Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Field   Listen
noun
field  n.  
1.
Cleared land; land suitable for tillage or pasture; cultivated ground; the open country.
2.
A piece of land of considerable size; esp., a piece inclosed for tillage or pasture. "Fields which promise corn and wine."
3.
A place where a battle is fought; also, the battle itself. "In this glorious and well-foughten field." "What though the field be lost?"
4.
An open space; an extent; an expanse. Esp.:
(a)
Any blank space or ground on which figures are drawn or projected.
(b)
The space covered by an optical instrument at one view; as, wide-field binoculars. "Without covering, save yon field of stars." "Ask of yonder argent fields above."
5.
(Her.) The whole surface of an escutcheon; also, so much of it is shown unconcealed by the different bearings upon it.
6.
An unresticted or favorable opportunity for action, operation, or achievement; province; room. "Afforded a clear field for moral experiments."
7.
(Sports) An open, usually flat, piece of land on which a sports contest is played; a playing field; as, a football field; a baseball field.
Synonyms: playing field, athletic field, playing area.
8.
Specifically: (Baseball) That part of the grounds reserved for the players which is outside of the diamond; called also outfield.
9.
A geographic region (land or sea) which has some notable feature, activity or valuable resource; as, the diamond fields of South Africa; an oil field; a gold field; an ice field.
10.
A facility having an airstrip where airplanes can take off and land; an airfield.
Synonyms: airfield, landing field, flying field, aerodrome.
11.
A collective term for all the competitors in any outdoor contest or trial, or for all except the favorites in the betting.
12.
A branch of knowledge or sphere of activity; especially, a learned or professional discipline; as, she's an expert in the field of geology; in what field did she get her doctorate?; they are the top company in the field of entertainment.
Synonyms: discipline, subject, subject area, subject field, field of study, study, branch of knowledge. Note: Within the master text files of this electronic dictionary, where a word is used in a specific sense in some specialized field of knowledge, that field is indicated by the tags: () preceding that sense of the word.
13.
A location, usually outdoors, away from a studio or office or library or laboratory, where practical work is done or data is collected; as, anthropologists do much of their work in the field; the paleontologist is in the field collecting specimens. Usually used in the phrase in the field.
14.
(Physics) The influence of a physical object, such as an electrically charged body, which is capable of exerting force on objects at a distance; also, the region of space over which such an influence is effective; as, the earth's gravitational field; an electrical field; a magnetic field; a force field.
15.
(Math.) A set of elements within which operations can be defined analagous to the operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division on the real numbers; within such a set of elements addition and multiplication are commutative and associative and multiplication is distributive over addition and there are two elements 0 and 1; a commutative division ring; as, the set of all rational numbers is a field. Note: Field is often used adjectively in the sense of belonging to, or used in, the fields; especially with reference to the operations and equipments of an army during a campaign away from permanent camps and fortifications. In most cases such use of the word is sufficiently clear; as, field battery; field fortification; field gun; field hospital, etc. A field geologist, naturalist, etc., is one who makes investigations or collections out of doors. A survey uses a field book for recording field notes, i.e., measurment, observations, etc., made in field work (outdoor operations). A farmer or planter employs field hands, and may use a field roller or a field derrick. Field sports are hunting, fishing, athletic games, etc.
Coal field (Geol.) See under Coal.
Field artillery, light ordnance mounted on wheels, for the use of a marching army.
Field basil (Bot.), a plant of the Mint family (Calamintha Acinos); called also basil thyme.
Field colors (Mil.), small flags for marking out the positions for squadrons and battalions; camp colors.
Field cricket (Zool.), a large European cricket (Gryllus campestric), remarkable for its loud notes.
Field day.
(a)
A day in the fields.
(b)
(Mil.) A day when troops are taken into the field for instruction in evolutions.
(c)
A day of unusual exertion or display; a gala day.
Field driver, in New England, an officer charged with the driving of stray cattle to the pound.
Field duck (Zool.), the little bustard (Otis tetrax), found in Southern Europe.
Field glass. (Optics)
(a)
A binocular telescope of compact form; a lorgnette; a race glass.
(b)
A small achromatic telescope, from 20 to 24 inches long, and having 3 to 6 draws.
(c)
See Field lens.
Field lark. (Zool.)
(a)
The skylark.
(b)
The tree pipit.
Field lens (Optics), that one of the two lenses forming the eyepiece of an astronomical telescope or compound microscope which is nearer the object glass; called also field glass.
Field madder (Bot.), a plant (Sherardia arvensis) used in dyeing.
Field marshal (Mil.), the highest military rank conferred in the British and other European armies.
Field officer (Mil.), an officer above the rank of captain and below that of general.
Field officer's court (U.S.Army), a court-martial consisting of one field officer empowered to try all cases, in time of war, subject to jurisdiction of garrison and regimental courts.
Field plover (Zool.), the black-bellied plover (Charadrius squatarola); also sometimes applied to the Bartramian sandpiper (Bartramia longicauda).
Field spaniel (Zool.), a small spaniel used in hunting small game.
Field sparrow. (Zool.)
(a)
A small American sparrow (Spizella pusilla).
(b)
The hedge sparrow. (Eng.)
Field staff (Mil.), a staff formerly used by gunners to hold a lighted match for discharging a gun.
Field vole (Zool.), the European meadow mouse.
Field of ice, a large body of floating ice; a pack.
Field of view (or Field), in a telescope or microscope, the entire space within which objects are seen.
Field magnet. see under Magnet.
Magnetic field. See Magnetic.
To back the field, or To bet on the field. See under Back, v. t. To keep the field.
(a)
(Mil.) To continue a campaign.
(b)
To maintain one's ground against all comers.
To lay against the field or To back against the field, to bet on (a horse, etc.) against all comers.
To take the field (Mil.), to enter upon a campaign.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Field" Quotes from Famous Books



... farming in this country, it was the custom to grow a single crop, which had been found to give good results, year after year in the same field. In Virginia and other near-by states nearly all the best land was given every year to the cultivation of tobacco, which exhausts the soil rapidly. In the states farther north other crops were planted in the same way. As a result, some of the most fertile ...
— Checking the Waste - A Study in Conservation • Mary Huston Gregory

... stories about their elders, when they were children; to stretch their imagination to the conception of a traditionary great-uncle, or grandame, whom they never saw. It was in this spirit that my little ones crept about me the other evening to hear about their great-grandmother Field, who lived in a great house in Norfolk—a hundred times bigger than that in which they and papa lived—which had been the scene—so at least it was generally believed in that part of the country—of the tragic ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Vol. V (of X) - Great Britain and Ireland III • Various

