clear way, striking a fair clip at once. "That end of him already works better than the other. How ...
— The Million-Dollar Suitcase • Alice MacGowan

... spoke Bastin pointed to the edge of the bush some hundreds of yards away, where we perceived brown figures slipping about among the trees. I suggested that we should go back to the mouth of our path, so as to have a line of retreat open in case of necessity, and await events. So we did and there stood still. ...
— When the World Shook - Being an Account of the Great Adventure of Bastin, Bickley and Arbuthnot • H. Rider Haggard

... to accompany them to their houses. On hearing that we intended to spend the night in the "dead town" they grew awfully indignant. They assured us it was highly dangerous and utterly impossible. Two hours later hyenas, tigers, and other beasts of prey were sure to come out from under every bush and every ruined wall, without mentioning thousands of jackals and wild cats. Our elephants would not stay, and if they did stay no doubt they would be devoured. We ought to leave the ruins as quickly as possible and go with them to the nearest ...
— From the Caves and Jungles of Hindostan • Helena Pretrovna Blavatsky

... of a tree-trunk, perhaps twice the height of his head above the ground, Anthony beheld a ravishing face and two very bright eyes. Without removing his gaze, he leaned his gun carefully against a bush—firearms have an abominable ...
— The Ne'er-Do-Well • Rex Beach

... Government botanist, Perth, says, "The plant in question is very poisonous. It is scientifically known as GASTROLOBIUM GRANDIFLORUM, occurs throughout the dry, tropical portion of Australia, and is commonly known as 'Desert poison,' 'Australian poison,' and 'Wallflower poison bush.'" ...
— Spinifex and Sand - Five Years' Pioneering and Exploration in Western Australia • David W Carnegie

... uttering these words, a whiz in a whin-bush near to where we were standing, and the sound of a gun, startled us, and on looking round we saw five men, and one of the black-cuffs with his firelock still at his shoulder, looking towards us from ...
— Ringan Gilhaize - or The Covenanters • John Galt

... of us, to talk such nonsense. I didn't come here carrying Phil on my shoulders, to spring at your throat if you expressed your opinion. Look here—tell me, don't let us go beating about the bush, Mr. Tatham—I suppose ...
— The Marriage of Elinor • Margaret Oliphant

... blessed minute," returned Tom Reed. "Wish I could. You make it too evident that you are—ladies, with every word you speak, and all your beating about the bush. A man would blurt it out, and then I would know where I am at. Hang it if I know now. You all say that your sister is singular and that she distresses your father, and you"—addressing Imogen—"say that she must be in that house. You are the only one ...
— The Copy-Cat and Other Stories • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... vouch for the accuracy of the following details. These butterflies frequent dry forests, and fly very swiftly. They were seen to settle on a flower or a green leaf, but were many times lost sight of in a bush or tree of dead leaves. On such occasions they were generally searched for in vain, for while gazing intently at the very spot where one had disappeared, it would often suddenly dart out, and again vanish twenty or fifty yards further on. ...
— On the Genesis of Species • St. George Mivart

... for a thorough bred, she was a clipper at trotting—to trot a mile or so on the grass—another day to gallop the length of the nine acres opposite the Lodge—and then sometimes, back her for a ten pound note, to jump the biggest furze bush that could be found—all or which she could do with ease, nobody thinking, all the while, that the cock-tailed pony was out of Scroggins, by a 'Lamplighter mare.' As every fellow that was beat to-day was sure to come back to-morrow, with something better, either of his own or a friend's, ...
— The Confessions of Harry Lorrequer, Complete • Charles James Lever (1806-1872)

... 'Revue Horticole,' 1867, p. 382, mention is made of a bush which produces these double nuts each year—in fact, it never produces any single-seeded fruit. The plant was a chance seedling, perhaps itself the offspring of a double-seeded parent. It would be interesting ...
— Vegetable Teratology - An Account of the Principal Deviations from the Usual Construction of Plants • Maxwell T. Masters

... Now, you must know that I am quite as fond of the oaks and the grass and the blue sky as Sunbeam, or Fairy, or the brown-faced Little Chick. And so it happens, when the day is hot, and the lazy breezes will not keep the house cool, that I just move my chair and table out by the lilac-bush that grows under the twin oaks, and then I think I can write better. And there I sit and watch the trains coming and going to and from the great, bustling city, only a dozen miles away, or listen to the singing of ...
— Queer Stories for Boys and Girls • Edward Eggleston

