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Famish   Listen
verb
Famish  v. t.  (past & past part. famished; pres. part. famishing)  
1.
To starve, kill, or destroy with hunger.
2.
To exhaust the strength or endurance of, by hunger; to distress with hanger. "And when all the land of Egypt was famished, the people cried to Pharaoh for bread." "The pains of famished Tantalus he'll feel."
3.
To kill, or to cause to suffer extremity, by deprivation or denial of anything necessary. "And famish him of breath, if not of bread."
4.
To force or constrain by famine. "He had famished Paris into a surrender."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Famish" Quotes from Famous Books



... thy lips with loath'd satiety, But rather famish them amid their plenty, 20 Making them red and pale with fresh variety; Ten kisses short as one, one long as twenty: A summer's day will seem an hour but short, Being wasted in such time-beguiling ...
— Venus and Adonis • William Shakespeare

... fain to beg the servants would bring her secretly a morsel of food; but they being instructed by Petruchio, replied, they dared not give her anything unknown to their master. 'Ah,' said she, 'did he marry me to famish me? Beggars that come to my father's door have food given them. But I, who never knew what it was to entreat for anything, am starved for want of food, giddy for want of sleep, with oaths kept waking, and with brawling ...
— Tales from Shakespeare • Charles and Mary Lamb

... fishes snaring roamed, by famine urged) And standing at my side, me thus bespake. Stranger! thou must be ideot born, or weak At least in intellect, or thy delight Is in distress and mis'ry, who delay'st To leave this island, and no egress hence Canst find, although thy famish'd people faint. So spake the Goddess, and I thus replied. I tell thee, whosoever of the Pow'rs 460 Divine thou art, that I am prison'd here Not willingly, but must have, doubtless, sinn'd Against the deathless tenants of ...
— The Odyssey of Homer • Homer

... Bourdeaux, real red rosy wine, Which you quaff at a draught, neat nectar, divine! Thus they pamper the taste with everything good And of an old shoe can make savoury food, But the worst of it is that when you have done You are nearly as famish'd as when you begun!" ...
— My Life as an Author • Martin Farquhar Tupper

... streams and rills, And to their borders lifts them high; Or else withdraws The mighty cause, And leaves their famish'd channels dry. ...
— The Poetical Works of Edward Young, Volume 2 • Edward Young

... reach the topmost stair To find no wide eyes watching there, No wither'd welcome waiting thy return! A passing ghost, a smoke-wreath in the air, The flameless ashes, and the soulless urn, Warm with the famish'd fire that lived to burn— Burn out its lingering life for thy return, Its last of lingering life for thy return, Its last of lingering life to light thy ...
— Book of English Verse • Bulchevy

... to the same Sepulchre, and cryed with a lowd voice, saying: o yee dead spirites whom I have so highly and greatly offended, vouchsafe to receive me, behold I make Sacrifice unto you with my whole body: which said, hee closed the Sepulchre, purposing to famish himselfe, and to finish his life there in sorrow. These things the young man with pitifull sighes and teares, declared unto the Cowheards and Shepheards, which caused them all to weepe: but they fearing to become subject unto new masters, prepared themselves ...
— The Golden Asse • Lucius Apuleius

... from attack but in the event of a siege their safety would only be temporary. With their scant water supply at a distance and unprotected they could not hold out long in a siege, but would soon be compelled either to fight, fly or famish. ...
— Arizona Sketches • Joseph A. Munk

... must be relied on to defend Richmond. These men are mainly clerks and employees of the departments, who have just been insulted by the government, being informed that no increased compensation will be allowed them because they are able to bear arms. In other words, they must famish for subsistence, and their families with them, because they happen to be of fighting age, and have been patriotic enough to volunteer for the defense of the government, and have drilled, and paraded, ...
— A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital • John Beauchamp Jones

... And these poor hand-loom weavers, first to suffer from every crisis, and last to be relieved from it, must serve the bourgeoisie as a handle in meeting attacks upon the factory system. "See," cries the bourgeois, triumphantly, "see how these poor creatures must famish, while the mill operatives are thriving, and then judge the factory {140} system!" As though it were not precisely the factory system and the machinery belonging to it which had so shamefully crushed the hand-loom ...
— The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844 - with a Preface written in 1892 • Frederick Engels

