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Drench   Listen
noun
Drench  n.  A drink; a draught; specifically, a potion of medicine poured or forced down the throat; also, a potion that causes purging. "A drench of wine." "Give my roan horse a drench."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Drench" Quotes from Famous Books



... compliment. Dusenberry was more sober, and stepped in to make a reconciliation; but before he had time to exert himself, the Dutchman running behind the counter, Dunn aimed another blow at him, which glanced from his arm and swept a tin drench, with a number of tumblers on it, into a smash upon the floor. This was the signal for a general melee, and it began in right earnest between the Dutch and the Irish,—for the Dutchman called the assistance of several kinsmen who were in the front store, and Dunn, with the assistance of Dusenberry, ...
— Manuel Pereira • F. C. Adams

... torrential surges,—where the crest You flung on leaping mountains that you drave Across your father's fields from East to West? Shine forth, O Moon! unveil thee, pallid queen! Heal me, as when my passion clomb to thine; Shed down thy lucent drench, thy light serene, Oh, lift me back to Life and Love—oh, shine! My salt hath lost its virtue in men's blood And o'er their hearts the marish vapour crawls; Now Death o'erwhelms me with his colder flood, And, prey to Time, my royal ...
— The Masque of the Elements • Herman Scheffauer

... and patriotic sentiment that "without a little bloodletting" the Union would not be "worth a rush."[131] With such unworthy levity did these leaders of sectional strife express their exultation in the prospect of the conflict, which was to drench the land with blood and enshroud ...
— The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government • Jefferson Davis

... if he is like to mend the same!" And so the lady, white to ghastliness, Manages somehow to display the page With left-hand only, while the right retains The other hand, the young man's,—dreaming-drunk He, with this drench of stupefying stuff, Eyes wide, mouth open,—half the idiot's stare And half the prophet's insight,—holding tight, All the same, by his one fact in the world— The lady's right-hand: he but seems to read— Does not, for certain; yet, how understand ...
— Browning's England - A Study in English Influences in Browning • Helen Archibald Clarke

... was there none. His fate was fixed. He was dried with a drench of turpentine, hastily clothed in a coat of copal, and here he yet was fully aware of all his misery, was being borne away upon the great board out of doors and handed to the gardener. For the master was a hasty and ardent man, and had been stung into impatience by the slaughter ...
— Bimbi • Louise de la Ramee

... country Christmasses, Their thirty pound butter'd eggs, their pies of carps' tongues: Their pheasants drench'd with ambergris; the carcases of three fat wethers bruised for gravy, to make ...
— Old Christmas From the Sketch Book of Washington Irving • Washington Irving

... be so Then so let it go, Let the giddy-brain'd times turn round; Since we have no king let the goblet be crown'd, Our monarchy thus will recover: While the pottles are weeping We'll drench our sad souls In big-bellied bowls; Our sorrows in sack shall lie steeping, And we'll drink till our eyes do run over; And prove it by reason That it can be no treason To drink and to sing A mournival of healths to our ...
— Cavalier Songs and Ballads of England from 1642 to 1684 • Charles Mackay

... is this contest, and thy mighty host is vain, Why with blood of friendly nations drench this ...
— Maha-bharata - The Epic of Ancient India Condensed into English Verse • Anonymous

... the world return To its first chaos, mufled in its urn; The stars and elements together lye, Drench'd in perpetual obscurity, And the whole machine in confusion be, As immethodick as an anarchie. May the great eye of day weep out his light, Pale Cynthia leave the regiment of night, The galaxia, all in ...
— Lucasta • Richard Lovelace

... the poet, there is a far deeper subject for reflection in revolutions, these tempests of the social atmosphere which drench the earth with blood, and crush an entire generation of men, than in those upheavals of nature which deluge a harvest, or flay the vineyards with hail—that is to say, the fruits of a single harvest, wreaking an injury, which can ...
— The Companions of Jehu • Alexandre Dumas, pere

... all bewildered faces there was never a blanker, I believe, since the world began than my uncle Gervase's; who now appeared in the doorway, a bucket in his hand, straight from the stables where he had been giving my father's roan horse a drench. Billy's summons must have hurried him, for he had not even waited to turn down his shirt-sleeves: but as plainly it had given him no sort of notion why he was wanted and in the State Room. I guessed ...
— Sir John Constantine • Prosper Paleologus Constantine

... traceries and arabesques against the blue. But in the night, mayhap, a dismal rain would come, chill with the breath of the nearing mountains; and then the trees turned into dripping sprinkling-pots to drench us where we lay, sodden already with ...
— The Master of Appleby • Francis Lynde

... latter case, root-pruning and heading-in would be an effectual preventive. In the former, supply suitable manures, and give good cultivation. In every case, remove at once all affected parts, and wash the wounds and whole tree, and drench the soil under it, with copperas-water—one ounce of copperas to two gallons of water. This is stated to be ...
— Soil Culture • J. H. Walden

... Be ev'ry word that might displease thine ear! The song—the harp,—what can they less than charm 200 These wantons? who the bread unpurchased eat Of one whose bones on yonder continent Lie mould'ring, drench'd by all the show'rs of heaven, Or roll at random in the billowy deep. Ah! could they see him once to his own isle Restored, both gold and raiment they would wish Far less, and nimbleness of foot instead. But He, alas! hath by a wretched fate, Past question perish'd, and what news soe'er We ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer

... of battle, or Mavors Or rapid Triton's Queen or eke the Virgin Rhamnusian, 395 Bevies of weaponed men exhorting, proved their presence. But from the time when earth was stained with unspeakable scandals And forth fro' greeding breasts of all men justice departed, Then did the brother drench his hands in brotherly bloodshed, Stinted the son in heart to mourn decease of his parents, 400 Longed the sire to sight his first-born's funeral convoy So more freely the flower of step-dame-maiden ...
— The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus • Caius Valerius Catullus

... a general visiting the different quarters of his camp; as the Squire leaves the control of all these matters to him, when he is at the Hall. He inquired into the state of the horses; examined their feet; prescribed a drench for one, and bleeding for another; and then took me to look at his own horse, on the merits of which he dwelt with great prolixity, and which, I noticed, had the ...
— Bracebridge Hall, or The Humorists • Washington Irving

... with golden rain, No heat with drench of wattle scent Can touch the heart of me again But with that ...
— 'Hello, Soldier!' - Khaki Verse • Edward Dyson

... and divine strength, and says, unconsciously, to the most uncontrolled anguish, "There is in me a life no mortal accident can invade; the breath of God is not altogether extinct in any blast of man's devising; shake, torture, assault the outer tenement,—darken its avenues with fire to stifle, and drench its approaches with seas to drown,—there is that within that God alone can vanquish,—yours is but a finite terror"? Half-crazed as I was, the fern-bed attracted me, as I said, and I flung myself wearily down on the leaves, whose healing and soothing odor stole up like a cloud all about ...
— Atlantic Monthly Vol. 3, No. 16, February, 1859 • Various

... place them there, but to her great alarm, the blood issued from the punctures in such a quantity as to drench the bed-linen almost immediately. In vain she tried to stop it—it flowed in torrents, and before the horror-struck servants could summon the physician, the life had ebbed from the child—nothing but a blood-stained form remained. The physician said ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXIII No. 5 November 1848 • Various

... the flowers, I knew the leaves, I knew The tearful glimmer of the languid dawn On those long, rank, dark wood-walks, drench'd in dew, ...
— The Early Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Tennyson

