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Champ   Listen
verb
Champ  v. i.  To bite or chew impatiently. "They began... irefully to champ upon the bit."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Champ" Quotes from Famous Books



... north of the department of Ille-et-Vilaine, not far from the sea-coast. Near it, in a field called the Champ Dolent ('Field of Woe'), stands a gigantic menhir, about thirty feet high and said to measure fifteen more underground. It is composed of grey granite, and is surmounted by a cross. The early Christian ...
— Legends & Romances of Brittany • Lewis Spence

... I hardly can amend. O, how I champ my tongue to talk these terms! I do forget ofttimes my friar's part; But pull me by the sleeve when I exceed, And you shall see me ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... dinner, he suggested the "Italiens," or the "Bouffes," it was always precisely that theatre that she had been thinking of all the morning. She was in the seventh heaven when he won a hurdle-race in the Champ de Mars. ...
— Guy Livingstone; - or, 'Thorough' • George A. Lawrence

... on a bamboo hurries past, jostling a group of young Creole exquisites smoking their cheroots at a corner, and talking of last night's Norma, or the programme of the evening's performance at the Hippodrome in the Champ de Mars. His eye next catches a couple of sailors reeling out of a grogshop, to the amusement of a group of laughing negresses, in white muslin dresses of the latest Parisian fashion, contrasting strongly with a modestly attired Cingalese woman, and an Indian ...
— Thomas Henry Huxley; A Sketch Of His Life And Work • P. Chalmers Mitchell

... lonely place called Champ-Landry, these criminals, obeying the impulse which leads all malefactors into the blunders and miscalculations of crime, threw their guns into a wheat-field. This action, done by all of them, is a proof of their mutual understanding. Struck with terror at ...
— The Brotherhood of Consolation • Honore de Balzac

... different barracks in Rouen: the first is situated near the quai aux Meules at Saint-Sever, and contains about one thousand men. The second on the Champ-de-Mars, and contains about seven hundred and fifty men. The third is the caserne Bonne-Nouvelle, situated in the suburb of Saint-Sever. Most people pass the ancient priory of Bonne-Nouvelle (so named by Queen Matilda, on receiving the news of the victory of Hastings), and see only a barrack. ...
— Rouen, It's History and Monuments - A Guide to Strangers • Theodore Licquet

... que je vous prie de cachete, et d'y mettre son adress, et de l'envoier sur Le Champ a Madame de Labruiere. Il est inutile d'hors en avant que vous communiquier aucune Chose de ce qui regard Mlle. Chevalier [himself], a Md. la Tante [Talmond] jusqu'a ce que Elle pense otrement, car, il n'est que trop cler ques es procedes ...
— Pickle the Spy • Andrew Lang

... CHAMP-DE-MARS, a large space, of ground in Paris, between the front of the Ecole Militaire and the left bank of the Seine; the site of recent Expositions, and the scene of the ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... however, heartbroken and disgusted with a civilization which had failed to redeem its promises, proved but poor material for laying the foundations for a future nation. It was as with the Darien Company organized by William Paterson when Scotland was sorely distressed, and the Champ d'Asile, by the remnant of Napoleon's grand army—a fine idea, but the men and the means were wanting to execute it. The colonies in Palestine fared no better than those in America. They were opposed by the Government ...
— The Haskalah Movement in Russia • Jacob S. Raisin

... in the stables high: These biddeth he for Teucrian men be led forth presently, Wing-footed purple-bearing beasts, with pictures o'er them flung Of woven stuff, and, on their breasts are golden collars hung: Gold-housed are they, and champ in teeth the yellow-golden chain But to AEneas, absent thence, a car and yoke-beasts twain 280 He sends: the seed of heaven are they, and breathing very fire, The blood of those that Circe stole when ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... acquainted with its forms, is known to have been tempered by a large infusion of popular influence. This is proved, as Mr. James observes, by the deposition of Chilperic—by the grand national assemblies of the Champ de Mars—and by other great historical facts. Now, the situation of Charlemagne, successor to a throne already firmly established, and in his own person a mighty amplifier of its glories, and a leader in ...
— Theological Essays and Other Papers v2 • Thomas de Quincey

... to have in the Champ de Mars a serious and useful exhibition, so it began by paying no sort of attention to the decorative and architectural side of its two pavilions, placed in the centre of the upper garden between the monumental ...
— The American Architect and Building News, Vol. 27, No. 733, January 11, 1890 • Various

... execution of this plan presented themselves. In the first instance, Henri de Campion being with his band in the Rue du Champ-Fleuri—one end of which joins the Rue Saint-Honore and the other approaches the Louvre—saw the Cardinal leave the Hotel de Cleves in his carriage with the Abbe de Bentivoglio, the nephew of the celebrated cardinal of that name, with a few ecclesiastics and ...
— Political Women (Vol. 1 of 2) • Sutherland Menzies

... et le corps fendus du Khoutoukhtou, le prit par la main et lui dit: "Fils d'illustre origine! Vois les suites inevitables de ton voeu; mais parce que tu l'avais fait pour l'illustration de tous les Bouddhas, tu as ete gueri sur-le-champ. Ne sois donc plus triste, car quoique ta tete se soit fendue en dix pieces, chacune aura, par ma benediction, une face particuliere, et au-dessus d'elles sera place mon propre visage rayonnant. Cet onzieme visage de L'INFINIMENT RESPLENDISSANT, ...
— Diary of a Pedestrian in Cashmere and Thibet • by William Henry Knight

... of the Champ du Mai orders for a general illumination were given, and that the tricolour flag should be displayed from the windows. The greater number of the inhabitants paid no attention to the desires of the authorities, and the officers ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... revoir, Partes, separes vous de la triste Aricie, Mais du moins en partaut assures votre vie. Defendes votre honneur d' un reproche honteux, Et forces votre pere a revoquer ses vaeux; Il en est tems encore. Pourguoi, par quel caprice, Laisses vous le champ libre a votre accusatrice? ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume 5 (of 18) - Amboyna; The state of Innocence; Aureng-Zebe; All for Love • John Dryden