... here, left 'a l'abandon;' without which means they had all fallen into wild and shameful disorder, to her Majesty's great disgrace and overthrow of her service. I am compelled, unless I would see the poor men famish, and her Majesty dishonoured, to try my ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... friends, I'll make fair 'mends For my foul errors past, and twenty-fold Restore to all men, what with wrong I robb'd them: My barns and garners shall stand open still To all the poor that come, and my best grain Be made alms-bread, to feed half-famish'd mouths. Though hitherto amongst you I have lived, Like an unsavoury muck-hill to myself, Yet now my gather'd heaps being spread abroad, Shall turn to better and more fruitful uses. Bless then this man, curse him no more for the saving My life and soul together. O how deeply ...
— Every Man Out Of His Humour • Ben Jonson

... all to one appetite, shall starve all the rest. You shall have some that live only in their palates, and in their sense of tasting shall drown the other four: others are only epicures in appearances, such who shall starve their nights to make a figure a days, and famish their own to feed the eyes of others: a contrary sort confine their pleasures to the dark, and contract their specious acres to the ...
— The Beaux-Stratagem • George Farquhar

... Now tyres the famish'd Eagle on his pray, Incorporating his rude lips in hers, Sucking her balmey breath soft as he may: Which did more vigor, through his brest disperse, Such kisses louers vse at first conuerse. All parts were ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... on the sweet springing grass down by the side of blue Gennesaret is an emblem of the whole work of the Church in this starving world. The multitudes famish. Tell Christ of their wants. Count your own small resources till you have completely learned your poverty, then take them to Jesus. He will accept them, and in His hands they will become mighty, being transfigured from ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - St. Matthew Chaps. IX to XXVIII • Alexander Maclaren

... the gems of India's gaudy zone, And plunder piled from kingdoms not their own, Degenerate trade! thy minions could despise Thy heart-born anguish of a thousand cries: Could lock, with impious hands, their teeming store, While famish'd nations died along the shore; Could mock the groans of fellow men, and bear The curse of kingdoms, peopled with despair; Could stamp disgrace on man's polluted name, And barter with ...
— Newton Forster - The Merchant Service • Captain Frederick Marryat

... hear that little wail in the trees—as if a child were whimpering out there? That is the plaint of the fairies who live in the buds and twigs, in the flower cups and mosses. They famish, their gods will hear. Their gods hear when ours is deaf. You will see. There will be clouds over us to-morrow and we will ...
— The Hollow of Her Hand • George Barr McCutcheon

... very numerous, some Gentlemen having Hundreds of them of all Sorts, to whom they bring great Profit; for the Sake of which they are obliged to keep them well, and not over-work, starve, or famish them, besides other Inducements to favour them; which is done in a great Degree, to such especially that are laborious, careful, and honest; tho' indeed some Masters, careless of their own Interest or Reputation, ...
— The Present State of Virginia • Hugh Jones

... than their Fathers did their Shillings to one another. As to any other Improvements, and particularly as to Learning, Virtue, or Piety, (which probably were over-look'd in the Account) they poor famish'd Devils, cou'd tell me nothing ...
— A Dialogue Between Dean Swift and Tho. Prior, Esq. • Anonymous

... little breakfast that morning, and verily I thought I should famish before their dinner hour arrived; and when at last it came, and I saw the table glittering with silver, I felt many misgivings as to my ability to acquit myself creditably. But by dint of watching Nellie, doing just what she did, and refusing just ...
— Homestead on the Hillside • Mary Jane Holmes

... his Aldermanship: an the whole Bench were such notable Swingers, 'twould famish the City sooner than ...
— The Works of Aphra Behn - Volume IV. • Aphra Behn

... doing a famish here, sitting with your tongues hanging out," he laughed, "so I've brought you a few more raisins." And dismounting, he drew out from a pack-bag a long calico bag containing quite ten ...
— We of the Never-Never • Jeanie "Mrs. Aeneas" Gunn

