Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Land   Listen
noun
Land  n.  
1.
The solid part of the surface of the earth; opposed to water as constituting a part of such surface, especially to oceans and seas; as, to sight land after a long voyage. "They turn their heads to sea, their sterns to land."
2.
Any portion, large or small, of the surface of the earth, considered by itself, or as belonging to an individual or a people, as a country, estate, farm, or tract. "Go view the land, even Jericho." "Ill fares the land, to hastening ills a prey, Where wealth accumulates and men decay." Note: In the expressions "to be, or dwell, upon land," "to go, or fare, on land," as used by Chaucer, land denotes the country as distinguished from the town. "A poor parson dwelling upon land (i.e., in the country)."
3.
Ground, in respect to its nature or quality; soil; as, wet land; good or bad land.
4.
The inhabitants of a nation or people. "These answers, in the silent night received, The king himself divulged, the land believed."
5.
The mainland, in distinction from islands.
6.
The ground or floor. (Obs.) "Herself upon the land she did prostrate."
7.
(Agric.) The ground left unplowed between furrows; any one of several portions into which a field is divided for convenience in plowing.
8.
(Law) Any ground, soil, or earth whatsoever, as meadows, pastures, woods, etc., and everything annexed to it, whether by nature, as trees, water, etc., or by the hand of man, as buildings, fences, etc.; real estate.
9.
(Naut.) The lap of the strakes in a clinker-built boat; the lap of plates in an iron vessel; called also landing.
10.
In any surface prepared with indentations, perforations, or grooves, that part of the surface which is not so treated, as the level part of a millstone between the furrows, or the surface of the bore of a rifled gun between the grooves.
Land agent, a person employed to sell or let land, to collect rents, and to attend to other money matters connected with land.
Land boat, a vehicle on wheels propelled by sails.
Land blink, a peculiar atmospheric brightness seen from sea over distant snow-covered land in arctic regions. See Ice blink.
Land breeze. See under Breeze.
Land chain. See Gunter's chain.
Land crab (Zool.), any one of various species of crabs which live much on the land, and resort to the water chiefly for the purpose of breeding. They are abundant in the West Indies and South America. Some of them grow to a large size.
Land fish a fish on land; a person quite out of place.
Land force, a military force serving on land, as distinguished from a naval force.
Land, ho! (Naut.), a sailor's cry in announcing sight of land.
Land ice, a field of ice adhering to the coast, in distinction from a floe.
Land leech (Zool.), any one of several species of blood-sucking leeches, which, in moist, tropical regions, live on land, and are often troublesome to man and beast.
Land measure, the system of measurement used in determining the area of land; also, a table of areas used in such measurement.
Land of bondage or House of bondage, in Bible history, Egypt; by extension, a place or condition of special oppression.
Land o' cakes, Scotland.
Land of Nod, sleep.
Land of promise, in Bible history, Canaan: by extension, a better country or condition of which one has expectation.
Land of steady habits, a nickname sometimes given to the State of Connecticut.
Land office, a government office in which the entries upon, and sales of, public land are registered, and other business respecting the public lands is transacted. (U.S.)
Land pike. (Zool.)
(a)
The gray pike, or sauger.
(b)
The Menobranchus.
Land service, military service as distinguished from naval service.
Land rail. (Zool)
(a)
The crake or corncrake of Europe. See Crake.
(b)
An Australian rail (Hypotaenidia Phillipensis); called also pectoral rail.
Land scrip, a certificate that the purchase money for a certain portion of the public land has been paid to the officer entitled to receive it. (U.S.)
Land shark, a swindler of sailors on shore. (Sailors' Cant)
Land side
(a)
That side of anything in or on the sea, as of an island or ship, which is turned toward the land.
(b)
The side of a plow which is opposite to the moldboard and which presses against the unplowed land.
Land snail (Zool.), any snail which lives on land, as distinguished from the aquatic snails are Pulmonifera, and belong to the Geophila; but the operculated land snails of warm countries are Dioecia, and belong to the Taenioglossa. See Geophila, and Helix.
Land spout, a descent of cloud and water in a conical form during the occurrence of a tornado and heavy rainfall on land.
Land steward, a person who acts for another in the management of land, collection of rents, etc.
Land tortoise, Land turtle (Zool.), any tortoise that habitually lives on dry land, as the box tortoise. See Tortoise.
Land warrant, a certificate from the Land Office, authorizing a person to assume ownership of a public land. (U.S.)
Land wind. Same as Land breeze (above).
To make land (Naut.), to sight land.
To set the land, to see by the compass how the land bears from the ship.
To shut in the land, to hide the land, as when fog, or an intervening island, obstructs the view.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Land" Quotes from Famous Books



... forget himself, the aspect of strange lands, of scenes and pictures which one after the other exhibit themselves before him, all that forcibly attracts the attention, all that occupies the mind in a new land, material cares, unexpected incidents, the surprises of travel, and yet more the magical influence of nature, are required to restore tone to ...
— International Miscellany of Literature, Art and Science, Vol. 1, - No. 3, Oct. 1, 1850 • Various

... hundred thousand acres or more—lacking a thorough survey, she had never determined exactly how much land she really owned—and the property fronted upon a stream of water. In any other country it would have been a garden of riches, but agriculture was well-nigh impossible in northern Mexico. For several years now the instability of the government had precluded ...
— Heart of the Sunset • Rex Beach

