Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Go   Listen
verb
Go  v. t.  (past went; past part. gone; pres. part. going)  
1.
To take, as a share in an enterprise; to undertake or become responsible for; to bear a part in. "They to go equal shares in the booty."
2.
To bet or wager; as, I'll go you a shilling. (Colloq.)
To go halves, to share with another equally.
To go it, to behave in a wild manner; to be uproarious; to carry on; also, to proceed; to make progress. (Colloq.)
To go it alone (Card Playing), to play a hand without the assistance of one's partner.
To go it blind.
(a)
To act in a rash, reckless, or headlong manner. (Slang)
(b)
(Card Playing) To bet without having examined the cards.
To go one's way, to set forth; to depart.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Go" Quotes from Famous Books



... answered the manito, "I will go; but on such a day I will again visit you, and see who it is that furnishes the meat, and whether it ...
— The Indian Fairy Book - From the Original Legends • Cornelius Mathews

... Saw-Horse remembered that this word was the command to go as fast as he could; so he began rocking along the road at ...
— The Marvelous Land of Oz • L. Frank Baum

... Mr. Roscoe, if you will be so good as to go with me to the express car, I can get ...
— Infelice • Augusta Jane Evans Wilson

... whisky and go on," I said. "That was the first village you came into. How did you get to ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... and 18 degrees south latitude, between the parallels of Valparaiso and Arica, the Andes present towards the east three remarkable spurs, the Sierra de Cordova, the Sierra de Salta, and the Nevados de Cochabamba. Travellers partly cross and partly go along the side of the Sierra de Cordova (between 33 and 31 degrees of latitude) in their way from Buenos Ayres to Mendoza; it may be said to be the most southern promontory which advances, in the Pampas, towards the meridian of 65 degrees; it gives birth to the great ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V3 • Alexander von Humboldt

... deal of exact knowledge to go upon in discussing the significance of the ovum for the cell-theory. There were two possible interpretations. Either the ovum was a cell and the germinal vesicle its nucleus, or else the germinal vesicle was itself a cell within the larger cell of the ovum and the germinal spot was its ...
— Form and Function - A Contribution to the History of Animal Morphology • E. S. (Edward Stuart) Russell

... an overweening and mortified ambition he rejected, with the utmost discourtesy, Lorenzo's overtures, at the same time remorselessly exposing his intentions, and vowing that no Pazzo should "go round the corner" for a Medico! Messer Francesco displayed unreservedly the true character of his family: he was in truth the "Mirror of his ...
— The Tragedies of the Medici • Edgcumbe Staley

... the kindness of the director, Dr. Thomas Denison Wood. The girls so affected have thus the advantage of the latest methods known to science. If any of the numerous skin diseases are present which demand frequent and regular attention, the student is assigned to a group who go twice a week to a dispensary to receive electrical or X-ray treatment. In cases of enlarged tonsils or adenoids, the necessity for immediate operation is explained and every effort made to gain the consent of the parents. When permission is obtained the girl goes ...
— The Making of a Trade School • Mary Schenck Woolman

... had hitherto gazed with envious eyes, had viewed from afar with longing. How his heart beat when he thought of it! To wear a fashionable coat, to feast after long abstinence, to hire handsome apartments, to go at once to the theatre, to the confectioner's, to... other places; and seizing his money, he was in the ...
— Taras Bulba and Other Tales • Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol

... friendly Buddhist priest I seek respite from the strife And manifold anomalies which go to make up life— ...
— Roving East and Roving West • E.V. Lucas

... one that is fair to those who need help or cannot help themselves, fair to the community, and fair to the taxpayer. And let us have as our goal that there will be no Government program which makes it more profitable to go on welfare than to ...
— State of the Union Addresses of Richard Nixon • Richard Nixon

... help for me, and I went to work. For an hour I cut and whittled on that old newspaper, along with a number of others, before I got a pattern that I fancied might do. Then I submitted it to Miss J. herself, who told me to go ahead and cut it out. It appeared all right, so far as she could see. Then I cut, and basted, and tried the garment on Bessie. It was too wide across the chest, too short in the legs, and the feet were monstrosities. What was to be done, ...
— A Woman who went to Alaska • May Kellogg Sullivan

... operations of the Kurdish Workers Party (PKK)—a terrorist group based in northern Iraq that has killed thousands of Turks. They are upset that the United States and Iraq have not targeted the PKK more aggressively. The Turks have threatened to go after the PKK themselves, and have made several forays across the ...
— The Iraq Study Group Report • United States Institute for Peace

... change in temperature explains one reason why so many Congo natives die under forty. They are scantily clad, perspire freely, and lie out at night with scarcely any covering. They go to sleep in a humid atmosphere and wake up with the temperature forty degrees lower. The natural result is that half of them constantly have colds and the moment pneumonia develops they succumb. Congestion of the lungs vies with ...
— An African Adventure • Isaac F. Marcosson

... a positive jump; Maisie caught her look of alarm. "'Take' her? You don't mean to go ...
— What Maisie Knew • Henry James

... to estimate the influence of Darwinism upon sociological conceptions, we must not dwell only upon the way in which Darwin impressed the general notion of evolution upon the minds of thinkers. We must go into details. We must consider the influence of the particular theories by which he explained the mechanism of this evolution. The name of the author of The Origin of Species has been especially attached, as everyone knows, to the doctrines of "natural selection" and of "struggle for existence," ...
— Evolution in Modern Thought • Ernst Haeckel

... but told Henry again and again in answer to his importunate questions—told him with her frank courage how she had loved him from the first in the old churchyard as a child—loved him for what she called his love-eyes; told him—ah! what did she not tell him? I must not go on. These things should not be written about at all but for the ...
— Aylwin • Theodore Watts-Dunton

... poor spirit in the old boy if he doesn't feel under a lifelong obligation to you for your goodness. I should, if it were me.—Look, though, we shall have to go now; they are ...
— The Reason Why • Elinor Glyn

... people. In this fact is to be found an entirely rational and competent explanation of their failure. The schools have done so much toward popularizing science, and the circulating-library has rendered so familiar the prominent facts of history, that men and women do not go to the lecture to learn, and, as far as any appreciably practical benefit is concerned, do not need to go. It is only when some eminent enthusiast in these walks of learning consents to address them that they come out, and then it is rather to place themselves ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 15, No. 89, March, 1865 • Various

... here, is but an insignificant amount as contrasted with the income which I freely gave up to my son and you; therefore, some money for the poor woman who is waiting, I shall now have; give me some shillings, for God's sake, and let me go." He advanced closer to her, ...
— International Weekly Miscellany Of Literature, Art, and Science - Vol. I., July 22, 1850. No. 4. • Various

