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Fire   Listen
noun
Fire  n.  
1.
The evolution of light and heat in the combustion of bodies; combustion; state of ignition. Note: The form of fire exhibited in the combustion of gases in an ascending stream or current is called flame. Anciently, fire, air, earth, and water were regarded as the four elements of which all things are composed.
2.
Fuel in a state of combustion, as on a hearth, or in a stove or a furnace.
3.
The burning of a house or town; a conflagration.
4.
Anything which destroys or affects like fire.
5.
Ardor of passion, whether love or hate; excessive warmth; consuming violence of temper. "he had fire in his temper."
6.
Liveliness of imagination or fancy; intellectual and moral enthusiasm; capacity for ardor and zeal. "And bless their critic with a poet's fire."
7.
Splendor; brilliancy; luster; hence, a star. "Stars, hide your fires." "As in a zodiac representing the heavenly fires."
8.
Torture by burning; severe trial or affliction.
9.
The discharge of firearms; firing; as, the troops were exposed to a heavy fire.
Blue fire, Red fire, Green fire (Pyrotech.), compositions of various combustible substances, as sulphur, niter, lampblack, etc., the flames of which are colored by various metallic salts, as those of antimony, strontium, barium, etc.
Fire alarm
(a)
A signal given on the breaking out of a fire.
(b)
An apparatus for giving such an alarm.
Fire annihilator, a machine, device, or preparation to be kept at hand for extinguishing fire by smothering it with some incombustible vapor or gas, as carbonic acid.
Fire balloon.
(a)
A balloon raised in the air by the buoyancy of air heated by a fire placed in the lower part.
(b)
A balloon sent up at night with fireworks which ignite at a regulated height.
Fire bar, a grate bar.
Fire basket, a portable grate; a cresset.
Fire beetle. (Zool.) See in the Vocabulary.
Fire blast, a disease of plants which causes them to appear as if burnt by fire.
Fire box, the chamber of a furnace, steam boiler, etc., for the fire.
Fire brick, a refractory brick, capable of sustaining intense heat without fusion, usually made of fire clay or of siliceous material, with some cementing substance, and used for lining fire boxes, etc.
Fire brigade, an organized body of men for extinguished fires.
Fire bucket. See under Bucket.
Fire bug, an incendiary; one who, from malice or through mania, persistently sets fire to property; a pyromaniac. (U.S.)
Fire clay. See under Clay.
Fire company, a company of men managing an engine in extinguishing fires.
Fire cross. See Fiery cross. (Obs.)
Fire damp. See under Damp.
Fire dog. See Firedog, in the Vocabulary.
Fire drill.
(a)
A series of evolutions performed by fireman for practice.
(b)
An apparatus for producing fire by friction, by rapidly twirling a wooden pin in a wooden socket; used by the Hindoos during all historic time, and by many savage peoples.
Fire eater.
(a)
A juggler who pretends to eat fire.
(b)
A quarrelsome person who seeks affrays; a hotspur. (Colloq.)
Fire engine, a portable forcing pump, usually on wheels, for throwing water to extinguish fire.
Fire escape, a contrivance for facilitating escape from burning buildings.
Fire gilding (Fine Arts), a mode of gilding with an amalgam of gold and quicksilver, the latter metal being driven off afterward by heat.
Fire gilt (Fine Arts), gold laid on by the process of fire gilding.
Fire insurance, the act or system of insuring against fire; also, a contract by which an insurance company undertakes, in consideration of the payment of a premium or small percentage usually made periodically to indemnify an owner of property from loss by fire during a specified period.
Fire irons, utensils for a fireplace or grate, as tongs, poker, and shovel.
Fire main, a pipe for water, to be used in putting out fire.
Fire master (Mil), an artillery officer who formerly supervised the composition of fireworks.
Fire office, an office at which to effect insurance against fire.
Fire opal, a variety of opal giving firelike reflections.
Fire ordeal, an ancient mode of trial, in which the test was the ability of the accused to handle or tread upon red-hot irons.
Fire pan, a pan for holding or conveying fire, especially the receptacle for the priming of a gun.
Fire plug, a plug or hydrant for drawing water from the main pipes in a street, building, etc., for extinguishing fires.
Fire policy, the writing or instrument expressing the contract of insurance against loss by fire.
Fire pot.
(a)
(Mil.) A small earthen pot filled with combustibles, formerly used as a missile in war.
(b)
The cast iron vessel which holds the fuel or fire in a furnace.
(c)
A crucible.
(d)
A solderer's furnace.
Fire raft, a raft laden with combustibles, used for setting fire to an enemy's ships.
Fire roll, a peculiar beat of the drum to summon men to their quarters in case of fire.
Fire setting (Mining), the process of softening or cracking the working face of a lode, to facilitate excavation, by exposing it to the action of fire; now generally superseded by the use of explosives.
Fire ship, a vessel filled with combustibles, for setting fire to an enemy's ships.
Fire shovel, a shovel for taking up coals of fire.
Fire stink, the stench from decomposing iron pyrites, caused by the formation of hydrogen sulfide.
Fire surface, the surfaces of a steam boiler which are exposed to the direct heat of the fuel and the products of combustion; heating surface.
Fire swab, a swab saturated with water, for cooling a gun in action and clearing away particles of powder, etc.
Fire teaser, in England, the fireman of a steam emgine.
Fire water, a strong alcoholic beverage; so called by the American Indians.
Fire worship, the worship of fire, which prevails chiefly in Persia, among the followers of Zoroaster, called Chebers, or Guebers, and among the Parsees of India.
Greek fire. See under Greek.
On fire, burning; hence, ardent; passionate; eager; zealous.
Running fire, the rapid discharge of firearms in succession by a line of troops.
St. Anthony's fire, erysipelas; an eruptive fever which St. Anthony was supposed to cure miraculously.
St. Elmo's fire. See under Saint Elmo.
To set on fire, to inflame; to kindle.
To take fire, to begin to burn; to fly into a passion.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Fire" Quotes from Famous Books



... persuaded to become adherents of the Cross. Osric, though a pagan himself, tolerated them for the sake of his British wife, Toura, and for a while they went unmolested. When Osric died, however, the chiefdom fell to Wulfbert, a fierce warrior, who was determined to annihilate by fire and bloodshed any faith that had taken root among his subjects. In daily peril of their lives, Kolgan and his monks stayed on, knowing that if they deserted their post the last light of Christianity in the district would ...
— The New Girl at St. Chad's - A Story of School Life • Angela Brazil