... great. Sorry am I his numbers are so few, His soldiers sick, and famish'd in their march; For, I am sure, when he shall see our army, He'll drop his heart into the sink of fear, And, for achievement offer ...
— King Henry the Fifth - Arranged for Representation at the Princess's Theatre • William Shakespeare

... to the soul by his neglect, and unkind treatment, actually resolved to famish herself; and injured her health by the attempt; though she had not sufficient resolution to adhere to her project, or renounce it entirely. Death came not at her call; yet sorrow, and the methods she adopted to conceal her condition, still doing ...
— Posthumous Works - of the Author of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman • Mary Wollstonecraft

... pain, Men really know not what good water's worth: If you had been in Turkey or in Spain, Or with a famish'd boat's crew had your berth, Or in the desert heard the camel's bell, You'd wish yourself where truth is—in a well. 2031 BYRON: Don Juan, Canto ii., ...
— Handy Dictionary of Poetical Quotations • Various

... fiercely will it burn "To the last particle; but when the earth "Fuel and oily nutriment no more "The flame shall give; a tedious length of years "Its force exhausting, and its nutriment "By nature's tooth consum'd, the famish'd flames "Will this desert, deserted by their food. "Fame says, the men who in Pallene live, "A northern clime, when nine times in the lake "Tritonian plung'd, in plumage light are clad. "This scarce can I believe. They also tell "That Scythia's females, sprinkling ...
— The Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidus Naso in English blank verse Vols. I & II • Ovid

... Disraeli and Mr. Thackeray. In "Vanity Fair" we find it described as the temporary abode of the impecunious Colonel Crawley, and Moss describes his uncomfortable past and present guests in a manner worthy of Fielding himself. There is the "Honourable Capting Famish, of the Fiftieth Dragoons, whose 'mar' had just taken him out after a fortnight, jest to punish him, who punished the champagne, and had a party every night of regular tip-top swells down from the clubs at the West End; and Capting Ragg and the Honourable Deuceace, who lived, when at home, in ...
— Old and New London - Volume I • Walter Thornbury

... the Use of their Master.... The Negroes are very numerous, some Gentlemen having Hundreds of them of all Sorts, to whom they bring great Profitt; for the Sake of which they are obliged to keep them well, and not over-work, starve or famish them, besides other Inducements to favour them; which is done in a great Degree, to such especially that are laborious, careful and honest; tho' indeed some Masters, careless of their own Interest or deputation, ...
— Pioneers of the Old South - A Chronicle of English Colonial Beginnings, Volume 5 In - The Chronicles Of America Series • Mary Johnston

... Twice two hundred vassals bend, Hail him as their guardian friend; Mock thee writhing with the wound, Bid thee bite the dusty ground; Leave thee suffering, scorn'd alone, To die unpitied and unknown. Be thy nacked carcase strew'd, To give the famish'd eagles food; Sea-mews screaming on the shore, Dip their beaks, and drink thy gore. Be thy fiend-fir'd spirit borne, Wreck'd upon the fiery tide, An age of agony abide. But soft, the morning-bell beats one, ...
— Translations of German Poetry in American Magazines 1741-1810 • Edward Ziegler Davis

... holidays from the vast majority of Irish Protestant proprietors,—do you avow yourselves to be in the position of landowners, who stand in no relation of aristocracy or leadership, government or guidance, succour or solace to millions of the people, who famish on the territorial possessions from which you derive your titles, your importance, your influence, your wealth. Has confiscation been mellowed into the legal semblance of undisputed succession, only to bring about ...
— The History of the Great Irish Famine of 1847 (3rd ed.) (1902) - With Notices Of Earlier Irish Famines • John O'Rourke

... swelled; and five is an unnatural number to keep dry, in a hurry-skurry, with a little birchen bark and gum. There, go you all on the rock, and I will bring up the Mohicans with the venison. A man had better sleep without his scalp, than famish in the ...
— The Last of the Mohicans • James Fenimore Cooper