... Day, 10 September (1967); note - day of the national referendum to decide whether to remain with the UK or go with Spain ...
— The 2007 CIA World Factbook • United States

... she repeated. Then as he still remained silent she added, "There's no hurry, Tommy dear; just go on listening with your mouth. I quite ...
— Malcolm Sage, Detective • Herbert George Jenkins

... jests, Wilson," cried Pembroke. "Mayhap there is somewhat to be learned here of this New World and of our dear cousins, the French. Go on, tell us, Monsieur du Mesne—as I think you call yourself, sir?—tell us more of your new country of ice and snow, of princesses and ...
— The Mississippi Bubble • Emerson Hough

... boy, he might have escaped. He was a negative sort of a being at best; and no one, save Logan and the girl, either hated him or loved him greatly, tender and true as he was. They both implored him to slip between the fingers of the soldiers and not go to the Reservation. But he would not think of being separated from his sister. Poor, stunted, starved little thing! There were wrinkles about his face; his hands were black, short, and hard, from digging roots from the frosty ground. It is not probable the lad had ever had enough ...
— Shadows of Shasta • Joaquin Miller

... drop of water be allowed to form at the extremity of a fine tube, it will go on increasing until its weight overcomes the surface tension by which it clings to the tube, and then it will fall. Hence any impurity which diminishes the surface tension of the water will diminish the size of the drop (unless the density ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 2 - "Demijohn" to "Destructor" • Various

... I think you are out of your senses, Katherine! If I were to be such a miserable coward as to go on my knees to Peter and his damned crew, do you suppose I should ever know an hour's peace of mind all my ...
— An Enemy of the People • Henrik Ibsen

... and would tell on the far side yonder? We do not know much of that future, and these days are intolerant of mere unverifiable hypotheses. But accuracy of knowledge and definiteness of impression do not always go together, nor is there the fulness of the one wanted for the clearness and force of the other. Though the thread which we throw across the abyss is very slender, it is strong enough, like the string of a boy's kite, to bear the messengers ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture: Romans Corinthians (To II Corinthians, Chap. V) • Alexander Maclaren

... an obsolete industrial base and a pattern of industrial capacity wholly unsuited to its needs. In February 1997, Romania embarked on a comprehensive macroeconomic stabilization and structural reform program, but reform subsequently has been a frustrating stop-and-go process. Restructuring programs include liquidating large energy-intensive industries and major agricultural and financial sector reforms. In 1999 Romania's economy contracted for a third straight year - by an estimated 4.8%. Romania reached an agreement with the IMF in ...
— The 2000 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... resistance, there is needed a vigour and freedom of mind that but few understand and even fewer appreciate or encourage. The prejudices that grow around a man's principles are like weeds and poison in his garden: they blight his flowers, trees and fruit; and he must go forth with fire and sword and strong unsparing hand to root out the evil things. He will find with his courage and strength are needed passion and patience and dogged persistence. For men defend a prejudice with bitter venom altogether unlike the fire that quickens the fighter for freedom; ...
— Principles of Freedom • Terence J. MacSwiney

... breath of Divine influence drawn in by the soul living on the provision of God's covenant, sanctified by the word and prayer—including the solemn vow, intense as the flame on God's altar kindled from above, holy because from the Holy Spirit of promise, it would go out on the members of the hallowed circle, subduing as the power of an ever active principle, ennobling as all the gifts of God, and as the bond of a glorious union, that may not be broken in life, beyond the dissolving power of ...
— The Ordinance of Covenanting • John Cunningham

... who has lived in a dozen different houses, staying about a month in each, is not thought the worse of on that account. As the love of finery is inherent in them all, even more so than in other daughters of Eve, a girl will go to service merely to earn sufficient to buy herself an embroidered chemise; and if, in addition to this, she can pick up a pair of small old satin shoes, she will tell you she is tired of working, and going home to rest, ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon de la Barca

... marble porches, the fountains, lily-tanks, and cloisters. But you will see that, wherever it was possible—though in humbler materials, and on a smaller scale—we have faithfully followed her design; and when presently you go through this building, and when, hereafter, you find health and refreshment and diversion here, I ask you to remember the beauty she dreamed of giving you, and to let the thought of it make her memory beautiful among you and among ...
— The Fruit of the Tree • Edith Wharton

... took the basket in which Fanchon had brought her a cake, filled it with apples and grapes, hung it on the child's arm, and said: "Now, Fanchon, go straight back home, without stopping to play with the village ragamuffins. Be ...
— Child Life In Town And Country - 1909 • Anatole France

... them a living bond between father and son. So let us examine the books together with these thoughts in mind and see if we cannot find just the things that will arouse your enthusiasm and make you young again, an equal and a friend who can lead your boy where you want him to go and where he will ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 10 - The Guide • Charles Herbert Sylvester

... arisen between these chiefs, on the subject, as we afterward understood, of our horses. But as we could not learn the cause, and were desirous of terminating the dispute, we interposed, and told them we should go on to the first water and camp. We therefore set out, followed by all the Indians, and having reached, at two miles' distance, a small stream running to the right, we camped with the two chiefs and their little bands, forming separate camps at a distance from ...
— First Across the Continent • Noah Brooks

... unusual deftness of hand, and becomes possessed with the desire to fasten real clothes whenever he has the opportunity. We see the smallest children wanting to dress themselves and their companions. They go in search of amusement of this kind, and defend themselves with all their might against the adult who would ...
— Dr. Montessori's Own Handbook • Maria Montessori

... waited until finally it dawned upon him that among the old established lawyers of Jacksonville there was no room for an ambitious beginner. Then it was that he remembered the advice of Horace Greeley, "Young man, go West." ...
— Modern Americans - A Biographical School Reader for the Upper Grades • Chester Sanford

... Speaker's chair introducing the third great Bill of the Government in the same evening. Mr. Asquith's grasp of Parliamentary method increases daily. He is really a born Parliamentarian. It is certain that he has made up his mind to go back to the bar when his time for retiring from office comes; it will be a tremendous pity if he does. Such a man is wasted before juries and in the pettiness of nisi prius. For the moment, however, he sails before the wind. With his youthful—almost boyish face—clean-shaven, fair and ...
— Sketches In The House (1893) • T. P. O'Connor

... must go there," he said, still speaking laboriously. Then after that effort, as if exhausted, he ...
— Barbara in Brittany • E. A. Gillie