... the bad faith of M. de Conde, Concini was nevertheless compelled to follow this interested suggestion; but, before he left the field open to his enemies, he resolved to strike a parting blow; and he had accordingly no sooner dismissed the messenger of the Prince than he proceeded to the Louvre, where, while taking leave of the Queen-mother, he eagerly impressed upon her that she was alike ...
— The Life of Marie de Medicis, Vol. 2 (of 3) • Julia Pardoe

... green with a vertical white band (symbolizing the role of religious minorities) on the hoist side; a large white crescent and star are centered in the green field; the crescent, star, and color green are traditional ...
— The 1998 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... morally nearer to us, are prepared without knowing it to receive our intellectual and social influence in other fields, are made in greater or less degree to resemble us. Indeed, it can be said, that, material interests apart, Rome is still in the mental field the strongest bond that holds together the most diverse peoples of Europe; that it unites the French, the English, the Germans, in an ideal identity which overcomes in part the diversity in speech, in traditions, in geographical ...
— Characters and events of Roman History • Guglielmo Ferrero

... beauty, and sublimity of their language, or receive into his heart all its peculiarity of meaning, unless his own eye had been used to trace the skill of that hand which framed and fashioned every thing that is, and to descry the delicacy of that pencil which has painted all the flowers of the field, nor unless his own ear has learned to perceive the melody ...
— Popular Education - For the use of Parents and Teachers, and for Young Persons of Both Sexes • Ira Mayhew

... the ground, a start was made upon the oats by the three machines belonging to Mr. Wood, Messrs. Samuelson & Co., and the Johnston Harvester Company. It should, perhaps, be mentioned that the strength of this crop of oats varied a good deal in different parts of the field. These three machines all belong to the class which has the automatic trip—that is, the binding gear is thrown into action by the pressure of the straw accumulated arriving at a certain value, independently of any special action on the part of the driver. The sheaves from Messrs. Samuelson's ...
— Scientific American Suppl. No. 299 • Various

... maxims of the Spartans, not to press upon a flying army, and, therefore, their enemies were always ready to quit the field, because they knew the danger was only in opposing. The civility with which you have thought proper to treat me, when you had incontestable superiority, has inclined me to make your victory complete, ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes - Volume V: Miscellaneous Pieces • Samuel Johnson

... describes the combat in this quarter of the field:—"When the light broke, three heavy masses detached from the sixth corps were seen to enter the woods below, and to throw forward a profusion of skirmishers; one of them, under General Marchand, emerging from the dark chasm and following the main road, seemed intent to turn ...
— The Young Buglers • G.A. Henty

... the wish you expressed not long ago," said Leif laughing. "Would that thou wert a man, Freydissa, for assuredly a spirit like thine is invaluable on the field of battle." ...
— The Norsemen in the West • R.M. Ballantyne

... Num. 14, 18: The innocent shall not be innocent [cf. Ex. 34, 7]. Deut. 4, 24: The Lord, thy God, is a consuming fire. Zechariah also says, 2, 13: Be silent, O all flesh, before the Lord. Is. 40, 6: All flesh is as grass, and all the goodliness thereof is as the flower of the field; the grass withereth, the flower fadeth, because the Spirit of the Lord bloweth upon it, i. e., flesh and righteousness of the flesh cannot endure the judgment of God. Jonah also says, chap. 2, 8: They that observe lying ...
— The Apology of the Augsburg Confession • Philip Melanchthon

... for the man. To Heine, Napoleon was the incarnation of the French Revolution, the glorious new-comer who took by storm the intrenched strongholds of hereditary privilege, the dauntless leader in whose army every common soldier carried a field marshal's baton in his knapsack. If later we find Heine mercilessly assailing the repressive and reactionary aristocracy of Germany, we shall not lightly accuse him of lack of patriotism. He could not be expected to hold dear institutions of which he felt ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. VI. • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... important strides have been made elsewhere in the investigation of social conditions and in the administration of State and municipal affairs, in civil-service reform, in the management of penal and charitable institutions, and in the field of education, the South ...
— The Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, 1995, Memorial Issue • Various

... had to be dragged in by the scruff of our necks. The short armistice over, the combat was resumed; but presently Charlotte and I, a little weary of contests and of missiles that ran shudderingly down inside one's clothes, forsook the trampled battle-field of the lawn and went exploring the blank virgin spaces of the white world that lay beyond. It stretched away unbroken on every side of us, this mysterious soft garment under which our familiar world had so suddenly hidden itself. Faint ...
— Dream Days • Kenneth Grahame

... forest with his rescued mate had witnessed slight diminution of the mighty powers that had made him the invincible lord of the jungle. His great estates in Uziri had claimed much of his time and attention, and there he had found ample field for the practical use and retention of his almost superhuman powers; but naked and unarmed to do battle with the shaggy, bull-necked beast that now confronted him was a test that the ape-man would scarce have welcomed at any ...
— The Beasts of Tarzan • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... which, although it has been the means of buoying me up with false hopes, I can never regret, from the pleasure her society has afforded me. I have remarked, on my mentioning his name to her, that she showed unusual emotion; and as Denbigh is already a husband, and myself rejected, the field is now fairly open to you. You will enter on your enterprise with great advantage, as you have the same flattering resemblance, and, if anything, the voice, which, I am told, is our greatest recommendation with ...
— Precaution • James Fenimore Cooper

... to get in the crotch of a hickory tree at the end. Was so exhausted he couldn't stir a foot when the hounds got him." While they waited at the crossroads before a little country store, where the pack of hounds, lean, cringing, habitually hungry creatures, started from beneath an old field pine on the right, Virginia heard the broken phrases blown on the wind, which carried the joyous notes of the horn over the meadows. The casual cruelty of the words awoke no protest in her mind, because it was a cruelty to which she was accustomed. If the sport had been unknown in Dinwiddie, ...
— Virginia • Ellen Glasgow

... actually sweet violets growing in a field on the opposite side of the river," said Edith, who ...
— Monitress Merle • Angela Brazil

... took the field a day or two afterward. Bedient was not at all himself.... In all the months that followed meeting David Cairns in Alphonso, the Block-House incident was too close and horrible for words—though Bedient spoke of Adelaide and the great wind and ...
— Fate Knocks at the Door - A Novel • Will Levington Comfort