... asked the country to believe that Taft had ceased to be progressive and had become the ally of the stand-pat interests. The split in the Republican party enabled the Democrats to carry the country in 1910, and to obtain a large majority in the House of Representatives. Champ Clark, of Missouri, and Oscar Underwood, of Alabama, both aspirants for the Democratic presidential nomination, became, respectively, Speaker and chairman of the Committee on Ways and Means in the ...
— The New Nation • Frederic L. Paxson

... they themselves have sanctioned against others. Only three or four times do the majority, when the insurrection becomes too daring—after the murder of the baker Francois, the insurrection of the Swiss Guard at Nancy, and the outbreak of the Champ de Mars—feel that they themselves are menaced, vote for and apply martial law, and repel force with force. But, in general, when the despotism of the people is exercised only against the royalist minority, they allow their adversaries ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 2 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 1 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... strength from reflection, and on reaching Paris I proceeded straight to the Champ de Mars. The spectacle that there met my eyes was of a nature to encourage my inclination to embrace a military career, even in the humble capacity of a private trooper. It was a cavalry field-day, and a number ...
— Tales from Blackwood, Volume 7 • Various

... leave her name upon her soldiers' lips, a watchword and a rallying-cry for evermore. To be for ever a beloved tradition in the army of her country, to have her name remembered in the roll-call as "Mort sur le champ d'honneur;" to be once shrined in the love and honour of France, Cigarette—full of the boundless joys of life that knew no weakness and no pain, strong as the young goat, happy as the young lamb, careless as the young flower tossing on the summer breeze—Cigarette would have died ...
— Wisdom, Wit, and Pathos of Ouida - Selected from the Works of Ouida • Ouida

... dog, Bonaparte, but me," said Carpenter after a while—"he's to dogs what his namesake was to man. He's the champ'un fighter of the Tennessee Valley, an' the only cross-eyed purp in the worl', as I have often said. Like all gen'uses of course, he's a leetle peculiar—but him and me—we ...
— The Bishop of Cottontown - A Story of the Southern Cotton Mills • John Trotwood Moore

... miles around and there were no vacant seats. Even the aisles were filled with chairs when the Rev. Obadiah Champ rose and bawled aloud in rolling paragraphs about "Hopeless, helpless, hell-damned sinners all. Come, come to-day. Come now and be saved." A wave of religious hysteria spread over the packed-in human beings. A wave that to those ...
— The Preacher of Cedar Mountain - A Tale of the Open Country • Ernest Thompson Seton

... of aspirants for the presidential nomination. J.B. ("Champ") Clark, Speaker of the House of Representatives, Governor Judson Harmon, of Ohio, O.W. Underwood, Chairman of the House Committee on Ways and Means, and Governor Woodrow Wilson, of New Jersey, all had earnest supporters. In contests ...
— The United States Since The Civil War • Charles Ramsdell Lingley

... what to make of it all. But while he was towing his two carriages behind his tricycle towards the Champ-de-Mars, from which point he would at last be able to contemplate the Eiffel Tower, he had fallen in with the editor of the Auto, to whom, in exchange for a bottle of wine at the next cafe, he had ingenuously confided his story. A sensational article ...
— Fantomas • Pierre Souvestre

... a head start, Champ," remarked one of the men, with a grin. "Pass everything down this way, you amateurs. There's a professional here wants to show us some ...
— The Radio Boys Trailing a Voice - or, Solving a Wireless Mystery • Allen Chapman

... March 14, 1914, resulted in a majority but not the required two-thirds, and it was a majority of Republicans. The history of the struggle for this amendment for the next six years, through Democratic and Republican administrations, will be found in Chapter XX. Speaker Champ Clark was a steadfast friend. In 1914 William Jennings Bryan declared for it and thenceforth spoke for it many times. In 1915 President Woodrow Wilson announced his conversion to woman suffrage and in 1918 to the Federal Amendment ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V • Ida Husted Harper

... States was surrounded by guards, and the citizens refused admission. Paris was also encompassed by various bodies of the army ready to besiege or blockade it, as the occasion might require; when the court, having established troops at Versailles, Sevres, the Champ de Mars, and St. Denis, thought it able to execute its project. It began on July 11, by the banishment of Necker, who received while at dinner a note from the king enjoining him to leave ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol XII. - Modern History • Arthur Mee

... all resembling this, and the loud hurricane bursts of Mrs. Byron, the collision, it may be supposed, was not a little formidable; and the age at which the young poet was now arrived; when—as most parents feel—the impatience of youth begins to champ the bit, would but render the occasions for such shocks more frequent. It is told, as a curious proof of their opinion of each other's violence, that, after parting one evening in a tempest of this kind, they ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. I. (of VI.) - With his Letters and Journals. • Thomas Moore

... object of interest at Vire is the old clock-tower of the thirteenth century, over the Rue de Calvados, with its high gateway, formerly called 'the gate of the Champ de Vire.' Over this gateway (which we cannot see from the position where we have sketched the belfry) there is a statue of the Virgin, with the inscription, 'Marie protege la ville.' This tower has been altered and repaired ...
— Normandy Picturesque • Henry Blackburn

... storm, scouring the mountainside, sweeps down into the valley. From all the surrounding plateaus, down every slope, up every narrow gorge, by the Floing road, by Pierremont, by the cemetery, by the Champ de Mars, as well as through the Fond de Givonne, the same sorry rabble was streaming cityward in panic haste, and every instant brought fresh accessions to its numbers. And who could reproach those wretched men, who, for twelve long, mortal hours, had ...
— The Downfall • Emile Zola

... youse could do it, kid!" he screamed. "You're as good as made now, an' you're de next champ, or ...
— The Mucker • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... Toutefois, la peur ne venait chez lui qu'en seconde ligne; il etait surtout scandalise de ce bruit qui lui faisait mal aux oreilles. L'escorte prit le galop; on traversait une grande piece de terre labouree, situee au dela du canal, et ce champ etait jonche ...
— Books and Characters - French and English • Lytton Strachey