... presence was unobserved. Carefully putting one foot behind the other I retreated out of sight, and rapidly returned to my party. Knowing that there were videttes sitting somewhere at the front in the dark, we concluded to go back about two miles to a plantation, and call at one of the outermost negro houses for information. We returned, and I volunteered to make the call while the others ...
— The Citizen-Soldier - or, Memoirs of a Volunteer • John Beatty

... was intriguing in Scotland; the air was full of rumours of a plot of the Court to bring down the army in the North to overawe the Parliament; and the moderate men,—"that is to say, men who never go to the bottom of any difficulty," as Gardiner expresses it,—by whose aid the above changes had been effected, were inclined to pause, if not to retrace their steps. Under these circumstances the popular leaders in the ...
— The Digger Movement in the Days of the Commonwealth • Lewis H. Berens

... too fast. Faye, of course, was entitled to two rooms, some place in the post, but it seems that the only quarters he could take were those occupied by Lieutenant Cole, so Faye decided at once to go into tents himself, in preference to compelling Lieutenant Cole to do so. Now it so happened that the inspector general of the department was in the garrison, and as soon as he learned the condition of affairs, he ordered ...
— Army Letters from an Officer's Wife, 1871-1888 • Frances M.A. Roe

... There are many verses in the Gospels and Epistles which go to prove, either that the story was unknown to the writers, or else not accepted by them. The genealogies of Joseph are cited to prove the descent of Jesus from David, which depends entirely upon the fact of Joseph's actual parentage. Jesus is ...
— Mystic Christianity • Yogi Ramacharaka

... Radicals so far disheartened by their rebuffs from the President that they gave up the fight? Not a bit of it. There was a tribunal in some respects higher than the President, and to that they resolved to go. The National Republican Convention to nominate a successor to Mr. Lincoln was approaching, and they decided to appeal to it in a way that would compel a decision between them and the President. They appointed a delegation to the convention, which they instructed for General Grant. The Claybanks ...
— The Abolitionists - Together With Personal Memories Of The Struggle For Human Rights • John F. Hume

... her new jacket, she would not shiver so. The new jacket was pretty—the only pretty thing she had ever worn. God had taken care of her father so long. He would do it still, if those two men would but go away. Ah, now the meesters were on the roof, they were clambering to the top—no—it was her mother and Hans—or the storks. It was so dark, who could tell? And the mound rocking, swinging in that strange way. How sweetly the birds were singing. They must be ...
— Hans Brinker - or The Silver Skates • Mary Mapes Dodge

... in December, 1839, brought with him to the throne a reputation for enlightened and progressive views. Further, however, than to pledge himself to certain administrative reforms the new sovereign displayed scant willingness to go. One liberal project after another was repelled, and press prosecutions and other coercive measures were brought to bear to discourage propaganda. It was in this period, however, that there arose a preponderating issue whose settlement was destined eventually to exert a powerful influence in the ...
— The Governments of Europe • Frederic Austin Ogg

... Sweepstakes, "I'm within one inch of the mark; who'll go nearer, I should like to see. Shoot away, Hal; but first, understand our laws: we settled them before you came on the green. You are to have three shots, with your own bow and your own arrows; and nobody's to borrow or lend under pretence of other bows being better or worse, or under any ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... them, and Herb and Joe went away together, after promising to come back as soon after supper as possible. After they had gone, Bob could not resist the temptation to go down and gaze with an approving eye on the shiny new tuner they had made, and dream of the many wonderful sounds that would soon come drifting in through ...
— The Radio Boys' First Wireless - Or Winning the Ferberton Prize • Allen Chapman

... direct, to his parish priest or other discreet clergyman; when, after some compliments on his part, he told me that he was clerk to a very eminent trader, at whose warehouses much business consisted in packing goods in order to go abroad; that he was often tempted to take paper and packthread enough for his own use, and that he had indeed done so so often, that he could recollect no time when he ever had bought any for himself. 'But probably,' said I, 'your master was wholly ...
— Anecdotes of the late Samuel Johnson, LL.D. - during the last twenty years of his life • Hester Lynch Piozzi

... for that," said Danglars, angry at this prolongation of the jest,—"as for that you won't get them at all. Go to the devil! You do not know with whom you have to deal!" Peppino made a sign, and the youth hastily removed the fowl. Danglars threw himself upon his goat-skin, and Peppino, reclosing the door, again began eating his ...
— The Count of Monte Cristo • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... be careful," she reproved him gently. "What has come to you? And why do you go off like that ...
— The Great Amulet • Maud Diver

... then, what's all this? Move along 'ere, all of you—don't go blocking up the thoroughfare like this! (Scathingly.) What are yer all lookin' at? (The Crowd, feeling this rebuke, move away some three paces, and then linger undecidedly.) 'Ere, Cabman, you've no right to lay 'old ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 98, January 18, 1890 • Various

... House he had found a basket of cherries, of which he partook heartily, drinking at the same time several goblets of iced milk. After dinner he still further feasted on cherries and iced milk against the protestations of Dr. Witherspoon, who was his guest. When it was time to go to Mr. Winthrop's he felt ill, and soon afterward he was seized with a violent attack of cholera morbus. This was on Thursday, but he did not consider himself dangerously ill until Sunday, when he said to his physician, "In two days I shall be a dead man." Eminent ...
— Perley's Reminiscences, Vol. 1-2 - of Sixty Years in the National Metropolis • Benjamin Perley Poore

... to leave you and mother again, but I am not quite ready to have you go on with me this time. I want to do more to my farm; I want to build an addition to my log-house for you, and prepare a little more to make you comfortable. Yes, I shall always feel sad to leave Cloverdale, though I like the ...
— Summerfield - or, Life on a Farm • Day Kellogg Lee

... and remained what its Foundress meant it to be. It would be interesting—but lack of space forbids—to compare the discipline prescribed with that administered in Wadham now. Sufficient to say—what indeed might go without saying—that the lapse of three hundred years has made changes ...
— The Life and Times of John Wilkins • Patrick A. Wright-Henderson

... go to Rome. This is still addressed to the mourner, the 'fond wretch' of the preceding stanza. He is here invited to adopt a different test for 'knowing himself and Adonais aright'; namely, he is to visit Rome, and muse over the grave of ...
— Adonais • Shelley

... now go back to the contention that it is not we who are looking out upon Nature but that our senses are being bombarded from without; we are living in a world of continuous and multitudinous changes, and as our senses require change or motion for ...
— Science and the Infinite - or Through a Window in the Blank Wall • Sydney T. Klein