... earth fresh from 'wholesome drench of April rains,'" said Mr. Raleigh, taking the dish of white porcelain between his brown, slender hands. "An immature scent, just such an innocent breath as should precede the epigea, that spicy, exhaustive wealth of savor, that complete maturity of odor, ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 6, No. 38, December, 1860 • Various

... very deed, Thou hast thy joy, but thou hast more of pain. Others will live in peace, and thou be fain To bargain with despair, and in thy need To make thy meal upon the scantiest weed. These palaces, for thee they stand in vain; Thine is a ruinous hut; and oft the rain Shall drench thee in the midnight; yea the speed Of earth outstrip thee pilgrim, while thy feet Move slowly up the heights. Yet will there come Through the time-rents about thy moving cell, An arrow for despair, and oft the hum Of far-off populous realms where ...
— Robert Falconer • George MacDonald

... Gablin, pointing a pistol at his head. "Now, shall I fire, or shall I reward you?" The officer gave in. He helped M. Gablin to pour the buckets of coal-oil into the gutters in the courtyard, to clear away the powder, and to drench the floors with water. Then Gablin took him to a chamber, gave him plain clothes, and locked him in. He fell asleep upon ...
— France in the Nineteenth Century • Elizabeth Latimer

... advised: Drench with 1 pound of Epsom salts dissolved in a couple quarts of water. The sores may be treated by washing them with a 2 per cent solution of one of the coaltar disinfectants, such as creolin. After the sores have been allowed to dry naturally, a very little powdered calomel ...
— One Thousand Questions in California Agriculture Answered • E.J. Wickson

... he proceeded to the kitchen, summoned all the servants to his presence, to whom he related the whole story from beginning to end, and proposed that they should drench him with water when he made his appearance under the window. But there happened to be among them a corpulent lady called Betty Devine, who entered a plea of objection to that mode of proceeding on the ground of "waste of water;" that ...
— Irish Wit and Humor - Anecdote Biography of Swift, Curran, O'Leary and O'Connell • Anonymous

... behold him in this piteous case, Ye that nor king nor emperor holds in fee, But only God in heaven; behold his face Who needs must fast, Sundays and holidays, Which makes his teeth like rakes; and when he hath fed With never a cake for banquet but dry bread, Must drench his bowels with much cold watery fare, With board nor stool, but low on earth instead; Your poor old friend, what, will you leave ...
— Poems & Ballads (Second Series) - Swinburne's Poems Volume III • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... laughed. "Though of course one doesn't connect petroleum with the thought of Italy, and of all Italy, Southern Italy. But in spite of the years I've lived there, I've discovered myself to be so essentially American and commercial that I want to drench the surface of that antique soil with the brown, bad-smelling crude oil that lies so deep beneath it. Basilicata is the coming great oil-field of the world—and that's my secret. I dare to tell it here, as I ...
— The Flirt • Booth Tarkington

... possible in unbroken halves. Squeeze over them the juice of two large lemons, or three small ones, and leave them for several hours, or a day if convenient. Just before dinner pick over in a cool place one quart of watercress, wash it carefully and drain on a napkin. At the last moment drench the cress with French dressing, spread the nuts over it, give them a generous sprinkling of the ...
— Vaughan's Vegetable Cook Book (4th edition) - How to Cook and Use Rarer Vegetables and Herbs • Anonymous

... was heard So sweetly, "Tu asperges me," that I May not remember, much less tell the sound. The beauteous dame, her arms expanding, clasp'd My temples, and immerg'd me, where 't was fit The wave should drench me: and thence raising up, Within the fourfold dance of lovely nymphs Presented me so lav'd, and with their arm They each did cover me. "Here are we nymphs, And in the heav'n are stars. Or ever earth Was visited of Beatrice, we Appointed for her handmaids, tended on her. ...
— The Divine Comedy, Complete - The Vision of Paradise, Purgatory and Hell • Dante Alighieri

... thoughtst me coward, liar—thou shalt see All oaths Severus swears fulfilled shall be. Poor moth! I might have saved thee—nay, I planned to save, Thy perfidy the torch that marks thee for the grave. Drench earth in blood,—for Jove pour forth malignant zeal, The strokes that thou hast dealt redoubled shalt thou feel! I go: the storm shall break o'er this devoted land, From Jove the bolt?—maybe—but I ...
— Polyuecte • Pierre Corneille

... open our gilded tomb, he will find Melicent to be no more admirable than Demetrios. One skull is like another, and is as lightly split with a mattock. You will be as ugly as I, and nobody will be thinking of your eyes and hair. Hail, rain and dew will drench us both impartially when I lie at your side, as I intend to do, for a hundred years and yet another hundred years. You need not frown, for what will it matter a ...
— Domnei • James Branch Cabell et al

... Smells! What long nasal misery their nastiness foretells! How they trickle, trickle, trickle, On the air by day and night! While our thoraxes they tickle. Like the fumes from brass in pickle, Or from naphtha all alight; Making stench, stench, stench, In a worse than witch-broth drench, Of the muck-malodoration that so nauseously wells From the Smells, Smells, Smells, Smells, Smells, Smells, Smells— From the fuming and the spuming ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 99., Nov. 1, 1890 • Various

... days; and the great white banks first grew porous, and then slowly sank away, while the water ran in streams along the streets, or lingered in still pools far under the unbroken crust, waiting to drench the unwary passerby who should venture to set ...
— In Blue Creek Canon • Anna Chapin Ray

... the offer with alacrity. A few moments later, seated in a dilapidated cockle-shell, he found himself slamming over the water. The boat didn't ship the tops of many seas but it took in enough spray over the port bow to drench pretty thoroughly the passenger. In the stern, the darky handling the sheet of a small, much patched sail, kept himself comparatively dry. But Mr. Heatherbloom didn't seem to mind the drenching; though the briny drops stung ...
— A Man and His Money • Frederic Stewart Isham

... prevail in the spring months; March will bluster, April will weep; May will smile through her tears by day and freeze us with her frosts at night, and July will stupefy us with thunderstorms, and August scorch us with heat one day and drench us ...
— The Girl's Own Paper, Vol. VIII, No. 354, October 9, 1886 • Various

... with any considerable quantity of oil on board, it is a regular semiweekly duty to conduct a hose into the hold, and drench the casks with sea-water; which afterwards, at varying intervals, is removed by the ship's pumps. Hereby the casks are sought to be kept damply tight; while by the changed character of the withdrawn water, the mariners readily detect any serious ...
— Moby Dick; or The Whale • Herman Melville

... Lily—drench'd with dew! I like thy Vision of the Covenanters, That bloody-minded Grahame shot and slew. I like the battle lost and won; The hurly-burlys bravely done, The warlike gallop and the warlike canters! I like that girded chieftain of the ranters, Ready to preach down heathens, or to grapple, ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... sinful it is to yield to an obscene and exaggerated intemperance?—would it not be to the last degree ungrateful to the great source of our enjoyment, to overload it with a weight which would oppress it with languor, or harass it with pain; and finally to drench away the effects of our impiety with some nauseous potation which revolts it, tortures it, convulses, irritates, enfeebles it, through every particle of its system? How wrong in us to give way to anger, jealousy, ...
— Pelham, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... about diet, About exercise, air, mild aperients, and quiet; Would leave Nature alone to her vigour elastic, And never exhibit a drug that is drastic. Doctor Russell's the man for a good searching pill, Or a true thorough drench that will cure or will kill. For bleeding and blistering, and easy bravado, (Not to speak of hot water,) he passes Sangrado. He stickles at nothing, from simple phlebotomy, As our friend Sidney said, to ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 364, February 1846 • Various