... quite at a loss how to proceed. The complaint preferred against me was 'that I had examined the Longships Lighthouse with the most minute attention, and was no less particular in my inquiries at the keepers of the lighthouse regarding the sunk rocks lying off the Land's End, with the sets of the currents and tides along the coast: that I seemed particularly to regret the situation of the rocks called the Seven Stones, and the loss of a beacon which the Trinity Board had caused to be fixed on the Wolf Rock; that I had taken notes of the bearings ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 16 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... irregular living, announced that she was about to resort once more to the healing breezes of the heather-land"—Mr. Debnam was thoroughly warming to his discourse and thoroughly enjoying his ...
— The Yellow Claw • Sax Rohmer

... their accepted meaning in that day, they did not include the African race, whether free or not: for the fifth section of the ninth article provides that Congress should have the power "to agree upon the number of land forces to be raised, and to make requisitions from each State for its quota in proportion to the number of white inhabitants in such State, which ...
— Cotton is King and The Pro-Slavery Arguments • Various

... the hills of this broad land are of heroic mould as are its men. Sons of the open, deep-chested, tall and straight, they ride like conquerors and walk—like bears. Slow to anger and quick to act, they carry their strength ...
— Sundown Slim • Henry Hubert Knibbs

... before it: where the tops of some houses are yet to be seen, and where his rents and domains are converted into pitiful barren pasturage. The inhabitants of this place affirm, that of late years the sea has driven so vehemently upon them, that they have lost above four leagues of land. These sands are her harbingers: and we now see great heaps of moving sand, that march half a league before ...
— The Essays of Montaigne, Complete • Michel de Montaigne

... to canter her horse straight to the centre of it and jump it. All that she need be instructed to do, is to give the horse his head when he is rising at the jump, and to lean well back when he is about to land over it. By giving her horse his head, I mean that she is to extend her arms to their utmost length, and bring them again into position after he has landed. Fig. 102 shows a lady leaning back and extending her arms at a fence. The pupil will not require to alter the length of her reins ...
— The Horsewoman - A Practical Guide to Side-Saddle Riding, 2nd. Ed. • Alice M. Hayes

... any productions of the United States which British vessels might import therefrom. But this privilege was coupled with conditions which are supposed to have led to its rejection by the Senate; that is, that American vessels should land their return cargoes in the United States only, and, moreover, that they should during the continuance of the privilege be precluded from carrying molasses, sugar, coffee, cocoa, or cotton either from those islands or from the United ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents, - Vol. 2, Part 3, Andrew Jackson, 1st term • Edited by James D. Richardson

... Christmas eve when Washington reached Mount Vernon. It must have been a happy and a merry Christmas in that beautiful home, for the toils and dangers of war were over, peace was smiling upon all the land, and the people were free and independent. The enjoyment of his home, under these circumstances, was an exquisite one to the retired soldier; and in his letters to his friends he gives frequent and touching evidence of his happiness in private life. To Lafayette ...
— Washington and the American Republic, Vol. 3. • Benson J. Lossing

... hotly, there was not a breath of air, and Kenneth, who seemed as languid as the drooping sails, slowly turned his head round to look at a cloud of smoke which appeared to be coming round a distant point of land. ...
— Three Boys - or the Chiefs of the Clan Mackhai • George Manville Fenn

... Prince was supposed to have the best taste, and as he kept a court of his own filled with the young nobility, and all the wits of that great faction known by the name of Whig, Hoppner had the youth and beauty of the land for a time; and it cannot be denied that he was a rival in every way worthy of contending with any portrait-painter of his day. The bare list of his exhibited portraits will show how and by whom he was supported. It is well said by Williams, in his ...
— Six Centuries of Painting • Randall Davies

... on one of his land-viewing trips for the Ohio Company, and tells us that he saw a "vast migrating herd" of buffalo cross the river here. In the beginning of colonization in this valley, buffalo and elk were to be seen in herds ...
— Afloat on the Ohio - An Historical Pilgrimage of a Thousand Miles in a Skiff, from Redstone to Cairo • Reuben Gold Thwaites

... that such persons usually give some account of their experiences during the period in which they have deserted their bodies. They usually allege that they have traversed a part of the road to the land of shades, and describe it in terms agreeing more or less closely with the traditional account of it current among the Kayans. Since in these cases the person is thought to be dead, no efforts are made by the DAYONG to lead back his departing ...
— The Pagan Tribes of Borneo • Charles Hose and William McDougall

... words to that effect; and then a sigh, and down stairs and off. So, thinks I, now the cat's out of the bag. And I wouldn't give much myself for Miss Broadhurst's chance of that young lord, with all her Bank stock, scrip, and omnum. Now, I see how the land lies, and I'm sorry for it; for she's no fortin; and she's so proud, she never said a hint to me of the matter: but my Lord Colambre is a ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. 6 • Maria Edgeworth

... between the first and the last; and the latter is the writer's seventy-fifth book. The author has endeavored to make his works correct in facts and descriptions, as well as in moral tendency; and in the preparation of them he has travelled over fifty thousand miles by sea and land. ...
— Up the River - or, Yachting on the Mississippi • Oliver Optic

... boisterous sedge, Nor grew there rudely, then, along the edge A bending willow, nor a prickly bush, Nor broad-leafed flag, nor reed, nor knotty rush: But here, well ordered, was a grove with bowers; There, grassy plots, set round about with flowers. Here, you might, through the water, see the land Appear, strewed o'er with white or yellow sand. Yon, deeper was it; and the wind, by whiffs, Would make it rise, and wash the little cliffs; On which, oft pluming, sate, unfrighted then The gagling wild goose, and the snow-white swan, With all those ...
— A History of English Literature - Elizabethan Literature • George Saintsbury