... simply to see whether this elderly sun would rise yet higher in the heavens. It was the same consideration, no doubt, that had caused her to throw Frank over a month or two earlier. A Lord Talgarth in the bush was worth two cadets in the hand. That was where her sensibleness had come in, and certainly ...
— None Other Gods • Robert Hugh Benson

... then, the champeen Day Begins to put on dawg among 'is push, An', as he mooches on 'is gaudy way, Drors tribute from each tree an' flow'r an' bush. An', w'ile 'e swigs the dew in sylvan bars, The sun shouts insults at the ...
— The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke • C. J. Dennis

... figure, yet it seemed as though she was meeting the gaze of his sparkling dark eyes. Now he was speaking. How she longed to know what he said. Summoning up her courage, she glided along in the shadow of the wall and sat down behind the oleander bush on the sharp edge of the tub. No one noticed her, but she was afraid that a fit of coughing might betray her presence, so she pressed her apron firmly over her lips and sat straining her ears to listen. In spite ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... racing over hill and heather, with startled grouse and black-cock skirring up from under the very hoofs of the equally startled horses;- rides by tumbling streams, like the Swirl - splashing through them, with pulled-up or draggled habits - then cantering on "over bank, bush, and scaur," like so many fair Ellens and young Lochinvars - clambering up very precipices, and creeping down break-neck hills - laughing and talking, and singing, and whistling, and even (so far as Mr. Bouncer was concerned) blowing cows' horns! What vagabond, rollicking ...
— The Adventures of Mr. Verdant Green • Cuthbert Bede

... greater activity, the males being, during the season of nesting, very pugnacious, continually chasing one another about the woods. It lives near the ground, making its artfully concealed nest among the low herbage and feeding in the undergrowth, the male singing from some old log or low bush, his song recalling that of the Cardinal, ...
— Birds Illustrated by Color Photography [August, 1897] - A Monthly Serial designed to Promote Knowledge of Bird-Life • Various

... his enemies went away believing that they had seen the last of him. But, in reality, he was carried down, half drowned, below the next bend in the river, where he fortunately came across a 'snag' floating in the water (a snag is, you know, a part of a tree or bush which floats very nearly under the surface of the water); and he held on to this snag, and by great good luck eventually came ashore some two or three miles down the river. At the place where he landed he came across a fine fat cow buffalo, and immediately he jumped on her back and ...
— The Orange Fairy Book • Andrew Lang

... variety, and, if they do much, shall change it to Silver Top. You never can tell what a thing named Doolittle will do. The one in the Senate changed color, and got sour. They ripen badly,—either mildew, or rot on the bush. They are apt to Johnsonize,—rot on the stem. ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... fox, "I will obey thee as a scholar obeys his master." "Follow me," said the musician; and when they had walked a part of the way, they came to a footpath, with high bushes on both sides of it. There the musician stood still, and from one side bent a young hazel-bush down to the ground, and put his foot on the top of it, then he bent down a young tree from the other side as well, and said, "Now little fox, if thou wilt learn something, give me thy left front paw." The fox obeyed, and the musician fastened his paw to the left bough. "Little ...
— Household Tales by Brothers Grimm • Grimm Brothers

... beautiful. It was because she seized the right moment to impart knowledge that made it so pleasant and acceptable to me. She realized that a child's mind is like a shallow brook which ripples and dances merrily over the stony course of its education and reflects here a flower, there a bush, yonder a fleecy cloud; and she attempted to guide my mind on its way, knowing that like a brook it should be fed by mountain streams and hidden springs, until it broadened out into a deep river, capable ...
— Story of My Life • Helen Keller

... colours. Then must the moss be fetched to completely line the bag, and to form both bed and wrapping for the little one. For miles into the woods will the Indian women hike to pick the soft moss which is only to be met with in certain localities. They will hang it out on bush and shrub to dry for weeks before it is wanted, and then trudge back again to bring it home, in cloths or blankets swung on their often already-burdened shoulders. Then comes the picking and cleaning process, ...
— Owindia • Charlotte Selina Bompas

... the shade beneath was broken by the gilding of a ray of sunshine on a lower twig, or on a white trunk, but the floor of the vast arcades was almost entirely of the russet brown of the fallen leaves, save where a fern or holly bush made a spot of green. At the foot of the slope lay a stretch of pasture ground, some parts covered by "lady-smocks, all silver white," with the course of the little stream through the midst indicated by a perfect golden river of shining kingcups interspersed with ...
— The Armourer's Prentices • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... turned in and hurried after his sister. But he was so busy collecting all the pencils and paper he could find that he forgot to brush his hair, and consequently appeared at the supper table with a head like a tangled blackberry bush. His ...
— A Prisoner in Fairyland • Algernon Blackwood