... objectionable because it readily discharges certain colours from fabrics, flowers, and birds' feathers. My advice is, therefore, to pull to pieces any case infested with insects, to burn all fittings not absolutely valuable, and to drench with turpentine all specimens, together with all the rockwork and fittings desired to be retained. [Footnote: I would indeed advise the destruction by burning of the birds themselves even, should they be ...
— Practical Taxidermy • Montagu Browne

... of concession as the infusion drawn from those two doctrines laid down at starting, and throw away the effete axioms as fit only for old women to coddle and drench themselves withal. Having done this, the reader is ready for the book the title ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II., November, 1858., No. XIII. • Various

... certain hushed vision named Adelaide.... At last, the Train made Manila, wreck that it was, after majestic service; and the great gray mantle, a sort of moveless twilight, settled down upon Luzon and the archipelago. Within its folds was a mammoth condenser, contracting to drench the land impartially, incessantly, for sixty days or more. And now the fruition of the rice-swamps waxed imperiously; the carabao soaked himself in endless ecstasy; the rock-ribbed gorges of Southern Luzon filled with ...
— Fate Knocks at the Door - A Novel • Will Levington Comfort

... art that bear'st celestial wine! Declare thy name: not mortal is this juice, Such as the unbless'd Cyclopaean climes produce (Though sure our vine the largest cluster yields, And Jove's scorn'd thunder serves to drench our fields); But this descended from the bless'd abodes, A rill of nectar, ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer, translated by Alexander Pope

... stayed in the car, for there was no likelihood of more passengers that evening, but somehow he preferred going out where the rain could drench him and the wind pommel him. How horribly tired he was! If there were only some still place away from the blare of the city where a man could lie down and listen to the sound of the sea or the storm—or if one could grow suddenly old and get through with the bother ...
— The Shape of Fear • Elia W. Peattie

... was very wet: indeed, it poured down till day-dawn; and, as I took my morning walk round the house, I observed the master's window swinging open, and the rain driving straight in. He cannot be in bed, I thought: those showers would drench him through. He must either be up or out. But I'll make no more ado, I'll ...
— Wuthering Heights • Emily Bronte

... and turn'd to ice?[647] O gods, what death prepare ye? with what plague Mean ye to rage? the death of many men Meets in one period. If cold noisome Saturn 650 Were now exalted, and with blue beams shin'd, Then Ganymede[648] would renew Deucalion's flood, And in the fleeting sea the earth be drench'd. O Phoebus, shouldst thou with thy rays now singe The fell Nemaean beast, th' earth would be fir'd, And heaven tormented with thy chafing heat: But thy fires hurt not. Mars, 'tis thou inflam'st The threatening Scorpion ...
— The Works of Christopher Marlowe, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Christopher Marlowe

... body was prickled with the air or evil that lay upon the ship. A case of nerves? Aye, I had nerves. Most sailormen had nerves when they were within sight of Captain Swope. This night he seemed to drench the ship with evil, it poured out of him as ink from a squid, it was almost something tangible. Somehow I knew that Newman's long grace was ended. This black villain had prepared a net to trap my friend, and was even now casting ...
— The Blood Ship • Norman Springer

... drench from the skies, the dreary mud—even the dead and wounded—were forgotten in the jubilation at the sight of the lately insolent foe flying in confusion down the mountain side, recking for nothing so ...
— The Red Acorn • John McElroy

... July, came word that the forts Ontario and Oswego, on each side of the mouth of the Oswego River, were menaced by the Drench. They had been imperfectly constructed by Shirley, and were insufficiently garrisoned, yet contained a great amount of military and naval stores, and protected the vessels which ...
— The Life of George Washington, Volume I • Washington Irving

... doda call, oy dodo oy dodo le! That dewy rain may fall, oy dodo oy dodo le! And drench the diggers all, oy dodo oy dodo le! The workers great and small, oy dodo oy dodo le! Even those in house and stall, oy ...
— The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought • Alexander F. Chamberlain

... our power, and proud of his rebellion? It is the pride of a child and a schoolboy. They are little children rioting and barring out the teacher at school. But their childish delight will end; it will cost them dear. They will cast down temples and drench the earth with blood. But they will see at last, the foolish children, that, though they are rebels, they are impotent rebels, unable to keep up their own rebellion. Bathed in their foolish tears, they will recognize at last that He who created ...
— The Brothers Karamazov • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... the little mouths still parched and gaping and the clean and quite white area unblemished, Mrs. Samstag found her back to bed. She was in a drench of sweat when she got there and the conflagration of neuralgia, curiously enough, was now roaring in her ears so that it seemed to her she could ...
— The Vertical City • Fannie Hurst

... on this abutment and along down its side, keeping near the edge of the water, but fifteen feet above, when, to the unaccountability of all, he fell headlong down into the river. The water at this point was not more than three or four feet deep, but deep enough to drench him from head to foot. He rose up, and as usual, quick to place the blame, said: "If I knew the d——n man who pushed me off in the water, I'd put a ball in him." No one had been in twenty feet of him. All the consolation ...
— History of Kershaw's Brigade • D. Augustus Dickert

... and deep peace, on this high wold, And on the dews that drench the furze, And on the silvery gossamers, That twinkle into green ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume I (of 3) • John Ruskin

... What I did well, let men say I was mad; Or let my name for ever be a question That will not sleep in history. What men say I was will cool no cannon, dull no sword, Invalidate no truth. Meanwhile, I was; And the long train is lighted that shall burn, Though floods of wrath may drench it, and hot feet May stamp it for a slight time into smoke That shall blaze up again with growing speed, Until at last a fiery crash will come To cleanse and shake a wounded hemisphere, And heal it of a long malignity That angry time discredits ...
— The Three Taverns • Edwin Arlington Robinson

... unhairing, kid skins must be fermented in a drench of bran, whose purpose is to completely decompose the remaining albuminous matter, and also to remove all traces of the lime. The operation is extremely delicate. While the gelatine is not so sensitive to the decomposing action ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 794, March 21, 1891 • Various

... peculiar on one side, but still full of sweetness and intelligence; and the years of comfort and quiet had, in spite of anxiety, done much to obliterate the likeness to a cankered oak gall. Lambert wanted to drench her with perfumes, but she only submitted to have a little essence in the pouncet box given her long ago by Lady Margaret at their parting at Amesbury. Master Groot himself chose to conduct her on this first great occasion, and they made their way to the old gateway, sculptured above with ...
— Grisly Grisell • Charlotte M. Yonge

... Till the drench of the dusk you drink In the poppy-field west; Then veer and settle and sink As a gull ...
— Behind the Arras - A Book of the Unseen • Bliss Carman

... nay, we despise her pains That wets her garden when it rains: But when the drought has dried the knot, Then let her use the wat'ring-pot. We pray for showers, at our need, To drench, but not ...
— The Hesperides & Noble Numbers: Vol. 1 and 2 • Robert Herrick

... to be wrought under the instrumentality of the physical sciences. 2. To know is one thing, to do is another; the two things are altogether distinct. 3. Does Sir Robert Peel mean to say, that whatever be the occult reasons for the result, so it is; you have but to drench the popular mind with physics, and moral and religious advancement follows on the whole, in spite of individual failures? 4. A man knows he should get up in the morning,—he lies abed; he knows he should not lose his temper, yet he cannot keep it. 5. Can the process be ...
— English: Composition and Literature • W. F. (William Franklin) Webster