... particulieres," we read in the Gazette musicals, "ont suivi jusqu'au cimetiere de l'Est, dit du Pere-Lachaise, le pompeux corbillard qui portait le corps du defunt. L'elite des artistes de Paris lui a servi de cortege. Plusieurs dames, ses eleves, en grand deuil, ont suivi le convoi, a pied, jusqu'au champ de repos, ou l'artiste eminent, convaincu, a eu pour oraisons funebres des regrets muets, profondement sentis, qui valent mieux que des discours dans lesquels perce toujours une ...
— Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician - Volume 1-2, Complete • Frederick Niecks

... men who stood in his way. Lafayette was too strong for him. On the first anniversary of the Bastille he received an ovation. Forty thousand National Guards assembled from all parts of France for the feast of Federation. At an altar erected in the Champ de Mars, Talleyrand celebrated his last Mass, and France sanctioned the doings of Paris. The king was present, but all the demonstration was for the hero of two hemispheres, on his white charger. In November a new Ministry took office, composed of his partisans. Mirabeau attempted a coalition, ...
— Lectures on the French Revolution • John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

... nourri dans la Satire, N'ofe encor manier la Trompette & la Lyre, Vous me verrez pourtant, dans ce champ glorieux, Vous animez du moins de la voix & des yeux; Vous offrir ces lecons, que ma Muse au Parnasse, Rapporta, jeune ...
— The Art Of Poetry An Epistle To The Pisos - Q. Horatii Flacci Epistola Ad Pisones, De Arte Poetica. • Horace

... his conversational pearls upon a single string, and that he was, in fact, presenting himself to his latest audience with a discourse which was already finished and polished at Adunguen. He gave me a description of the scene of Dreyfus's public degradation on the Champ de Mars which was like a chapter of Carlyle's French Revolution at first hand. It was crammed with detail and so intensely dramatic that it made the scene live over again. I asked him at last in surprise: "But surely you were not there?" "No," he ...
— Recollections • David Christie Murray

... in sympathy and understanding. He had faced a hostile Quebec, and was to face it again, in defence of the rights of the English-speaking {83} provinces. Now he faced a hostile Ontario, and told Toronto exactly what he told Montreal. In the great meeting of protest which was held in the Champ de Mars in Montreal on the Sunday after Riel's execution, Mr Laurier took a leading part, and a year later he spoke before a great audience in Toronto and pressed home the case against the Government—that ...
— The Day of Sir Wilfrid Laurier - A Chronicle of Our Own Time • Oscar D. Skelton

... provided an everlasting amount of apparatus for me to carry on my "professional duties," and that unknowingly. My mother was a heald knitter, and there was always plenty of band throwing about. One night's "tolling" I remember with particular liveliness. I thought what a "champ" thing it would be to have a "lark" with "Jim o' Old Jack's"—an eccentric old man who lived by himself in an old thatched dwelling in our locality. I had no sooner turned the thought over in my mind than I resolved to "have a go" at the old chap. Poor old Jim went out to his work during the ...
— Adventures and Recollections • Bill o'th' Hoylus End

... straight and sometimes curled, and not unfrequently tied up behind; but we saw no instance of a negro, or woolly, head among them. They wear the beard upon the chin, but not upon the upper lip, and allow it to grow to such a length as enables them to champ and chew it when excited by rage; an action which they accompany with spitting it out against the object of their indignation or contempt. They have very overhanging brows, and retreating foreheads, large noses, full lips, and wide mouths: in some cases they ...
— Discoveries in Australia, Volume 1. • J Lort Stokes

... would 'twere day, that thou, sweet love, mightst see The fervid passion stamp'd upon my brow. I dared not disobey thy late command; Yet, did I fret, and champ the bit of duty, Like some proud battle steed arching his neck, Spurning the earth, impatient for the fray. So my young heart throbs with its new delight, That it e'en now would burst its cords asunder, And make one joyous bound ...
— Olla Podrida • Frederick Marryat

... the Election of 1912.—With the Republicans divided, victory loomed up before the Democrats. Naturally, a terrific contest over the nomination occurred at their convention in Baltimore. Champ Clark, Speaker of the House of Representatives, and Governor Woodrow Wilson, of New Jersey, were the chief contestants. After tossing to and fro for seven long, hot days, and taking forty-six ballots, ...
— History of the United States • Charles A. Beard and Mary R. Beard

... masses of hostile armies on the frontiers. The approach of a crisis became evident on the 14th of July, when a fete was held in commemoration of the destruction of the Bastille. On that day the king with the queen and dauphin went to the Champ de Mars, and it was with difficulty that the soldiers saved them from the rage of the rabble. The fermentation of the public mind received a fearful acceleration, when it was discovered that the Prussians and Austrians were advancing ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... flow'ry field. 'War, war is threaten'd from this foreign ground,' My father cried, 'where warlike steeds are found. Yet, since reclaim'd to chariots they submit, And bend to stubborn yokes, and champ the bit, Peace may succeed to war.' Our way we bend To Pallas, and the sacred hill ascend; There prostrate to the fierce virago pray, Whose temple was the landmark of our way. Each with a Phrygian mantle veil'd his head, And ...
— The Aeneid • Virgil

... conversations!"—"Dimanche, 23 Ao'ut. Enfin, enfin, il n'y a plus de mer qui nous s'epare; j'ai l'esperance de vous voir d'ees aujoqrd'hui. J'ai pri'e hier Madame Simonetti d'envoyer chez moi au moment de votre arriv'ee; si vous voulez venir chez MOi, comme j'esp'ere, vous aurez sur le champ mon carrosse. Je me flatte que demain vous dinerez et souperez avec moi t'ete-'a-t'ete; nous en aurons bien 'a dire. Sans cette maudite compagnie que j'ai si sottement rassembl'ee, vous m'auriez trouv'ee chez vous 'a la d'escente de votre chaise; cela vous auroit fort ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole Volume 3 • Horace Walpole

... yes, certainly,' says I. 'Get out of this, you inquisitive little imp of darkness, and tell Reynolds to tie the colt up to the pillar-reins, and let him champ the bit till I come down; that's the way to bring him to a mouth;' and, hastening Shrimp's departure by throwing the slippers at his head, I continued, 'Now, sir, I'm your man; what's ...
— Frank Fairlegh - Scenes From The Life Of A Private Pupil • Frank E. Smedley