... the coast, or across the island. We find a cliff to bask on, or a wood that comes down to the water, and then papa gets out a Greek book and translates to me. Sometimes I listen to the sea, instead of to him, and go to sleep. But he doesn't mind. He is looking better, but work is loading up for him again as soon as we get back to Oxford about a week from now. If only he could get rid of drudgery, and write his best about the things he loves. Nobody knows what a mind he has. He is not only ...
— Lady Connie • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... If one had to miss a meal, what comfort in the knowledge that many others had to miss it too? There was more distraction in the thought of getting away out into this vast world of which he knew nothing yet. He could not go on staying here, walled in and sheltered, with everything so slick and comfortable, and nothing to do but brood and think what might have been. He could not go back to Wansdon, and the memories of Fleur. If he saw her again he could not trust himself; and if he stayed here or went back ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... you please find out if Brown is in New York. Wherever he is, I am going to see him, immediately and I want you to go with me. No, don't be alarmed! There will be no ...
— The Enchanted Canyon • Honore Willsie Morrow

... the sons of men befalleth beasts; even one thing befalleth them: as the one dieth, so dieth the other; yea, they have all one breath; so that a man hath no preeminence above a beast: for all is vanity. All go unto one place; all are of the dust, and all turn to dust again. Who knoweth the spirit of man that goeth upward, and the spirit of the beast that goeth downward to the ...
— The Golden Age Cook Book • Henrietta Latham Dwight

... war," he told Harry on Wednesday morning. He spoke very seriously. "He was a captain in the Boer War, you know, so he knows something about soldiering. He thinks he'll be taken, though he's a little older than most of the men who'll go. He'll be an officer, of course. And he says I've got to look after the ...
— The Boy Scout Aviators • George Durston

... improvised footbridges for crossing to its support if it should be attacked. I announced that my headquarters for the night would be immediately in rear of the centre of my second line; but when the pressure of duty was off and I was at liberty to go to the position I had named, I found that it was one of the densest parts of a pine thicket, and I could not even get back of the troops in line till a path was cut for me by a detachment of men with axes. They cleared a narrow way for a few rods, ...
— Military Reminiscences of the Civil War V2 • Jacob Dolson Cox

... convinced that he was a dangerous character, could not find sufficient evidence to procure his conviction before a court of justice. For five years he lived under police supervision in a small town near the White Sea, and then one day he was informed, without any explanation, that he might go and live anywhere he pleased except ...
— Russia • Donald Mackenzie Wallace

... wounds inflicted may be the keener and silver spoons, and knives and forks. Yea, my Christian brethren, carving knives and pitchforks right down on the top of their brown mistresses, who are thereby invariably bruised like the clown in the pantomime—at least as I am told he is, for I never go to such profane Places—oh, no!—bruised as flat as pancakes, and generally murdered outright on the spot. Last of all the landlord gets up, and kicks the miserable butler himself down after his mates, into the very heart of the living mass; and ...
— Tom Cringle's Log • Michael Scott

... camp equally well, anywhere here, Zaki, but we may as well go round to the extreme left; as, if we have to ride off suddenly, we shall at least start from the nearest point to the line by ...
— With Kitchener in the Soudan - A Story of Atbara and Omdurman • G. A. Henty

... amazing to the people of Europe. Just before I left Paris in 1919 a French business man said to me: "I understand that the cables are saying that you have some men in your country who are opposing your president and this effort to abolish war. What kind of men have you got over there, anyway? Go back and tell them that it is not only the greatest thing for America that he came over here but it is one of the greatest things for the whole world that ...
— Birdseye Views of Far Lands • James T. Nichols

... indirectly of Colonel Feraud's attitude, made a gesture as if to put aside an importunate person. His thoughts were solicited by graver cares. He had had no time to go and see his family. His sister, whose royalist hopes were rising higher every day, though proud of her brother, regretted his recent advancement in a measure, because it put on him a prominent mark of the usurper's favour which ...
— The Point Of Honor - A Military Tale • Joseph Conrad

... shook with the tension. Oh, such a wind! It made a whining and wailing noise, with each note higher, and when you felt that it couldn't possibly increase, that it simply must ease off, or the whole world would go smash, why, that whining note merely grew tenser and the wind grew stronger. How it lashed things! How it shook and flailed and trampled this poor old earth of ours! Just before supper Olie announced that he'd look after my chicks for me. I told him, ...
— The Prairie Wife • Arthur Stringer

... the work there is no possible doubt, no shadow of doubt whatever, and therein you and I are at one. But you will do me the justice to admit that I put very forcibly before those in charge of the Mission the delusion under which they were labouring; the responsibility now lies with them, and I "go to prove my soul." What awaits me I know not, but except when the mighty billows rocked me, not soothingly with gentle motion, but harshly and immoderately. I have never wavered in my decision; and ...
— Le Petit Nord - or, Annals of a Labrador Harbour • Anne Elizabeth Caldwell (MacClanahan) Grenfell and Katie Spalding

... never mind—you cannot help your misfortunes. I say, lads, will ye teuk a tram. Hooch, hurra! prof, prof! Let's get a dram." And Donald flung up one of his legs hilariously, while he gave utterance to these uncouth expletives, which he did in short joyous shouts. "Where will we go, lads? Did you'll know any decen' public-house, where we'll can depend ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland, Volume 2 - Historical, Traditional, and Imaginative • Alexander Leighton

... nothing of dropping the after part entirely when troublesomely long. The Turanian, or lowest class of language, as Professor Max Muller tells us, preserves its root-words for ever, tacking one to another, but never losing the full sound of each; while all sorts of word "jerry mandering" liberties go on in the highest class. I ventured to propound my theory to my linguistic friend, Mr. Hyde Clarke; but he found so many divergencies in Latin and Greek and Hebrew, and what not, that I was driven to a partial reconstruction. It was the busy as well ...
— Personal Recollections of Early Melbourne & Victoria • William Westgarth

... others have their dues; but if we can make farther discoveries of truth and fitness than they, why are we envied? Let us beware, while we strive to add, we do not diminish or deface; we may improve, but not augment. By discrediting falsehood, truth grows in request. We must not go about, like men anguished and perplexed, for vicious affectation of praise, but calmly study the separation of opinions, find the errors have intervened, awake antiquity, call former times into question; but make no parties with ...
— Discoveries and Some Poems • Ben Jonson

... rose to go; and Betty, who was informal with her friends, went out into the hall with her instead of ringing for a servant. Senator North remained in the parlor for a few moments to say good- night to Mrs. Madison and the Carters, and Betty, although the Montgomerys did not linger, waited for him ...
— Senator North • Gertrude Atherton