... tomatose and grean apples. that will be hard two because it is jest the time for them things and the cucumbers is brite yeller and full of guice and seeds. if a feller waring a stove pipe hat shood come along the strete when i was near a tomatoe vine or a cucumber bush i am afraide i shood have to let ding at him. i dont beleeve the palsams wood do enny good. there is sum things that no feller can stand. but i am going to do the best i can even if i am like a solitary sandpiper ...
— Brite and Fair • Henry A. Shute

... He did not reach the Flinders River until two or three months after Walker's party, and he could not then find Burke's tracks. He considered he could not be expected to find them, since Mr. Walker, a gentleman whose great perseverance and bush experience were well-known, who was then two months before with a larger party than his and twice the equipment, could not follow them up. He could not even find Walker's tracks. He believed it was impossible for Burke and Wills to have gone within ...
— Journal of Landsborough's Expedition from Carpentaria - In search of Burke and Wills • William Landsborough

... to say, in this world; so are the men of this world, they must have all their good things now, they cannot stay till next year, that is until the next world, for their portion of good. That proverb, 'A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush', is of more authority with them than are all the Divine testimonies of the good of the world to come. But as thou sawest that he had quickly lavished all away, and had presently left him nothing but rags; so will it be with all such men at the end ...
— The Pilgrim's Progress - From this world to that which is to come. • John Bunyan

... bush grew near. The rhino attacked this savagely, horning it, trampling it down. The dust arose in clouds. Then the huge brute trotted slowly away, still snorting angrily, pausing to butt violently the ...
— The Leopard Woman • Stewart Edward White et al

... box-plants growing in the old basin, the orange-trees which alone marked the outline of the beds—all seemed full of charm, instinct with a sweet and dreamy cosiness in which it was very pleasant to lull one's joy. And it was so warm, too, beside the big laurel-bush, in the corner where the streamlet of water ever fell with flute-like music ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... was he when he beheld her: Stick after stick did Goody pull, He stood behind a bush of elder, Till she had filled her apron full. When with her load she turned about, The bye-road back again to take, He started forward with a shout, And sprang upon poor ...
— Lyrical Ballads 1798 • Wordsworth and Coleridge

... by fugitive shrieking white women, by Terror and Rumour. Black demonised squadrons are massacring and harrying, with nameless cruelty. They fight and fire 'from behind thickets and coverts,' for the Black man loves the Bush; they rush to the attack, thousands strong, with brandished cutlasses and fusils, with caperings, shoutings and vociferation,—which, if the White Volunteer Company stands firm, dwindle into staggerings, into quick gabblement, into panic flight at the first volley, perhaps before it. (Deux ...
— The French Revolution • Thomas Carlyle

... their fire with so great readiness that I forced them to withdraw their artillery. But, as if they were goblins, they remained here behind a bush or a tree, firing at us, without being seen. Thus did they keep us busy until one o'clock at night. I remained three days without landing, awaiting the arrival of Lumaquan—a chief of the tingues [i.e., hill-people], the best Indian of this island, and our best friend—and five hundred ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume IX, 1593-1597 • E. H. Blair

... they all rushed off to fetch the other stuffed things. Uncle has a tremendous lot of stuffed things. He shot most of them himself—but not the fox, of course. There was another fox's mask, too, and we hung that in a bush to look as if the fox was peeping out. And the stuffed birds we fastened on to the trees with string. The duck-bill—what's its name?—looked very well sitting on his tail with the otter snarling at him. Then Dicky had an idea; and ...
— The Wouldbegoods • E. Nesbit

... his nest in the elderberry bush over by the fence, came flying into the woods. He perched on one of the big branches of Robert Robin's tree and started hopping around looking for a bug for his breakfast, but when he saw Robert Robin and Jeremiah Yellowbird sitting so very still, ...
— Exciting Adventures of Mister Robert Robin • Ben Field

... laugh that win," said Ross. "In case of a row, a paving-stone in trouser-pocket is worth a Krupp's Battery in the bush." ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 103, August 20, 1892 • Various

... for emigrating to New Zealand was this: My uncle's second son, Lewis, had abandoned the profession of the law and gone to Australia by himself, where he was now a shepherd in the bush. He would rejoin his father, and they would be a re-united family. All of them would be together in New Zealand except one, my cousin Edward, who lay in the family vault in Burnley Church. I had feelings of the strongest fraternal affection for Edward, and if the reader ...
— Philip Gilbert Hamerton • Philip Gilbert Hamerton et al

