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Hie   Listen
noun
Hie  n.  Haste; diligence. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Hie" Quotes from Famous Books



... the architecture of which one of the handsomest girls and her swain made a striking silhouette. Then she remembered that the next name on the programme was Warner's; he was to read for half an hour from his own work; after which all would hie themselves to the music ...
— The Gorgeous Isle - A Romance; Scene: Nevis, B.W.I. 1842 • Gertrude Atherton

... oh ye glass-makers," said he one morning at breakfast. "I find after telephoning to the office that I am not needed to-day; therefore, the moment we have swallowed these estimable griddle cakes of Hannah's we will hie us forth to instruct Jean in the art of manufacturing vases, bottles, tumblers and the various sorts ...
— The Story of Glass • Sara Ware Bassett

... from heaven, from heaven so hie, Of angeles ther came a great companie, With mirthe, and joy, and great solemnitye, The sange, terly, terlow; So mereli the ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... began to move away when he saw us, but stopped to ask what was the matter when he saw Willie's face. As soon as he knew what it was, he took the string off Pincher's neck, and throwing a stone at the stick called, "Hie, Pincher! fetch ...
— Golden Moments - Bright Stories for Young Folks • Anonymous

... to the Brocken the witches hie, The stubble is yellow, the corn is green; Thither the gathering legions fly, And sitting aloft is Sir Urian seen: O'er stick and o'er stone they go whirling along, Witches and he-goats, ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... Rommany churl And the Rommany girl To-morrow shall hie To poison the sty, And bewitch on the ...
— George Borrow - The Man and His Books • Edward Thomas

... "August. I walke many times into the pleasant fieldes of the Holy Scriptures, where I plucke up the goodliesome herbes of sentences by pruning: eate them by reading: chawe them by musing: and laie them up at length in the hie seate of memorie by gathering them together: that so having tasted their sweetenes I may the lesse perceave the bitterness of this miserable life." The covering is done in needle work by the Queen [then princess] herself, and ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... had a call from a little country parish to a large and wealthy one in a big city. He asked time for prayer and consideration. He did not feel sure of his light. A month passed. Some one met hie youngest son. "How is it, Josiah; is your ...
— Good Stories from The Ladies Home Journal • Various

... the Palais Cardinal and that Palais wheir the Lawyers pleads. The choops[53] their have great resemblance wt those in the hie exchange at London. I saw also that vast stupendious building, the Louwre, which hath layd many kings in their graves and yet stands unfinished; give[54] all be brought to a close that is in their ...
— Publications of the Scottish History Society, Vol. 36 • Sir John Lauder

... words, being absorbed in play. O Charioteer, I seek thy protection. Do my behest. My mind misgiveth me. The king may come to grief. Yoking Nala's favourite horses endued with the fleetness of the mind, do thou take these twins (my son and daughter) on the car and hie thou to Kundina. Leaving the children there with my kindred as also the car and the horses, either stay thou there, or go to any other place as it listeth thee." Varshneya, the charioteer of Nala, then reported in detail these ...
— Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 • Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa

... for me. Just as soon as you people hie forth, off comes this b'iled shirt, and I shall probably meander around the house in my new silk pajamas. I shall read a little from Homer—Jack, let me have the key to that locked case; I've an idea ...
— The Man on the Box • Harold MacGrath

... recruits travelled mostly of will and at their own charge. In Franken, in Schwaben, in the Rhine Countries, a dissolute son would rob his father,—as shopmen their masters' tills, and managers their cash-boxes,—and hie off to those magnanimous Prussian Officials, who gave away companies like kreutzers, and had a value for young fellows of spirit. They hastened to Magdeburg with their Commissions; where they were received as common recruits, and put by ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XIX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... Thousand mewed hawks, sev'n hundred camelry; Silver and gold, four hundred mules load high; Fifty wagons his wrights will need supply, Till with that wealth he pays his soldiery. War hath he waged in Spain too long a time, To Aix, in France, homeward he will him hie. Follow him there before Saint Michael's tide, You shall receive and hold the Christian rite; Stand honour bound, and do him fealty. Send hostages, should he demand surety, Ten or a score, our loyal oath to bind; Send him our sons, the first-born of our wives;— An he ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... the world, and lo! we live in another. It hides in a night the old scars and familiar places with which we have grown heart-sick or enamored. So, as quietly as we can, we hustle on our embroidered robes and hie us on Prince Camaralzaman's horse or in the reindeer sleigh into the white country where the seven colors converge. This is when our fancy can overcome ...
— Waifs and Strays - Part 1 • O. Henry