... forthwith told her how she had taken a young girl to help her in washing the Queen's linen, and how, on asking the news of the town, she had heard from her the vexation which all the honourable women endured at seeing the Canon's mistress go before them, together with some of the history of the ...
— The Tales Of The Heptameron, Vol. V. (of V.) • Margaret, Queen Of Navarre

... intertwine themselves about my legs, and brush my face, and seize hold of my clothes, with their multitudinous grip,—always, in such a difficulty, I feel as if it were almost as well to lie down and die in rage and despair as to go one step farther. It is laughable, after I have got out of the moil, to think how miserably it affected me for the moment; but I had better learn patience betimes, for there are many such bushy tracts in this vicinity, on the margins of meadows, ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 106, August, 1866 • Various

... about a minute. That will just give us time to get out of reach before the powder blows up, and will not leave the Peruvians sufficient to displace the torpedo. Now then, grapple hold of the spar, you four men, and stand by to push all together when I give the word. Be ready, Terry, my boy, to go ahead with your engines directly we scramble on board, for a second's delay may mean that we shall all be blown to smithereens. Give me that piece of fuse, Carlos. There, that has fixed that up," continued Douglas, as ...
— Under the Chilian Flag - A Tale of War between Chili and Peru • Harry Collingwood

... possible to see with clearer eyes than at Shanghai that the Taeping cause was one that could not be resuscitated. But although Burgevine soon and very clearly saw the hopelessness of the Taeping movement, he had by no means made up his mind to go over to the imperialists. With a considerable number of European followers at his beck and call, and with a profound and ineradicable contempt for the whole Chinese official world, he was both to lose or surrender the position ...
— China • Demetrius Charles Boulger

... at me that way, it makes me forget what I was going to say! When you come, back—next year—" and then she lifted her eyes to his and he saw that they were full of sudden tears. "Bruce, don't go away—don't go away ...
— The Prodigal Judge • Vaughan Kester

... do you say to the Metropole at Brighton?' But, alas, I cannot speak thus; there are others to think of. The King of GREECE, President WILSON, Marshal JOFFRE—I need say no more. You understand. Things will have to go on as they are, except that the rent will ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 152, May 16, 1917. • Various

... we'll have that done, after all. I expect he'll want to go out soon—at any rate, some time during the day. Let him go whenever he likes. I'll sit upstairs a bit in ...
— Martin Hewitt, Investigator • Arthur Morrison

... silenced, but not the less resolved to hold to his point, if possible. He still held back, while the captain, being busy with the others, some of whom were rather too eager to go, paid no further attention to him. Robin, Slagg, and Stumps, recognising Sam as their leader, fell behind him ...
— The Battery and the Boiler - Adventures in Laying of Submarine Electric Cables • R.M. Ballantyne

... her that day or the day before. She hoped that "please God he won't come till I'm gone away," and he suddenly burst in on her. The rest we know already. To get him off her hands she suggested at once that he should walk with her to Samsonov's, where she said she absolutely must go "to settle his accounts," and when Mitya accompanied her at once, she said good-by to him at the gate, making him promise to come at twelve o'clock to take her home again. Mitya, too, was delighted at this ...
— The Brothers Karamazov • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... amongst many: she has no curiosity, or else she has some other quality which keeps her from prying as other women would. It would seem that she has not so much as opened the cover of one of my journals ever in her life, and that she would not without my permission. So this can in time go ...
— The Lady of the Shroud • Bram Stoker

... gallery. The electric action is of an old and clumsy pattern, operated from storage batteries filled from the electric-light main, and requiring constant attention. The "full organs" and "full swells" go off slowly, with a disagreeable effect, familiar to players on faulty ...
— The Recent Revolution in Organ Building - Being an Account of Modern Developments • George Laing Miller

... mean to say, mother, that you would have given him leave to go, even if he had teased you for a ...
— The Soldier Boy; or, Tom Somers in the Army - A Story of the Great Rebellion • Oliver Optic

... Awfully hot up there in the hay it was, too. They were hiding near us when we planned to drop the bar as a signal, and I heard them laughing over that trick half the night. They slept up there with me—I was nearly dead for a drink of water—and once during the night Fluss did go down to the pump and bring me a drink, standing over me with that big club in case I should cry out when ...
— Betty Gordon in the Land of Oil - The Farm That Was Worth a Fortune • Alice B. Emerson

... to us from the West, with a fearful look on his face and a cruel stab in his heart. I say us, for Julia Hamilton has been with me all through the dreadful days and nights when I watched to see Guy's life go out and know I was left alone. She was with me when I was getting ready for Daisy and waiting for Guy to bring her home—not to Elmwood—that dear old place is sold and strangers walk the rooms I love so well—but here to the brown cottage on the hill, which, if I had never had Elmwood, ...
— Miss McDonald • Mary J. Holmes

... welcome if they were not of the house of Montague. At this feast of Capulets, Rosaline, beloved of Romeo, son to the old Lord Montague, was present; and though it was dangerous for a Montague to be seen in this assembly, yet Benvolio, a friend of Romeo, persuaded the young lord to go to this assembly in the disguise of a mask, that he might see his Rosaline, and, seeing her, compare her with some choice beauties of Verona, who (he said) would make him think his swan a crow. Romeo had small faith in Benvolio's words; ...
— Tales from Shakespeare • Charles and Mary Lamb

... you to add to your other civilities this one, to go to Mr. Millar and represent to him the manner of going on, and inform him that I know not how to manage. I pay three and twenty shillings a week to my assistants, in each instance having much assistance from them, but they tell me they shall be able to pull better in method, ...
— Life of Johnson, Volume 6 (of 6) • James Boswell

... back to my cabin.... It is stuffy, and there is a smell of cooking. My travelling companion, Suvorin-fils, is asleep already.... I take off all my clothes and go to bed.... The darkness sways to and fro, the bed seems to breathe.... Boom-boom-boom! Bathed in perspiration, breathless, and feeling an oppression all over with the rocking, I ask myself, "What am I ...
— Letters of Anton Chekhov • Anton Chekhov

... penitence there could be no doubt. But there are outrages for which no penitence can atone. This seemed to be one of them. Her first impulse was to dismiss the Duke forthwith and for ever. But she wanted to show herself at the races. And she could not go alone. And except the Duke there was no one to take her. True, there was the concert to-night; and she could show herself there to advantage; but she wanted ALL Oxford to ...
— Zuleika Dobson - or, An Oxford Love Story • Max Beerbohm