... or four hundred Indians on their way to the annual payment, camped in the woods between town and Cannon City. One evening we went, in a body, to visit them and were entertained by dancing. However, too much "fire water" caused some fear among ...
— Old Rail Fence Corners - The A. B. C's. of Minnesota History • Various

... in thunder, and in streams of sulphurous fire. The hurricane burst upon the ship, the canvass flew away in ribbons; mountains of seas swept over us, and in the centre of a deep o'erhanging cloud, which shrouded all in utter darkness, were written ...
— The Phantom Ship • Frederick Marryat

... no longer the marvel of the fire come down from heaven to smite the altar. It was the comfortable miracle of the daily manna. Had my goddess departed from her divinity, my queen from her throne, my star from her heaven? Rather, in becoming mine she had become myself, and if there were a loss, that loss was in my own ...
— The Gates Between • Elizabeth Stuart Phelps

... coil about Gerard Eliassoen," said Martin contemptuously. Then he lighted the candle, and seating himself coolly by the fire, proceeded to whip some fine silk round his bow-string at the place where the nick ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... contest wages, the parlor-door standing open, and beyond that the door of the sitting-room, look down the long perspective! Do you not see in the twilight of the kitchen fire a dark head, lighting up, as in flashes, with a glittering row of teeth, with a violent agitation of the body, with gusty ha-ha's, and fragments of an uproarious chant flying through the door something to ...
— Chanticleer - A Thanksgiving Story of the Peabody Family • Cornelius Mathews

... women were already seated. The others jumped in and the horses started home again, even before the Carcajou Vigilantes had finished spreading robes over their shaky knees. Striking a bit of flat bare rock, the runners spat out fire and squealed, after which the heavy sled slithered and slipped over the crackling snow, so that presently the outfit disappeared around the first bend in ...
— The Peace of Roaring River • George van Schaick

... I answered, "my own weapon, an air-gun which I can fire sixteen times without reloading, and which will kill at a hundred yards' distance. With a weapon unknown to me I might not only fail altogether, but I might not improbably do serious injury, by my clumsiness and inexperience, ...
— Across the Zodiac • Percy Greg

... high in heaven, To man hast given This clouded earthly life All storm and strife, Blasted with ice and fire, Love and desire, Filled with dead faith, and love That change is ...
— The Rainbow and the Rose • E. Nesbit

... it was that the Count de Gabalis peopled his mystic world with sylphs,—beautiful beings whose breath of life was lambent fire, and who sported forever in regions of purest ether and purest light. The Rosicrucian had anticipated the wonder that I ...
— Masterpieces of Mystery In Four Volumes - Mystic-Humorous Stories • Various

... thee love; thou gavest but Desire. Ah, the delusion of that summer night! Thy soul vibrated at the rate of Fire; Mine, with the rhythm of ...
— Last Poems • Laurence Hope

... conveys so poor and insufficient an idea of the thing described, that it could scarcely have the smallest effect, if the speaker did not call in to his aid those modes of speech that mark a strong and lively feeling in himself. Then, by the contagion of our passions, we catch a fire already kindled in another, which probably might never have been struck out by the object described. Words, by strongly conveying the passions, by those means which we have already mentioned, fully compensate for their weakness ...
— Selections from the Speeches and Writings of Edmund Burke. • Edmund Burke

... and soft, warm and cold, colors and sounds, tastes and odors) are in the last analysis caused—as are the primary—by motion, but not perceived as such. Yellow and warm are merely sensations in us, which we erroneously ascribe to objects; with equal right we might ascribe to fire, as qualities inherent in it, the changes in form and color which it produces in wax and the pain which it causes in the finger brought into proximity with it. The warmth and the brightness of the blaze, the redness, the pleasant taste, and the aromatic odor of the strawberry, ...
— History Of Modern Philosophy - From Nicolas of Cusa to the Present Time • Richard Falckenberg

... the Latin version was formerly in the Cottonian collection (Vitellius E. vii.), but no fragment of it has hitherto been recovered from the mass of burnt crusts and leaves left after the fire of 1731. I am happy, however, to add, that within the last few months, the manuscript marked Vitellius F. vii., containing a French translation of the Riwle, made in the fourteenth century (very closely agreeing with the vernacular text), ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 219, January 7, 1854 • Various

... till about the consistence of honey, and skim it; when cool enough, pour a quantity among the combs, directly on the bees; cover the bottom of the hive with a cloth, securing it firmly, and bring to the fire to warm up. In two or three hours they will be revived, and may be returned to the stand, providing the honey given is all taken up; on no account let any honey run out around the bottom. The necessity of a daily visit to the hives is ...
— Mysteries of Bee-keeping Explained • M. Quinby

... of a century which was so brilliant from the literary aspect, James Delille was despotic: his earlier efforts have already been attended to. A skilled versifier, but without fire or many ideas, he made cultured translations from Virgil and Milton, wrote perennially descriptive poems, such as The Man in the Fields, The Gardens, etc., and a witty satirical poem on Conversation, which, in our opinion, was the best ...
— Initiation into Literature • Emile Faguet

... to Eloquent crowds of people in the hall, mostly gathered about a round table near the fire. He discerned Mrs Ffolliot in the very act of "dispensing tea" and General Grantly standing on the hearthrug warming his coat tails. Mary, too, he saw give a cup of tea into her grandfather's hands, and he was conscious of the presence of Mrs Grantly ...
— The Ffolliots of Redmarley • L. Allen Harker

... I lay writhing on the floor in agony indescribable. My veins were filled with liquid fire, and but that stygian darkness was about me, I told myself that I must have seen the smoke arising from my ...
— The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu • Sax Rohmer

... hour, for Madelon proposed tune after tune with nervous ardor when her father and brothers seemed to flag. Nobody paid much attention to Lot; he was too constant a visitor. He settled into a favorite chair of his near the fire, and listened with the firelight playing over his delicate, peaked face. ...
— Madelon - A Novel • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... spread through the entire school was an unheard of thing at Warwick Hall, but A.O. Miggs had that distinction early in the term. Her birthday was in October, and when she appeared that morning with a zodiac ring on her little finger, set with a brilliant fire opal, there was a mingled ...
— The Little Colonel's Chum: Mary Ware • Annie Fellows Johnston