... most when they grow sour! But right art thou, man, for I love ale and beer right well. Therefore come straightway with me hard by to the Sign of the Blue Boar, and if thou drinkest as thou appearest—and I wot thou wilt not belie thy looks—I will drench thy throat with as good homebrewed as ever was tapped in ...
— The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood • Howard Pyle

... the garden to serve them. Swift, cool breezes were scurrying down the valley, bearing in their wake the soft rain clouds that were soon to drench the earth and then radiantly pass on. They were quite alone, seated in the shelter of a wide, overhanging portico. A soft, green darkness was creeping over the mountainside, pregnant with smell ...
— The Husbands of Edith • George Barr McCutcheon

... some days the weather has been perfect, bright and warm as midsummer, and the nights cool without being cold, but with dews heavy enough to drench the tents. ...
— The Incomparable 29th and the "River Clyde" • George Davidson

... Grandsire on the Royal Bench Of Brittish Themis, with no mean applause Pronounc't and in his volumes taught our Lawes, Which others at their Barr so often wrench: To day deep thoughts resolve with me to drench In mirth, that after no repenting drawes; Let Euclid rest and Archimedes pause, And what the Swede intend, and what the French. To measure life, learn thou betimes, and know Toward solid good what leads the nearest way; For ...
— Book of English Verse • Bulchevy

... The cedar waved its arms of peaceful shade, The vine embraced the elm, and myrtles flower'd Among the fragrant orange-groves. No storms Vex'd the serene of heaven: but genial mists, Such as in Eden drench'd the willing soil, Nurtured all lands with richer dews than balm. Earth breathed her thanks. Rivers of living waters Broke from a thousand unsuspected springs; And gushing cataracts, like that call'd forth On Horeb by the rod of Amram's son, Gladden'd the ...
— The Harp of God • J. F. Rutherford

... devise Many grinning properties. Players there will be, and those Base in action as in clothes; Yet with strutting they will please The incurious villages. Near the dying of the day There will be a cudgel-play, Where a coxcomb will be broke, Ere a good word can be spoke: But the anger ends all here, Drench'd in ale, or drown'd in beer. —Happy rusticks! best content With the cheapest merriment; And possess no other fear, Than to ...
— A Selection From The Lyrical Poems Of Robert Herrick • Robert Herrick

... Among his Angels, and his throne itself Mixed with Tartarean sulphur and strange fire, His own invented torments. But perhaps The way seems difficult, and steep to scale With upright wing against a higher foe! Let such bethink them, if the sleepy drench Of that forgetful lake benumb not still, That in our proper motion we ascend Up to our native seat; descent and fall To us is adverse. Who but felt of late, When the fierce foe hung on our broken rear Insulting, and pursued us through the Deep, With what compulsion and laborious ...
— Paradise Lost • John Milton

... drench her with my love and she does not know it," thought Maurice, "it cannot annoy her. Let me take what she is willing to give, ...
— The Indian On The Trail - From "Mackinac And Lake Stories", 1899 • Mary Hartwell Catherwood

... discharged. The judge says don't come here again." And she was pushed through an iron gate. She walked unsteadily up the aisle, between two masses of those burning-eyed human monsters. She felt the cold outside air like a vast drench of icy water flung upon her. If it had been raining, she might have gone toward the river. But than that day New York had never been more radiantly the City of the Sun. How she got home she never knew, but late in the afternoon she realized ...
— Susan Lenox: Her Fall and Rise • David Graham Phillips

... And Consternation, Flit up from Hell with pure intent! Slash them at Manchester, Glasgow, Leeds, and Chester; 645 Drench all with blood from ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... Bolton ain't bad when the charry-bang's well loaded up With swell seven-and-sixpence-a-headers. I felt like a tarrier-pup On the scoop arter six weeks of kennel and drench in the 'ands of a vet; I'd got free of the brimstoney flaviour and went ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 103, October 15, 1892 • Various

... storm Of the bleak winter parch his shivering form; The journey o'er and every peril past Beholds his little cottage-home at last, And as he sees afar the smoke curl slow, Feels his full eyes with transport overflow: So from the scene where Death and Anguish reign, And Vice and Folly drench with blood the plain, Joyful I turn, to sing how Woman's praise Avail'd again Jerusalem to raise, Call'd forth the sanction of the Despot's nod, And freed ...
— Poems • Robert Southey

... Oglethorpe, coldly. "You have drenched me and mine for two hundred and three years, madam. To-night you have had your last drench." ...
— The Water Ghost and Others • John Kendrick Bangs

... of it is, that our garments being drench'd in the sea, keep notwithstanding their freshness and glosses. Of this emendation I find that the author of notes on The Tempest had a glimpse, but could ...
— Johnson's Notes to Shakespeare Vol. I Comedies • Samuel Johnson

... did each comfort contain, And that gave my bosom delight; When drench'd by the winterly rain, I watch'd ...
— Poems • Matilda Betham

... of the boat," said Meon; "we may need it," and we had to drench ourselves again, ...
— Rewards and Fairies • Rudyard Kipling

... of Severn are screaming aloud, And Penline's lofty castle involv'd in a cloud, If true, the old proverb, a shower of rain, Is brooding above, and will soon drench the plain. ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 470 - Volume XVII, No. 470, Saturday, January 8, 1831 • Various

... she could legitimately claim. She refused to listen to the conciliatory proposals presented by Italy in conjunction with other powers in the effort to spare Europe from a vast conflict, certain to drench the Continent with blood and to reduce it to ruin beyond the conception of human imagination, and finally ...
— History of the World War - An Authentic Narrative of the World's Greatest War • Francis A. March and Richard J. Beamish

... wilt do mine errand, and return hither when it is done, thou shalt see Saxon flesh cheap as ever was hog's in the shambles of Sheffield. And, hark thee! thou seemest to be a jolly confessor—come hither after the onslaught and thou shalt have as much good wine as would drench thy whole convent." ...
— The Literary World Seventh Reader • Various

... moon's o'erclouded ray Shone dim; the breeze's murmurs died away: On his wan brow unwonted slumbers creep, And drench his soul in visionary sleep. When lo! deep thunders on his startled ear Successive roll, and shadowy forms appear; As thro' the misty vale at morning rise A row of trees before the traveller's eyes. His father's, from the first of time, arose, Their country's friends, and terror ...
— Gustavus Vasa - and other poems • W. S. Walker

... welcome, so that no one would give him anything to drink, he went to the quarters of his old friend, Bill Bennett, the overland stage agent, and begged him to give him some liquor. Bill was mixing a bottle of medicine to drench a sick mule. The moment he set the bottle down to do something else, Satanta seized it off the ground and drank most of the liquid before quitting. Of course, it made the old savage dreadfully sick as well as angry. He then started ...
— The Old Santa Fe Trail - The Story of a Great Highway • Henry Inman

... continuance of the war upon the Republican party. "Four years ago," he said, "a convention met in this city when our country was peaceful, prosperous, and united. Its delegates did not mean to destroy our government, to overwhelm us with debt, or to drench our land with blood; but they were animated by intolerance and fanaticism, and blinded by an ignorance of the spirit of our institutions, the character of our people, and the condition of our land. They thought they might safely ...
— Twenty Years of Congress, Vol. 1 (of 2) • James Gillespie Blaine