... o' money in d' fightin' game, an' I'm fightin' all for Hermy. If ever I get a champ, I'll have money to burn, an' then she'll never be shy on d' dollar question no more, you bet! There'll be no more needlework or Mulligan's for Hermy; it'll be a farm in d' country wid roses climbin' around, an' chickens, an'—an' automobiles, an' servants to come ...
— The Definite Object - A Romance of New York • Jeffery Farnol

... the order, so I tell you without waiting. I saw a few pale faces—but it was only for a moment. A group of them stood in front of me in the library. I had just received from the front, by post, the silk parachute of a fusee volante, on which was written: "A Miss Mildred Aldrich Ramasse sur le champ de bataille a 20 metres des lignes Boches. Souvenir de la patrouille de Fevrier 22, 1917," and the signature of the Aspirant, and that was the only way I knew he had probably been ...
— On the Edge of the War Zone - From the Battle of the Marne to the Entrance of the Stars and Stripes • Mildred Aldrich

... understand. Presently I looked back and saw I was being followed again. To make sure, I ran—and the spy ran after me. I twisted and doubled all through this quarter, and at last succeeded in shaking him off. Then I turned down this street, hoping to pick up a cab in the Champ-Elysees. Of a sudden I see Dupont. He is crossing the street toward this house. He does not know me, but quickens his pace, and hastily lets himself in at the service entrance.... Incidentally, if I were you, Liane, I would give my staff of servants a bad quarter of an hour in the morning. The ...
— Alias The Lone Wolf • Louis Joseph Vance

... in spite of himself, and thought of nothing but ostentation, and of being noticed. He continually touched his horse with his spurs, and worried it, so as to make it appear restive, and to prance and rear, to champ its bit, and to cover it with foam, and then he would continue his inspection, galloping from regiment to regiment with a satisfied smile, while the good old infantry captains, sitting on their thin Arab horses, with their toes well stuck out, said ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume IV (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... demonstrated the action of the scene to Saint-Prosper, and the soldier became collaborator, "abandoning, as it were," wrote the manager in his autobiographical date-book and diary, "the sword for the pen, and the glow of the Champ de Mars for the glimmer of a kerosene lamp." And yet not with the inclination of Burgoyne, or other military gentlemen who have courted the buskin and sock! On the contrary, so foreign was the occupation to his leaning, that often a whimsical light ...
— The Strollers • Frederic S. Isham

... substantially enriched the field of literature in every department, and given our city permanent fame as a place of letters. As we begin our survey of the local field, the wonder grows that the literary production is so large, and that the character of much of it is so very high. Let Pegasus champ his golden bit as he may, and beat his hoof upon the empty air, Pittsburgh men and Pittsburgh women have ridden the classic steed with grace and skill through all the flowered deviations of his bridal paths. This ...
— A Short History of Pittsburgh • Samuel Harden Church

... retribution! Gaul may champ the bit And foam in fetters;—but is Earth more free?[289] Did nations combat to make One submit? Or league to teach all Kings true Sovereignty?[he] What! shall reviving Thraldom again be The patched-up Idol of enlightened days? Shall ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... is the celebrated painting representing "The Interview of Henry the Eighth with Francis the First," between Guisnes and Ardres, near Calais, in the year 1520, on an open plain, since denominated Le Champ de Drap d'or. "After the execution of Charles the First," says Britton, "the parliament appointed commissioners to dispose of his effects, and an agent from France began a treaty with them for ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. XVII. No. 473., Saturday, January 29, 1831 • Various

... going to the "Champ de Mai," and his enthusiasm redoubled. "Go!" cried he, "courage!" as he spoke to them of the Romans who fought for their country. I thought to myself as I listened to him, "If you think all that so beautiful why ...
— Waterloo - A sequel to The Conscript of 1813 • Emile Erckmann

... The Champ de Mars is in the west, the Rue du Faubourg St. Antoine (the old suburb of St. Antony) in the east, Montmartre in the north, and the dome of St. Genevieve, commonly called the Pantheon, ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Vol. III • William Wordsworth

... Pleasant, Miss Kate Gordon, and Miss Charlotte Rowe. On June 4, the Federal Amendment was reported favorably in the Senate. "Get suffrage out of the way" became the slogan, but neither side was ready to risk a vote. The Federal bill was passed to third reading. On June 8 former Speaker of Congress Champ Clark addressed the General Assembly and urged its ratification as an act of justice to women and a great benefit to Louisiana and the Democratic party. The next day the vote on ratification was indefinitely postponed by a vote of 22 ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume VI • Various

... didn't know. Oh, things have been going well with me lately. Those two studies over there simply did themselves. That camp scene on the left is almost a picture. I think I'll put a little more work on it and give it a chance in Paris. I got in once, you know. Champ de Mars. ...
— The Pool in the Desert • Sara Jeannette Duncan

... hot air, and a modification by Charles, inflated with hydrogen gas. The mass of the French people did not regard these balloons with Franklin's serenity. Some weeks earlier the danger of attack had necessitated a balloon's removal from the place of its first moorings to the Champ de Mars at dead of night. Preceded by flaming torches, with soldiers marching on either side and guards in front and rear, the great ball was borne through the darkened streets. The midnight cabby along the route stopped his nag, or tumbled from sleep on his box, to kneel on the pavement ...
— The Age of Invention - A Chronicle of Mechanical Conquest, Book, 37 in The - Chronicles of America Series • Holland Thompson

... express car, he had walked some fifteen miles to the Missouri River, near St. Charles, and had then gone north on a train through Pike County. I had more than once made the same trip on freight trains; and I had a liking for the county as the home district of Champ Clark, a politico-newspaper comrade of several legislative sessions and conventions. Newspaper experience in those days, before the "flimsy" and the "rewrite," emphasized the value of going to the place in order to report the occurrence; and ...
— Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911: In Mizzoura • Augustus Thomas

... on it! have its debt! Thunder on the Hill accurst, Golgotha, be ye! and sweat Blood, and thirst the Passion's thirst. Red of heat and white of heat, Champ it like fierce teeth ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... was now appearing, and the spring is delightful in Paris, and the promenades in the Champs Elysees, and in the Bois de Boulogne, and the promenade in Long-Champ, commenced. Riding was just coming into high fashion with the French ladies; and, instead of riding in men's clothes, and like a man, it was now the ambition de monter a cheval a l'Angloise: to ride on a side-saddle and in an English riding habit was now the ambition. Now Dora, ...
— Tales & Novels, Vol. IX - [Contents: Harrington; Thoughts on Bores; Ormond] • Maria Edgeworth