... swans flying to the north. "The George is ready for sailing," he said at last. "To-morrow or the next day she will be going home with the tidings of this massacre. I shall go with her, and within a week they will bury me at sea. There is a stealthy, slow, and secret poison.... I would not die in a land where I have lost every throw of the dice, and I would not die in England for Buckingham to come and look upon my face, and so I took that poison. For the man upon the floor, there,—prison and death awaited him at home. He chose to ...
— To Have and To Hold • Mary Johnston

... "Her tender heart," said Mr. Erwyn, "is affected by the pathetic and moving spectacle of the poor hungry swans, pining for their native land and made a raree-show for visitors in the Pantiles; and she has gone to stay them with biscuits and ...
— Gallantry - Dizain des Fetes Galantes • James Branch Cabell

... thoughts of them. Both are infinite,—his goodness and power and mercy, and your sin and misery,—no end of them. Whatever ye find good in God, write up answerably to it, so much evil and sin in yourselves and the land; and what evil ye find in yourselves and the land, write up so much goodness and mercy in his account. All the names of his praise would be so many grounds of your confusion in yourselves, and would imprint so many notes of reproach and ...
— The Works of the Rev. Hugh Binning • Hugh Binning

... my opinion. Another day we received an invitation from some friends to visit them at Peteroff, a village formed by a collection of villas and palaces on the south side of the Gulf of Finland. It can be reached by land, but we preferred going there by water. Steamers run between it and Saint Petersburg several times in the day. Crossing the bridge, we embarked in a boat, built in the far-off Clyde, and now called by a Russian name. The passage between the shallows all the way is very narrow, and the bar ...
— Fred Markham in Russia - The Boy Travellers in the Land of the Czar • W. H. G. Kingston

... of Sir Oswald Eversleigh was conducted with all the pomp and splendour befitting the burial of a man whose race had held the land for centuries, with untarnished fame and honour. The day of the funeral was dark, cold, and gloomy; stormy winds howled and shrieked among the oaks and beeches of Raynham Park. The tall firs in the avenue were tossed to and fro in ...
— Run to Earth - A Novel • M. E. Braddon

... as often happens after a storm, was full of blinding sunlight. The glare of the sun upon the snow was almost unbearable. I kept my eyes all but closed but there was so much beauty abroad in the land that I could not bear to close them altogether. The snow clung to twigs and to fences and to wires, and a thousand flames glinted from every crystal when the sun struck down upon the drifts. The pine wood upon the eastern slope of Rayborn Hill was a checkerboard ...
— O Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1919 • Various

... have seen was also an Italian. I was taking an early walk, with my younger brother, from Baveno to the summit, or at any rate, to the shoulder of the Monte Moteroni. The time was between five and six o'clock in the morning, and the place a small peasant's farm just at the fringe of the land between the open mountain and the cultivated slopes. I looked over the hedge or wall, I forget which, and there was a bare- legged girl of some seventeen or eighteen working in the field with her father and her brothers, hoeing potatoes. Here, ...
— The Adventure of Living • John St. Loe Strachey

... hot to stand or sit in the sunshine and wait for fish to bite. They went in swimming, but the sun, beating on their heads, seemed hotter while they were in the water than it did when they were on the land. Jim and Joe tried a game of mumble-to-peg, but they gave it up long before they had reached "cars." It was probably the hottest day of the year; and as it was clearly impossible to row or to do anything else while the heat lasted, the boys brought their ...
— Harper's Young People, July 20, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... can buy those flimsy French things that do not give you any wear. And presently we may not be able to buy either French or English. She is not going to be so rich either. It's nonsense to think of that marshy land ever being valuable. Whatever possessed anyone to buy it, I can't see! And if Doris was to be a queen I think she ought to ...
— A Little Girl in Old Boston • Amanda Millie Douglas

... very bright, warm August day when Mrs. Wishart and her young companion steamed over from Portsmouth to the Isles of Shoals. It was Lois's first sight of the sea, for the journey from New York had been made by land; and the ocean, however still, was nothing but a most wonderful novelty to her. She wanted nothing, she could well-nigh attend to nothing, but the movements and developments of this vast and mysterious Presence of nature. ...
— Nobody • Susan Warner

... who drinks alcoholic liquors may succeed in attaining to the region of Brahman. This has been said by Brahman himself. If a person, after having drunk alcoholic liquor, becomes humble and makes a gift of land, and abstains from it ever afterwards, he becomes sanctified and cleansed. The person that has violated his preceptor's bed, should lie down on a sheet of iron having heated it, and having cut off the emblem of his sex should leave the world for a life in the woods, with ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 - Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 • Unknown

... most of the other towns in Palestine, ennobled by any recollection from the olden times. Yea, as it would appear, a special contempt was resting upon it, besides the general contempt in which all Galilee was held; just as every land has some place to which a disgrace attaches, which has often been called forth by causes altogether trifling. This appears not only from the question of Nathanael, in John i. 47: "Can there any good thing come out of Nazareth?" but also from the fact, ...
— Christology of the Old Testament: And a Commentary on the Messianic Predictions. Vol. 2 • Ernst Hengstenberg