... arrogant in their demand of all or nothing. Compromise we tried for three quarters of a century, and it brought us to where we are, for it was only a fine name for cowardice, and invited aggression. And now that the patient is dying of this drench of lukewarm water, Doctor Sangrado McClellan gravely prescribes another gallon. If that fail to finish him, why, ...
— The Writings of James Russell Lowell in Prose and Poetry, Volume V - Political Essays • James Russell Lowell

... had a curious effect upon the boy; his fierceness dropped from him; he turned again to the railing and, looking upward, seemed to drench himself in the coolness of ...
— Max • Katherine Cecil Thurston

... a ship of death, her boom slamming to port and starboard on the gentle heave of the sea, and her fore-sail reefed that serene morning. Only when I was quite near her, and hurrying down to stop the engines, did the real truth, with perfect suddenness, drench my heated brain; and I almost ran into her, ...
— The Purple Cloud • M.P. Shiel

... divinity of the gods is revealed and their tranquil abodes, which neither winds do shake nor clouds drench with rains, nor snow congealed by sharp frost harms with hoary fall: an ever cloudless ether o'ercanopies them, and they laugh with light shed largely around. Nature, too, supplies all their wants, and nothing ever ...
— Ancient Art and Ritual • Jane Ellen Harrison

... Offensive to all pious ears. To flatter women by a metaphor! What profit could you hope to get of her? And, for her sake, turn base detractor Against your greatest benefactor. But we shall keep revenge in store If ever you provoke us more: For, since we know you walk a-foot, We'll soundly drench your frieze surtout; Or may we never thunder throw, Nor souse to death a birth-day beau. We own your verses are melodious; But such ...
— Poems (Volume II.) • Jonathan Swift

... shall take in all their beauty and completeness, to have our most eager desires after His name more than satisfied. We need not ask for more sunshine, but take care to spread ourselves out in the full sunshine which we have, and let it drench our eyes and fire our hearts. 'And He blessed him there.' Not till now was he capable of receiving the full blessing. He needed to have self beaten out of him; he needed to recognise God as lovingly striving with Him; he needed to yield himself up to Him; he needed to have ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus and Numbers • Alexander Maclaren

... do mine errand, and if thou return hither when it is done, thou shalt see Saxon flesh cheap as ever was hog's in the shambles of Sheffield. And, hark thee, thou seemest to be a jolly confessor—come hither after the onslaught, and thou shalt have as much Malvoisie as would drench thy ...
— Ivanhoe - A Romance • Walter Scott

... state approaching distraction. He could not rest; he could not eat; and he would not see the doctor. One morning as I walked round the house I observed the master's window swinging open and the rain driving straight in. 'He cannot be in bed,' I thought, 'those showers would drench him through.' And so it was, for when I entered the chamber his face and throat were washed with rain, the bed-clothes dripped, and he was perfectly still—dead and stark. I called up Joseph. 'Eh, ...
— The Worlds Greatest Books - Vol. II: Fiction • Arthur Mee, J. A. Hammerton, Eds.

... moments—when you come upon me—ah you are here now, Give me now libidinous joys only, Give me the drench of my passions, give me life coarse and rank, To-day I go consort with Nature's darlings, to-night too, I am for those who believe in loose delights, I share the midnight orgies of young men, I dance with the dancers ...
— Leaves of Grass • Walt Whitman

... no longer bear The floods that o'er her burst in dread career. The labouring hull already seems half fill'd With water, through an hundred leaks distill'd: Thus drench'd by every wave, her riven deck, Stript and defenceless, floats a ...
— Newton Forster - The Merchant Service • Captain Frederick Marryat

... before him. Two soldiers in the meantime were supporting the Prefect on his mule, and convincing that stubborn bearer of burdens that it was not quite so unable to trot as it had fancied, by the combined arguments of a drench of wine and two sword-points, while they heaped their general with blessings, and kissed his hands ...
— Hypatia - or, New Foes with an Old Face • Charles Kingsley

... their gathered waters. And the birds were at their loving, or the building of their homes, flying among the bushes, trolling upon the bough. One with an eye, as the saying goes, could scarcely pass among this travail of the new year without some pleasure in the spectacle, though the rain might drench him to the skin. He could not but joy in the thrusting crook of the fern and bracken; what sort of heart was his if it did not lift and swell to see the new fresh green blown upon the grey parks, to see the hedges burst, the young ...
— Gilian The Dreamer - His Fancy, His Love and Adventure • Neil Munro

... Cross from man to man, Vich-Alpine's summons to his clan, Burst be the ear that fails to heed! 270 Palsied the foot that shuns to speed! May ravens tear the careless eyes, Wolves make the coward heart their prize! As sinks that blood-stream in the earth, So may his heart's blood drench his hearth! 275 As dies in hissing gore the spark, Quench thou his light, Destruction dark! And be the grace to him denied, Bought by this sign to all beside!" He ceased; no echo gave again 280 The murmur of the ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... so many of her principal witmongers and bards of misrule. What would you have said had you seen Nash or Green, when you interest yourself about the poor mimes you supped with last night? Suffice it, they had their drench and their doze, and they drank and slept as much as may save them from any necessity of eating till evening, when, if they are industrious, they will find patrons or players to feed them. [Footnote: The condition of men of wit and talents was never more melancholy ...
— The Fortunes of Nigel • Sir Walter Scott

... on. Lay the second waffle upon the first, butter, and keep hot. It is not safe to begin serving without at least six waffles in plate. This, of course, provided you have several eaters with genuine appetites. Syrup can be passed with the waffles—but it is profanation to drench them with it—strong clear coffee, and broiled chicken are ...
— Dishes & Beverages of the Old South • Martha McCulloch Williams

... a shame for you boys to drench old Ness and Aleck," was Sam Rover's sober comment. "Both of them might ...
— The Rover Boys at Colby Hall - or The Struggles of the Young Cadets • Arthur M. Winfield

... I dare not trust myself in the presence of those whom I love and respect, lest my wild thoughts should find vent in wilder words. I lose my humanity. I am a beast. Out of this depth there is but one way of escape. Downwards. I must drench the monster I have awakened until he sleeps again. I drink and become oblivious. In these last paroxysms there is nothing for me but brandy. I shut myself up alone and pour down my gullet huge draughts of spirit. It mounts to my brain. I am ...
— For the Term of His Natural Life • Marcus Clarke

... a great Angel past along the highest Crying 'the doom of England,' and at once He stood beside me, in his grasp a sword Of lightnings, wherewithal he cleft the tree From off the bearing trunk, and hurl'd it from him Three fields away, and then he dash'd and drench'd, He dyed, he soak'd the trunk with human blood, And brought the sunder'd tree again, and set it Straight on the trunk, that thus baptized in blood Grew ever high and higher, beyond my seeing, And shot out sidelong boughs across the deep That dropt ...
— Queen Mary and Harold • Alfred Lord Tennyson

... a revival of that which has not ceased to drench the west of Europe in blood since the historical birth of the continent. The two chief episodes in the conflict, as we all know, are the invasion of Roman Gaul, including the north of Italy, by the ...
— The Wrack of the Storm • Maurice Maeterlinck

... battle join'd. Shield clash'd with shield[16] And spear with spear, conflicting corselets rang, Boss'd bucklers met, and tumult wild arose. Then, many a yell was heard, and many a shout 535 Loud intermix'd, the slayer o'er the maim'd Exulting, and the field was drench'd with blood. As when two winter torrents rolling down The mountains, shoot their floods through gulleys huge Into one gulf below, station'd remote 540 The shepherd in the uplands hears the roar; Such was the thunder of the mingling hosts. And first, Antilochus a Trojan ...
— The Iliad of Homer - Translated into English Blank Verse • Homer