... in his silken skies, Nor delicate ardours of the yellow land; Yea, dead, for all its gold, the woodland lies, And all the throats of music filled with sand. Neither to him across the stubble field May stack nor garner any comfort bring, Who loveth more this jasmine he hath made, The little tender rhyme he yet can sing, Than yesterday, with all its pompous yield, Or all its shaken laurels ...
— English Poems • Richard Le Gallienne

... sheep. I have found them, here a Jesuit, there a Presbyterian, winning my friendship and my admiration, despite fundamental differences of belief about many things. There are few Germans among them! Even in this field Germany produces theological controversialists whom we have all studied, orthodox and destructive, but few pioneers, and practically no Augustines or Loyolas, Wesleys or Booths, Livingstones or Stanleys. Columba, an Irish refugee, founded on the island of ...
— Germany and the Germans - From an American Point of View (1913) • Price Collier

... has one powerful virtue to boast Above all the flowers of the field— When its leaves are all dead, and fine colours are lost, Still how sweet a ...
— The Royal Guide to Wax Flower Modelling • Emma Peachey

... field of sight is equally puzzling, and can only be drawn rightly on the same difficult conditions. Try it fairly. Take the commonest, closest, most familiar thing, and strive to draw it verily as you see it. Be sure of this last fact, for otherwise you will find yourself continually drawing, not ...
— Modern Painters, Volume IV (of V) • John Ruskin

... mother, as of someone who, after gently and vaguely fumbling about for a clue to her own meaning in new conditions, had suddenly found something to which she held very firmly. Imogen was rejoiced for her that she should find a field of real usefulness-were it only that of housekeeping and seeing to weekly bills; but there was certainly a touch of the inappropriate, perhaps of the grotesque, in any assumption on her mother's part of maturity and competence. She therefore smiled back at her with much ...
— A Fountain Sealed • Anne Douglas Sedgwick

... were about the lions. The serviceable one who found a resting-place in a field for Mary the Egyptian; the flaming lion who protected virgins or maidens in danger; and then the lion of Saint Jerome, to whose care an ass had been confided, and, when the animal was stolen, went in search of him and brought him back. There was also the penitent wolf, who had restored a little ...
— The Dream • Emile Zola

... working on these figures I noticed a lack of a period of "double digit inflation" commonly referred to in most all recent reports on these economic trends. I checked this with local sources in the field, and was given the following figures which did include [just barely] some "double digit inflation", but only for a few years of ...
— Price/Cost Indexes from 1875 to 1989 - Estimated to 2010 • United States

... Peyrade, bereft of Corentin, but seconded by Contenson, still kept up his disguise as a nabob. Even though his invisible foes had discovered him, he very wisely reflected that he might glean some light on the matter by remaining on the field of the contest. ...
— Scenes from a Courtesan's Life • Honore de Balzac

... Colt learned to walk steadily and turn as her driver wished, she was allowed to draw a light log through the furrows of a field. This tired her, but it made her very proud, and she arched her neck and took the daintiest of steps. It was not necessary that the log should be drawn over the field; still, she did not know this, and thought it was ...
— Among the Farmyard People • Clara Dillingham Pierson

... the 31st of May, in order to prevent their own ruin. But the Mountain, on two occasions, had diverted the assembly from this discussion by two coups d'etat, the trial of Louis XVI., and the elimination of the Gironde. Masters of the field, they now endeavoured to secure the republicans by decreeing the constitution. Herault de Sechelles was the legislator of the Mountain, as Condorcet had been of the Gironde. In a few days, this new constitution was adopted in ...
— History of the French Revolution from 1789 to 1814 • F. A. M. Mignet

... human association made great and varied development. The gap between the men of Santander's caves, or early Egypt, and the civilization of a century ago is bridged rather by union of human powers, by the needs and stimulating contacts of society, than by conquest in the field of nature. It was in military, political, and religious organization that the power of associated effort was first shown. Army, state, and hierarchy were its visible representatives. Then, a little over a century ago, began what we call the industrial revolution, still incomplete, which combined ...
— The Ethics of Coperation • James Hayden Tufts

... went up from the grand stand! What joy was in Remsen's heart as the St. Eustace full-back went trotting up the field and Greer stooped over the ball! Then came a pause, a silence. Every one knew what to look for. Squarely between the posts and directly under the cross-bar stood Joel March, his left foot on the goal-line. Back came the ball, straight and low into Joel's outstretched hands. The line blocked ...
— The Half-Back • Ralph Henry Barbour

... creation stood in the center of a vast pumpkin-field, where the vines grew in profusion and bore pumpkins of extraordinary size as well as those which were smaller. Some of the pumpkins now ripening on the vines were almost as large as Jack's house, and he told Dorothy ...
— The Patchwork Girl of Oz • L. Frank Baum

... take it, and Allan, too, down the mountain at three o'clock. In the spring of 1861, one out of every two Confederate privates had a trunk. One must preserve the decencies of life; one must make a good appearance in the field! Allan's was small and modest enough, God knows! but such as it was it had not occurred to him to doubt the propriety of taking it. It stood there neatly packed, the shirts that Sairy had been ironing laid atop. The young man, kneeling beside it, placed in this or that corner the last few articles ...
— The Long Roll • Mary Johnston

... our bicycles standing against the front veranda, and, with Willie and Don leading us, we plunged off along the little dirt road of the Dorrance estate. The poinsettia blooms were thick on both sides of us. A lily field, which a month before had been solid white with blossoms, still added its redolence to the perfumed night air. Through the branches of the squat cedar trees, in almost every direction there was water visible—deep ...
— The White Invaders • Raymond King Cummings

... wonderful assurance of a man? In his omissions, no less than in his fulfilments. He taught,—so far as we know,—nothing but what the common mind might easily accept; nothing to miss the mark of the intelligence of dull Li or Ching toiling in the rice-field;—nor yet too paltry for the notice of the Hwangti on the Dragon Throne. Laotse had come in the spirit of Plenydd the Light-bringer; in the spirit of Alawn, to raise up presently sweet profusions of song. ...
— The Crest-Wave of Evolution • Kenneth Morris

... Bell 'll do the rest on't." Hardweather here interrupted Molly's suggestion which was, indeed, most fortunate, and albeit supplied the initiative to the strategy afterwards adopted-for slavery opens wide the field of strategy-by reminding the stranger that she had a long Scotch head. The night had now well advanced; the stranger shook the woman's hand firmly, and bade her good night, as a tear gushed into his eyes. The scene was indeed simple, but touching. The hard mariner will accompany his friend to ...
— Our World, or, The Slaveholders Daughter • F. Colburn Adams