... to speak intelligibly. Ralph, Bishop of Rochester, asked him to bestow his absolution and blessing on us who were present, and on his other children, and also on the king and queen with their children, and the people of the land who had kept themselves under God in his obedience. He raised his right hand, as if he was suffering nothing, and made the sign of the Holy Cross; and then dropped his head and sank down. The congregation of the brethren were already chanting matins in the great church, when one ...
— MacMillan's Reading Books - Book V • Anonymous

... situation; I showed in minute detail how the people standing together under the leadership of the honest men of property could easily force the big bandits to consent to an honest, just, rock-founded, iron-built reconstruction. My statement appeared in all the morning papers throughout the land. Turn back to it; read it. You will say that ...
— The Deluge • David Graham Phillips

... you are not happy— And fate did you follow As led by its hand; Or the flight of a swallow From some far-away land? ...
— Zanetto and Cavalleria Rusticana • Giovanni Targioni-Tozzetti, Guido Menasci, and Pietro Mascagni

... bootless gold we stand Upon the desert verge of death, and say: "What shall avail the woes of yesterday To buy to-morrow's wisdom, in the land Whose currency is strange unto our hand? In life's small market they had served to pay Some late-found rapture, could we but delay Till Time hath matched our means to ...
— Artemis to Actaeon and Other Worlds • Edith Wharton

... of overflowing gall? Who, when my cup was mantling with the only bliss I coveted upon earth, traitorously emptied it, and substituted a heart-corroding poison in its stead? Who blighted my fair name, and cast me forth an alien in the land of my forefathers? Who, in a word, cut me off from every joy that existence can impart to man? Who did all this? Your father! But these are idle words. What I have been, you know; what I now am, and through what agency I have been rendered what I now ...
— Wacousta: A Tale of the Pontiac Conspiracy (Complete) • John Richardson

... gentleman, with what I think you call a bitter smile, 'not quite. This is my land and I'll have you up for trespass and damage. Come along now, no nonsense! I'm a magistrate and I'm Master of the Hounds. A vixen, too! What did you shoot her with? You're too young to have a gun. Sneaked your ...
— The Wouldbegoods • E. Nesbit

... up spake a grizzled Goeben lad, "We be far from land or fort; I should feel more safe if I knew we had A ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, September 16, 1914 • Various

... the conflict, based upon these grounds, was short, and defeat almost sure; and the great fact remained that the innermost recesses of evil force and power were by this pledge still left unassailed. We found that this power of evil had largely entered the homes of our land through the family physicians, and that willingly or not, the physicians were being used to bring in even our innocent children as recruits ...
— Alcohol: A Dangerous and Unnecessary Medicine, How and Why - What Medical Writers Say • Martha M. Allen

... no authority: Clemens' command rested on popularity, and he was as greedy of battle as he was criminally blind to insubordination. No one could have imagined they were in Italy, on the soil of their native land. As though on foreign shores and among an enemy's towns, they burnt, ravaged, plundered, with results all the more horrible since no precautions had been taken against danger. The fields were full, the houses open. The inhabitants came to meet them with their wives and children, ...
— Tacitus: The Histories, Volumes I and II • Caius Cornelius Tacitus

... cried, jerking his head in that direction. "In town or country it is the same. These poison-sellers are scattered over the whole face of the land, and every one of them is a focus of ...
— The Firm of Girdlestone • Arthur Conan Doyle

... especially of all great Poets. How true is it of Shakespeare and Homer! Who knows, or can figure what the Man Shakespeare was, by the first, by the twentieth perusal of his works? He is a Voice coming to us from the Land of Melody: his old brick dwelling- place, in the mere earthly burgh of Stratford-on-Avon, offers us the most inexplicable enigma. And what is Homer in the /Ilias/? He is THE WITNESS; he has seen, and he reveals it; we hear and believe, ...
— Autobiography • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

... akin to camping. Much valuable instruction may be given boys regarding the forests of the locality in which the camp is located, kind of land, character and use of woods, how utilized—conservatively or destructively—for saw timber, or other purposes, protection of forests, forest fires, etc. Send to United States Department of Agriculture, ...
— Camping For Boys • H.W. Gibson

... have happened since the boy's gone? You couldn't get much idea of the lay of the land when you were down there ...
— The Million-Dollar Suitcase • Alice MacGowan

... his father's death, the possessor of two vast but neglected estates, he had sold one in order to be able to do justice to the other, instead of laying house to house, and field to field, like most of his compeers, "till he stood alone in the land, and there was no place left;" and how he had lowered his rents, even though it had forced him to put down the ancestral pack of hounds, and live in a corner of the old castle; and how he was draining, claying, ...
— Alton Locke, Tailor And Poet • Rev. Charles Kingsley et al

... his work in the beginning, he is certainly represented, not only as naming all things imperatively, when he spoke them into being, but as expressly calling the light Day, the darkness Night, the firmament Heaven, the dry land Earth, and the gatherings of the mighty ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... which happened to be very fine, Beth revelled out of doors. Everything was a wonder and a joy to her in this fertile land, the trees especially, after the bleak, wild wastes to which she had been accustomed in the one stormy corner of Ireland she knew. Leaves and blossoms were just bursting out, and one day, wandering alone in the grounds, she happened unawares upon ...
— The Beth Book - Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius • Sarah Grand

... often into the south. His glances into the north were few and brief, but his eyes dwelled long on the lonely land that lay beyond the yellow current. His was an attractive face. He was young, only a boy, but the brow was broad and high, and the eyes, grave and steady, were those of one who thought much. He was ...
— The Texan Scouts - A Story of the Alamo and Goliad • Joseph A. Altsheler