... der drue veapon uf der zoshul refolushun. Dynamite! You must plenty haf. Ve must avenge der murder uf our brudders in Shegaco. Deir innocent plood gries ter heffen for revensh. A t'ousan' lifes vill not der benalty bay. Der goundry must pe drench mit plood. Den vill Anarchy reign subreme ofer de ...
— Tin-Types Taken in the Streets of New York • Lemuel Ely Quigg

... through the whole course," replied Blueskin, with a ferocious grin, "unless he comes down to the last grig. We'll lather him with mud, shave him with a rusty razor, and drench him with aqua pompaginis. Master, your humble ...
— Jack Sheppard - A Romance • William Harrison Ainsworth

... flowers of your soul have been mine, all your thoughts. There has not been the faintest cloud in our heaven; we have not known what sacrifice is; we have always acted on the impulses of our hearts. I have known happiness, infinite for a woman. Will the tears that drench this sheet tell you all my gratitude? I could wish that I had knelt to write the words!—Well, out of this felicity has arisen torture more terrible than the pain of desertion. Dear, there are very deep recesses in a woman's heart; how deep in my own heart, ...
— The Deserted Woman • Honore de Balzac

... what avails it to have traced the springs, That whirl of empire the stupendous wheel? Ah, what have I to do with conquering kings, Hands drench'd in blood, and breasts begirt with steel? To those, whom Nature taught to think and feel, Heroes, alas! are things of small concern; Could History man's secret heart reveal, And what imports a heaven-born ...
— The Poetical Works of Beattie, Blair, and Falconer - With Lives, Critical Dissertations, and Explanatory Notes • Rev. George Gilfillan [Ed.]

... rain," he explained. "These Pacific showers come up quickly this side of the Divide, and they drench you in a jiffy. Donald is going on ahead to put up ...
— The Hunted Woman • James Oliver Curwood

... the trees. The Bordeaux mixture (No. II.) is the best preventive and remedy if there are any signs of fungus. Cut away all diseased twigs, boughs and branches, and burn them. Fungus spores are scattered by the wind and spread the disease. Drench the trunk and bark in winter with this mixture before the buds swell. Care must be taken not to apply the mixture in full strength to tender leaves ...
— The Book of Pears and Plums • Edward Bartrum

... that the tightest band Must burst with the wildest power?— That the more the slave is oppressed and wronged, Will be fiercer his rising hour? They may thrust him back with the arm of might, They may drench the earth with his blood— But the best and purest of their own, Will blend with the ...
— The Liberty Minstrel • George W. Clark

... time when Titan's steeds were driven To drench themselves beneath the western heaven; And sable Morpheus had his curtains spread, And silent night had laid the world to bed; 'Mongst other night-birds which did seek for prey, A blunt exciseman, which abhorred the day, Was rambling ...
— Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of England • Robert Bell

... sweet 'twould be unto mine eyes alway Waters of tears to pour, To sob and drench thy sacred robes, till they Could hold ...
— Chapters on Jewish Literature • Israel Abrahams

... deep peace on this high wold And on these dews that drench the furze, And all the silvery gossamers That ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... It's time I gave the old bay mare her drench. [Stumbles over the children. What's here? A lifeless lad!—and little wench! Been eatin' berries—where did they get them idees? For cows, when took so, I've the reg'lar remedies. I'll try 'em here—and if their state ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 98, May 3, 1890. • Various

... aerial fields: The soul still ling'red in its lov'd abode, Till conq'ring David o'er the giant strode: Goliath's sword then laid its master dead, And from the body hew'd the ghastly head; The blood in gushing torrents drench'd the plains, The soul found passage through the spouting veins. And now aloud th' illustrious victor said, "Where are your boastings now your champion's "dead?" Scarce had he spoke, when the Philistines fled: But fled in vain; the ...
— Religious and Moral Poems • Phillis Wheatley

... melted slag had crept to within a few feet of the two at the toe of the dump when the men of the engine crew ran with water to drench them. ...
— The Quickening • Francis Lynde

... never quite understood the parable of the tares," he said to me, just before I went, "till I found these words in a book the other day: 'The root of the common darnel (lolium) or dandelion, with saltpeter, make a very cheap and effective sheep-drench. It can be applied ...
— Memoirs of Arthur Hamilton, B. A. Of Trinity College, Cambridge • Arthur Christopher Benson

... along the twilight air The shades of our fathers glide! There Morven fled, with the blood-drench'd hair, And Colma with gray side. No gale around its coolness flings, Yet sadly sigh the gloomy trees; And hark! how the harp's unvisited strings Sound sweet, as if swept by a whispering breeze! 'Tis done! the ...
— The Poetical Works of Henry Kirke White - With a Memoir by Sir Harris Nicolas • Henry Kirke White

... this system as an economic weapon is bound to do in America what it has done throughout the world. The days of Chattel Slavery are numbered. The Abolitionist is wasting his breath, or worse. He is raising a feud that may drench this nation in blood in a senseless war over an issue that is settled ...
— The Man in Gray • Thomas Dixon

... wild with streaks of white and black The pair remained."—O stout Caractacus! 'Twas thus you stood when Caesar's legions strove To beat their few, fantastic foemen back— Your patriots with their savage stripes of red! To drench the stormy cliff and moaning cove With faithful blood, as pure as any ...
— The Poems of Henry Kendall • Henry Kendall

... Ehawshoga[B], his enemy had certainly caused the earth to freeze, that he might be defeated of his object. If Makusue wished to cross the lake, the wind was sure to blow violently the moment he entered his canoe, and rain to drench him before he left it. If he sought an opportunity to surprise the Coppermines, the Evil Spirit flew with the speed of a loon before a high wind to apprise them of his intentions. Equally great was the ...
— Traditions of the North American Indians, Vol. 3 (of 3) • James Athearn Jones

... on gaining! Far away I heard the storm wind and the clamour of the sea. The thunder moaned and sobbed. I hurried along the deserted road and asked my heart for a village, a house, a church, a cave, anything to shield from the oncoming drench. ...
— A Tramp's Sketches • Stephen Graham

... that a drop from such a sweet fount flying Should flame like fire and leave my heart a-dying! I burn, my tears can never drench it Till in your eyes I bathe my heart and quench it: But there, alas, love with his fire lies sleeping, And all conspire to burn my ...
— Lyrics from the Song-Books of the Elizabethan Age • Various

... his big hand into the pail and began to ladle out the water and drench the bees with it, while the old woman flailed with the roll of cloth to keep them away from her, and the farmer's boy, dancing up and down in his excitement, jangled the bell like an ...
— Frank Merriwell's Reward • Burt L. Standish

... Hideous place, where you couldn't do right if you died for it! The fire began there—stoves no doubt— and there it would have stopped if any one had had any sense; but there they would run and gape, and the more I tried to get them to form a chain and drench the warehouses, the more they wouldn't do it. And when the flame once got hold of the paper—did you see it?— it was not a thing to forget. I verily believe the whole town would have gone if the Charnocks hadn't come and got a little discipline into ...
— The Three Brides • Charlotte M. Yonge

... mists cleared, and a rosy hue followed the brightening in the east. The birds ceased twittering to break into gay songs, and the cock in the barnyard gave one final clarion-voiced salute to the dawn. The rose in the east deepened into rich red, and then the sun peeped over the eastern hilltops to drench the valley with glad ...
— The Last Trail • Zane Grey