... Knowing this, that one who'll send Such a treasure is my friend. Who hath sent thee?-Flora knows, For with care she reared the rose. Lo! here's a name!-it is the key That will unlock the mystery; This will tell from whom and why Thou didst to my presence hie. Wait-the hand's disguised!-it will Remain to me a mystery still. But I'm a "Yankee," and can "guess" Who wove this flowery, fairy tress. Yea, more than this, I almost know Who tied this pretty silken bow, Whose hand arranged them, and whose taste Each in such ...
— Town and Country, or, Life at Home and Abroad • John S. Adams

... Chandler's fast crystallizing gaze, he pointed to the sleeping lady's door with a gesture so stern and significant that the prostrate man half-lifted his head, with his remaining strength, to see. He saw nothing; but he caught the cold words of the doctor—the last sounds hie was ...
— Rolling Stones • O. Henry

... going to slip out to Johnstown to spend Sunday with her mother. How I wish I could slip out to Rochester to sit a few hours in my mother's delightful east chamber, but I must hie me back to New ...
— The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 1 of 2) • Ida Husted Harper

... two first the nuptial torches bore, As brightly burning as the mid-day's sun: But after them doth Hymen hie as fast, Clothed in sable and ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 34, June 22, 1850 • Various

... The winged troops hie From the black woods outpouring; Under them fly Storms and waves roaring. Over them waken Mild stars, and beckon The ...
— Strife and Peace • Fredrika Bremer

... and all, about to realize, theories and fancies sink wonderfully in the scale. For some weeks past, everything with the power of motion or locomotion has been exerting itself to quit the place and the region, and hie to more kindly latitudes for the winter. Nature has also become imperceptibly sour tempered, and shows her teeth in ice and snows. Man-kind and bird-kind have concurred in the effort to go. ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... repeated. It is our first of duties to give aid To those who beg for succour at our hands; For we ourselves, whatever we possess, Are but the stewards of the bounteous Lord Who giveth to his creatures all good gifts. But it is time that thou shouldst seek the hills, So take thy crook and pipe and hie away. ...
— Mazelli, and Other Poems • George W. Sands

... spring, In that it yields great store of rare delights; And, passing farther than our wonted walks, Scarce ent'red were within these luckless woods. But right before us down a steep-fall hill, A monstrous ugly bear did hie him fast To meet us both—I faint to tell the rest, Good shepherd—but suppose the ghastly looks, The hideous fears, the thousand hundred woes, Which at ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition) • Various

... strike had been called it was this particular striker's habit to hie himself each morning to the corner saloon of Flaherty Brothers, and there establish himself upon the sidewalk, with one foot resting on the bootblack's stand, observing the panorama of the street until the pace of time brought twelve o'clock ...
— The Voice of the City • O. Henry

... Cimber; and he's gone To seek you at your house. Well, I will hie, 150 And so bestow these ...
— The New Hudson Shakespeare: Julius Caesar • William Shakespeare

... pretty fledgling," he said, half jesting, half in scorn. "But knowest thou, to fight in very earnest is something different than to read and chant it in a minstrel's lay? Better hie thee back to Florence, boy; the mail suit and crested helm are not for such as thee—better shun them now, than after they ...
— The Days of Bruce Vol 1 - A Story from Scottish History • Grace Aguilar

... could the lot of the fender-fisherman be happier? No colds, quinsies or asthmas follow his incursions into the realms of fancy where in cool streams and peaceful lakes a legion of chubs and trouts and sawmon await him; in fancy he can hie away to the far-off Yalrow and once more share the benefits of the companionship of Kit North, the Shepherd, and that noble Edinburgh band; in fancy he can trudge the banks of the Blackwater with the sage of Watergrasshill; in ...
— The Love Affairs of a Bibliomaniac • Eugene Field

... "'Hie thee hence, Rodrigo Diaz, An thou love thy liberty; Lest, with this thy king, we take thee Into dire captivity.'" Ancient Spanish Ballads ...
— Legends of the Middle Ages - Narrated with Special Reference to Literature and Art • H.A. Guerber