... the finest white Angoras in this country. His owner, Mr. D.W. Stevens, of West-field, Mass., has refused five hundred dollars for him, and would not consider one thousand dollars as a fair exchange for the majestic creature. He was born in 1893, and is valued, not only for his fine points, but because he is a family ...
— Concerning Cats - My Own and Some Others • Helen M. Winslow

... emigrated from England, and that of his father who acquired lands in Litchfield and New Milford, went out, as that of many of their descendants does to-day, in the west, for "more land." He and his brother Joshua, and other thrifty citizens of Wethersfield, fixed upon the province of Maine as the field of their enterprise. Timothy and Joshua owned the tract of land, thirty miles from north to south, and twenty-eight from east to west, which now, apparently, constitutes Lincoln Co. They had a clear title to eight hundred ...
— Log-book of Timothy Boardman • Samuel W Boardman

... the other youth, just then, that if the warrior was in the vicinity and could be seen by Otto, he must be visible to him. But a sweeping survey of the field failed to bring to light the painted face ...
— The Lost Trail - I • Edward S. Ellis

... I saw you hungry in the field and took pity on you; so I picked up for you some grain and took hold of you that you might eat; but you fled from me, and I know not the cause of your flight, except it were to put upon me a slight. Come out, then, and take the grain I have brought ...
— Journeys Through Bookland V2 • Charles H. Sylvester

... found it expedient to appear in W—— in a new character. Brooks had done his work. Accordingly, I, as Brooks, set out for the city one morning, leaving my shadower in charge of the field. Jasper Lamotte went to the city by the same train, and, singular coincidence, he came back on the train which brought me. I returned, as Mr. Wedron, an attorney, and I brought with me an assistant (for ...
— The Diamond Coterie • Lawrence L. Lynch

... her, and no theme seemed dull to her vivid intelligence,—her fancy being roused to action in a moment, by the barest hint given either by Nature or Art. Her first drama was written at this early age; it was called "Boadicea," and was composed immediately after she had been shown a field at Islington where this queen is said to have pitched her tent. Any one who asked was welcome to "some verses by 'Little Lizzie,'" written in her peculiar and fairy-like hand, (for when very young, her writing was remarkable for its extreme smallness and finish.) given with ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 10, Number 60, October 1862 • Various

... feeble and fitful. Soon afterwards the day began to dawn, and he softly detached himself from the clasping hand, and cautiously looked out again. A man, so besmeared that he might have been a sorely wounded soldier creeping back to consciousness on a field of slain, was rising from the pavement by the side of the grindstone, and looking about him with a vacant air. Shortly, this worn-out murderer descried in the imperfect light one of the carriages of Monseigneur, and, staggering to ...
— A Tale of Two Cities - A Story of the French Revolution • Charles Dickens

... our text is widely asked in the present day as an expression of utter bewilderment at the miseries of humanity, both in the wide area of this disordered world and in the narrower field of individual lives. There are whole schools of so-called political and social thinkers who have yet to learn that the one thing which the world and the individual need is not a change of conditions or environment, but redemption ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Ezekiel, Daniel, and the Minor Prophets. St Matthew Chapters I to VIII • Alexander Maclaren

... of Victoria is the special gold-field of Australia, and has produced two-thirds of all the precious metal which statistics credit to the country at large. One of the localities which has proved to be the most prolific in gold is Ballarat, now a charming and populous city, ...
— Foot-prints of Travel - or, Journeyings in Many Lands • Maturin M. Ballou

... the North, as Saxo explains. He describes shield-maidens, as Alfhild, Sela, Rusila (the Ingean Ruadh, or Red Maid of the Irish Annals, as Steenstrup so ingeniously conjectures); and the three she-captains, Wigbiorg, who fell on the field, Hetha, who was made queen of Zealand, and Wisna, whose hand Starcad cut off, all three fighting manfully at ...
— The Danish History, Books I-IX • Saxo Grammaticus ("Saxo the Learned")

... wealth is concentrated into the hands of a comparatively few families. It finally gets to the point of a closed circle all but impossible to break into. These industrial feudalistic families become so powerful that only in rare instances can anyone lift himself into their society. They dominate every field, including the so-called labor unions, which amount to one of the biggest businesses of all. With their unlimited resources they even own every ...
— Ultima Thule • Dallas McCord Reynolds

... hour of subdivided men and sub-selected careers that any young man who shall deliberately set out at the beginning of his life to be interested, at any expense and at all hazards, in everything, in twenty or thirty years will have the field entirely to himself. It is true that he will have to run, what every more vital man has had to run, the supreme risk, the risk of being either a fool or a seer, a fool if he scatters himself into everything, ...
— The Lost Art of Reading • Gerald Stanley Lee

... this sacrament, i.e. in order by its good odor, to remove any disagreeable smell that may be about the place; secondly, it serves to show the effect of grace, wherewith Christ was filled as with a good odor, according to Gen. 27:27: "Behold, the odor of my son is like the odor of a ripe field"; and from Christ it spreads to the faithful by the work of His ministers, according to 2 Cor. 2:14: "He manifesteth the odor of his knowledge by us in every place"; and therefore when the altar which represents Christ, has been incensed on every side, then all are incensed ...
— Summa Theologica, Part III (Tertia Pars) - From the Complete American Edition • Thomas Aquinas

... observation by Palm (p. 34), who states that the opposite leaves of the Hop always stand in a row, exactly over one another, on the same side of the supporting stick, whatever its thickness may be. My sons visited a hop-field for me, and reported that though they generally found the points of insertion of the leaves standing over each other for a space of two or three feet in height, yet this never occurred up the whole length of the pole; the points of insertion forming, ...
— The Movements and Habits of Climbing Plants • Charles Darwin

... of the field now, extracted from his mother's work-basket a bunch of keys; with these he opened the sideboard cupboard, produced thence a black bottle and a small glass, placed them on the table, nimbly mounted the stairs, made for Mr. Moore's door, tapped; ...
— Shirley • Charlotte Bronte

... during the Civil War. The story goes that a raw battalion of rough backwoodsmen, who had "volunteered," once joined General Grant. He admired their fine physique, but distrusted the capacity of their uncouth commander to handle troops promptly and efficiently in the field, so ...
— Best Short Stories • Various