... failed to meet. Brayne, however, claimed a moiety and engaged in a lawsuit with Burbage which dragged along until his death, when his heirs continued the litigation. Giles Allen, the landlord from whom Burbage leased the land on which he had built the Theatre, evidently a somewhat sharp and grasping individual, failed to live up to the terms of his lease which he had agreed to extend, provided that Burbage expended a certain amount of money upon improvements. ...
— Shakespeare's Lost Years in London, 1586-1592 • Arthur Acheson

... land-fettered limbs glimmer up to his mistress Moon. His breast heaves unto her as of old with an awful ...
— The Masque of the Elements • Herman Scheffauer

... take the midnight train to Boston and connect there with a ten-o'clock train next morning. This would get him into Portland in time for a connection that would land him at Brenton at four that afternoon. He went back to the house to pack his bag. As he opened the door and went in, it seemed as if she might already be there—as if she might be waiting for him. ...
— The Wall Street Girl • Frederick Orin Bartlett

... records, and archives of the nation; for authorizing the surplus revenue to be applied to the payment of the public debt in advance of the time when it will become due; for the establishment of land offices for the sale of the public lands in California and the Territory of Oregon; for the construction of a road from the Mississippi Valley to the Pacific Ocean; for the establishment of a bureau of agriculture for the promotion of that interest, perhaps the most important in the country; ...
— State of the Union Addresses of Millard Fillmore • Millard Fillmore

... Pennsylvania, where the number of the latter greatly increased during the first quarter of the nineteenth century. Turner says a white servant was indicted for this offence in Sussex County in 1677 and a tract of land there bore the name of "Mulatto Hall."[470] According to the same writer Chester County seemed to have a large number of these cases and laid down the principle that ...
— The Journal of Negro History, Volume 3, 1918 • Various

... glaring influences of the sun, and combining that comfortable idea of shelter and repose so grateful in a well-conditioned country house. It is true, that the dwelling might be more extensive in room, and the purposes of luxury enlarged; but the planter on five hundred, or five thousand acres of land can here be sufficiently accommodated in all the reasonable indulgences of family enjoyment, and a liberal, even an elegant and prolonged hospitality, to which ...
— Rural Architecture - Being a Complete Description of Farm Houses, Cottages, and Out Buildings • Lewis Falley Allen

... there was a princess in Troezene, Aithra, the daughter of Pittheus the king. She had one fair son, named Theseus, the bravest lad in all the land; and Aithra never smiled but when she looked at him, for her husband had forgotten her, and lived far away. And she used to go up to the mountain above Troezene, to the temple of Poseidon, and sit there all day looking out across the bay, over Methana, to the ...
— Types of Children's Literature • Edited by Walter Barnes

... If the powerful use their strength merely to further their own selfish desires, in what way save in degree do they differ from the lower animals of creation? And how can man under such a moral code justify his dominion over land ...
— Philip Dru: Administrator • Edward Mandell House

... saw him at his best. He showed up especially well at swimming. She was a notable figure herself in bathing suit, and could swim in a nice, ladylike way; but he was a water creature—indeed, seemed more at home in the water than on land. She liked to watch his long, strong, narrow body cut the surface of the transparent lake with no loss of energy in splashing or display—as easy and swift as a fish. She began to fear she had made a mistake ...
— The Fashionable Adventures of Joshua Craig • David Graham Phillips

... previous personal experience, at least the reflected inchoate thoughts of ancestors which I am unable in any clearer way to bring out of darkness. But enough! I must say no more, for I again find myself in the land of vague fancy, gliding phantoms and ...
— The Story of a Child • Pierre Loti

... representative in a foreign land, however, comes into line again in the beginning of the eighteenth century, and in a really serious fashion, thanks to the very considerable learning of a French refugee, Jacob Le Duchat, who died in 1748. He had a most thorough knowledge of the French prose-writers ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... obtained, by this maniac, over the small farmers and peasantry in his neighbourhood, is most astonishing. They believed in all he told them; first that he should be a great chieftain in Kent, and that they should all live rent free on his land, and that if they would follow his advice, they should have good living and large estates, as he had great influence at Court, and was to sit at the Queen's right hand, on the day of her Coronation. It would seem as if his madness, then, was personal and political, ...
— Gossip in the First Decade of Victoria's Reign • John Ashton

... of Henry James is a case in point. Undoubtedly he fled the shores of his native land to escape the barrage of the bonbonniverous sub-deb, who would else have mown him ...
— Shandygaff • Christopher Morley

... finished the preamble, and touched on some other preliminary considerations, we proceed to the Laws, beginning with the constitution of the state. This is not the best or ideal state, having all things common, but only the second-best, in which the land and houses are to be distributed among 5040 citizens divided into four classes. There is to be no gold or silver among them, and they are to have moderate wealth, and to respect number and numerical order in ...
— Laws • Plato

... has, in consequence of this affair, slandered and persecuted him. The archbishop again denounces Tello's vices, and asks that he himself be permitted to return to Spain, as he cannot remain with Tello in that land. ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume X, 1597-1599 • E. H. Blair

... Lincoln will proclaim the freedom of four millions of human slaves, the most important event in the history of the world since Christ was born. Our boast that this is a land of liberty has been a flaunting lie. Henceforth it will be a veritable reality. The defeats of our armies in the past we have deserved, because we waged a war to protect and perpetuate and to rivet firmer the chains of ...
— Slavery and Four Years of War, Vol. 1-2 • Joseph Warren Keifer