... ambassador, Sugawara Kiyokimi, in 802, and the latter accompanied Fujiwara Kuzunomaro, two years later. Saicho was specially sent to China by his sovereign to study Buddhism, in order that, on his return, he might become lord-abbot of a monastery which his Majesty had caused to be built on Hie-no-yama—subsequently known as Hiei-zan—a hill on the northeast of the new palace in Kyoto. A Japanese superstition regarded the northeast as the "Demon's Gate," where a barrier must be erected against the ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... the morning cock is crowing; Dreams, like ghosts, must hie away; 'Tis the day. Rosy morn now is born; Dark thoughts may not stay. Day my brain from foes will keep; Now, my soul, ...
— The Complete Poems of Paul Laurence Dunbar • Paul Laurence Dunbar

... you hie, 'Mid green slopes to tarry, In your scrip pray no more tie, Than you well can carry. Take no hindrances along To the crystal fountains; Drown them in a cheerful song, Send ...
— A Happy Boy • Bjornstjerne Bjornson

... long-before "Euphues" was written, occurs the following passage: "Like as a shipman in stormy wether plukes down the sails tarrying for bettar winde, so did I, most noble kinge, in my unfortunate chanche a Thursday pluk downe the hie sailes of my joy and comforte, and do trust one day that as troublesome waves have repulsed me backwarde, so a gentil winde will bringe me forwarde to my haven."[58] This is a moderate specimen of the ornate and exaggerated ...
— A History of English Prose Fiction • Bayard Tuckerman

... very clearly, if you please—except in a case of extreme urgency. This is a distinct order, Adelaide, and I shall be severely displeased if you fail to observe it. And now," he resumed his lighter manner again as he rose from his chair, "I must hie me to the parish room where my good ...
— The Bars of Iron • Ethel May Dell

... If so minded, hie you to the nearest grove and, digging down through the mid-winter's snow, bring home a spadeful of leaf-mould. Examine it carefully with hand-lens and microscope, and then prophesy what warmth and light will bring forth. "Watch the unfolding life of plant and animal, ...
— The Log of the Sun - A Chronicle of Nature's Year • William Beebe

... of Love is not Cupidity, but Cupid. Perchance 'tis well, for had I wed That maid of dark-brown curls, You had not been, or been, instead Of boy, a pair of girls. Now listen to me, Walter Smith; Hie to yon plumber bold, An thou would'st ease my dying pang, His 'prentice be enrolled. For Jones has houses many on The fashionable squares, And thou, perchance, may'st be called in To see to the repairs. ...
— Humour of the North • Lawrence J. Burpee

... in a gold camp or gambling joint, and that wildcat did not hie to Canada when the real estate boom broke loose, the wildcat species not in evidence was too rare to be classified. Property in small cities sold at New York and Chicago values. Suburban lots were staked out round small towns in areas for a London or ...
— The Canadian Commonwealth • Agnes C. Laut

... hie thee soon, and grope behind the old brass pan, Which thing when thou hast done, There shalt thou find an old shoe, wherein, if thou look well, Thou shalt find lying an inch of white tallow candle: Light it, and bring it ...
— The Growth of English Drama • Arnold Wynne

... fa's when it tries ower soon to flee, Folks are sure to tumble, when they climb ower hie; They wha canna walk right are sure to come to wrang, Creep awa', my ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 1 (of 4) • Various

... Euaemon. Ninth came Teucer with his bow, and took his place under cover of the shield of Ajax son of Telamon. When Ajax lifted his shield Teucer would peer round, and when he had hit any one in the throng, the man would fall dead; then Teucer would hie back to Ajax as a child to its mother, and again duck down under ...
— The Iliad • Homer

... rhetoric, he did feel the music which came through the man who was speaking and the men who were listening. The power of the speaker was raised to the hundredth degree by the echo thrown back from hie hearers. At first Christophe only took stock of the speakers, and he was interested enough to make the ...
— Jean-Christophe Journey's End • Romain Rolland

... am too old for that, Mr. Gerardo. Long before a week, as measured by your chronology, has elapsed, I shall lie beneath the sod. I've been put off that way too often. (Bringing down his fist on the piano.) Hie Rhodus! Hie salta! It's five years ago now that I called on the manager of the Royal Theatre, Count Zedlitz: "What have you got for me, my dearest professor?" "An opera, your Excellency." "Indeed, you have written a ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... is as big as a mouse's ear, Then to sow barley never fear. When the elmen leaf is as big as an ox's eye, Then say I, 'Hie, boys, hie!'" ...
— The Folk-lore of Plants • T. F. Thiselton-Dyer