... of the military classes thus organized was on a large plain just outside the city walls, called the Campus Martius, or "Field of Mars." The meeting of these military orders was called the comitia centuriata, or the "assembly of hundreds." [Footnote: This assembly was not organized by Servius Tullius, but it grew out of the military organization he created.] This body, which of course was made up of patricians and ...
— A General History for Colleges and High Schools • P. V. N. Myers

... triumphing, over prejudice, and over bigotry. The civilized and Christian world is fast learning the great lesson, that difference of nation does not imply necessary hostility, and that all contact need not be war. The whole world is becoming a common field for intellect to act in. Energy of mind, genius, power, wheresoever it exists, may speak out in any tongue, and the world will ...
— Pearls of Thought • Maturin M. Ballou

... that one uses life, looks at life, as so much material for one's art. Life becomes a province of art, instead of art being a province of life. That is all a sad mistake, perhaps an irreparable mistake! I walked to-day on the crisp frozen snow, down the valley, by field-paths, among leafless copses and wood-ends. The stream ran dark and cold, between its brambly banks; the snow lay pure and smooth on the high-sloping fields. It made a heart of whiteness in the covert, the trees all delicately outlined, the hazels weaving an intricate pattern. All ...
— The Altar Fire • Arthur Christopher Benson

... that looked on him; And from affliction he awoke to joy. Over the bloodless face the flush of health Glowed, and for wretched weakness mighty strength Thrilled through him: goodly and great waxed all his limbs. As when a field of corn revives again Which erst had drooped, by rains of ruining storm Down beaten flat, but by warm summer winds Requickened, o'er the laboured land it smiles, So Philoctetes' erstwhile wasted frame Was all requickened:—in the galley's hold He seemed to have ...
— The Fall of Troy • Smyrnaeus Quintus

... as, leaning on his stout stick, he went about among the rural guests, acting as a sort of head constable as well as master of the revels. "Now, young'un, if you can't manage to get along without that screeching, you'd better go to the other side of the twelve-acre field and take your dinner with you. Come, girls, what do you stand there for, twirling of your thumbs? Come out, and let the lads see you; you've no need to be so ashamed of your faces. Hollo there, who are you? How did you make your way ...
— Barchester Towers • Anthony Trollope

... politely, "even a day with this paper is quite enough, but it is not a bog and you can reach it quite easily. You see where I point? Simply follow that field in that direction for half a mile, perhaps, and you will come to a road. Turn to your right, and after three miles you will see a house, the first house you will meet, in fact. It has a gambrel roof and ...
— The Unspeakable Gentleman • John P. Marquand

... instinct of the true artist shows itself, in knowing what details to present and what to omit. Observe this: the abstraction of the philosopher is meant to keep the object itself, with its perturbing suggestions, out of sight, allowing only one quality to fill the field of vision; whereas the abstraction of the poet is meant to bring the object itself into more vivid relief, to make it visible by means of the selected qualities. In other words, the one aims at abstract symbols, the other at picturesque effects. The one can carry on his deductions by the aid of ...
— The Principles of Success in Literature • George Henry Lewes

... career in the heavens, with a lustre not surpassed in any part of its course. For the oldest of Greek writings which we possess are among the most brilliant, comprising the poems of Homer, the model of all later works in the epic field, and which light up and illustrate a broad period of human history as no works in different vein could do. They shine out in a realm of darkness, and show us what men were doing and thinking and how they were living and striving at a time which ...
— Historic Tales, vol 10 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... the last shilling of their private fortunes. The number of persons connected with these banks as shareholders is very great, almost every man of opulence in the country being a holder of stock to a greater or a less amount. That some jealousy must exist among so many competitors in a limited field, is an obvious matter of inference. Such jealousy, however, has only operated for the advantage of the public, by the maintenance of a common and vigilant watch upon the manner in which the affairs of each establishment are conducted, and against the intrusion of any new parties ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 350, December 1844 • Various

... the army is equipped, is the invention of a Japanese. In 1897 Colonel Arisaka invented several improvements in this same rifle, increasing the velocity and accuracy, and lessening the weight. Still more recently he has invented a rapid-fire field-piece to superintend whose manufacture he has been sent to Europe. Mr. Shimose has invented a smokeless powder, which the government is manufacturing for its own use. Not infrequently there appear in the papers notices of new inventions. I have recently noted the invention of important improvements ...
— Evolution Of The Japanese, Social And Psychic • Sidney L. Gulick

... He frequently upheld an opinion that must have been little less than treason in the eyes of a commander so strict as Colonel de Haldimar, that an officer who rose at eight, with all his faculties refreshed and invigorated, might evince as much of the true bearing of the soldier in the field, as he who, having quitted his couch at dawn, naturally felt the necessity of repose at a moment when activity and exertion ...
— Wacousta: A Tale of the Pontiac Conspiracy (Complete) • John Richardson

... away, and the accursed beasts and her castle too went with her, as smoke passes. Manuel was thus left standing out of doors in a reaped field, alone with his wife and child while Miramon's ship came about. Niafer slept. But now the child awoke to regard the world into which she had been summoned willy-nilly, and the child ...
— Figures of Earth • James Branch Cabell

... the possibility that "dear George" might at that very moment have her accurately focussed in the field of his glass, sauntered along the beach with as much of an air of total abstraction as she could conveniently assume on the spur of the moment, and finally, after watching the schooner pass safely into Portsmouth Harbour and there come to ...
— The Voyage of the Aurora • Harry Collingwood

... great jeopardy; and, perhaps, even the death of his old friend of forty years' standing may have had some effect on him. It was a mingled feeling that pervaded him. "Oh, Mr. George!" he said, just before they went to the churchyard, "we are grass of the field, just grass of the field; here to-day, and gone to-morrow; flourishing in the morning, and cast into the oven before night! It behoves such frail, impotent creatures to look close after their interests—half a million of money! I'm afraid ...
— The Bertrams • Anthony Trollope

... however, had been caused by fire. There had been a growth of cane. It had been burned off and as yet was not grown up again, though the young reeds were making their appearance like a field of green wheat. Some places, and especially near the river, the ground was still bare. This change in the landscape was quite agreeable to our travellers; so much so, that they resolved to exercise ...
— Popular Adventure Tales • Mayne Reid

... her in blank amazement. Haynerd's jaw dropped as he gazed. He had had a long apprenticeship in the newspaper field, but never would he have dared attempt what this ...
— Carmen Ariza • Charles Francis Stocking