... since the Cimmerians of the Euxine came in upon their western kinsmen, the sons of the giant Galates; since the sisters, Gaul and Britain, cut the mistletoe in their forests, and saw the coming of Caesar! Blanc, rouge, rocher champ, eglise, seigneur,—these words, by which the Gallo-Roman Celt now names white, and red, and rock, and field, and church, and lord, are no part of the speech of his true ancestors, they are words he has learnt; ...
— Celtic Literature • Matthew Arnold

... Barry's Junction is about f'r to revive th oratorical thraditions iv th' sinit an' th' fire department comes up f'r a week, an' wets down th' capitol buildin'. Th' speech comes off, they ain't a dhry eye in th' House, an' th' pa-apers say: 'Where's ye'er Dan'l Webster an' ye'er Champ Clark, now?' An' th' young man goes away an' has his pitchers took on a kinetoscope. He has a nice time while it lasts, Hinnissy, but it don't las' long. It don't las' long. Th' la-ad has th' wind, but it's endurance ...
— Mr. Dooley's Philosophy • Finley Peter Dunne

... was an evident relief to the ponies, and after a few minutes they began to champ ...
— Comrades of the Saddle - The Young Rough Riders of the Plains • Frank V. Webster

... out in France. The rights of man had been proclaimed on the Champ de Mars. All Europe was uneasy and alarmed, and nowhere offered a propitious field for peaceful labor. But Gallatin did not long need other distraction than he was to find ...
— Albert Gallatin - American Statesmen Series, Vol. XIII • John Austin Stevens

... to the mill. The mystical Om-Om-Om of the dynamos in the electric-light plant behind the mill was louder in the darkness. Outside sat the night watchman, Champ Perry. He held up his stringy hands and squeaked, "We've ...
— Main Street • Sinclair Lewis

... then a lamb, or fowl; but how much less have they taken than enough to pay them for the good they did. How few of us would do the same good to them for the same small reward. We are impatient of griefs and vexations. We chafe, and foam, and champ the bit that curbs in our passions, and reins us around the wisest way. We think it hard that wolves should sometimes bring us a disguised blessing. We find it difficult to discover the good design of apparent ill. But at last we shall see how ...
— Summerfield - or, Life on a Farm • Day Kellogg Lee

... Thursday, the 30th September, had to attend a review on the Champ-de-Mars. The morning of this day, the readers of all the journals found in them a decree abolishing the censorship and restoring liberty of the press. The enthusiasm was immense. The Journal de Paris ...
— The Duchess of Berry and the Court of Charles X • Imbert De Saint-Amand

... about a hundred pieces. The retaking of this artillery was the matter in question. While they at Versailles were occupied with the solution of the problem, the National Guards continued their manifestations at the Place de la Bastille, dragging these pieces of artillery in triumph from the Champ de Mars to the Luxembourg, from the park of Montrouge to Notre Dame, from the Place des Vosges to the Place d'Italie, and from the Buttes Montmartre to ...
— Paris under the Commune • John Leighton

... You champ on spongy toadstools, hateful treat! Fearful of poisons in each bit you eat: He feasts secure on mushrooms, fine as those Which Claudius for his special eating chose, Till one more fine, provided by his wife, Finished at once his ...
— Post-Augustan Poetry - From Seneca to Juvenal • H.E. Butler

... pathless, snowbound journey. The balloon itself, at present, lay carefully packed in its berth, together with the car and the apparatus for making the necessary gas. It had been manufactured in France a month before, and while on exhibition for four days at the Champ de Mars, had been ...
— Chatterbox, 1905. • Various

... dwindle; and crumble down, or rush down, noisily or noiselessly disappearing. The blossom is so brief; as of some centennial Cactus-flower, which after a century of waiting shines out for hours! Thus from the day when rough Clovis, in the Champ de Mars, in sight of his whole army, had to cleave retributively the head of that rough Frank, with sudden battleaxe, and the fierce words, "It was thus thou clavest the vase" (St. Remi's and mine) "at Soissons," forward ...
— The French Revolution • Thomas Carlyle

... century consult the "Histoire de la Prostitution chez tous les Peuples du Monde," and "La Prance devenue Italienne," a treatise which generally follows"L'Histoire Amoureuse des Gaules" by Bussy, Comte de Rabutin.[FN422] The headquarters of male prostitution were then in the Champ Flory, i.e., Champ de Flore, the privileged rendezvous of low courtesans. In the xviiith century, "quand le Francais a tete folle," as Voltaire sings, invented the term "Peche philosophique," there was a temporary recrudescence; and, after the death of Pidauzet de Mairobert (March, ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 10 • Richard F. Burton

... and the wooded knolls were calling to him. A horse was between his legs—a good horse, he decided; one that sent him back to the cayuses he had ridden during his eastern Oregon boyhood. He had been somewhat of a rider in those early days, and the champ of bit and creak of saddle-leather ...
— Burning Daylight • Jack London

... hour later I was walking down the Champ Elysees sniffing at the secret violets in the air. I had forgotten Cousin Emily and the world was full of primroses and larks and light-hearted passers-by. Suddenly, at the other side of the street I saw a bursting sunshade of ...
— Balloons • Elizabeth Bibesco

... Louis. But as regards our own Revolution, they aren't quite sure whether it was started by the Boston Tea Party or Mrs. O'Leary's Cow. Languidly they inquire whether that quaint Iowa character, Uncle Champ Root, is still Speaker of the House? And so the present Vice-President is named Elihu Underwood? Or isn't he? Anyway, American politics is such a bore. But they stand ready, at a minute's notice, to furnish ...
— Europe Revised • Irvin S. Cobb

... To these must be added Kemp, a champion, a very early loan-word connected with Lat. campus, field, and Wright, originally the worker, Anglo-Sax. wyrht-a. Camp is sometimes for Kemp, but is also from the Picard form of Fr, champ, i.e. Field. Of similar formation to Webb, etc., is Clapp, from an ...
— The Romance of Names • Ernest Weekley