... there's HYPERION - O, yes, and ENDYMION! I should like to see the lot: beautiful pictures dance before me by hundreds: I believe ENDYMION would suit you best. It also is in faery-land; and I see a hundred opportunities, cloudy and flowery glories, things as delicate as the cobweb in the bush; actions, not in themselves of any mighty purport, but made for the pencil: the feast of Pan, Peona's isle, the 'slabbed margin of a well,' the chase of the butterfly, the nymph, Glaucus, Cybele, Sleep on his couch, a farrago ...
— Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson - Volume 2 • Robert Louis Stevenson

... feed on the buds and blossoms when fallen to the ground. "The twigs thus destroyed are detached by as clean a cut as if severed with a knife." Sir Walter Elliot writes of it: "The gulandi lives entirely in the jungle, choosing its habitation in a thick bush, among the thorny branches of which, or on the ground, it constructs a nest of elastic stalks and fibres of dry grass thickly interwoven. The nest is of a round or oblong shape, from six to nine inches in diameter, within which is a chamber ...
— Natural History of the Mammalia of India and Ceylon • Robert A. Sterndale

... miles of copper-red grass were drenched in sunlight that was stronger and fiercer than at any other time of the day. The blond cornfields were red gold, the haystacks turned rosy and threw long shadows. The whole prairie was like the bush that burned with fire and was not consumed. That hour always had the exultation of victory, of triumphant ending, like a hero's death—heroes who died young and gloriously. It was a sudden transfiguration, ...
— My Antonia • Willa Cather

... terror of sink-holes. But their progress was very slow; and they were still in sight, fighting a painful path amid the evergreens, when Quintana suddenly squatted close to the moist earth behind a juniper bush. ...
— The Flaming Jewel • Robert Chambers

... may be," says he— "Whatever the weather may be, It's the songs ye sing, an' the smiles ye wear, That's a-makin' the sun shine everywhere; An' the world of gloom is a world of glee, Wid the bird in the bush, an' the bud in the tree, An' the fruit on the stim of the bough," says he, "Whatever the weather may be," says he— ...
— Complete Works of James Whitcomb Riley • James Whitcomb Riley

... luck to do that, in a way it'll make no real difference. I've written her name in my private calendar, and shall always remember it."—She paused a moment. "We got rather near each other somehow, I think. We didn't dawdle or beat about the bush, but went straight along, passed the initial stages of acquaintance in a few hours, and reached that point of friendship where ...
— The History of Sir Richard Calmady - A Romance • Lucas Malet

... us at the end of the house beside the brier bush, where George was to sit on summer afternoons before he died, and a flash passed between Domsie and the lad's mother. Then she knew that it was well, and fixed her eyes on the letter, but Whinnie, his thumbs in his ...
— Beside the Bonnie Brier Bush • Ian Maclaren