... calculations from the first living engineers—French, English, and American. The point of exit of the tunnel could be calculated to the yard. That portfolio in the corner is full of sections, plans, and diagrams. I have agents employed in buying up land, and if all goes well, we may get to work in the autumn. That is one device which may produce results. ...
— The Doings Of Raffles Haw • Arthur Conan Doyle

... and therefore hesitated not a moment in giving it up into other hands.'[654] Bishop Watson, of Llandaff, gives a most artless account of his non-residence. 'Having,' he tells us, 'no place of residence in my diocese, I turned my attention to the improvement of land. I thought the improvement of a man's fortune by cultivating the earth was the most useful and honourable way of providing for a family. I have now been several years occupied as an improver of land and planter of trees.'[655] The same bishop gives us a most extraordinary ...
— The English Church in the Eighteenth Century • Charles J. Abbey and John H. Overton

... dove in Venice, as of old a cat in Egypt. We wish some one would do as much for the beggars, which are yet more numerous, and who know no more, when they get up in the morning, where they are to be fed, than do the fowls of heaven. Trade there is none; "to dig," they have no land, and, even if they had, they are too indolent; they want, too, the dove's wing to fly away to some happier country. Their seas have shut them in; their marble city is but a splendid prison. The story of Venice is that of Tyre over again,—her wealth, her glory, ...
— Pilgrimage from the Alps to the Tiber - Or The Influence of Romanism on Trade, Justice, and Knowledge • James Aitken Wylie

... the country the land was quite level, and long before Edwin reached the place, he could see the large brick building that during his stay there was the quarters of the vicious and insane. He wondered if it was still used for the ...
— The Poorhouse Waif and His Divine Teacher • Isabel C. Byrum

... up the Yazoo belonged to the State, and the State sold it for $1.25 per acre. The fellows that got up there first weren't any too anxious to see new folks coming in and entering land. Used to try all kinds of schemes to get ...
— American Adventures - A Second Trip 'Abroad at home' • Julian Street

... offering simple and pure we bring, And a wreath of wild roses around it fling; Not culled from the shades of enamelled bowers, But watered by love's own gentle showers. In tones of affection we here would speak; To waken an echo of love we seek; We mingle our tears for the early dead, To the land of spirits before us fled. While a moral we humbly would here entwine With the flowers we lay on affection's shrine, We pray that the light of religion may dawn, To brighten our pathway each coming morn. Then with love for each other ...
— Our Gift • Teachers of the School Street Universalist Sunday School, Boston

... American peoples to the south of our own Republic, the progress they have made since their emancipation from European tutelage, and the future before them which, like ripening fruits, they need only stretch forth the hand to pluck. The undiscovered land—for to many of us it is unknown—is a land of exquisite beauty, grace and courtesy, which the reader may here visit, if he choose, ...
— Latin America and the United States - Addresses by Elihu Root • Elihu Root

... are ready to sacrifice their lives and fortunes for him upon this, and all other occasions, but at the some time they humbly beseech him to give them such magistrates as may be agreeable to the laws of the land, for at present there is no authority to which they can legally submit. By what I can hear, every body wishes well to the King, but would be glad his ministers were hanged. The winds continue so contrary, that no landing can be so soon as was apprehended, ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753) - Vol. IV • Theophilus Cibber

... a few minutes, and they resolved to follow Sam's advice, Dick to lead the way and learn just how the land lay. ...
— The Rover Boys on the Ocean • Arthur M. Winfield (Edward Stratemeyer)

... last week's television commentary downgrading our optimism and our idealism. They are the entrepreneurs, the builders, the pioneers, and a lot of regular folks—the true heroes of our land who make up the most uncommon nation of doers in history. You know they're Americans because their spirit is as big as the universe and their hearts are ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... Proud as Artaban, the little shepherd, seated beneath the shade of a tree, uttered his infallible oracles, and they were believed all the more implicitly, as nature had given to his eyes that veiled and impenetrable expression calculated to impose upon fools. The land to which I belonged was owned by a venerable relative of Count Kostia. At her death she left her property to him. He came to see his new domain; heard of me, had me brought into his presence, questioned me, and was struck with my natural gifts and precocious genius. He had already proposed ...
— Stories of Modern French Novels • Julian Hawthorne

... on Transcendental Idealism and Absolute Rationalism, 1841. By the Letters on the History of Philosophy from Descartes to Kant, 1827, in the later editions to Cousin, he became the founder of this discipline in his native land.] ...
— History Of Modern Philosophy - From Nicolas of Cusa to the Present Time • Richard Falckenberg

... sleep now," said Tayoga, "but Dagaeoga can keep on talking and be happy, because he will talk to himself long after we have gone to the land of dreams." ...
— The Rulers of the Lakes - A Story of George and Champlain • Joseph A. Altsheler

... poor feller, he was," said Bill, greatly affected. "For plum duff or Irish stoo there wasn't his equal in the land. But enough of these sad subjects. Pausin' only to explain that me an' Sam got off the iceberg on a homeward bound chicken coop, landed on Tierra del Fuego, walked to Valparaiso, and so got home, I will proceed to enliven ...
— The Magic Pudding • Norman Lindsay