... strange island of Iceland, thrown up, by fire, from the depths of the sea, there once lived a lad who worshipped the god Odin, and was taught from two absurd books called the Eddas. He wished to fight and die on a battle-field, so that his soul ...
— Fairy Book • Sophie May

... take it. "Do you want to die, my father, and sacrifice us besides?" That night they held a council, and in the morning again refused to go. Beaujeu did not despair. "I am determined," he exclaimed, "to meet the English. What! will you let your father go alone?"[219] The greater part caught fire at his words, promised to follow him and put on their war-paint. Beaujeu received the communion, then dressed himself like a savage, and joined the clamorous throng. Open barrels of gunpowder and bullets were set before ...
— Montcalm and Wolfe • Francis Parkman

... Simon Slade, just passing out, after seeing that every thing was in order. I had not observed her before; and now could not help remarking that she had a flushed, excited countenance, as if she had been over a hot fire, and was both worried and fatigued. And there was, moreover, a peculiar expression of the mouth, never observed in one whose mind is entirely at ease—an expression that once seen is never forgotten. The face stamped itself instantly on my memory; and I can even now recall it with ...
— Ten Nights in a Bar Room • T. S. Arthur

... (said she) how is thy poor unwary Heart misled? Whither am I come? The false deluding Lights of an imaginary Flame, have led me, a poor benighted Victim, to a real Fire. I burn and am consumed with hopeless Love; those Beams in whose soft temperate warmth I wanton'd heretofore, now flash destruction to my Soul, my Treacherous greedy Eyes have suck'd the glaring Light, they have united all its ...
— Incognita - or, Love & Duty Reconcil'd. A Novel • William Congreve

... of drawing out the wit of her guests. With her, we always found ourselves in poetical raptures, and each left her salon amazed at himself. There was no flint so rough that she could not cause it to emit one spark; and with Balzac, as you may well believe, there was no need of trying to strike fire; he flashed and kindled at once." (Theophile Gautier, ...
— Women in the Life of Balzac • Juanita Helm Floyd

... people's feet, of the rustling of the bow, the quiver, and the lance? Let us rise up and inquire. Behold! the inhabitants are all alarmed! a wakeful woman has shown them yon distant column of smoke and blaze. The neighbouring village is on fire: the prince, unfaithful to the sacred duty of the protection of his subjects, has surrounded them. He is now burning their habitations, and seizing, as saleable booty, the ...
— The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the - Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, by the British Parliament (1839) • Thomas Clarkson

... down to breakfast before my friend and stood before the fire eagerly scanning the papers. At first I could find nothing that seemed to indicate any further effects of the bacillus. I was in the act of buttering a piece of toast when my eye fell on one of the newspapers lying beside me. A heading in small ...
— The Blue Germ • Martin Swayne

... kitchen and pantry when she reached there, but a few cockroaches scuttled away before her and made her utter a hysterical little scream. But there WAS some condensed milk and there was a little warm water in a kettle became the fire was not quite out. She imperfectly mixed a decoction and filled a bottle which ought not to have been downstairs but had been brought and left there by Louisa as a result of ...
— The Head of the House of Coombe • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... more drinks, for which I insisted on paying, Nelson decided to go. We parted true comradely, and I wandered down the wharf to the Razzle Dazzle. Spider was just building the fire for supper. ...
— John Barleycorn • Jack London

... They like some sunshine, but will get along with little of it if they have good light beside. They do finely in halls and bedrooms where the temperature is almost to the frost line at night, and no fire heat at all during the day. An Aster will not bloom all winter. Its period of bloom is quite long enough, however, to make it a welcome guest in the plant window, and when through blooming it can ...
— The Mayflower, January, 1905 • Various

... veldt, hunting for maneless lions—an amazon in breeches and boots, at the head of her own safari. Week after week she had led her dark-skinned retainers through the wilds, cheerily doctoring them in their sicknesses, herself never ailing or weary. At the charge of a lion she had withheld her fire till the last possible moment. By night, the safari encamped, she had sat before her tent in a folding chair, one knee cocked over the other, a pipe between her teeth, listening to the gossip of ragged ...
— Sacrifice • Stephen French Whitman

... obstacles left out—the wind, the weather, the crashing surf in Gabarus Bay, the rocks and bogs of the surrounding country, the difficulties of entering a narrow-necked harbour under a combination of end-on and broadside fire, the terrible lee shore off the islands, reefs, and Lighthouse Point, the commonest vigilance of the most slovenly garrison, and even the offensive power of the guns on the walls of Louisbourg itself. Shirley's plan was that Pepperrell should arrive ...
— The Great Fortress - A Chronicle of Louisbourg 1720-1760 • William Wood

... Something About Fires The lee-King's Reign. Malmo, the Wounded Rat Mama's Happy Christmas Cured of Carelessness A Visit from a Prince Stringing Cranberries Christmas in California A Troublesome Call Bertie's Corn-Popper Fire! Fire! Fire! The Dolls and the Other Dolls Why Did Mamma Change Her Mind? Clara's Funeral. The Chickadee-Dee. The Children's Party Brave Tomasso Tommy Frost Sees a Bear Myself Two Strange Sights A Cat's Instincts Diliah's New Year's Presents Night Flowers ...
— Cinderella; or, The Little Glass Slipper and Other Stories • Anonymous

... her governess, and closed the door softly. Her mood was a strange one. She no longer feared her mother. Something had escaped from her nature, as if she had been touched by fire. It was that subtle, perishable essence ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 7 • Various

... hear that. Still, you must make some allowance at a time like this. If you will come with me, I will write you a pass which will prevent any similar mistake happening in the future." The general led the way to a smoldering camp fire, where, out of a valise, he took writing materials and, using the valise as a desk, began to write. After he had written "Headquarters of the Grand Army of the Irish Republic" he looked up, and asked Yates his Christian name. Being answered, he inquired the name ...
— In the Midst of Alarms • Robert Barr