... "Help, help, ye nations, or I die; "'Tis Freedom's fight and on the field "Where I expire your doom is sealed." The Gull-King hears the awakening call, He hath summoned his Peers and Patriots all, And he asks. "Ye noble Gulls, shall we "Stand basely by at the fall of the Free, "Nor utter a curse nor deal a blow?" And they answer with ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... insects be stayed were the birds gone? We should have to depend upon a few predaceous beetles, the bats, and upon the sprayers and squirtguns which throw insecticides. Think of the aesthetic loss in substituting these agencies for the "sweet spirits" of the wood and field! Besides not being musical or charming in action, they would not prove efficient. Birds are therefore essential ...
— Bird Day; How to prepare for it • Charles Almanzo Babcock

... however, in the same year, 1808, appeared the poem of "Marmion: A Tale of Flodden Field," which was received by the public with great avidity, and unbounded delight. Jeffrey wrote a chilling review, for which Scott with difficulty forgave him, since with all his humility and amiability he could not ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIII • John Lord

... banks by the house where he was born. He had no difficulty in recognizing it. The shutters were closed: all were asleep in it. Christophe stopped in the middle of the road: and it seemed to him that if he knocked at the door, familiar phantoms would open to him. He went into the field round the house, near the river, and came to the place where he used to go and talk to Gottfried in the evening. He sat down. And the old days came to life again. And the dear little girl who had sipped with him the dream of first love was conjured ...
— Jean-Christophe Journey's End • Romain Rolland

... to take the risk, for I think I have counted the cost pretty accurately. As for a failure, I don't mean to know the word. There is a wide field of enterprise before me, and I ...
— Words for the Wise • T. S. Arthur

... keeping, and each new year brings increased blessing from the gods of the household in recompense of piety and duty.[2] Many dedications bring vividly before us the humbler life of the country cottager, no man's servant or master, happy in the daily labour over his little plot of land, his corn-field and vineyard and coppice; of the fowler with his boys in the woods, the forester and the beekeeper, and the fisherman in his thatched hut on the beach.[3] And in these contrasted pictures the "wealth that makes men kind" seems not to jar with the "poverty that lives with freedom."[4] Modern ...
— Select Epigrams from the Greek Anthology • J. W. Mackail

... and laborious tracking continued. Suddenly Malcolm Sage stopped. In the field on their right two horses were grazing in the moonlight. It was the scene of the tragedy ...
— Malcolm Sage, Detective • Herbert George Jenkins

... beyond the circle of his own family, though as thirteen of his children had grown up, and he had seven married daughters, the two elder of whom had each thirteen children of her own, the number of his immediate descendants afforded him a fairly wide field of selection. In his old age he liked to have his five sons round him all the winter, together with their wives and children. Accordingly, every October my three married brothers arrived at Baron's Court with their entire families, and remained there till January, ...
— The Days Before Yesterday • Lord Frederick Hamilton

... the line to the other place and change it back again, making fifteen hundred per cent, on the round trip. Of course you couldn't always change the full amount, but in a couple of months I had sixty thousand roubles—my valise was crammed with them—and I was only waiting to get down to the Field Cashier to change ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, March 17, 1920 • Various

... vases, Lucca della Robbia faience, and Palissy platters; of old arm-chairs, in which perhaps had sat Henry IV. or Sully, Louis XIII. or Richelieu—for two of these arm-chairs, adorned with a carved shield, on which were engraved the fleur-de-lis of France on an azure field evidently came from the Louvre, or, at least, some royal residence. Over these dark and sombre chairs were thrown splendid stuffs, dyed beneath Persia's sun, or woven by the fingers of the women of Calcutta or of Chandernagor. What ...
— The Count of Monte Cristo • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... Gaultier de Varennes de la Verendrye, at the ambitious age of fourteen, determined that he would become a discoverer.[2] At eighteen he was fighting in New England, at nineteen in Newfoundland, at twenty-three in Europe at the battle of Malplaquet, where he was carried off the field with nine wounds. Eager for more distinguished service, he returned to Canada in his twenty-seventh year, only to find himself relegated to an obscure trading post in far Northern wilds. Then the boyhood ambitions reawakened. All France and Canada, ...
— Pathfinders of the West • A. C. Laut

... at Thundercloud. Well he knew that chief's prowess in the field. He ran his eyes over the silent, watching Hurons, and then back to the sombre face of their leader. Thundercloud sat rigid upon his stallion; his head held high; every muscle tense and strong for instant action. He was ready and eager for ...
— Betty Zane • Zane Grey

... certain that the garrison of Bristol had surrendered to the besiegers. A few shots were heard, but they were only fired in rejoicing by the Royalists, and while Steadfast was studying his barley field, already silvered over by its long beards, and wondering how soon it would be ripe, and how he should get it cut and stacked, his name was shouted out, and he saw Tom Oates and all the rest of the boys scampering down ...
— Under the Storm - Steadfast's Charge • Charlotte M. Yonge

... lieutenant, a prey to martial ardour, ordered all swords to be unsheathed, and with a fierce smile he charged upon the crowd like a wild boar, and all the Lancians were terrified at the sight. There was a strong tendency to retire from the field of battle, but at that moment somebody infused courage into their hearts by holding out deceptive hopes of victory. "Down with the civilians!" "Down with the cocked hats!" "Death to the potato-face!" Such were the seditious cries that issued from the throats of those ...
— The Grandee • Armando Palacio Valds

... Treviso, Montebello, these are names Their sons inherit without fear, But other names are glorious, and since My Father would have made Corneille a Prince I'll make our Victor Hugo Peer! I'll do—I'll do—I'll be the poor man's shield! The heroic savour, rising from this field, Gives me a foretaste of my home; Wagram! 'Twas well I hither came to drain The stirrup-cup upon thy glorious plain! Oh, my ...
— L'Aiglon • Edmond Rostand

... of metaphor, we may find out, on examination, that De Foe had discovered in 'Robinson Crusoe' precisely the field in which his talents could be most effectually applied; and that a very slight alteration in the subject-matter might change the merit of his work to a disproportionate extent. The more special the idiosyncrasy upon which a man's literary success is founded, the greater, of course, ...
— Hours in a Library, Volume I. (of III.) • Leslie Stephen

... the theorists who favor protection taking part with the producer. Let us consider the case of the unfortunate consumer, who seems to have entirely escaped their attention. They compare the field of protection to the turf. But on the turf, the race is at once a means and an end. The public has no interest in the struggle, independent of the struggle itself. When your horses are started in the course ...
— What Is Free Trade? - An Adaptation of Frederic Bastiat's "Sophismes Econimiques" - Designed for the American Reader • Frederic Bastiat