... fit to wake the dead,' and fled into her house, where on her bed she had an attack which came as near being hysterical as the strong-minded woman could compass. She only recovered when Mrs. Devine and Mrs. Cahill and the widow Mulvany, running in, proposed to drench her with cold water, when her heels suddenly left off drumming and she stood up, very determinedly, and bade them be off about their own business. She always spoke afterwards of Margret as the robber of the widow and orphan, which was satisfying if ...
— An Isle in the Water • Katharine Tynan

... Drawer tirkesto. Drawers (garment) kalsono. Drawing (lots) lotado. Dray sxargxveturilo. Dread timi, timegi. Dread teruro, timo. Dreadful terurega. Dream songxi. Dreary malgaja. Dredge skrapi. Dredger skrapilego. Dregs fecxo. Drench akvumi. Dress (clothe) vesti. Dress (wound) bandagxi. Dressing case necesujo. Dress coat frako. Dressing gown negligxa vesto. Dressmaker kudristino. Dressing room tualetejo, vestejo. Drill bori. Drill (tool) borilo. Drill (military) ekzerco. Drink trinki. Drink (to ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes

... yourself, seeing it as Sophia was later to see it in the light of day; then drench it with blue Indian night and stud it with a myriad eyes of fire—lamps, torches, candles, blue-white electric arcs, lights running up and down both hillsides and fringing the very star-sheeted skies, clustering ...
— The Bronze Bell • Louis Joseph Vance

... meal, or in the house be fed, Till on my knee thou satt'st, and by my hand Thy food were cut, the cup were tender'd thee; And often, in thy childish helplessness. The bosom of my dress with wine was drench'd; Such care I had of thee, such pains I took, Rememb'ring that by Heav'n's decree, no son Of mine I e'er might see; then thee I made, Achilles, rival of the Gods, my son, That thou mightst be the ...
— The Iliad • Homer

... holier love, Thou hast displayed? The Angel meek replied— Call rather fiends of hell those who abuse The mercies they receive: that such, indeed, 400 On whom the light of clearer knowledge beams, Should wander forth, and for the tender voice Of charity should scatter crimes and woe, And drench, where'er they pass, the earth with blood, Might make ev'n angels weep: But the poor tribes That groaned and died, deem not them innocent As injured; more ensanguined rites and deeds Of deepest stain ...
— The Poetical Works of William Lisle Bowles, Vol. 1 • William Lisle Bowles

... down and expiate Your crime with burning penitential tears— And if you 'scape the perils of the pass, And are not whelm'd beneath the drifted snows, That from the frozen peaks come sweeping down, You'll reach the bridge that's drench'd with drizzling spray. Then if it give not way beneath your guilt, When you have left it safely in your rear, Before you frowns the gloomy Gate of Rocks, Where never sun did shine. Proceed through this, And you will reach a bright and gladsome vale. Yet must you hurry on with hasty steps, You ...
— Wilhelm Tell - Title: William Tell • Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller

... Breeding, than at present they are. Indeed where any of the Guests are known to measure their Fame or Pleasure by their Glass, proper Exhortations might be used to these to push their Fortunes in this sort of Reputation; but where 'tis unseasonably insisted on to a modest Stranger, this Drench may be said to be swallowed with the same Necessity, as if it had been tendered in the Horn [1] for that purpose, with this aggravating Circumstance, that it distresses the Entertainer's Guest in the same degree ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... to the mowers in meaed, When the zun wer a-rose to his height, An' the men wer a-swingen the sneaed, Wi' their eaerms in white sleeves, left an' right; An' out there, as they rested at noon, O! they drench'd en vrom eaele-horns too deep, Till his thoughts wer a-drown'd in a swoon; Aye! his life wer ...
— Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect • William Barnes

... pour down Plata thro his tinctured bed. Rich with the spoils of many a distant mine, In his broad silver sea their floods combine; Wide over earth his annual freshet strays, And highland drains with lowland drench repays; Her thirsty regions wait his glad return, And drink their future ...
— The Columbiad • Joel Barlow

... timber, new railings," "drench for cows, from Farmer Hayes," "Dobson's accounts,"—'um 'um—here it is. Now read that letter,' handing it to ...
— Wives and Daughters • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... as giants atoned. Common sense, mediocrity—save upon the throne—were rare. Even the fools in their folly were great. The spectacle was recurrent of men who would smilingly stake a fortune as a wager, who could for hours drench their drink-sodden brains in wine, then rise like gods refreshed, and with an iron will throw off the stupor which bound them, to wield a flood of eloquence that swayed senates and ruled the fate of nations. Even the fops in their foppishness were of a ...
— The Letter-Bag of Lady Elizabeth Spencer-Stanhope v. I. • A. M. W. Stirling (compiler)

... Tempest blows; Where will this rough, rude Storm of Ruin end? What crimson Floods are yet to drench the Earth? What new-form'd Mischiefs hover in the Air, And point their Stings at this devoted Head? Has Fate exhausted all her Stores of Wrath, Or has she other Vengeance in reserve? What can she more? My Sons, my Name is gone; My Hopes all blasted, my Delights all fled; Nothing remains but an ...
— Ponteach - The Savages of America • Robert Rogers

... made available to 5,500,00 x3 telephone subscribers. A farmer may call central by telephone and learn with remarkable certainty what the weather for twenty-four hours will be, except in the case of local thunder showers which may drench his fields while passing ...
— Community Civics and Rural Life • Arthur W. Dunn

... heaves so effectually, that you may work, ride, or run him, and they cannot be detected. This will last from twelve to twenty-four hours, long enough to trade off. Drench the horse with one-fourth pound of common bird shot, and he will not heave until they ...
— Young's Demonstrative Translation of Scientific Secrets • Daniel Young

... two ounces of croquet-mallet and three arches of pergola, and reduce the whole to a fine powder. Drench with still lemonade and boil into a thick paste. Add two hundredweight of dandelions and plantains together with at least three pounds of garden-roller and five yards of wire-netting carefully grilled. Let this be roasted and basted for an hour and then flavoured with vantage. ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 152, May 16, 1917. • Various

... rain; but heavy drops yet fall From the drench'd roof;—yet murmurs the sunk wind Round the dim hills; can yet a passage find Whistling thro' yon cleft rock, and ruin'd wall. The swoln and angry torrents heard, appal, Tho' distant.—A few stars, emerging kind, Shed their green, trembling beams.—With lustre ...
— Original sonnets on various subjects; and odes paraphrased from Horace • Anna Seward

... chief .. officer of his ship. However it was, his orders were executed; and the Burtons were hoisted. .. In Sperm-whalemen with any considerable quantity of oil on board, it is a regular semi-weekly duty to conduct a hose into the hold, and drench the casks with sea-water; which afterwards, at varying intervals, is removed by the ship's pumps. Hereby the casks are sought to be kept damply tight; while by the changed character of the withdrawn water, the mariners readily detect any serious ...
— Moby-Dick • Melville

... Draigl't, draggled. Drant, prosing. Drap, drop. Draunting, tedious. Dree, endure, suffer. Dreigh, v. dreight. Dribble, drizzle. Driddle, to toddle. Dreigh, tedious, dull. Droddum, the breech. Drone, part of the bagpipe. Droop-rumpl't, short-rumped. Drouk, to wet, to drench. Droukit, wetted. Drouth, thirst. Drouthy, thirsty. Druken, drucken, drunken. Drumlie, muddy, turbid. Drummock, raw meal and cold water. Drunt, the huff. Dry, thirsty. Dub, puddle, slush. Duddie, ragged. Duddies, ...
— Poems And Songs Of Robert Burns • Robert Burns