... I 'm teugh as the wire, Sae we 'll at the rogues have a dash, And, fegs, if my gun winna fire, I 'll turn her butt-end, and I ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... be in this Island mountaines lift up to the skies, whose tops being white with perpetual snowe, their roots boile with everlasting fire, etc. ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries - of the English Nation, v. 1, Northern Europe • Richard Hakluyt

... In these modern days of long journeys, a place so remote as San Francisco, in the most commonplace of circumstances, gathers to its reputation something of the fabulous. How much more true then of a city built from sand dunes in four years; five times swept by fire, yet rising again and better before its ashes were extinct; the resort of all the picturesque, unknown races of the earth—the Chinese, the Chileno, the Mexican, the Spanish, the Islander, the Moor, the Turk—not to speak of ordinary foreigners from Russia, ...
— The Gray Dawn • Stewart Edward White

... in the scene, was overawed with the glorious majesty of the Divine character; shame at the revelation of his own impurity overwhelmed him. He rightly felt that he was a blot upon this temple scene, but the Divine touch of the living fire transformed him, and prepared him for that which ...
— Standards of Life and Service • T. H. Howard

... we were comfortably seated in the snug little room, before a cheerful fire. My friend in his easy-chair, wrapped in his dressing-gown, and my own beautiful Charlotte seated on a gaily-embroidered ...
— The Monctons: A Novel, Volume I • Susanna Moodie

... say 'fire up,'" said Preston, "but no, don't do anything of that sort! If there is any sort of talking that has a chilly effect, I wish you'd ...
— Melbourne House, Volume 1 • Susan Warner

... by this time landed all the articles we had brought on shore. They were somewhat miscellaneous, but all likely to prove useful. Besides the fire-arms and ammunition, we had found some cases of preserved meat and hams, a cask of biscuit, some tins of pepper and salt and mustard, a case of wine, a cask of pork, a box of cigars, and a couple of Mr Hooker's cases. We thought it would do his heart good to see them; ...
— In the Eastern Seas • W.H.G. Kingston

... is nine years distant, I trust none of the fair readers of this journal will trouble themselves to address me notes which I really cannot answer, and which it would give me pain to throw in the fire. ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. III, No IV, April 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... cloud-work of serene Asks her long deputed power— Takes her sceptre—bids her cower— Strips her of her ancient robe, She, who once bestrode the globe— Flings around his flaming path Crescents of destructive wrath; Tramples earth, and rolls in fire Forth the thunders of his ire. Nature sinks, no more to rise While JEHOVAH fills the skies With his glory high, sublime— Death is dead, and perished time! What a scene! when naught shall ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 19, Issue 551, June 9, 1832 • Various

... their good allies—the same rebels frequently returning with different tones and new stories, to obtain double and treble provisions of arms, ammunition, and uniforms—selling the ammunition for whisky, and running away at the first fire in the day of battle. The French, detesting and despising those by whom they had been thus cheated, pillaged, and deserted, called them beggars, rascals, and savages. They cursed also without scruple their own Directory for sending them, after ...
— Richard Lovell Edgeworth - A Selection From His Memoir • Richard Lovell Edgeworth

... a very cruel action of Elijah, when he called for fire from heaven, and consumed no fewer than two captains and a hundred soldiers, and this for no other crime than obeying the orders of their king, in attempting to seize him; and it is owned by our Savior, that it was an instance of greater severity than the spirit of the New Testament allows, Luke ...
— The Antiquities of the Jews • Flavius Josephus

... sacrifice I am making in telling you this, when you know that I could have done all that I propose without your leave or hindrance. Yes, Diego; I had but to stretch out my hand thus, and that foolish fire-brand of a heretic muchacha would have vanished from Todos Santos forever. I could have left you in your fool's paradise, and one morning you would have found her gone. I should have condoled with you, and consoled you, and you would have forgotten her as you did the ...
— The Crusade of the Excelsior • Bret Harte

... below the belt was too much for him. He was raging up and down the hall like a wild man when Boyle came in. 'Mr. Boyle,' he roared, rushing up to him and seizing him by the hand and working it like a pump-handle in a fire, 'it was a most iniquitous proceeding! I wish to assure you I have no sympathy whatever with that sort of thing!' And so he went on till he had Boyle almost in tears. By Jove! he's a rum old party! Look ...
— The Doctor - A Tale Of The Rockies • Ralph Connor

... eye for an eye, blood for blood. I read it written on the faces of the men who strode with martial tread around the last sad resting-place Of him they loved—their chief, the dauntless General Wauchope. Vengeance spoke in the sombre fire that blazed in every Scotsman's eye. Retribution was carved large and deep on every hard-set Scottish face; it spoke in silent eloquence in the grip of each hard, browned hand on rifle barrels; it found a mute echo in each knitted brow, and leapt ...
— Campaign Pictures of the War in South Africa (1899-1900) - Letters from the Front • A. G. Hales

... my existence painful: change then, I beseech thee, the essence which thy will has given to all beings. Grant that the elements, at this moment, lose in my favor their distinguishing properties; so order it, that heavy bodies shall not fall, that fire shall not burn, that the brittle frame which I have received at thine hands, shall not suffer those shocks which it every instant experiences. Rectify, I pray thee, for my happiness, the plan which thine infinite prudence hath marked out from all eternity." Such ...
— The System of Nature, Vol. 2 • Baron D'Holbach

... evening, and he was returning from Alexandria to Mount Vernon with three friends and a groom. Having halted a few moments he dismounted, and upon rising in his stirrup again, the horse, alarmed at the glare from a fire near the road-side, sprang from under his rider who came heavily to the ground. His friends rushed to give him assistance, thinking him hurt. But the vigorous old man was upon his feet again, brushing the dust from his clothes, and after thanking those who came ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... month ago the town was lighted from one end to the other with the burning of Catholic churches; and now, within the last week, the outrages have recommenced with more fury than ever, because, for a wonder, the militia actually did fire upon the mob, who, unused to any such demonstration of being in earnest on their part, had possessed themselves of cannon and fire-arms, and would have exterminated the small body of militia which could be gathered together at the first outbreak of the riot, but which is now backed by ...
— Records of Later Life • Frances Anne Kemble