... chanced so, Bold Robin in forest did spy A jolly butcher, with a bonny fine mare, With his flesh to the market did hie. ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... nodding in their bowers; Or bright on leafy towers, Where the fairy monarchs rest." "But chiefly I bring, On my fresh sweet mouth, Her father's kiss, As he sails out of the south. He hitherward blew it at break of day, I lay it, Babe, on thy tender lip; I'll steal another and hie away, And kiss it to him on ...
— Old Spookses' Pass • Isabella Valancy Crawford

...Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear; And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes - Volume V: Miscellaneous Pieces • Samuel Johnson

... heard these words, that the pillars of the earth sank beneath me, and that the roof of the house was carried away in a whirlwind. The drums of my ears crackit, blue starns danced before my sight, and I was fain to leave the house and hie me home to the manse, where I sat down in my study, like a stupified creature, awaiting what would betide. Nothing, however, was found against the weaver lads; but I never from that day could look on Mr Cayenne as a Christian, though surely he was ...
— The Annals of the Parish • John Galt

... write, that from the bloody course of war, My dearest master, your dear son, may hie; Bless him at home in peace, whilst I from far, His name with ...
— Writings in the United Amateur, 1915-1922 • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

... now the evening goes. No man has thrown The weary dog his well-earned crust or bone. We grin and hie us home and go to sleep, Or feast like kings till midnight, drinking deep. He drank alone, for sorrow, and then slept, And few there were that watched him, few that wept. He found the gutter, lost to love and man. Too ...
— General William Booth enters into Heaven and other Poems • Vachel Lindsay

... will he come? With trembling hope I hie me on the busy street, To ask the evening horoscope, That straightway thus gives ...
— Japanese Literature - Including Selections from Genji Monogatari and Classical - Poetry and Drama of Japan • Various

... brought. Vnhappy borne, of all vnhappy day! So luckles was my Babes nativity, Saturne chiefe Lord of the Ascendant lay, The wandring Moone in earths triplicitie. Now, or by chaunce or heauens hie prouidence, His Mother died, and by her Legacie (Fearing the stars presaging influence) Bequeath'd his wardship to my soueraignes eye; Where hunger-staruen, wanting lookes to liue, Still empty gorg'd, with cares consumption pynde, Salt luke-warm teares shee for his drink did ...
— Minor Poems of Michael Drayton • Michael Drayton

... greensward under the olive!' Or perchance you had liefer I should give you:—'Woe is me, the wave of the sea!' But no tabret have I: wherefore choose which of these others you will have. Perchance you would like:—'Now hie thee to us forth, that so it may be cut, as May the fields about.'" "No," returned the queen, "give us another." "Then," said Dioneo, "I will sing:—'Monna Simona, embarrel, embarrel. Why, 'tis not the month of October.'"(1) "Now a plague upon thee," said the queen, with ...
— The Decameron, Vol. II. • Giovanni Boccaccio

... hie me to the knight," continued Philip. "I happened once to be of use to him, and he is not a man to forget a favor, though he is somewhat changed since the time I first saw him. He was then a fiery youth, for all he can look so ...
— The Knight of the Golden Melice - A Historical Romance • John Turvill Adams

... "Hie thee to Sybil," said Luke to the patrico. "Bid her haste hither. Say that this maiden—that Miss Mowbray is here, and requires her aid. Fly! I will bear her ...
— Rookwood • William Harrison Ainsworth

... should saddle old Ravenwing And hie me out at night, Scared little birds away would spring An ill-shot arrow's flight: The idle fancy away I fling, ...
— Poetical Works of George MacDonald, Vol. 2 • George MacDonald

... longer be the sport of sentiment forlorn, But scale the heights of Primrose Hill, pretending it's the Matterhorn; Or hie me through the dusk to sit beside the shimmering Serpentine, And, with a little make-believe, imagine I ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 99, August 30, 1890. • Various

... me The memory of thine eyes? Evermore by me Thy lithe white form doth rise, If God were nigh me Still, in so sure a wise Quick might I hie me ...
— A Williams Anthology - A Collection of the Verse and Prose of Williams College, 1798-1910 • Compiled by Edwin Partridge Lehman and Julian Park

... animated beyond description. From November to March the weather is particularly fine; then it is that rich and poor, young and old, foreigners and natives, all issue from the city to enjoy the country till Lent approaches, when back they hie them. Villages and hamlets, where nothing before but rags was seen, now shine in all the elegance of dress; every house, every room, every shed become eligible places for those whom nothing but extreme necessity could have forced to live there a few ...
— Wanderings In South America • Charles Waterton

... would collapse. A howl of terror would apprise the world at large that he was about to drown. Whereat some passing boatman would pick him up and hold him for ransom, or else some one from The Place must jump into skiff or canoe and hie with all speed to the rescue. The same thing would be repeated ...
— Bruce • Albert Payson Terhune