... Baconian philosophy. Poets sang with emulous fervour the approach of the golden age. Cowley, in lines weighty with thought and resplendent with wit, urged the chosen seed to take possession of the promised land flowing with milk and honey, that land which their great deliverer and lawgiver had seen, as from the summit of Pisgah, but had not been permitted to enter. [183] Dryden, with more zeal than knowledge, joined voice to the general ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 1 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... mountain; and that, when the sun shone upon this mist, the parts of the building that appeared through the vaporous veil were strangely glorified in their indistinctness, so that they seemed to belong to some aerial abode in the land of the sunset; and the beholders could hardly tell whether they had ever seen them before, or whether they were now for ...
— The Portent & Other Stories • George MacDonald

... knowing participation of leaders of government, business, education and unions. Neither state nor Federal solutions imposed from on high will suffice. Neighborhoods are the fabric and soul of this great land. Neighborhoods define the weave that has been used to create a permanent fabric. The Federal government must take every opportunity to provide access and influence to the individuals and organizations affected at ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... well knew that Sir George Vernon was her friend, therefore his house and his friendship were my sanctuary, without which my days certainly would have been numbered in the land of Elizabeth, and their number would have been small. I was dependent on Sir George not only for a roof to shelter me, but for my very life. I speak of these things that you may know some of the many imperative reasons ...
— Dorothy Vernon of Haddon Hall • Charles Major

... scruples. As I clambered over the rotten gate, and crossed the grass-grown lawn or court, the tide of association became too strong for casuistry; here the poet dwelt and wrote, and here his thoughts fondly recurred when composing his Traveler in a foreign land. Yonder was the decent church, that literally 'topped the neighboring hill.' Before me lay the little hill of Knockrue, on which he declares, in one of his letters, he had rather sit with a book in hand than mingle in the proudest assemblies. And, above all, ...
— Oliver Goldsmith • Washington Irving

... map of the eastern section of the mountains. Not only were they planning their routes, but they were critically examining a portion of the map that was encircled with a ring of red ink. The space within the circle represented a tract of mountain land that belonged to Lieutenant Hippy Wingate, property that he ...
— Grace Harlowe's Overland Riders Among the Kentucky Mountaineers • Jessie Graham Flower

... sail from England in December 1654, with the secret object of "gaining an interest" in that part of the West Indies in possession of the Spaniards. Admiral Penn commanded the fleet, and General Venables the land forces.[119] The expedition reached Barbadoes at the end of January, where some 4000 additional troops were raised, besides about 1200 from Nevis, St. Kitts, and neighbouring islands. The commanders having resolved to direct their first attempt ...
— The Buccaneers in the West Indies in the XVII Century • Clarence Henry Haring

... He that is fierce as a bull, and yet tender-hearted like a young child—the greatest blasphemer on earth, and yet the most religious, or even the most superstitious, of men—he is not to be tied down by the rules of aesthetics, like a land-crab. His home is on the sea, as somebody has said or sung; he has nobody there to see him but himself, (if we may be excused the bull.) What does he care for dress? Only look at him standing by his gun, when broadside ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 363, January, 1846 • Various

... flash the world is forgotten, and into the attic come dear faces from that distant land of childhood, where a strange enchantment glorified the commonplace, and made the dreams of night seem real. Footsteps that have long been silent are heard upon the attic floor, and voices, hushed for years, whisper from the shadows from the other ...
— Threads of Grey and Gold • Myrtle Reed

... with a frequency unknown before; its public works, roads, railways, and canals have generated malaria; it has introduced plague, by poisoning wells, in order to reduce the population that has to be held in subjection it has deprived the Indian peasant of his land; the Indian artisan of his industry, and the Indian merchant of his trade; it has destroyed religion by its godless system of education; it seeks to destroy caste by polluting maliciously and of set purpose, the salt and sugar that men eat and the cloth that they wear; it allows Indians to ...
— Indian Unrest • Valentine Chirol

... for you to wonder at. But also, nearer home, there are gentle shadows on the stairs, a dim cellar for the friendly creatures of your fancy, and for your exalted mood there is a garret with dark corners. Here, on a braver morning, you may push behind the trunks and boxes and come to a land unutterable where the furthest Crusoe has scarcely ventured. Or in a more familiar hour you may sit alongside a window high above the town. Here you will see the milkman on his rounds with his pails and long tin dipper. And these misty kingdoms that ...
— Chimney-Pot Papers • Charles S. Brooks

... and pardon us for making such homes part and parcel and a necessity of our century and our land! ...
— The Secret of a Happy Home (1896) • Marion Harland

... The marines were then landed, and, aided by a strong contingent of bluejackets, who were placed under the command of Captain Horatio Nelson, at once set to work to throw up a chain of sod batteries, completely investing the town on the land side. ...
— Under the Meteor Flag - Log of a Midshipman during the French Revolutionary War • Harry Collingwood

... side the rustling cable rings: The sails are furled; and anchoring round she swings; And gathering loiterers on the land discern Her boat descending from the latticed stern. 100 'Tis manned—the oars keep concert to the strand, Till grates her keel upon the shallow sand.[hm] Hail to the welcome shout!—the friendly speech! When hand grasps hand uniting ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... land again, lads," put in the captain, with a grave shake of his head. "This wind is growing worse. We don't want ...
— The Rover Boys on Land and Sea - The Crusoes of Seven Islands • Arthur M. Winfield

... hypocrites, for ye compass sea and land to make one proselyte, and when he is made, ye make him two-fold more the ...
— The Mistakes of Jesus • William Floyd

... must have been, to go sailing all over the shop never knowing where they'd fetch the land! Hah!" ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... northwest a giant arm of land reached out into the water, high and stark and rocky; further on a group of white farallones lay in the tossing foam and over them great flocks of seabirds dipped and circled. Finally, along the coast to the northward, they descried those chalk cliffs which Francis ...
— Port O' Gold • Louis John Stellman