... dined as we could, probably with a neighbor, and by quarter to eight in the evening the hickory fire in the hall was pouring a sheet of flame up the chimney, the house was in a drench of gas- light from the ground floor up, the guests were arriving, and there was a babble of hearty greetings, with not a voice in it that was not old and familiar and affectionate; and when the curtain ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... meal, substantial meal, full meal; blowout*; light refreshment; bara[obs3], chotahazri[obs3]; bara khana[obs3]. mouthful, bolus, gobbet[obs3], morsel, sop, sippet[obs3]. drink, beverage, liquor, broth, soup; potion, dram, draught, drench, swill*; nip, sip, sup, gulp. wine, spirits, liqueur, beer, ale, malt liquor, Sir John Barleycorn, stingo[obs3], heavy wet; grog, toddy, flip, purl, punch, negus[obs3], cup, bishop, wassail; gin &c. (intoxicating liquor) ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... Through the rough fir-planks 25 Of my hut, by the chestnuts, Up at the valley-head, Came breaking, Goddess! I sprang up, I threw round me My dappled fawn-skin; 30 Passing out, from the wet turf, Where they lay, by the hut door, I snatch'd up my vine-crown, my fir-staff, All drench'd in dew— Came swift down to join 35 The rout deg. early gather'd deg.36 In the town, round the temple, Iacchus' deg. white fane ...
— Matthew Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum and Other Poems • Matthew Arnold

... frog; I go into everything with a composed despair, and don't mind—just as I always go to sea with the conviction I am to be drowned, and like it before all other pleasures. But you should have seen the return voyage, when nineteen horses had to be found in the dark, and nineteen bridles, all in a drench of rain, and the club, just constituted as such, sailed away in the wet, under a cloudy moon like a bad shilling, and to descend a road through the forest that was at that moment the image of a respectable mountain brook. ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 25 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... stretched before me, I grew hungrier and hungrier. I could feel that I was becoming gaunt, and wasting away: already I seemed to be emaciated. It is astonishing how speedily a jocund, well-conditioned human being can be transformed into a spectacle of poverty and want, Lose a man in the Woods, drench him, tear his pantaloons, get his imagination running on his lost supper and the cheerful fireside that is expecting him, and he will become haggard in an hour. I am not dwelling upon these things to excite the reader's sympathy, but only to advise him, if he contemplates an adventure of this kind, ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... talk of Country Christmasses, Their thirty pound butter'd eggs, their pies of carps' tongues; Their pheasants drench'd with ambergris; the carcasses of three fat wethers bruised for gravy to make ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... they took it home, And then the prize was all for Isabel: She calm'd its wild hair with a golden comb, And all around each eye's sepulchral cell Pointed each fringed lash; the smeared loam With tears, as chilly as a dripping well, She drench'd away:—and still she comb'd, and kept Sighing all day—and ...
— Keats: Poems Published in 1820 • John Keats

... Dr. Drench was of course instantly sent for. But what are the medicaments of the apothecary in a case where the grave gives up its dead? Dr. Sly arrived, and he offered ghostly—ah! too ghostly—consolation. He said he believed in them. His own grandmother had appeared to his grandfather several ...
— Stories of Comedy • Various

... the citizen about the foot and mouth disease and the cattle traders and taking action in the matter and the citizen sending them all to the rightabout and Bloom coming out with his sheepdip for the scab and a hoose drench for coughing calves and the guaranteed remedy for timber tongue. Because he was up one time in a knacker's yard. Walking about with his book and pencil here's my head and my heels are coming till Joe Cuffe gave him the order of the boot for giving lip to a grazier. Mister Knowall. Teach your ...
— Ulysses • James Joyce

... he'd still got the "bother o' dyin' before him." He was certain we should lose the war, and the rush of the September victories did not affect him. And if we didn't lose it, no matter—prices and wages would still be enough to ruin us. Rachel grew impatient under the constant drench of pessimism. Janet remembered that the man was a delicate man, nearing the sixties, with, as she suspected, but small provision laid up for old age; with an ailing wife; and bearing the marks in body and spirit of years of overwork. ...
— Harvest • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... title-page of the Kerr acting edition runs as follows: "Rip Van Winkle; A Legend of Sleepy Hollow. A Romantic Drama in Two Acts. Adapted from Washington Irving's Sketch-Book by John Kerr, Author of 'Therese', 'Presumptive Guilt', 'Wandering Boys', 'Michael and Christine', 'Drench'd and Dried', 'Robert Bruce', &c., &c. With Some Alterations, by Thomas Hailes Lacy. Theatrical Publisher. London." The Burke version, used here as a basis, follows the acting text, without stage positions, published by Samuel French. An opera on the subject of "Rip Van Winkle," ...
— Representative Plays by American Dramatists: 1856-1911: Rip van - Winkle • Charles Burke

... reflections of that moment to some who beheld him!—memory running back, perhaps, to that day in May, 1861, when Jefferson Davis, their President, entered the city,—the pageant of that hour, his speech, his promise to smite the smiter, to drench the fields of Virginia with richer blood than that shed at Buena Vista! How that part of the promise had been kept!—how their sons, brothers, and friends had fallen!—how all else predicted had failed!—how the land had been filled with mourning!—how the State had become ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 92, June, 1865 • Various

... us to use our prahus until we reached the foot of the dividing ridge. At noon we arrived in camp, with our clothing thoroughly wet. What the downpour might have left intact the Penyahbongs, forgetting everything but the safety of the prahus, had done their best to drench by splashing water all the time. Just as we had made camp the rain ceased and with it, being near the source of the stream, the overflow too passed away. In dry weather it would be a tedious trip to get ...
— Through Central Borneo: - An Account of Two Years' Travel in the Land of Head-Hunters - Between the Years 1913 and 1917 • Carl Lumholtz

... bacon in the forrard hold! Pile it in! Levy on that turpentine in the fantail-drench every stick of wood ...
— The Gilded Age, Part 1. • Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) and Charles Dudley Warner

... and crack your cheeks! rage! blow! You cataracts and hurricanoes spout Till you have drench'd our steeples, drown'd the cocks! You sulphurous thought-executing fires Vaunt-couriers of oak-cleaving thunderbolts Singe my white head! And thou, all shaking thunder, Strike flat the thick rotundity o' the world! Crack nature's moulds, all germons ...
— Swan Song • Anton Checkov

... cold Neglect had chill'd thy soul, 5 Athirst for Death I see thee drench the bowl! Thy corpse of many a livid hue On the bare ground I view, Whilst various passions all my mind engage; Now is my breast distended with a sigh, 10 And now a flash of Rage Darts through the tear, that glistens in ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... added. After full dilatation has been accomplished and the membranes can serve no further purpose, they rupture; as the midwife puts it, "the bag of waters breaks." The quantity of fluid which escapes will vary. Occasionally, a huge gush will drench the patient's clothing; but more often what is lost at first amounts to only a few teaspoonfuls, though small quantities of fluid often ...
— The Prospective Mother - A Handbook for Women During Pregnancy • J. Morris Slemons



Words linked to "Drench" :   imbibe, brine, impregnate, wet, fauna, draggle, brute, provide, soak, ply, flood, douse, bedraggle, ret, saturate, sluice, sop, animal, bate, swamp, imbrue, flush, drink, beast, cater



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