... our rejoinder to his cartels?" returned the Sorbonist. "Do you not call to mind that beneath his arrogant defiance of our learned body, affixed to the walls of the Sorbonne, it was written, 'That he who would behold this miracle of learning must hie to the tavern or bordel?' Was ...
— Library of the World's Best Literature, Ancient and Modern, Vol. 1 • Charles Dudley Warner

... trust to keep up the spirits of the doubtful, and to guard Prince John's person. If you receive such news as I trust to send you, our enterprise will no longer wear a doubtful aspect.—Page," he said, "hie to my lodgings, and tell my armourer to be there in readiness; and bid Stephen Wetheral, Broad Thoresby, and the Three Spears of Spyinghow, come to me instantly; and let the scout-master, Hugh Bardon, attend me also.—Adieu, my Prince, till better ...
— Ivanhoe - A Romance • Walter Scott

... indeede, Even to the greatest I will answere it; If great mens eares be ope to inocency, If greatnesse be not partial with greatenesse, Even to the greatest I will answere it. Perhaps, some shallow censurer will say, The Orator was proud, he would climbe too hie; But heaven and truth will say the contrarie. My greatest grief is, I have my friend betraide; The treasons done, I, and the Traitor's free, Yet innocent Treason needes not to flee. His loyaltie bids me abide his frowne, ...
— A Collection Of Old English Plays, Vol. IV. • Editor: A.H. Bullen

... wight doeth craue, in life who wanteth smart? Who doeth not fele, or beare som- time, a bitter storme, to doleful tune, mirth full oft chaunged is, the meaner state, more quiet rest, on high, who climes more deper care, more dolefull harte doeth presse, moste tempestes hie trees, hilles, & moutaines beare, valleis lowe rough stor- mes doeth passe, the bendyng trees doeth giue place to might by force of might, Okes mightie fall, and Ceders high ar re[n]t from the roote. The state full meane in hauen ...
— A booke called the Foundacion of Rhetorike • Richard Rainolde

... cool and pleasant" So you hie yourself away To the wild-wood sweet and shady For a joyous, happy day; Then the rain comes down in torrents Till it drowns the very snakes, And you have a high example Of ...
— Oklahoma Sunshine • Freeman E. (Freeman Edwin) Miller

... Hie hebt sich an das puch des edeln Ritters vn landtfarers || Marcho polo. In dem er schreibt die grossen wunderlichen || ding dieser welt. Sunderlichen von den grossen kunigen vnd || keysern die da herschen in den selbigen landen ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo, Volume 2 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... eastern hills, and it painted the waves that lapped the sleek sides of a yacht lying at anchor under the hill. A yacht that Paul had watched many a day and dreamed of many a night; for he often longed with a great longing to slip cable and hie away, ...
— In the Footprints of the Padres • Charles Warren Stoddard

... may not be content to follow through ignorance and indolence and be led to the lowly paths of life. Make my Hie positive; and from my surroundings may I look out and struggle to mount to the highest ideals, that I may be qualified to select the best in ...
— Leaves of Life - For Daily Inspiration • Margaret Bird Steinmetz

... letter is sent to my Lord Monteagle, and whereto it may grow—Hie you to White Webbs when morning breaketh, with all the speed you may, and tell Mr Catesby of this. I fear—I very much fear all shall ...
— It Might Have Been - The Story of the Gunpowder Plot • Emily Sarah Holt

... to his courtiers brave That they should before to Viborg hie; No thought he had that Ranild the lad ...
— Marsk Stig - a ballad - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... easily, I were to describe how they, by transgressing their own principles, make it apparent what kind of a spirit is moving them, while they, by virtue of the foundation of such principles, are scoffers and Ishmaels of all well-ordered church-life. Hic Rhodus, hie saltant (Here is Rhodes, here they dance)." "Also here" (as in Europe), Falckner proceeds, "the Protestant Church is divided in three nations; for there is here an English Protestant Church, a Swedish Protestant ...
— American Lutheranism - Volume 1: Early History of American Lutheranism and The Tennessee Synod • Friedrich Bente

... to make the acquaintance of the bird must either resort to some fancier's shop, or hie themselves to the cool heights of Mussoorie, or, better still, of Darjeeling, where the liothrix is exceptionally abundant. But even at Darjeeling the Pekin-robin will have to be looked for carefully, for it is of shy and retiring habits, ...
— Birds of the Indian Hills • Douglas Dewar