... Church's patrimony with waste and fire-raising," said the Sub-Prior, "and that in the face of the sun? I call on all who hear me to bear witness to the words this ruffian has spoken. Remember how the Lord James drowned such as you by scores in ...
— The Monastery • Sir Walter Scott

... they sat watching the red fire, it seemed to her there was no problem in all the world he could not solve, no struggle in which he would not prove victor, nor any knowledge too deep to reach. In the illumination of their great love the gates of life became visible and ...
— Christopher Hibbault, Roadmaker • Marguerite Bryant

... the doctor soothingly. "Where is the culprit? We'll see what she has to say for herself. Look here, Sarah," he opened fire as that young person came up the porch steps and into the hall, "Mrs. Anderson says you slapped ...
— Rosemary • Josephine Lawrence

... from the other. There I had no right to fire; but here I should take the chances rather ...
— Messenger No. 48 • James Otis

... match, and set fire to a wisp of bark. It blazed up brightly, and as he held it to ...
— Tom Fairfield's Pluck and Luck • Allen Chapman

... rites are serviceable to merit the remission of sins and grace. For they are then obscuring the Gospel, the benefit of Christ, and the righteousness of faith. [For they are just as directly contrary to Christ and to the Gospel as are fire and water to one another.] The Gospel teaches that by faith we receive freely, for Christ's sake, the remission of sins and are reconciled. The adversaries, on the other hand, appoint another mediator, namely these ...
— The Apology of the Augsburg Confession • Philip Melanchthon

... where she awaited Mrs. Denby's coming, was lit by a single silver vase-lamp under an orange shade and by a fire of thin logs, for the April evening was damp with a hesitant rain. On the table, near the lamp, was a silver vase with three yellow tulips in it, and Cecil, wandering about, came upon a double ...
— O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1920 • Various

... a moment, counting her toes softly to herself. The smoke grew thicker. Her left leg was on fire. ...
— Tales of the Jazz Age • F. Scott Fitzgerald

... spirit in the nest," said he, and Rosedrop heedless of the fire which burned her beautiful body, laid Isal's spirit in ...
— Seven Little People and their Friends • Horace Elisha Scudder

... bowels of the earth to find him, if he must, and if by chance there is some heart upon which the name is written, he will open that heart with the point of his sword to decipher those letters of blood and of fire!" ...
— Stories of Modern French Novels • Julian Hawthorne

... him in personal appearance, and the one is a professional man, while the other thought fit to continue a linen-draper like his good father before him; but that is by no means to infer that Miss Millar has chosen the better husband of the two. Girls are so foolish—they play with fire, and never look or take it into account where and whom it may burn. Tom Robinson deserved more respectful treatment in Redcross. He has never been like himself since. I used to hear him whistling and humming tunes to himself as he worked in the office—there ...
— A Houseful of Girls • Sarah Tytler

... about the real condition of men than Jesus Christ did. Lost sheep, lost coins, prodigal sons, builders of houses on the sand that are destined to be blown down and flooded away, men in danger of an undying worm and unquenchable fire—these are parts of Christ's representations of the condition of humanity, and these are the conceptions that underlie this great thought of salvation ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Ephesians; Epistles of St. Peter and St. John • Alexander Maclaren

... The bay seemed a vast sheet of fire, as the crimson clouds cast their shifting shadows on its bosom; and, forgetting everything else, Beulah leaned out of the buggy, and said ...
— Beulah • Augusta J. Evans

... he says, "gave to James Otis and to Patrick Henry the prophet's tongue of flame. They nerved the arm of Washington in battle, and kindled the embattled farmers to fire 'the shot heard round the world.' They kindled the eloquence of Phillips and the song of Longfellow. They gave to Abraham Lincoln the faith at whose bidding a hundred thousand men sprang to their feet as one—the faith which brightened the six ...
— The New England Magazine, Volume 1, No. 2, February, 1886. - The Bay State Monthly, Volume 4, No. 2, February, 1886. • Various

... covenant of Sinai; of the latter,—in connexion with the covenant which the LORD commanded Moses to make with the children of Israel in the land of Moab, besides the former Covenant. With characteristic fire and earnestness, glancing, as usual, at every side of the question before him,—having, a little way back, explained himself, without explanation, when he inserted that remarkable parenthetical clause, telos ...
— Inspiration and Interpretation - Seven Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford • John Burgon

... the legitimate reductio ad absurdum of an ember raked from a fire 1000 years ago. Is it not yet cooled down to the constant temperature of its surroundings? And we may evidently increase the time a million-fold if we please. It appears as if we must regard eternity as outliving every progressive change, ...
— The Birth-Time of the World and Other Scientific Essays • J. (John) Joly

... price than such an enchanted hush as surrounded him on his greatest nights. The most profane, on these occasions, felt a presence; all minor eloquence grew dumb. Adelaide Mulville, for the pride of her hospitality, anxiously watched the door or stealthily poked the fire. I used to call it the music-room, for we had anticipated Bayreuth. The very gates of the kingdom of light seemed to open and the horizon of thought to flash with the beauty of a sunrise ...
— The Coxon Fund • Henry James

... unflaggingly his studies of the English, French, and German languages, that he might search for the truth crystallized in those tongues. As his work progressed, the flush of health came to his cheeks. His eyes reflected the consuming fire which glowed in his eager soul. As he labored, he wrote; and his discoveries and meditations all found lodgment in ...
— Carmen Ariza • Charles Francis Stocking

... approaching. The waters were profoundly dark, but Captain Nemo pointed to a reddish spot in the distance, a sort of wide glow shimmering about two miles from the Nautilus. What this fire was, what substances fed it, how and why it kept burning in the liquid mass, I couldn't say. Anyhow it lit our way, although hazily, but I soon grew accustomed to this unique gloom, and in these circumstances I understood the ...
— 20000 Leagues Under the Seas • Jules Verne

... bookishness, as they commonly term it. Of such mind were certain Goths, of whom it is written, that having in the spoil of a famous city taken a fair library, one hangman, belike fit to execute the fruits of their wits, who had murdered a great number of bodies, would have set fire in it. "No," said another, very gravely, "take heed what you do, for while they are busy about those toys, we shall with more leisure conquer their countries." This, indeed, is the ordinary doctrine of ignorance, and many words sometimes I have heard spent in it; ...
— A Defence of Poesie and Poems • Philip Sidney