Words linked to "Bush" :   caper, Christmas bush, lomatia, furze, catjang pea, Baccharis viminea, kali, Adam's apple, Cestrum nocturnum, Himalaya honeysuckle, joint fir, Benjamin bush, Jacquinia armillaris, Acalypha virginica, bean caper, Labrador tea, fire-bush, Cycloloma atriplicifolium, Lyonia mariana, Cytisus ramentaceus, laurel cherry, desert willow, sugar-bush, carissa, Cercis occidentalis, gooseberry bush, barberry, Cordyline terminalis, Flacourtia indica, bitter-bark, cinquefoil, George Walker Bush, Caesalpinia decapetala, laurel sumac, joewood, Grewia asiatica, Adenium multiflorum, Francoa ramosa, barbasco, highbush cranberry, burning bush, Bush administration, Loiseleuria procumbens, bush jacket, currant, American spicebush, Christmasberry, honeyflower, flame bush, Codiaeum variegatum, blolly, cupflower, flat pea, bracelet wood, chanal, Aralia spinosa, Indian rhododendron, Indian currant, silver-bush, Cyrilla racemiflora, chaparral broom, arrow wood, cranberry tree, goldenbush, columnea, spice bush, Conradina glabra, Astroloma humifusum, California beauty, black-fronted bush shrike, pubic hair, Leycesteria formosa, Indigofera tinctoria, buddleia, groundsel tree, chanar, Acocanthera oblongifolia, bushy, coca, governor's plum, low-bush blueberry, honey bell, gastrolobium, Bassia scoparia, fetterbush, chalice vine, male berry, bush nasturtium, rosebush, Comptonia peregrina, Lyonia ligustrina, haw, Clethra alnifolia, Japanese angelica tree, leatherwood, Baccharis halimifolia, elder, gooseberry, dombeya, lawyer bush, cotton-seed tree, ringworm bush, day jessamine, Batis maritima, Aralia elata, Chilopsis linearis, Argyroxiphium sandwicense, Brugmansia suaveolens, Anagyris foetida, coronilla, dusty miller, Chimonanthus praecox, bush out, Erythroxylon coca, smoke bush, honeybells, Comptonia asplenifolia, flowering hazel, Leiophyllum buxifolium, Diervilla sessilifolia, flannelbush, glory pea, fetter bush, arbutus, belvedere, consumption weed, stingaree-bush, firethorn, cotton, horsebean, Kochia scoparia, bush poppy, George H.W. Bush, Leucothoe racemosa, bush violet, forestiera, kudu lily, minniebush, black haw, high-bush blueberry, hydrangea, strawberry bush, Brunfelsia americana, cajan pea, needlebush, lavender cotton, cassava, Dalmatian laburnum, beat around the bush, Leucothoe editorum, maikoa, blackberry bush, guinea flower, Lyonia lucida, Chilean flameflower, feijoa, crepe myrtle, Codariocalyx motorius, bush league, crepe jasmine, crape myrtle, cat's-claw, Graptophyllum pictum, Combretum bracteosum, capsicum pepper plant, Ledum palustre, Lepechinia calycina, Anadenanthera colubrina, Cineraria maritima, Christmas berry, crampbark, President Bush, abelia, Adenium obesum, Chrysolepis sempervirens, poison bush, Aralia stipulata, George Herbert Walker Bush, hediondilla, California redbud, Gaultheria shallon, catclaw, scarlet bush, butterfly bush, gorse, five-finger, Leitneria floridana, Jupiter's beard, bush baby, daisy bush, Desmodium motorium, squaw-bush, bush hibiscus, Acocanthera spectabilis, artemisia, Ledum groenlandicum, Lambertia formosa, saltbush, pepper bush, candlewood, Mahonia nervosa, caricature plant, Brazilian potato tree, Japan allspice, leucothoe, bush leaguer, Jew bush, banksia, bush vetch, kapuka, andromeda, Cytesis proliferus, President George W. Bush, hawthorn, huckleberry oak, Chamaedaphne calyculata, ligneous plant, Ardisia escallonoides, Japanese andromeda, American angelica tree, crepe gardenia, indigo plant, hovea, crystal tea, furnish, cotton plant, Guevina avellana, coville, feijoa bush, coyote brush, jasmine, bush clover, maleberry, Irish gorse, Ardisia paniculata, impala lily, American cranberry bush, dog laurel, Erythroxylon truxiuense, Dubyuh, batoko palm, Diervilla lonicera, huckleberry, cotoneaster, African hemp, Kolkwitzia amabilis, boxthorn, cherry laurel, Hibiscus farragei, dwarf golden chinkapin, chaparral, castor-oil plant, Hakea lissosperma, quince bush, Chinese angelica, Ilex cornuta, bush lawyer, cranberry bush, Australian heath, crowberry, flannel bush, honeysuckle, Mahernia verticillata, Canella-alba, Embothrium coccineum, Jacquinia keyensis, desert rose, beach plum bush, ephedra, flame pea, Eriodictyon californicum, Lysiloma sabicu, bush shrike, rabbit bush, spicebush, Euonymus atropurpureus, hog plum bush, brittle bush, kei apple bush, creosote bush, kalmia, supply, dewberry bush, bean trefoil, East Indian rosebay, Larrea tridentata, flowering quince, Kiggelaria africana, cyrilla, lentisk, groundberry, Lycium carolinianum, greasewood, Cestrum diurnum, climbing hydrangea, German tamarisk, minnie bush, bush bean, butcher's broom, George W. Bush, scrub, bridal-wreath, crape jasmine, governor plum, Euonymus americanus, fothergilla, hollygrape, castor bean plant, lavender, Benzoin odoriferum, currant bush, corkwood, Chile hazel, common flat pea, daisybush, calliandra, angel's trumpet, Christ's-thorn, George Bush, Apalachicola rosemary, Georgia bark, Bauhinia monandra, Datura sanguinea, fool's huckleberry, black greasewood, camellia, Hercules'-club, frangipani



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