... we heard some ane running yont the road. I keeked through a hole in the door, and I saw it was an Egyptian lassie 'at I had never clapped een on afore. She saw the licht in the window, and she cried, 'Hie, you billies in the windmill, the sojers is coming!' I fell in a fricht, but the other man opened the door, and again she cries, 'The sojers is coming; quick, or you'll be ta'en.' At that the other man up wi' his bonnet and ran, but I didna ...
— The Little Minister • J.M. Barrie

... old custom of the peasantry which takes place the Monday before Lent. The young men dress themselves gaily, and, armed with wooden clubs, hie them to the village green. Here a barrel is suspended with a cat inside it. Each man knocks the barrel with his club as he runs underneath it, and he who knocks a hole big enough to liberate poor puss is the victor. The grotesque costumes, the difficulty of stooping and running under the ...
— Denmark • M. Pearson Thomson

... ray is gone; Now the twilight shadows hie; Still the bell-notes, one by one, Send their soft voice to the sky, Praying, as with human lip,— "Angels, hasten, night is nigh, Take us to ...
— Verses • Susan Coolidge

... approval in polite society when an accredited writer's name is mentioned, go to college and listen to the lectures of literary Ph. D.'s. But if you want to learn to write, take your Bible, your Shakespeare and your Brann and hie you to your garret, there to read, reread, study, memorize, and imitate if you can. And God be praised if you can steal the best and to it ...
— Volume 1 of Brann The Iconoclast • William Cowper Brann

... found, Whose innermost wall's encircling bound Shall take in a couple of acres of ground; And there in that Abbey, all the year round, A full choir of monks and a full choir of nuns, And Sir Ingoldsby Bray, Without delay, Shall hie him again To Ascalon plain, And gather the bones of the foully slain; And shall place said bones, with all possible care, In an elegant shrine in his abbey so fair; And plenty of lights shall be there o' nights— None of your rascally 'dips,' but sound, Best superfine wax-wicks, ...
— The Haunted Hour - An Anthology • Various

... a comparatively low altitude many birds, as is well known, hie to the far North to find the proper climatic conditions in which to rear their broods and spend their summer vacation, some of them going to the subarctic provinces and others beyond. How different among the sublime heights of the Rockies! Here they are required ...
— Birds of the Rockies • Leander Sylvester Keyser

... little ones, laughing, must hie them away To the blackberry wood and the nut-growing ground; But in the home-garden our dear little May Sits calmly at rest, on this beautiful day, Contented with what she ...
— Little Folks (October 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... shall hie me home at once to do something I should otherwise have to do tomorrow. So Alice Penhallow is to be married tonight. Three weddings for you in one summer, Anne—Phil's, Alice's, and Jane's. I'll never forgive Jane for not ...
— Anne Of The Island • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... to our planet in this way, it seems, and hasten to incarnate themselves in as promising unborn though just begotten men and women as they find, that they may the sooner be free to hie them sunwards with ...
— The Martian • George Du Maurier

... a funny fellow; every one's a little mellow; Follow, follow, follow, follow, o'er the hill and in the hollow! Merrily, merrily, there they hie; now they rise and now they fly; They cross and turn, and in and out, and down in the middle, and wheel about,— With a "Phew, shew, Wadolincon! listen to me, Bobolincon!— Happy's the wooing that's speedily ...
— Birds and Poets • John Burroughs

... Athens). Come, my chief! come with speed! Or, if haply at hand, II 2 On the height where the curved altars stand, Thou art hallowing with oxen in sacrifice slain Yonder shrine of Poseidon, dread lord of the main, Hie thee hither! Be swift! The blind stranger intends To thee, to thy friends, To thy city, for burdens imposed, just amends. Haste thee, ...
— The Seven Plays in English Verse • Sophocles

... counties," is the reply; though, fresh from American roads, one can scarce see what shape the improvements can possibly take. Out of Lancashire into Cheshire we wheel, and my escort, after wishing me all manner of good fortune in hearty Lancashire style, wheel about and hie themselves back toward the rumble and roar of the world's greatest sea-port, leaving me to pedal pleasantly southward along the green lanes and amid the quiet rural scenery of Staffordshire to Stone, where ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle V1 • Thomas Stevens

... we are to rear only four children per marriage, and if we are to give the medical man liberty to weed out the weaklings, it behoves us to see that the children whom we produce are of the best quality. Let us, therefore, hie to the stud-farm, observe its methods and proceed to apply them to the human race. We must definitely prevent feeble-minded persons from propagating their species. Within limits, that is a proposition with which ...
— Science and Morals and Other Essays • Bertram Coghill Alan Windle