... volatile, and most inflammable, of all known Liquids: It swims upon the highest rectified Spirit of Wine as Oil does upon Water, and flies away so quickly as hardly to wet a Hand it is dropped upon; from which Properties it probably has obtained it's Name. It is so readily inflammable, as to take Fire at the approach of a Candle, before the Flame touches it. Any Electrified Body will also produce the ...
— An Account of the Extraordinary Medicinal Fluid, called Aether. • Matthew Turner

... jockey, "as you say you can speak High Dutch, I should like to hear you and master six foot six fire ...
— The Romany Rye - A Sequel to 'Lavengro' • George Borrow

... knowing me perfectly, she acted as a stranger, and asked the eunuch who I was. That excellent man replied, "This is that unfortunate, ill-fated wretch who has fallen under the displeasure and reprehension of your highness; for this reason his appearance is such; he is burning with the fire of love; how much soever he endeavours to quench the flame with the water of tears, yet it burns with double force. Nothing is of the least avail; moreover he is dying with the shame of his fault." The fair lady jocosely ...
— Bagh O Bahar, Or Tales of the Four Darweshes • Mir Amman of Dihli

... into these reflections, when he found himself sitting by the club-house fire, surrounded by green smock- frocks and shapeless hats: with Friar Bacon lively, busy, and expert, at a little table ...
— Contributions to All The Year Round • Charles Dickens

... its full strength or contributes its full colour. This proper pride does not lift the heart like the tongue of trumpets; you cannot go clad in crimson and gold for this. On the other hand, this mild rationalist modesty does not cleanse the soul with fire and make it clear like crystal; it does not (like a strict and searching humility) make a man as a little child, who can sit at the feet of the grass. It does not make him look up and see marvels; for Alice must grow small if she is to be Alice in Wonderland. Thus it loses ...
— Orthodoxy • G. K. Chesterton

... of rapid development now attained, the child daily surprises us afresh by his independent applications of words just heard, although many are not correctly applied, as tochen haiss (boiling hot), said not only of the milk, but also of the fire. ...
— The Mind of the Child, Part II • W. Preyer

... soldiers' cemetery to rear of the last block of buildings where the dead have been shovelled out of earth by shell fire. In this village the dead are out in the open ...
— The Red Horizon • Patrick MacGill

... of this probability, Morgan seemed determined to lose no time. He passed a bit of tinder-paper under the heater on the hearth, which caught fire instantly. He lighted four wax-candles, all there were in the room, placed two on the mantel-shelf and two on a bureau opposite, and spread upon the bed a complete dress of the Incroyable of the very latest fashion. It consisted of a short coat, cut square across the front and long behind, ...
— The Companions of Jehu • Alexandre Dumas

... under fire an' you're wishful to duck, Don't look nor take 'eed at the man that is struck, Be thankful you're livin', and trust to your luck And march to your front like a soldier. Front, front, front like a soldier ...
— Verses 1889-1896 • Rudyard Kipling

... fallen asleep with the window open and left the gas flaring in the wind. I stood for a moment outside the door wondering what I ought to do. Then I heard a crackling sound, and smelt something burning. That alarmed me still more, because I knew no fire had been lit in the room that day. I wondered if the bedroom was on fire, and I knelt down and tried ...
— The Moon Rock • Arthur J. Rees

... When the fire was poked, and the chairs were drawn together over the rug, there were no further preliminaries which could be decently introduced, and the earl was ...
— The Kellys and the O'Kellys • Anthony Trollope

... very eminent surgeon, a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Medicine and the Royal Academy of Surgeons." The two men occupied the entire day, Mr. Wheeler about two-thirds of it, but the committee consumed a good deal of this time by a running fire of questions not far from "heckling." Mr. Wheeler offered for insertion in the Record a page and a half of finely printed statistics compiled by the Men's Anti-Suffrage Association to prove that the laws for women and children were not so good in equal suffrage States as in those ...
— The History of Woman Suffrage, Volume V • Ida Husted Harper

... like a great fire in the night, and ran round the terrible ring in which Wayne was now held helpless. The fight was already over. One man's energy for one hour had saved the city ...
— The Napoleon of Notting Hill • Gilbert K. Chesterton

... wood was collected for a fire. There was no need to fear that the light might attract attention; the camp was far enough from human habitation, and neither man nor beast ever spent the night in the morass of the Hansag. Besides, they could have seen, from ...
— The Nameless Castle • Maurus Jokai

... autumn was in the air that evening. The bracken had begun to turn, and its hue was intensified by the russet warmth of the evening sunlight, that touched each frond with fire, burnished the granite boulders, and turned the purple of the heather to a warm ruddiness. As Ishmael went along the hard pale road a hare, chased by a greyhound belonging to a couple of miners, came thudding down it, and the light turned its dim fur to bronze. It flashed past over ...
— Secret Bread • F. Tennyson Jesse

... perhaps felt that the friends of slavery had set in motion a train of events whose result was beyond their ken. Mr. Palfrey, of Massachusetts, a few days later said with as much sagacity as wit that "Mr. Calhoun thought that he could set fire to a barrel of gunpowder and extinguish it when half consumed." In his anxiety that the war should be brought to an end, Calhoun proposed that the United States army should evacuate the Mexican capital, establish a defensive line, and hold ...
— Abraham Lincoln: A History V1 • John G. Nicolay and John Hay

... flashed, she quivered with anger. No one would have believed that the girl who always appeared calm, and rarely spoke, unless spoken to, could show such fire. One could not guess how the scene would have ended, but just at that moment a slight sound ...
— Dorothy Dainty at Glenmore • Amy Brooks

... came from the gloomy structure. The huge column of black smoke rose uninterruptedly into the sky, and the noise of the great engine never ceased for an instant. The mob gathered closer on all sides and redoubled the fire of the rifles, to which was now added the belching of several machine-guns. Ragged holes began to appear in the walls, and at the sight of these the assailants yelled with delight. It was evident that, the mill could not long ...
— The Moon Metal • Garrett P. Serviss

... you seen her With that high, laughing, turbulent head of hers Thrown backward, and the bowstring at her ear, Or sitting at the fire with those grave eyes Full of good counsel as it were with wine, Or when love ran through all the lineaments Of ...
— Irish Plays and Playwrights • Cornelius Weygandt