... Bailey. But there is a meaning in it, after all. Every art is based upon a selection, and the art of Racine selected the things of the spirit for the material of its work. The things of sense—physical objects and details, and all the necessary but insignificant facts that go to make up the machinery of existence—these must be kept out of the picture at all hazards. To have called a spade a spade would have ruined the whole effect; spades must never be mentioned, or, at the worst, they must be dimly referred to as agricultural implements, ...
— Books and Characters - French and English • Lytton Strachey

... the old man, "it has just come in time, lad, for me to wear on Sunday when I go to hear Will reading ...
— Garthowen - A Story of a Welsh Homestead • Allen Raine

... immediately and the skies grew darker still. His relations with the Mannheim theater were presently strained to the point of disgust by the production of a farce in which he was satirized. He was in terrible straits for money. To have something to do, after he was set adrift by Dalberg, he decided to go ahead with his project of a dramatic journal. An attractive prospectus for the Rhenish Thalia was issued, and he began to prepare for the first number, which was to contain an installment of 'Don Carlos'. The advance subscriptions fell far short of his sanguine hopes. In these occupations ...
— The Life and Works of Friedrich Schiller • Calvin Thomas

... him, and it is believed that Ferdinand shewed great friendship for the Inca, in the hope of procuring gold from him, to send to the king of Spain or for his own use. Two months after the return of Ferdinand to Cuzco, Manco Capac solicited permission from Ferdinand to go into the district of Jucaya[5] on purpose to celebrate a solemn festival, promising on his return to present him with a statue of the late Huana Capac of solid gold as large as life. Ferdinand allowed him ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. IV. • Robert Kerr

... plumes in her hat that nodded when she moved and trembled when she stood still, and she was herself either always nodding with glittering animation or straightening her back and quivering as if straining at a leash and just about to burst it and go off. She was like Rosalie's mother and yet not a bit like her. She was older and yet terribly brisker and stronger. Those were the days when frosted Christmas cards were of the artistic marvels of the age, and Aunt Belle beside Rosalie's ...
— This Freedom • A. S. M. Hutchinson

... you both could stay a long time with us," said the old man to the little strangers. "Jason here would take Gray fishin' an' huntin', an' Mavis would git on my old mare an' you two could jus' go flyin' up an' down the road. You could have a mighty good time if hit wasn't ...
— The Heart Of The Hills • John Fox, Jr.

... she said, "why should I deceive you? I did not go to find a servant, but to serve. I have told you we were poor, but not how poor. I can tell you what I could not say to others, for you have lived away from here, and I know how differently from most of us you look at things. I went to the barber's house to give the ...
— The Colonel's Dream • Charles W. Chesnutt

... Morel is quite abundant about Chillicothe. I have found Morels especially plentiful about the reservoirs in Mercer County, and in Auglaize, Allen, Harden, Hancock, Wood and Henry Counties. I have known lovers of Morels to go on camping tours in the woods about the reservoirs for the purpose of hunting them, and to bring home ...
— The Mushroom, Edible and Otherwise - Its Habitat and its Time of Growth • M. E. Hard

... you see curi's t'ing, if you only leev leetle w'ile, So long you got monee go all de place, for mebbe t'ree t'ousan' mile, But monee's not everyt'ing on dis worl', I tole you dat, mes amis, An' man can be ole lak' two honder year, an' not ...
— The Habitant and Other French-Canadian Poems • William Henry Drummond

... did not know they were on that footing! I wonder what's going forward. Suppose old Hartley was to propose for Miss Portman—there would be a denouement! and cut his daughter off with a shilling! Nothing's impossible, you know. Did he ever see Miss Portman? I must go and find out, positively." ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. III - Belinda • Maria Edgeworth

... I thought of my friend as I had taken leave of him, reclining on the hospital stoep, straining with eager eyes at mine. It was his breathless voice that I remembered. It was saying over and over, 'You will go and see her, won't you? I'll be with you in spirit in this your trek for ...
— Cinderella in the South - Twenty-Five South African Tales • Arthur Shearly Cripps

... yonder," he said, pointing toward the main street. "You can obtain food there. Why should respectable folk want to go elsewhere than to the public inn? And if you are afraid to go there you must have very good reasons for not wanting to be seen, and—" he stopped short as though assailed by an idea. "Wait," he cried, excitedly, "I will go and see if I can find a place ...
— The Mad King • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... darkly; "caves or islands. Don't give me anything to eat, 'cause I have to look up something in the library before I go home, and I'm ...
— Kit of Greenacre Farm • Izola Forrester

... remarkable indeed that the only two religions in the world which possess a devil in whom mischief predominates should also give to each the same adventures, if both did not come from the same source. In the Hymiskvida of the Edda, two giants go to fish for whales, and then have a contest which is actually one of heat against cold. This is so like a Micmac legend in every detail that about twenty lines are word for word the same in the Norse and Indian. The Micmac ...
— The Algonquin Legends of New England • Charles Godfrey Leland

... you've always been a kind man, especially kind to me. I suppose when I first signed with you that I was as ignorant and awkward a land lubber as you ever saw. But your patient teaching has made me a real sailor. Release me now, and I think that in a few hours I will be fit to go ...
— The Shadow of the North - A Story of Old New York and a Lost Campaign • Joseph A. Altsheler

... anthropomorphic idea of God, however it may fit the Japanese for the next world, undoubtedly comforts him in this. The religious festivals, which are numerous, are gala days in his life, and the services of religion bring him undoubtedly much consolation. But he does not of necessity go to a temple to conduct that uplifting of the heart which is, after all, the best service of man to the Creator. Every house has its little shrine, and although some superior persons may laugh at the act of burning a joss-stick, or some other trivial act of worship, ...
— The Empire of the East • H. B. Montgomery

... him, and with a kind of smile the word "Apres" passed between them. The Sunday custom was for Clement to take Adrian to say his Catechism, and have a little instruction before going out walking, but as this could not be on this day, Anna and he were to go out for a longer walk than usual, so as to remove disturbance from the household. Gerald declined, of course, and was left extended on the sofa; but just as Anna and Adrian had made a few steps along the street, and ...
— The Long Vacation • Charlotte M. Yonge

... air, as his speech had acquired something of the English intonation. He was often told that he might pass for an Englishman anywhere, and he was glad to think so. It was a reason the less for being identified as Norrie Ford. It sometimes seemed to him that he could, in case of necessity, go back to North America, to New York, to Greenport, or even to the little county town where he had been tried and sentenced to death, and run no risk ...
— The Wild Olive • Basil King

... go down. During Jefferson's lifetime he was more than once a guest at Monticello. The clock, however, was not completed until after the President died, and when Willard finally went to put it in place he stayed with Madison who had a home ...
— Christopher and the Clockmakers • Sara Ware Bassett