... said Blancandrin, "by this right hand, And my floating beard by the free wind fanned, Ye shall see the host of the Franks disband And hie them back into France their land; Each to his home as beseemeth well, And Karl unto Aix—to his own Chapelle. He will hold high feast on Saint Michael's day And the time of your tryst shall pass away. Tale nor tidings of ...
— The Harvard Classics, Volume 49, Epic and Saga - With Introductions And Notes • Various

... Rob's direction, to set to work at once. So Rob bade his brothers and cousin get their rude fishing rods, and hie away down to the rocks at the mouth of the harbor, and see what fish they could get ...
— The New McGuffey Fourth Reader • William H. McGuffey

... about their business, and not trouble poor people. Bah! such a speech was not like Louis Herbois! but out it came, Heaven knows how, and no sooner had I finished than up runs the young creature, and seizing my moustache she cries, "My brave fellow, hie away, and crop off all this; none but men have a right to it; God grant you were not born in France; no Frenchman could give such an answer to a man imploring protection for his wife. Look at my husband—did he ask aid for himself? Do you think he would turn you off in this ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 2, January, 1851 • Various

... in the atmosphere that makes me drier the farther we advance into the State. Maybe the pursuit of glory has something desiccating in it. At least, all the warriors I ever heard of seemed composed of clay that required as much moistening as unslaked lime. I will hie me to teh hill of frankincense and the mountain of myrrh; in other words, I'll go back where Abe is, and get what's left ...
— The Red Acorn • John McElroy

... down, light down from your horse o' pride, I trow ye talk too loud and hie, And I will make you a triple word, And syne, if ye dare, ye shall ...
— Verses 1889-1896 • Rudyard Kipling

... of ill, He me perswaded forth with him to fare. Nought tooke I with me, but mine oaten quill: Small needments else need shepheard to prepare. So to the sea we came; the sea, that is A world of waters heaped up on hie, Rolling like mountaines in wide wildernesse, Horrible, ...
— Spenser - (English Men of Letters Series) • R. W. Church

... charge thee, hie thee hence, sir knight!" The damsel shrilly cries; "If this should meet her father's sight, By Heaven! my ...
— The Baron's Yule Feast: A Christmas Rhyme • Thomas Cooper

... king, "Thou didst walk hither to tell me of him; now hie thee back to him, running at full speed. 15 Invite him to come in; and let every man who sees the light, and every man who blinks the eye, stand ready to do ...
— Story Hour Readings: Seventh Year • E.C. Hartwell

... Hie thee to Naples, Rufman; thou shalt find A prince there newly crowned, aptly inclined To any bendings: lest his youthful brows Reach at stars only, weigh down his loftiest boughs With leaden plummets, poison his best thoughts with taste Of things most sensual: if the heart once ...
— The Age of Shakespeare • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... of rolling around in your Lady Lizzie or listening to the blah-blah of your radio, hie yourself to the nearest news dealer, grab off a copy of a good detective, adventure or love story, ...
— A Woman at Bay - A Fiend in Skirts • Nicholas Carter

... who poison the poor man's food In shoddy and shop grow golden and grand: How the rent-roll harbours the stolen rood— The emblazoned escutcheon the bloody hand: How women and men to the altar hie, And swear to the promise they rarely keep; How Vice, a shameless and living lie, Gets honours which Virtue ...
— The Death of Saul and other Eisteddfod Prize Poems and Miscellaneous Verses • J. C. Manning

... our day, and day becomes our night; Love changes all, o'er nature rules supreme; Alters her seasons, mocks her wisest laws, And, like the prophet, checks the planet's course. But from this world of hate, the night has fled, And I must hie me hence. O Isidora! Though my seeming's doubtful, yet remember, 'Tis true as ...
— Olla Podrida • Frederick Marryat

... even so—for from the sky Heav'n's hosts with joyful tidings hie, That He is born in Bethl'hem's stall, Who Saviour is and Lord ...
— Paul Gerhardt's Spiritual Songs - Translated by John Kelly • Paul Gerhardt

... Now all things lie Hid by her mantle dark and dim, In pious hope I hither hie, And humbly chant ...
— The Paris Sketch Book Of Mr. M. A. Titmarsh • William Makepeace Thackeray