... quoth Gottlieb, "you are the discoverer of a new legal principle. You will inaugurate a new field of human activity. Generations yet unborn will profit by your ingenuity. From now on every rascal in the land will set his wits to work trying to bring his schemes within the scope ...
— The Confessions of Artemas Quibble • Arthur Train

... a matter of disengaging the chrono-beam, which happened to become tangled, in space-time, with the gravitonic structure of the neutronic chrono-field." ...
— Sorry: Wrong Dimension • Ross Rocklynne

... fatal faults of character. Her happiness proved of short duration. In 1512 Pescara was wounded and made prisoner at the battle of Ravenna, and, though he returned to his wife for a short interval, duty called him again to the field of war in Lombardy in 1515. After this date Vittoria saw him but seldom. The last time they met was in October 1522. As general of the Imperial forces, Pescara spent the next years in perpetual military operations. Under his leadership the battle of Pavia was won in 1525, and King Francis became ...
— The Life of Michelangelo Buonarroti • John Addington Symonds

... Why no; how can one be bored in this delightful "big little city," when here you will find a concentration of all the most picturesque phases of life—a conglomeration of gaiety and tragedy, humor and drama, frivolity and learning! What a fertile field for the psychologist ...
— Reno - A Book of Short Stories and Information • Lilyan Stratton

... as she toils up to her pretty room. Trixy's grand field night is over—Edith's first ball has come to an end, and the first ...
— A Terrible Secret • May Agnes Fleming

... also divided into three or more parts. Three "fields" were allotted to the ancient triad formed by Ea, Anu, and Bel. The zodiacal "path" ran through these "fields". Ea's field was in the west, and was associated with Amurru, the land of the Amorites; Anu's field was in the south, and was associated with Elam; and Bel's central "field" was associated with the land of Akkad. When the rulers of Akkad called themselves "kings of the four ...
— Myths of Babylonia and Assyria • Donald A. Mackenzie

... bringing about an alliance and if possible a union between England and Scotland. It was in furtherance of this design that Henry VII. had given his eldest daughter in marriage to James IV., who was slain with most of his nobles in a battle with the English on the fatal field of Flodden (1513). The schemes for a union with Scotland were continued by Henry VIII., particularly after his rupture with Rome had shown him the danger that might be anticipated from the north in case the French or the Emperor should declare ...
— History of the Catholic Church from the Renaissance • Rev. James MacCaffrey

... not a complete stranger to her. Why had their meeting been a clandestine one? This, and a thousand similar queries ran through his mind as they walked across the field in the direction of a long, low, thatched farmhouse which ...
— The House of Whispers • William Le Queux

... The landing field was not large, but Bell took the plane to its edge. He faced it about, and bent below the cockpit combing to avoid the slip stream and look at his maps again, brought from the big amphibian. Something caught his eye. ...
— Astounding Stories of Super-Science, June, 1930 • Various

... scene was going on at this time, not far distant. Esther, Phillis's third daughter, was a neat, genteel-looking servant, entirely above associating with "common niggers," as she styled those who, being constantly employed about the field, had not the advantage of being called upon in the house, and were thus very deficient in manners and appearance from those who were so much under the eye of the family. Esther, like her mother, was a great Methodist. Reading well, she was familiar ...
— Aunt Phillis's Cabin - Or, Southern Life As It Is • Mary H. Eastman

... therefore, read it, and looking upon Evangelist very carefully, said, Whither must I fly? Then said Evangelist, pointing with his finger over a very wide field, Do you see yonder wicket gate? (Matt. 7:13). The man said, No. Then said the other, Do you see yonder shining light? (Psa. 119:105; 2 Peter 1:19). He said, I think I do. Then said Evangelist, Keep that light in your eye, and go up directly thereto, so shalt thou see the gate; at which, ...
— The Works of John Bunyan • John Bunyan

... spent either in visits to the Louvre or in driving. George and Gertrude walked much in Paris. Monday morning all resolved to enjoy on foot the Boulevards from the Grand Hotel to the Place de la Republique. It was a field-day for the women, for every shop had its strong temptation, and the world seemed on dress-parade. Boulevard des Italiens in Paris is the most frequented and fashionable. Here are located handsome hotels and cafes, and many ...
— The Harris-Ingram Experiment • Charles E. Bolton

... say, unless it was because of his jealousy of Bob's affection and admiration for that charming young teacher, who won all hearts in the village, The Boy's among the number. Anyway, Bob was driven from the field by the hard little green apples of the Knox orchard; more hurt, he declares, by the desertion of his ally than by all the blows ...
— A Boy I Knew and Four Dogs • Laurence Hutton

... other, each balancing the other's eccentricities. The Greek idea runs out toward pantheism in Spinoza and Hegel. The Biblical idea runs out toward deism in Duns Scotus and Calvin. In the eighteenth century an extreme form of deism held the field and God, as personal will, was conceived as the Creator, who in a dim and distant past had made all things. In the nineteenth century the thought of God swung back to terms of immanence, and God, who had been crowded ...
— Christianity and Progress • Harry Emerson Fosdick

... looked at it, and then hurried on, Alice started to her feet, for it flashed across her mind that she had never before seen a rabbit with either a waistcoat-pocket, or a watch to take out of it, and, burning with curiosity, she ran across the field after it, and was just in time to see it pop down a large rabbit-hole under ...
— Junior Classics, V6 • Various

... of Charles V upon the dress of the culprit, a faint look of surprise swept Francis' face. Did it recall that fatal day, when on the field of battle, a rival banner had waved ever illusively; ever beyond his reach? Now it shone before him as though mocking his friendship for his one-time powerful enemy, the only man he feared, the emperor ...
— Under the Rose • Frederic Stewart Isham

... a two hours' drive to Hanau, and we must be the first on the field. Russians are always beforehand with their enemies! I have engaged the best ...
— The Torrents of Spring • Ivan Turgenev

... his tastes, and the same characteristic appeared in his conversation; an easy man to deceive, easy to make fun of, yet impossible to dislike, or despise—unless by the despicable. He delighted in stories of adventure, of bravery by flood or field, and might have posed—had he ever posed at all—as something of an authority on North Pole expeditions ...
— The House of Cobwebs and Other Stories • George Gissing