... am," he added with another genial pat. "So now you cheer up and run back home and go to bed n' don't you lie awake crying. You tell that little scout feller I'm coming to make you a visit n' that, I usually drink nine glasses of lemonade. Now you run along and get to ...
— Pee-wee Harris • Percy Keese Fitzhugh

... avail. Be ready, then, at all times to rally round the Royal Standard, and let those who are not called into the service assist the families of those who are called into the field.' 'Remember, when you go forth to the combat, that you fight not for yourselves alone, but for the whole world. You are defeating the most formidable conspiracy against the civilization of man that ever was contrived; a conspiracy ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 2 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Edgerton Ryerson

... been happening to Tom Kitten, and it shows how very unwise it is to go up a chimney in a very old house, where a person does not know his way, and ...
— A Collection of Beatrix Potter Stories • Beatrix Potter

... poor Camille! who has the power to make us all miserable, and who does it, and will go on doing it ...
— White Lies • Charles Reade

... water She bathed her lily-tinctured limbs, then took From her rich chests, of odorous cedar formed, A splendid robe, and her most radiant dress. Thus gorgeously arrayed, she stood before The hallowed flames, and thus addressed her prayer: "O queen, I go to the infernal shades; Yet, ere I go, with reverence let me breathe My last request: protect my orphan children; Make my son happy with the wife he loves, And wed my daughter to a noble husband; Nor let them, like their mother, to the ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... the Rogation Days, or on Ascension Day, it was the custom to go in procession round the boundaries of the parish to ask God's blessing on the fruits of the earth, and as there were few maps and divisions of land, to call to mind and pass on to the next generation the boundaries of the township or village. The choir sang hymns, and under ...
— Old English Sports • Peter Hampson Ditchfield

... principles which lie at the foundation of the Arminian doctrine of ability and grace, are not only calculated to destroy the energies of the Church, and unhinge the institutions of society, as I have endeavored to show, but they go still further; they enter the Christian's closet, and destroy the life and soul of his private devotions. They are calculated to dry up every fountain, and destroy every spring of religious feeling ...
— The Calvinistic Doctrine of Predestination Examined and Refuted • Francis Hodgson

... Gallipoli expedition was a political move, a violation of the true military principle—that you should always go against the main body of your enemy, which was at this time on the frontiers of Russia and France. Of course the effort was not entirely without its compensations; no expedition is, which holds any part of the enemy's troops in ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume I (of 8) - Introductions; Special Articles; Causes of War; Diplomatic and State Papers • Various

... the reserve in France is so great that the movements of the precious metals, when they are the result only of natural causes, are allowed to go on without corresponding movements in the discount rate. But it must be remembered that this large reserve is held in part against a gigantic note issue, and also that the trade activity and enterprise of the French people are less intense than ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 3, Part 1, Slice 3 - "Banks" to "Bassoon" • Various

... hard veils from my face that I may vent the grief which stuffs my heart, a little ere the weeping freeze again! Wherefore I said to him. 'If thou woulds't have me aid thee, tell me who thou art, and if I do not extricate thee, may I have to go to the bottom of the ice.'" The poet of course knows that he must go thither to continue his journey to Purgatory, but the reprobate soul is unaware of such a course, and believes that the visitor ...
— Dante: "The Central Man of All the World" • John T. Slattery

... thus doing incalculable injustice. The government of the United States suffers in its reputation from its innumerable failures to pay, at least promptly, its honest creditors. Thousands of bills to pay claims are annually introduced which go to committees and to the calendar, never to be disposed of for want of time. To remedy this, on April 16, 1878, I proposed in the House an amendment to the Constitution in ...
— Slavery and Four Years of War, Vol. 1-2 • Joseph Warren Keifer

... Astraea did not go to the windows. This was not from an apprehension of any thing she should see, but from a nervous aversion of the light, which strangely affected her that morning. She kept her rooms darkened, and busied herself over ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Vol. 3, July, 1851 • Various

... of the deeds on which he bases his claim which you will have to compare with the originals, with the help of a clerk from the Record Office and a sworn translator. You can go by Switzerland or by the Corniche route, as you please. You will be allowed six hundred francs and a fortnight's holiday. ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... pronounced still, if we find on the stage not merely two characters, as in the example from Pascal, but several, nay, as great a number as possible, the image of one another, who come and go, dance and gesticulate together, simultaneously striking the same attitudes and tossing their arms about in the same manner. This time, we distinctly think of marionettes. Invisible threads seem to us to be joining arms to arms, legs to legs, ...
— Laughter: An Essay on the Meaning of the Comic • Henri Bergson

... illustrations of what may be done by members of the community directly. All such efforts tend to the welfare of the state. All its members reap benefit from them. He who does not help and encourage them is as mean as the man who would go to an hotel and take its entertainment, and then sneak away without paying the reckoning. Whatever we can do to benefit society benefits ourselves, and in throwing ourselves heart and soul into any of those enterprises that benefit society we are discharging in a very special ...
— Life and Conduct • J. Cameron Lees

... that the letters lent to him by the Society were far more numerous than those returned by him. He missed little that could have been turned to account, unless it was the suggestion that if he knew the country his safest way from Seville to Madrid was to go afoot in the dress of beggar or Gypsy, and the remark that in Tangier one of his principal associates was a black slave, whose country was only three days journey from Timbuctoo. {163c} He had already in ...
— George Borrow - The Man and His Books • Edward Thomas

... Herne. They are in deadly earnest like Ibsen, and Margaret Fleming sprang directly from their radicalism on the woman question. The home of these extraordinary people is a charged battery radiating the most advanced thought. As one friend said: "No one ever leaves this house as he came. We all go away with something new and ...
— The Arena - Volume 4, No. 23, October, 1891 • Various

... Jones'[15] that he has painted no perfect character, because he never happened to meet one. His stories, like 'Vanity Fair,' may be described as novels without a hero. It is not merely that his characters are imperfect, but that they are deficient in the finer ingredients which go to make up the nearest approximations of our imperfect natures to heroism. Colonel Newcome was not perhaps so good a man as Parson Adams, but he had a certain delicacy of sentiment which led him, as we may remember, to be rather ...
— Hours in a Library - New Edition, with Additions. Vol. II (of 3) • Leslie Stephen

... purse and his pen under contribution. As to the former, it is possible I may be obliged to assume something for you. As to the latter, let me pray and beseech you to set apart a certain portion of every post-day to write what may be proper for the public. Send it to me while here, and when I go away I will let you know to whom you may send, so that your name shall be sacredly secret. You can render such incalculable services in this way, as to lessen the effect of our loss of your presence here. I shall see you on the 5th or ...
— Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson - Volume I • Thomas Jefferson