... watch him, with his Christmas sled; He hitches on behind A passing sleigh, with glad hooray, And whistles down the wind; He hears the horses champ their bits, And bells that jingle-jingle— You Woolly Cap! you Scarlet Mitts! You ...
— Nye and Riley's Wit and Humor (Poems and Yarns) • Bill Nye

... consequence, Palacio, his official residence was beset with soldier-guards, officers in gorgeous uniforms loitering about the gates, or going out and in, and in the Plaza Grande at all times exhibiting the spectacle of a veritable Champ de Mars. No one passing through the Mexican metropolis at this period would have supposed it the chief city of ...
— The Free Lances - A Romance of the Mexican Valley • Mayne Reid

... marching, or ready to march." The powers, of course, were acting strictly within the terms of their expressed declaration to make "neither peace nor truce with Bonaparte." The emperor's practical reply to this declaration was made in the Champ de Mars on the 1st of June. Descending from his throne, he distributed the imperial eagles to the troops of the line and the national guards as they marched past, and swore to defend them at the hazard of their lives, and to suffer no ...
— English Caricaturists and Graphic Humourists of the Nineteenth Century. - How they Illustrated and Interpreted their Times. • Graham Everitt

... monuments are endowed by the credulous with life. The menhir du Champ Dolent sinks an inch every hundred years. Others say that a piece of it is eaten by the moon each night, and that when it is completely devoured the Last Judgment will take place. The stones of Carnac bathe in the sea once a year, and many of those of the Perigord ...
— Rough Stone Monuments and Their Builders • T. Eric Peet

... yours. I was loitering along the Champ de Mars, when who should step up but Doctor Frank. Wasn't I astonished! I asked what brought him there, and he told me he found St. Croix so slow he couldn't stand it any longer. ...
— Kate Danton, or, Captain Danton's Daughters - A Novel • May Agnes Fleming

... me, riddle me right, Where was I last Sat'rday night? I seed a chimp-champ champin' at his bridle, I seed an ould fox workin' hissel' idle. The trees did shever, an' I did shake, To see what a ...
— The Astonishing History of Troy Town • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... with this affair. The Verite demonstrates that the explosion could not have been the result of intention, but was solely attributable to accident. The same paper states that no shell fell in the Champ de Mars at the ...
— The Insurrection in Paris • An Englishman: Davy

... of the days of chivalry and the knights of the olden time. I should cry out in thunder tones, "Ho! within! Unbar the door!" The colt would kick up his heels with joy at sight of the grass in the yard, while the black would champ his bit with impatience to get into a comfortable stall once more. Altogether the sight would be worth seeing; but it will not ...
— The Citizen-Soldier - or, Memoirs of a Volunteer • John Beatty

... obeys him. The movements of the one are hindered by the burden on his shoulder; of the other, by the bridle on his lips: there is no way by which the burden may be lightened; but we need not suffer from the bridle if we do not champ at it. To yield reverence to another, to hold ourselves and our lives at his disposal, is not slavery; often, it is the noblest state in which a man can live in this world. There is, indeed, a reverence which is servile, that is to say, irrational ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume II (of 3) • John Ruskin

... the National Assembly. Barnave's great Speech. Irresistible Advance of the Revolution. The Press. Camille Desmoulins. Marat. Brissot. Clamours for a Republic. Desmoulin's Attack on La Fayette. Petitions of the People. Robespierre's Popularity. Popular Meeting in the Champ de Mars. Absence of the Ringleaders. "The Altar of the Country." The Remarkable Signatures. Advance of the National Guard, preceded by the Red Flag. Fearful Massacre. The Day after. The Jacobins take Courage. ...
— History of the Girondists, Volume I - Personal Memoirs of the Patriots of the French Revolution • Alphonse de Lamartine

... horses are trained for this purpose. They are trained on purpose for out-door sparking. It is not an uncommon thing to see a young fellow drive up to the house where his girl lives with a team that is just tearing things. They prance, and champ the bit, and the young man seems to pull on them as though his liver was coming out. The horses will hardly stand still long enough for the girl to get in, and then they start off and seem to split the air wide open, and the neighbors say, "Them children will get all smashed ...
— Peck's Compendium of Fun • George W. Peck

... spears crossing, and hurtling of wheels that roar. As the grinding of teeth in the jaws of a lion that foam as they gnash Is the shriek of the axles that loosen, the shock of the poles that crash. 1350 The dense manes darken and glitter, the mouths of the mad steeds champ, Their heads flash blind through the battle, and death's foot rings in their tramp. For a fourfold host upon earth and in heaven is arrayed for the fight, Clouds ruining in thunder and armies encountering as clouds in the ...
— Erechtheus - A Tragedy (New Edition) • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... to play any of your ol' games." Now when Marmaduke acted that way there must have been something the matter. Perhaps he had gobbled down his oatmeal too fast—in great big gulps—when he should have let the Thirty White Horses "champ, champ, champ," all those oats. They were cooked oats, but then the Thirty White Horses, unlike Teddy and Hal and ole Methusaleh, prefer ...
— Half-Past Seven Stories • Robert Gordon Anderson

... deal in her rattling voice but it was invariably of personalities: the rumor that Raymie Wutherspoon was going to send for a pair of patent leather shoes with gray buttoned tops; the rheumatism of Champ Perry; the state of Guy Pollock's grippe; and the dementia of Jim Howland in painting his ...
— Main Street • Sinclair Lewis

... rose and remained suspended at a height of 100 feet, in which state it was conveyed with acclamation to the Place des Victoires, where it rested and underwent some repairs. At midnight it was conveyed in solemn procession by torchlight, and guarded by a detachment of horse, to the Champ de Mars, where, on the following day, the whole world of Paris turned out to witness another ascent. The balloon went up to the sound of cannon, and in two minutes reached a height of 3000 feet, when it was lost for a time in a dark cloud, but speedily reappeared ...
— Up in the Clouds - Balloon Voyages • R.M. Ballantyne