... slant for afternoon, When the midday meal is over, When the winds have sung themselves into a swoon, And the bees drone in the clover, Then hie to me, hie, for a lullaby— Come, my baby, do; Creep into my lap, and with a nap We'll break the day ...
— The Kingdom of Love - and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... that Page enjoy'd his life So that he had some other to his wife; But never could I wish, of low or hie, A longer life, and ...
— Devon, Its Moorlands, Streams and Coasts • Rosalind Northcote

... out into the courtyard. When the dancing was at an end, she, as was her wont, questioned the men and the elder woman as to all she desired to know; and, learning from them that the men were likewise tinkers, she bid Ann hie to the kitchen and command that the house-keeper should bring together all broken pots and pans. But now, near by the wagon, was a noise heard of furious barking, and the ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... gun has been fired, the vessel must fly To the town from the green wood shady. Come, friends, now we to the table will hie, A gentleman and ...
— O. T. - A Danish Romance • Hans Christian Andersen

... ich hit iwiste Ne mai ich isien bifore me for smeche ne for miste. Ar[gh]e we be to don god to juel al to riste More eie stonde man of man an him do of criste. 20 e wel ne de e hwile he mai wel ofte hit sal him rewen. an alle men sulle ripen at hie ar sewen. Do al to gode at he mu[gh]e ech e hwile he be aliue. Ne lipne noman to muchel to childe ne to wiue. | e e him selfe for[gh]iet for wiue oer for childe [f. 1v He sal cumen on euel stede bute ...
— Selections from early Middle English, 1130-1250 - Part I: Texts • Various

... flee and woman fail, And folly mock and hope deceive, Let cowards beat the breast and wail, I'll homeward hie; I will not grieve: I'll draw the blind, I'll there set free My heart's ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... strode and thus he spoke, to that Archbishop meek: "I take the land thy king bestows from Eure to Michael-peak, I take the maid, or foul or fair, a bargain with the toast, And for thy creed, a sea-king's gods are those that give the most. So hie thee back, and tell thy chief to make his proffer true, And he shall find a docile son, and ye a ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... began his lecture, and, you may depend upon it, by this time the lion was in him, and he went careering on. Hie views were extreme; he made them extravagant. I remember at one point—for he was a man without bluster, serene, self-poised, never disturbed in the least—he made an affirmation that was very bitter, and the cry arose over the whole congregation. He stood ...
— Brave Men and Women - Their Struggles, Failures, And Triumphs • O.E. Fuller

... o'er yon mountain sae hie, Faint gloams the sun through the mists o' the ocean, Rough rows the wave on whose bosom I see The wee bit frail bark that bears Jamie frae me. Oh, lang may I look o'er yon wild waste sae dreary, And lang count the hours, ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume IV. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... appeared at a distance, invested with that purple bloom so inexpressibly beautiful, and peculiar to this fortunate climate. I hailed the prospect and blessed the transparent air that gave me life and vigour to run down the rocks, and hie as fast as my savage across the plain to Puzzoli. There we took bark and rowed out into the blue ocean, by the remains of a sturdy mole: many such, I imagine, adorned the bay in Roman ages crowned by vast lengths of slender pillars; pavilions at their extremities, ...
— Dreams, Waking Thoughts, and Incidents • William Beckford

... spare for his tender age, Nor yet for his hie kin; But soon as ever he born is, He shall mount the ...
— The Chaplet of Pearls • Charlotte M. Yonge

... of woe; Where'er thy footsteps turn, to meet, An earthquake yawning at thy feet, While o'er thy head pale meteors glare, And boding tempests fill the air, In throbbing anguish doom'd to roam, Yet never find a peaceful home. Haste! to the shrine of Mercy hie, There lift the penitential eye, With breaking heart thy sins deplore, And wound Integrity no more! Repentance then thy soul shall save, And snatch thee, ransom'd, from ...
— Elegies and Other Small Poems • Matilda Betham

... virtue needful for such self-denial. Wrong shall not be wrong to Hafiz, for the name's sake. A law or statute is to him what a fence is to a nimble schoolboy,—a temptation for a jump. "We would do nothing but good; else would shame come to us on the day when the soul must hie hence;—and should they then deny us Paradise, the Houris themselves would forsake that, and come ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 6, April, 1858 • Various



Words linked to "Hie" :   step on it, belt along, go, tear, bucket along, linger, rush, travel, scoot, hasten, shoot, hotfoot, race, scud, speed, rush along, flash, move, dart, thrust ahead, cannonball along, locomote, pelt along, shoot down, buck, push forward, charge



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