... because he had a suspicion that Lily once felt an interest in Osgood, which might be on the point of awakening. He tried experiments upon her feelings, pinched them, tore them up by the roots, extracted them with wrenches of his will, applied slow fire; but he learned nothing. His motive was so palpable to Osgood that he more than once felt on the point of knocking him down, and had he seen any encouraging sign from Lily he would have done it. He sometimes ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 8 • Various

... of a shotgun, coming faint but clear from the street below, brought him up short. The shot was answered by a volley of rifle fire. ...
— The End of Time • Wallace West

... a child. He's a fool on impulse, a good man and a gentleman in principle. And he acts on principle, which it's not every—Some water, please! Thank you, sir. It's very hot, and yet one's feet get uncommonly cold. Oh, thank you, thank you. He's no fire-eater, but he has a trained conscience and a tender heart, and he'll do his duty when a braver and more selfish man might fail you. But he wants encouragement; and when ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... the door, and found every thing undisturbed; and while Smith drove off his team for the purpose of taking his oxen to pasture, I started a fire in the old stove, and Fred went after water, and to get the materials of a good supper together, which, by long fasting, we keenly felt ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... into envy and civil discord. In the siege of Nice, the arts and engines of antiquity were employed by the Latins; the mine and the battering-ram, the tortoise, and the belfrey or movable turret, artificial fire, and the catapult and balist, the sling, and the crossbow for the casting of stones and darts. [81] In the space of seven weeks much labor and blood were expended, and some progress, especially by Count Raymond, was made on the side of the besiegers. But the Turks could ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 5 • Edward Gibbon

... about ten or twelve feet square; the roof is also made of poles placed like rafters and covered over with sheets of birch-bark, an opening being left the whole length of the ridge for the escape of the smoke. In the centre of the earthen floor is the fire, over which are suspended five or six large sugar-kettles, holding perhaps twenty or thirty gallons each, and into these the sap is poured as it is brought in from the trees. Along the inside of the wigwam on either side of the fire is ...
— Missionary Work Among The Ojebway Indians • Edward Francis Wilson

... been estimated that at least thirty thousand were hanged and burned. The last victim executed in Scotland, perished in 1722. "She was an innocent old woman, who had so little idea of her situation as to rejoice at the sight of the fire which was destined to consume her. She had a daughter, lame both of hands and of feet—a circumstance attributed to the witch having been used to transform her daughter into a pony and getting ...
— The Ghosts - And Other Lectures • Robert G. Ingersoll

... monster log that comes furiously dashing from the summit down a chute a thousand feet in length with twice the ordinary speed of a locomotive. So rapid is its descent that it leaves a trail of smoke behind it, and sometimes kindles a fire among the slivers along its way. Ah! it strikes the water! In an instant there is an inverted Niagara in the air, resplendent with prismatic and transparent veils ...
— The Lake of the Sky • George Wharton James

... kitchen part escaped the smashing fire, and still stands," observed Jack. "I warrant you this is the only part of a building left around here. Tom, would our spy be likely to take up his headquarters in such a place as this, do ...
— Air Service Boys Over The Enemy's Lines - The German Spy's Secret • Charles Amory Beach

... goes too far (Reply to the Questions of a Provincial, vol. II, ch. 77, p. 104): he seems to think that a feeling of pleasure could have the same effect, and that, in order to prevent a child from going too near the fire, God could give him ideas of pleasure in proportion to the distance he kept from it. This expedient does not appear very practicable with regard to all evils, unless a miracle were involved. It is more natural that what if it were too near would cause ...
— Theodicy - Essays on the Goodness of God, the Freedom of Man and the Origin of Evil • G. W. Leibniz

... only for an instant, hung fire. "Oh the difficulty is that I don't, upon my honour, even yet quite make out ...
— The Wings of the Dove, Volume II • Henry James

... to woman's work should be taken with so little seriousness. She tried to rearrange a mental picture which the other was continually destroying. "But I suppose it's very picturesque. You cook over an open fire, I imagine." ...
— The Squirrel-Cage • Dorothy Canfield

... town, and Le-Tchen the inner one. It strikes us at first glance that both look desolate. Everywhere are traces of fire, here and there pagodas or houses half destroyed, a mass of ruins, not the work of time, but the work of war. This shows that Sou-Tcheou, taken by the Mussulmans and retaken by the Chinese, has undergone the horrors of those barbarous contests which end in the destruction of ...
— The Adventures of a Special Correspondent • Jules Verne

... his rifle at the approaching horsemen. The moonlight was silvery and brilliant, giving him fine chance for aim, and not in vain had his friend, Boyd, called him the greatest shot in the West. The rifle cracked, there was a little spit of fire in the moonlight, and the foremost Indian fell from his pony. The band uttered a single shout of rage, but did not charge. Instead, ...
— The Great Sioux Trail - A Story of Mountain and Plain • Joseph Altsheler

... take apart corded beds so as to get them out of houses that are on fire. There aren't hardly any corded beds now, of course, but it's a very old association that you're foreman of, and the members keep the old things. It's awfully nice to do so, I think. It's like keeping the furniture in old families. And that big bag there, with the puckerin'-string run around ...
— The Skipper and the Skipped - Being the Shore Log of Cap'n Aaron Sproul • Holman Day

... thunder and lightning, and many other things that are none of his business. Only, to be sure, he intends to get away safely with his information. When you think you see your finish bowing to receive you, something happens in your head. It's like a sultry sheet of rapid fire lapping up for a moment the thunder-shaken night—and discovering a strange land to you. And it's really good ...
— The River and I • John G. Neihardt

... sick, en I say ter myse'f dat I'd kinder drap 'roun' en see how de ole lady is, en fetch 'er dish yer bag er roas'n'-years. Mighty well dose I know dat ef yo' ma wuz yer right now, en in 'er min', she 'd take de roas'n'-years en be glad fer ter git um, en mo'n dat, she'd take'n ax me in by de fire fer ter worn my han's,' ...
— Nights With Uncle Remus - Myths and Legends of the Old Plantation • Joel Chandler Harris