... spotted fish belonging to the genus Chironectes . . . Mr. Champ writes thus respecting the frog fish:— 'It was found in the sea at Port Arthur by a person who was with me, and when caught had all the appearance of having four legs, from the position and shape of the fins; the two longest of which, from the sort of elbow in them, ...
— A Dictionary of Austral English • Edward Morris

... from the giddy height, we make our way across the Champ de Mars to the Hotel des Invalides. Formerly several thousand pensioners from the great French armies found a refuge in this huge building, but now it is used as a ...
— From Pole to Pole - A Book for Young People • Sven Anders Hedin

... of the prestige of Champ Clark, who was making political speeches in the same region. At one station a brass-band and a great gathering were waiting for Mr. Clark's train just as our train drew in; so the local suffragists ...
— The Story of a Pioneer - With The Collaboration Of Elizabeth Jordan • Anna Howard Shaw

... All see their fate in one dread moment come. No coward flees, no warrior bravely strides To meet the battle: nay, the trumpet call Stirs not the charger with resounding hoof To spurn the rock, nor galling bit compels To champ in eagerness; nor toss his mane And prick the ear, nor prancing with his feet To claim his share of combat. Tired, the neck Droops downwards: smoking sweat bedews the limbs: Dry from the squalid mouth protrudes the tongue, Hoarse, raucous panting issues from their chests; Their ...
— Pharsalia; Dramatic Episodes of the Civil Wars • Lucan

... and Berlaymont were present, Margaret narrated her fruitless attempts to persuade the seigniors into obedience to the royal orders lately transmitted, and asked their opinions. The extraordinary advice was then given, that "she should let them champ the bit a little while longer, and afterwards see what was to be done." Even at the last moment, the Cardinal, reluctant to acknowledge himself beaten, although secretly desirous to retire, was inclined for a parting struggle. The Duchess, however, being now armed with the King's express commands, ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... qui regissent ses actes, et surtout, parmi ces lois, celles qui sont relatives a notre etre physique; p. 60. Exposition des sources ou l'homme a puise les connaissances qu'il possede et dans lesquelles il pourra en recueillir quantite d'autres; sources dont l'ensemble constitue pour lui le champ des ...
— Lamarck, the Founder of Evolution - His Life and Work • Alpheus Spring Packard

... remarques a perfectionner les distributions; faire sortir enfin de cette fecondation mutuelle des deux sciences, l'une par l'autre, un systeme zoologique propre a servir d'introducteur et de guide dans le champ de l'anatomie, et un corps de doctrine anatomique propre a servir de developpement ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 09, No. 51, January, 1862 • Various

... are the oaks whose acorns Drop in dark Auser's[9] rill; Fat are the stags that champ the boughs Of the Ciminian hill;[10] 45 Beyond all streams Clitumnus[11] Is to the herdsman dear; Best of all pools the fowler loves ...
— Narrative and Lyric Poems (first series) for use in the Lower School • O. J. Stevenson

... with a strong and emphatic voice, produced the most lively sensation. A cry of "Long live the Emperor!" resounded in an instant throughout the immense space of the Champ de Mars, and was repeated from one to another in ...
— Memoirs of the Private Life, Return, and Reign of Napoleon in 1815, Vol. II • Pierre Antoine Edouard Fleury de Chaboulon

... got a gasp for lunch I mushed it for the Car-Barns just to lamp And see the Creamy Charlies do the vamp And swing their Fancy Floras in the crunch. I piped my Pansy in among the bunch And asked her would she mix it with the Champ, Wouldn't she like to join me in a stamp? She saw me first and stopped me ...
— The Love Sonnets of a Car Conductor • Wallace Irwin

... infantry. The main column marched from the Arc-de-Triomphe toward the middle of the afternoon. In its composition it represented United Germany—Saxons, Bavarians, and the Royal Guard of Prussia—and, to the strains of martial music, moving down the Champ Elysees to the Place de la Concorde, was distributed thence over certain sections of the city agreed upon beforehand. Nothing that could be called a disturbance took place during the march; and though there was a hiss now and then and murmurings of discontent, yet the most ...
— The Memoirs of General P. H. Sheridan, Complete • General Philip Henry Sheridan

... making eleven where women voted on the same terms as men. In 1913 Illinois granted a large amount of suffrage including a vote for Presidential electors. In 1915 President Wilson and all his Cabinet, except Secretary Lansing; Speaker Champ Clark and Mr. Bryan publicly endorsed suffrage for women. Constitutional amendments were defeated in four eastern States but they polled 1,234,470 ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V • Ida Husted Harper

... morions, with their plumy pride. Knights, with a long retinue of their squires, In gaudy liveries march, and quaint attires. One laced the helm, another held the lance: A third the shining buckler did advance. The courser paw'd the ground with restless feet, And snorting foam'd, and champ'd the golden bit. The smiths and armourers on palfreys ride, Files in their hands, and hammers at their side, 460 And nails for loosen'd spears, and thongs for shields provide. The yeomen guard the streets, in seemly bands; And clowns come crowding ...
— The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Vol II - With Life, Critical Dissertation, and Explanatory Notes • John Dryden

... not large, but promising more comfort for winter residence than if they were larger. The situation is on a wide avenue and central for many purposes; close to the Champs Elysees, near also to the Bois de Boulogne, and within a few minutes walk of the Champ de Mars, so that we shall be most eligibly situated to visit the great Exposition when it ...
— Samuel F. B. Morse, His Letters and Journals - In Two Volumes, Volume II • Samuel F. B. Morse

... de Seny a celui d'Ellemelle (Candroz); C) le fais du diable, bloc de gres d'environ 800 metres cubes, isole dans la bruyere entre Wanne et Grand-Halleux pres de Stavelot; D) les murs du diable a Pepinster, &c.—Dans plusieurs cantons, il y a un terrain que l'on appele tchan de makral, "champ des sorciers". C'est le cas pres de Remouchamps, pres de Tongres, pres de la Gileppe et ...
— The Witch-cult in Western Europe - A Study in Anthropology • Margaret Alice Murray