... passed over several villages, the inhabitants gazing up at them in open-mouthed wonder, and finally came in sight of a big church spire that they knew belonged in Plankville. Then Dick slowed down the engine, and soon they floated down in an open field close to the main street and not a great distance from the ...
— The Rover Boys in New York • Arthur M. Winfield

... o'er a field of buttercups, a field of lambs and buttercups, We danced along a cloth of gold, a summer king ...
— Collected Poems - Volume Two (of 2) • Alfred Noyes

... beat those old Boy Scouts easily when we have that field day, Bessie," said Dolly Ransom to her chum, Bessie King. "Look at the way we beat them in the swimming match ...
— The Camp Fire Girls in the Mountains - or Bessie King's Strange Adventure • Jane L. Stewart

... provinces in question. Such legislation had been enacted in the maritime provinces before 1867, but it did not prevent the ablest men of New Brunswick from selecting the larger and more ambitious field of parliamentary action. In Nova Scotia Sir Charles Tupper was the only man who emerged from the battle in which so many unionists were for the moment defeated. Even Sir Adams Archibald, the secretary of state, was defeated in a county where he had been always returned ...
— Canada under British Rule 1760-1900 • John G. Bourinot

... the bank of my pond. Straight before me there were glimpses through the pointed leaves of the willows of its broad surface with threads of fluffy mist clinging here and there upon it. To the right a field of rye shone dimly; on the left stood up my orchard trees, tall, rigid, drenched it seemed in dew ... The breath of the morning was already upon them. Across the pure grey sky stretched like streaks of smoke, two or three slanting clouds; they had a yellowish tinge, the first faint glow of ...
— Dream Tales and Prose Poems • Ivan Turgenev

... was in under his charge. It was of no avail. The night before, he had received a letter by the post messenger on his way to San Diego, charging the Father to prepare for removal to Mission San Juan Capistrano, his future field of work. After a sleepless night of vain repining, he had risen early and wandered out into his garden, back of the church, his favorite resort when in a meditative mood, or when he wished to escape intrusion ...
— Old Mission Stories of California • Charles Franklin Carter

... thunder-storm; but none looked on this as an evil omen. All were inclined to cheery views. The courtiers displayed their zeal with all the ardor, the passion, the furia francese, which is a national characteristic, and appears on the battle-field as well as in the ante- chamber. The French fight and flatter ...
— The Court of the Empress Josephine • Imbert de Saint-Amand

... left they that far-famous town, and turned From war, in awe of Zeus's threatenings, Hearkening to one with ancient wisdom wise. Yet they forgat not friends in battle slain, But bare them from the field and buried them. These the mist hid not, but the town alone And its unscaleable wall, around which fell Trojans and Argives many in battle slain. So came they to the ships, and put from them Their battle-gear, and strode ...
— The Fall of Troy • Smyrnaeus Quintus

... come over / and many a stranger too. Heigh-ho! What strong shafts splintered / before the ladies flew! Many a shaft go crashing / heard you there on shield. Heigh-ho! What din of costly / arms resounded o'er the field. ...
— The Nibelungenlied - Translated into Rhymed English Verse in the Metre of the Original • trans. by George Henry Needler

... not altogether turn tail, for ere they could get fairly off this hardly-contested field, they ...
— Jack Harkaway and his son's Escape From the Brigand's of Greece • Bracebridge Hemyng

... follows thought; he leaves his meat, and by some transubstantiation feeds on the wind; he no longer sees the pillars of Hercules on a sixpence; he is mad for the hour, if a majority shall say what is madness. Meanwhile his field is unploughed; and if he falls from this ecstasy, look to see an harassed, embittered man. The birds sing as they pick up the corn, but wisdom is not so quickly convertible into meal, and if he cannot feed always on it, let him never seek the Muse. Our poor half-genius ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 13, No. 76, February, 1864 • Various



Words linked to "Field" :   field of operations, gravitational field, combat zone, region, field game, armed forces, installation, engineering, field hut, field trip, protology, strip, field strength unit, field corn, play, political arena, field soybean, Bosworth Field, bailiwick, theater of operations, lawn, reply, land, armed services, sphere, horse racing, bit field, force field, flood plain, airstrip, field magnet, computer science, solid ground, arena, subject area, field lens, subject field, field wormwood, field-sequential color TV, visual image, study, futuristics, champaign, athletic field, dark field illumination, humanities, Serengeti Plain, occultism, taxi strip, escapology, theatre, palaestra, field-pea plant, theology, field-grade officer, ice field, tall field buttercup, runway, field general, aerodrome, flight line, front, field thistle, field marshal, paddy, track and field, Battle of Flodden Field, field of regard, moorland, war machine, sector, peneplain, playing area, responsibility, court, take the field, scene of action, field tent, ground, allometry, field goal, area, field of vision, hop field, parcel of land, orbit, battlefront, field-sequential color TV system, political sphere, field artillery, right field, transportation system, Olympia, field sparrow, bowling green, gasfield, airport, visual percept, diamond, Armageddon, bowl, field emission, football field, field pea, military, auxiliary airfield, terra firma, field officer, environment, distaff, geographic area, discipline, military science, drome, geographical area, field bean, arts, realm, field maple, flight strip, baseball field, field trial, select, frontier, Camlan, palestra, commercial enterprise, field hand, numerology, respond, fireguard, bibliotics, solar magnetic field, field scabious, handle, answer, field of force, scientific discipline, airdrome, field pussytoes, corn field, field sandbur, athletics, field chickweed, line of business, field-sequential color television system, field balm, physical phenomenon, field strength, field press censorship, electric field, futurology, field work, field of battle, midfield, sport, landing strip, field of view, flat, combat area, field glasses, radiation field, math, genealogy, field cricket, field of fire, airfield, mathematics, field-sequential color television, parcel, crown-of-the-field, field mint, choose, field ration, subject, field lupine, field day, mine field, sports stadium, field of study, piece of ground, European field elm, business, field glass, maths, field garlic, knowledge domain, battleground, field event, oilfield, field intensity, field winding, pick out, ology, computing, old-field toadflax, gridiron, field line, field hockey ball, field judge, visual field, field hospital, ball field, field pennycress, floodplain, field spaniel, field mouse-ear, center field, broken-field, graphology, architecture, communication theory, earth, field bindweed, theatre of operations, electrostatic field, field guide, field coil, transportation, lap, fielding, magnetic flux, grainfield, field-crop, grain field, taxiway, field speedwell, field horsetail, campus, field marigold, preserve, technology, wheat field, flying field



Copyright © 2020 Diccionario ingles.com