... reminded me of Naphtali, which, indeed, had something to do with my attachment for him. My relations toward him echoed with the feelings I used to have for the reticent, omniscient boy of Abner's Court, and with the hoarse, studious young Talmudist with whom I would "famish in company." He had neither Naphtali's brains nor his individuality, yet I looked up to him and ...
— The Rise of David Levinsky • Abraham Cahan

... they would approve of his good intent, and not seek to dehort him from it:" and so constantly died, precesque eorum taciturna sua obstinatione depressit. Even so did Corellius Rufus, another grave senator, by the relation of Plinius Secundus, epist. lib. 1. epist. 12. famish himself to death; pedibus correptus cum incredibiles cruciatus et indignissima tormenta pateretur, a cibis omnino abstinuit; [2768]neither he nor Hispilla his wife could divert him, but destinatus mori obstinate magis, &c. die he would, and die he did. So did Lycurgus, Aristotle, ...
— The Anatomy of Melancholy • Democritus Junior

... a famish'd wolf, that all night long Had ranged the Alpine snows, by chance at morn Sees from a cliff, incumbent o'er the smoke Of some lone village, a neglected kid That strays along the wild for herb or spring; Down from the winding ridge he sweeps amain, And ...
— Poetical Works of Akenside - [Edited by George Gilfillan] • Mark Akenside

... so just and so powerful as to inspire him with such astonishing confidence? In deciding upon the destruction of Moscow, his principal aim was not to famish the enemy, since he had contrived to clear that great city of provisions; nor to deprive the French army of shelter, since it was impossible to suppose that out of eight thousand houses and churches, dispersed over so vast a space, there should not be left buildings ...
— History of the Expedition to Russia - Undertaken by the Emperor Napoleon in the Year 1812 • Count Philip de Segur

... it so; yourself, if so you please, Will I attend upon, and both us wait On chaste Matilda's body, which with speed To Windsor Castle we will hence convey. There is another spectacle of ruth, Old Bruce's famish'd ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... manners he to teach was sent. Chastised he ought to have retreated home, But he reads politics to Absalom. For never Hebronite, though kick'd and scorn'd, To his own country willingly return'd. —But leaving famish'd Phaleg to be fed, 350 And to talk treason for his daily bread, Let Hebron, nay let hell, produce a man So made for mischief as Ben-Jochanan. A Jew of humble parentage was he, By trade a Levite, though of low degree: His pride no higher than the desk aspired, But ...
— The Poetical Works of John Dryden, Vol I - With Life, Critical Dissertation, and Explanatory Notes • John Dryden

... my curse to see thee and to learn That I must shun thee, though I blaze and burn With all this longing, all this fierce delight Fear-fraught and famish'd for a suitor's right; A right conceded for a moment's space And then withdrawn as, amorous face to face, I dared to clasp thee and to urge a troth Too sovereign-sweet for one of ...
— A Lover's Litanies • Eric Mackay

... that they were deceived, and neither met their parents nor any that they desired, but were compelled to undergo grievous sovereignty and command, and to endure cruel and extreme labour, they either slew themselves, or, choosing to famish, gave up their fair spirits, being persuaded by no reason or violence to take food. So these miserable Yucatans ...
— Short Studies on Great Subjects • James Anthony Froude

... in the administration of his province; that is to say, he returned in a short time with considerable military glory, and with money enough to pay all his debts, and famish him with means for ...
— History of Julius Caesar • Jacob Abbott

... on this important hour, And give at length my famish'd soul revenge! What is revenge, but courage to call in Our honour's debts, and wisdom to convert Others' self-love into our own protection? But see, the morning dawn breaks in upon us; I'll seek don Carlos, and inquire ...
— The Revenge - A Tragedy • Edward Young



Words linked to "Famish" :   decease, pop off, exit, give-up the ghost, choke, suffer, croak, pass away, conk, snuff it, cash in one's chips, die, deprive, starve, hurt, perish, buy the farm, hunger, kick the bucket, go, pass, feed, drop dead, be full, expire



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