... of a Lieutenant of the King's Hunt, widow of a Procureur and, for twenty years, the faithful mistress of the financier Brotteaux des Ilettes, had fallen in with the new ideas. She was to be seen, in July, 1790, digging the soil of the Champ de Mars. Her strong inclination to side with the powers that be had carried her readily enough along a political path that started with the Feuillants and led by way of the Girondins to end on the summit of the Mountain, while at the same time a spirit of compromise, ...
— The Gods are Athirst • Anatole France

... officer of the Legion of honor, and member of the Institute. There's not a more unhappy woman; her husband has taken her to live behind the Luxembourg, in the rue Duguay-Trouin, a street that is neither paved nor lighted. When he goes out, he doesn't know where he is going; he gets to the Champ de Mars when he wants to go to the Faubourg Poissoniere; he isn't even capable of giving his address to the driver of a street cab; and he is so absent-minded he couldn't tell if it were before dinner or after. You can imagine what sort of time a woman must have with a man whose nose ...
— The Lesser Bourgeoisie • Honore de Balzac

... so I had to wait at the Hotel Maurice for two or three days. I didn't mind much as I met such a lot of English friends, and also visited some interesting hospitals; but I knew by the thousands of wounded coming in that things must be busy at the front, and this made one champ one's bit. ...
— My War Experiences in Two Continents • Sarah Macnaughtan

... the iron bars Shot to the hearth with a pang and cry— And a lank howl plunged from the Champ de Mars To the ...
— War Poetry of the South • Various

... entire royal family, together with the Assembly, migrated to Paris the same day, escorted by the citizen soldiers and a turbulent mob both male and female. July 14, 1790, was memorable for the Oath of Federation, taken in the Champ de Mars, with imposing ceremonies, upon a platform of earth raised by the voluntary labors of all the citizens. Lafayette, as representative of the nation, and particularly of the militia, was the first to take the oath to be faithful to the law and the king and to support the constitution then under ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 6 of 8 • Various

... complete, is about 30,000; but the effective men at Paris did not exceed 20,000. These are made up from time to time, by picked men from the whole army. The charge of one of the regiments of cuirassiers, 1000 strong, upon the Champ de Mars, was one of the finest sights imaginable. The clattering of the horses feet on hard ground, and the rattling of the armour, increasing as they advanced, exceeded the sound of the ...
— Travels in France during the years 1814-1815 • Archibald Alison

... later, there was a great review on the Champ de Mars, and the waiters had leave of absence for the day. Only Germinie and old Joseph remained in the house. Joseph was at work sorting soiled linen in a small, dark room. He told Germinie to come and help him. She entered the room; she cried out, ...
— Germinie Lacerteux • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt

... sheep-walk, one found companies of National Guards learning the "goose-step" in the Champs Elysees and the Cours-la-Reine. Regulars were appropriately encamped both in the Avenue de la Grande Armee and on the Champ de Mars. Field-guns and caissons filled the Tuileries garden, whilst in the grounds of the Luxembourg Palace one again found cattle and sheep; yet other members of the bovine and ovine species being installed, singularly enough, almost cheek ...
— My Days of Adventure - The Fall of France, 1870-71 • Ernest Alfred Vizetelly

... out; for I'm a last year's champ; Into the old bone orchard am I blowing, So with the late lamented let me camp, My walkers to the graveyard daisies toeing, And shaking this too upish generation, Pass checks ...
— The Love Sonnets of a Hoodlum • Wallace Irwin

... for daily toil, To drag the ploughshare through the soil; To sweat in harness through the road; To groan beneath the carrier's load? How feeble are the two-legged kind! What force is in our nerves combined! Shall, then, our nobler jaws submit To foam and champ the galling bit? Shall haughty men my back bestride? Shall the sharp spur provoke my side? Forbid it, heavens! reject the rein, Your shame, your infamy disdain. Let him the Lion first control, And still the Tiger's famished growl! Let us, like them, our ...
— Favourite Fables in Prose and Verse • Various

... Champ Fleury, auquel est contenu l'Art et Science de la deue et vraye Proportion de Lettres Antiques et Romaines selon le Corps et visage Humain, avec figures. Par. 1529. Folio. "This uncommon book was sold at an auction, 1722, for 2l. ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... inquired, with aggravating pleasantness. "It ain't my fault you're starving, and you got all night to cook what YOU want—after I'm done. I don't care if you bake a layer cake and freeze ice-cream. You can put your front feet in the trough and champ your swill; you can root and waller in it, for all of ME. I won't hurry you, ...
— The Winds of Chance • Rex Beach

... desolation that surrounded me; or I exchanged a word with any passing acquaintance who ventured from Pera to his counting-house in Galata. A longer walk gave rise to too many sad reflections. Farther on was the Petit Champ des Morts, a small Turkish cemetery, here and there spotted with new-made graves, over which more than one aged female mourned the loss of her life's companion, or perhaps it would be one of fewer years, who wept the fatal destiny of her young husband, ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, June 1844 - Volume 23, Number 6 • Various

... Gaul may champ the bit, And foam in fetters, but is Earth more free? Did nations combat to make ONE submit; Or league to teach all kings true sovereignty? What! shall reviving thraldom again be The patched-up idol of enlightened days? Shall we, who struck ...
— Childe Harold's Pilgrimage • Lord Byron

... resuming its course, it passed by Saint-Sever, by the Quai des Curandiers, the Quai aux Meules, once more over the bridge, by the Place du Champ de Mars, and behind the hospital gardens, where old men in black coats were walking in the sun along the terrace all green with ivy. It went up the Boulevard Bouvreuil, along the Boulevard Cauchoise, then the whole of Mont-Riboudet to ...
— The Public vs. M. Gustave Flaubert • Various

... to the military in France, as Mr. Jorrocks found by all the hack, cab, and fiacre drivers pulling up and making way for him to pass, as the old crocodile-backed white horse slowly dragged its long length to the gateway of the Champ de Mars. Here the guard, both horse and foot, saluted him, which he politely acknowledged, under direction of the Countess, by raising his chapeau bras, and a subaltern was dispatched by the officer in command to conduct him to the place appointed ...
— Jorrocks' Jaunts and Jollities • Robert Smith Surtees



Words linked to "Champ" :   chomp, masticate, champion, rival, chew, record-holder, contender, title-holder, competitor, jaw, competition



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