... Find your Phidias first, and your new Phidias will very soon settle all your architectural difficulties in very unexpected ways indeed; but until you find him, do not think yourselves architects while you go on copying those poor subordinations, and secondary and tertiary orders of ornament, which the Greek put on the shell of his sculpture. Some of them, beads, and dentils, and such like, are as good as they can be for their work, and you may use them for subordinate ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume I (of 3) • John Ruskin

... you, in the cart of the executioner, and with your hands tied behind your backs.' 'All! I hope that in that case I shall at least have a carriage hung in black.' 'No, Madame; higher ladies than yourself will go, like you, in the common car, with their hands tied behind them.' 'Higher ladies! what! the princesses of the blood?' 'Yea, and still ...
— Genuine Mediumship or The Invisible Powers • Bhakta Vishita

... come; we are late!" cried Sir Julian at the door. Lord Cedric turned to go, but Constance flew to his side and ...
— Mistress Penwick • Dutton Payne

... to drop the receiver and go out for change. Every clerk was busy, but he interrupted one of them with a peremptory demand for change. The clerk, taken by surprise, actually obeyed the command without a word. When Wilson finally succeeded in getting the number, he heard ...
— The Web of the Golden Spider • Frederick Orin Bartlett

... cypress-tree, and to this fountain my guide forbade me to draw near. "There is another yonder," he said, pointing to the right hand, "a stream of still water that issues from the Lake of Memory, and there are guards who keep that stream from the lips of the profane. Go to them and speak thus: 'I am the child of earth and of the starry sky, yet heavenly is my lineage, and this yourselves know right well. But I am perishing with thirst, so give me speedily of that still water which floweth forth of the mere of ...
— In the Wrong Paradise • Andrew Lang

... distance warned the children that it was time to go in and tidy up for tea. Grizzel, however, was far too much enthralled by the little house to want to come down so soon. "I don't want any bread-and-butter tea," she announced; "bring me three oranges ...
— The Happy Adventurers • Lydia Miller Middleton

... signified that he would go with O'Shea. Indeed, looked at from a short distance, the passage through the ice did not look so difficult as ...
— The Mermaid - A Love Tale • Lily Dougall

... She half apologized for him, saying, 'He is very anxious to get through to-night. He doesn't like to go through in the night always, for there are many dangerous places along the road; but it is sleighing to-night, and not very dark, so he thinks he can do ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 2, August, 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... gave me ample rule; And on the bounds of Phthia bade me dwell, And o'er the Dolopes hold sov'reign sway. Thee too, Achilles, rival of the Gods, Such, as thou art I made thee; from my soul I lov'd thee; nor wouldst thou with others go Or to the meal, or in the house be fed, Till on my knee thou satt'st, and by my hand Thy food were cut, the cup were tender'd thee; And often, in thy childish helplessness. The bosom of my dress with wine was drench'd; Such care I had ...
— The Iliad • Homer



Words linked to "Go" :   retire, japan, rush, run short, lap, squelch, chatter, serve, pitter-patter, tweet, yield, babble, concord, go game, get going, double, board game, run low, jounce, search, march on, misfire, slide, pan, fare, let it go, go past, travel along, shack, lance, arise, accord, become, fail, occur, draw back, let go, fit, peal, trail, famish, motor, steamroller, bluff, steamer, cristal, Sunday-go-to-meeting, take effect, perish, draw, be, outflank, hum, advance, take the air, go in, skirl, plump, spurt, move on, go a long way, tessellate, select, beat, return, go ballistic, go wrong, merry-go-round, abort, go to the dogs, stand up, venture, clank, ski, wind, play, claxon, spread, give-up the ghost, happen, steamroll, pop off, sentry go, croak, crank, step, terminate, toot, drag, go to, snuff it, move, endeavor, hap, hide and go seek, bombinate, chug, continue, precede, pace, cruise, exit, come on, go to pot, go-between, go forward, plow, get-up-and-go, on the go, fit in, weave, ruff, ease, settle, hurry, zigzag, stifle, go deep, try, agree, boom out, rise, stray, attempt, make out, ride, lead, ray, raft, Nippon, follow, make noise, race, hiss, purr, retreat, go for broke, slice into, snap, sober, go back, happy-go-lucky, pass by, methylenedioxymethamphetamine, drum, take, lurch, click, automobile, go back on, expire, roll, come down, shove off, proceed, go on, travel rapidly, pink, hold out, taxi, snarl, go off, start, go far, rap, get off the ground, maneuver, go ahead, hold up, drop dead, go board, change state, ring, sit, cause to be perceived, blow out, roam, circulate, fall out, check, give-and-go, range, swoosh, thud, go forth, end, go-getter, back, hold water, leave, a-okay, malfunction, break down, go through, finish, stalemate, locomote, forge, pop, ascend, swing, starve, perennate, get around, vibrate, steam, bucket along, surpass, honk, precess, live, turn, hurtle, clop, get along, pick out, career, noise, come about, knock, extend, echo, angle, make a motion, plunk, clang, go to pieces, tap, sound, zoom, snowshoe, effort, go Dutch, step on it, whiz, compare, meander, bleep, castle, rove, pass over, blend in, exist, crash, go for, go across, Nihon, slush, birr, sift, ghost, pull away, asphyxiate, go over, betake oneself, sober up, seek, go to sleep, ferry, go down, go through the motions, walk, go against, harmonize, XTC, Adam, get out, stop, circuit, blend, subsist, fall, thread, work shift, fling, succumb, pass away, accompany, go to war, progress, go all out, boom, have a go at it, break, die, swosh, splat, derail, rifle, go after, belt along, go up, a-ok, go-around, have a go, cease, cash in one's chips, move around, propagate, pursue, clump, vanish, wander, suffocate, MDMA, trump, retrograde, tinkle, x, ticktock, no-go area, whirr, billow, whoosh, go-as-you-please, float, misfunction, din, clunk, give way, embark, rumble, rattle, come up, go home, swim, tink, run, pull back, drag out, patter, caravan, speed, glide, drone, change, zip, fly, endeavour, rush along, journey, pelt along, go-ahead, open, whine, drag on, slither, crack, twirp, get, consort, duty period, touch-and-go, resort, go-slow, buzz, chink, tramp, splash, tread, beep, trundle, get about, pass on, no-go, endure, whir, displace, scramble, belong, bubble, cannonball along, pass, go-kart



Copyright © 2019 Diccionario ingles.com