... emerged on that high altar on which, not twenty-four hours earlier, he had sunk face downward in the snow. The snow had drifted again over his footprints and the mark of his form. It was drifting still, in little powdery whirls, across a surface that caught tints of crimson and glints of fire from an angry sunset. It was windy here. As she stood above him, facing the north, her figure poised against a glowering sky, her garments blew backward. Even when he reached her and was standing by her side, she continued to gaze outward across the undulating, snow-covered country, in the ...
— The Side Of The Angels - A Novel • Basil King

... leave some. It gives both lightness and aplomb. We know, however wise by rule, Woman is still by nature fool; And men have sense to like her all The more when she is natural. 'Tis true, that if we choose, we can Mock to a miracle the man; But iron in the fire red hot, Though 'tis the heat, the fire 'tis not: And who, for such a feint, would pledge The babe's and woman's privilege, No duties and a thousand rights? Besides, defect love's flow incites, As water in a well will ...
— The Victories of Love - and Other Poems • Coventry Patmore

... the bridge. At this place Albuquerque fortified himself, and as considerable harm was done to his men by poisoned arrows discharged from the tops of the adjoining houses, he caused them to be set on fire. After bestowing great praises on his captains for their courageous behaviour, and perceiving that his people began to grow faint by long exertions, excessive heat, and want of food, he withdrew to the ships towards night. Ten of the Portuguese died in consequence of their wounds ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VI - Early English Voyages Of Discovery To America • Robert Kerr

... tolled for Hereward and Torfrida. Those had run down in molten streams upon that fatal night when Abbot Ingulf leaped out of bed to see the vast wooden sanctuary wrapt in one sheet of roaring flame, from the carelessness of a plumber who had raked the ashes over his fire in the bell-tower, and left it to smoulder through ...
— Hereward, The Last of the English • Charles Kingsley

... began this tradition in 1790 after reminding the Nation that the destiny of self-government and the "preservation of the sacred fire of liberty" is "finally staked on the experiment entrusted to the hands of the American people." For our friends in the press, who place a high premium on accuracy, let me say: I did not actually hear George Washington say that. But it is a matter ...
— State of the Union Addresses of Ronald Reagan • Ronald Reagan

... brought out another of his store of gaudy toy books and went into the parlor. His father, following a few moments later, looked down at the little figure on the carpet before the fire, ...
— A Son of the City - A Story of Boy Life • Herman Gastrell Seely

... most of all was something very different. What had caused that swift change in Maggie?—from a fury that was both fire and granite, to that pallid, quivering, whispering girl who had so rapidly led him safely out of ...
— Children of the Whirlwind • Leroy Scott

... that the wind came in on all sides. I had flannel jackets and blankets and still was cold, and my poor men, with nothing but their usual thin cotton clothes, passed miserable nights lying on a mat on the ground round the fire which could only warm one side at a time. The highest peak is an extinct volcano with the crater nearly filled up, forming merely a saucer on the top, in which is a good house built by the Government for the old Dutch naturalists who surveyed and explored the mountain. There are a lot of ...
— Alfred Russel Wallace: Letters and Reminiscences, Vol. 1 (of 2) • James Marchant

... of Turkic Muslims - has been an independent republic since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Despite a 1'994 cease-fire, Azerbaijan has yet to resolve its conflict with Armenia over the Azerbaijani Nagorno-Karabakh enclave (largely Armenian populated). Azerbaijan has lost almost 20% of its territory and must support some 750,000 refugees and internally displaced persons as a ...
— The 2002 CIA World Factbook • US Government

... difficulties. I propose to begin the attack by discharging the whole of these rockets as rapidly as possible into the thick of the crowd of natives, and then to charge upon them with sword and cutlass, reserving our pistol fire for emergencies. I hope by this plan to scatter the savages and cause their retirement for at least a few brief minutes, during which we must dash in, cut loose the prisoners, and retire with them to the boat. There must be no more fighting than ...
— A Middy in Command - A Tale of the Slave Squadron • Harry Collingwood

... primitive methods of message-sending by fire or smoke or other signals. The life and experiments of Morse are then pictured and the dramatic story of the invention and development of the telegraph is set forth. The submarine cable followed with the struggles of Field, ...
— Masters of Space - Morse, Thompson, Bell, Marconi, Carty • Walter Kellogg Towers

... how lovely! I went to Kestaag this year and was very glad to leave. Nothing to do in the evening but sit round a fire. All day the hotel was like a wilderness and outside nothing but a lot of men falling about in the snow. They were too tired to do anything during the evening. It was horrid. Next time I shall be more careful and choose a nice ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, March 17, 1920 • Various

... The fire cast up its red flare spasmodically, licked at the last of the dead branches which, rolling apart, burned out upon the rock floor. The darkness once more blotted out all detail saving the few smouldering coals, the knobs of stone in the small flickering circles of light, the quiet form of the man ...
— The Bells of San Juan • Jackson Gregory

... Mr. Wetherell seated in a low chair opposite the fire, and from the fact that his right foot was resting on a sort of small trestle, I argued that he was suffering from an attack of ...
— A Bid for Fortune - or Dr. Nikola's Vendetta • Guy Boothby

... reached even to our own times, with an increasing reputation and acceptance. According to this theory, the kinds of matter, or elements, must he regarded as infinitely various. HERACLITUS, who taught philosophy about 550 years before Christ, considered all things as derived from an elemental heat or fire;[25] a philosophy which seems to us to have formed the basis of the Hippocratic doctrines of life. Like HERACLITUS, HIPPOCRATES tells us, that the calidum was the first principle of things, and that by an expansion or extension of itself, it constitutes all the objects of the material ...
— North American Medical and Surgical Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3, July, 1826 • Various

... acquired the practice in repeated years of small frugality combined with large leisure—periods when she had nothing but hours and days and years to spend and had learned to calculate in any situation how long she could stay. "Staying" was so often a saving—a saving of candles, of fire and even (as it sometimes implied a scheme for stray refection) of food. Peter saw soon enough how bravely her shreds and patches of gentility and equanimity hung together, with the aid of whatever ...
— The Tragic Muse • Henry James

... at me with a smile of recollected entertainment, "have you forgiven Bobby yet for leaving you sitting on the wall? I remember, in the first blaze of your indignation, you vowed that never should he fire a gun in your preserves!—do you still stick to it, or have you ...
— Nancy - A Novel • Rhoda Broughton



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