... Around the fence stood vehicles of all descriptions, saddle horses, and a few ponies on which cowboys sat lazily, looking on. Even those who had come only for adventure were silenced. They felt the challenge of the land and were no longer in ...
— Land of the Burnt Thigh • Edith Eudora Kohl

... it very badly. He obtained all his sea experience at the Crystal Palace and has been mud-pounding up and down France for three years, and yet here we have him now pretending there's no such thing as dry land." ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, Jan. 8, 1919 • Various

... (there was, indeed, some appearance of the kind). "He points to something square that is an open coffer. Fine weather. But, look! there are clouds of azure and gold, which surround you. Do you see that ship on the high sea? How favourable the wind is! You are on board; you land in a beautiful country, of which you become the Queen. Ah! what do I see? Look there—look at that hideous, crooked, lame man, who is pursuing you—but he is going on a fool's errand. I see a very great man, who supports you in his arms. Here, look! he is a kind of giant. There is a great deal ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XV. and XVI., Volume 2 • Madame du Hausset, and of an Unknown English Girl and the Princess Lamballe

... spread her white duck sails, glided gracefully away from the wharf, and bounded through the coral reef; the red sunlight faded, the stars came out, the Honolulu light went down in the distance, and in two hours the little craft was out of sight of land on the broad, crisp Pacific. It was so chilly, that after admiring as long as I could, I dived into the cabin, a mere den, with a table, and a berth on each side, in one of which I lay down, and the other was alternately occupied by the captain and his son. But limited as I thought it, boards have ...
— The Hawaiian Archipelago • Isabella L. Bird

... misfortune could arouse me to infidelity and murmuring, but that, at moments of utter contrition and solitude, the idea of the injustice of Providence took root in me as readily as bad seed takes root in land well soaked with rain). Also, I imagined that I was going to die there and then, and drew vivid pictures of St. Jerome's astonishment when he entered the store-room and found a corpse there instead of myself! Likewise, recollecting what Natalia ...
— Boyhood • Leo Tolstoy

... of finding the poor girls who stood most in need of training and the shelter of charity? She, also, could add to this history of the woman belonging both to the old world and the new. There are also official records in evidence of much that is told here—deeds of land, bills of sale, with dates of marriages and deaths interwoven, changed as to ...
— The Bondwoman • Marah Ellis Ryan

... the season when such a residence meant little less than a slow suicide. They had, as they were accustomed to say, their purgatory upon earth, and they remained till their constitutions were hopelessly shattered and they were sent to die in their own land. Touching examples might be found in modern times of men who, in the last extremes of disease or suffering, scrupled, through religious motives, about availing themselves of the simplest alleviations,[21] and something of the same feeling is shown in the desire to prolong to the last ...
— The Map of Life - Conduct and Character • William Edward Hartpole Lecky

... Harrison for an old acquaintance, as to a rock in a weary land of unfamiliar surroundings. But such clinging was really unnecessary; for he wanted not to leave her side. Arethusa's little confusion ...
— The Heart of Arethusa • Francis Barton Fox

... Orient! It was a week since Stella had penned those words, and still the charm held her, the wonder grew. Never in her life had she dreamed of a land so perfect, so subtly alluring, so overwhelmingly full of enchantment. Day after day slipped by in what seemed an endless succession. Night followed magic night, and the spell wound closer and ever closer about her. She sometimes felt as if her very individuality were being absorbed ...
— The Lamp in the Desert • Ethel M. Dell

... paddock gate the day of the big race he's out of his trainer's hands; the man's got no more to do with the race himself than a kid sittin' up in the grand stand. Here's where I come in, if we mean to land the Brooklyn," and he looked searchingly at Crane, a misleading grin on his lips. But the latter simply joined in the ...
— Thoroughbreds • W. A. Fraser

... claims some land that I think is mine. When I bought this lumber camp, and formed a company, with myself as the largest stockholder, I was given to understand that a certain tract, containing valuable timber, went with my purchase. I had it surveyed, and I supposed I had title to ...
— The Outdoor Girls in a Winter Camp - Glorious Days on Skates and Ice Boats • Laura Lee Hope

... territory to protect to take the offensive and their Pacific fleet lay close to Manila, where, with the help of land aviation forces, they hoped to hold the possession of the islands, which according to the popular American view was supposed to be the prize for which the Japanese ...
— In the Clutch of the War-God • Milo Hastings

... called Moreh Nebuchim ("The Guide of the Perplexed"), explains that God commanded the Israelites to take these four emblems during this festival to remind them that they were brought out from the wilderness, where no fruit grew, and no people lived, into a land of brooklets, waters, a land flowing with milk and honey. For this reason did God command us to hold in our hands the precious fruit of this land while singing praises to Him, the One who wrought miracles in our behalf, who feeds ...
— Hebraic Literature; Translations from the Talmud, Midrashim and - Kabbala • Various

... and all races. They drift to the forest from all ranks of life by reason of the spirit driving them. They come from the universities of the world. They come straight from the gates of the penitentiary. They come from the land, the sea, the office. They come from all countries, and they come for every reason. The call of the forest is deep with significance. Its appeal is profound. Its life is free, and ...
— The Man in the Twilight • Ridgwell Cullum

... awful moment whilst we await the threatened attempt of the enemies of religion and of man to crush us in their sacrilegious embrace; whilst their diabolical influence cherishes rebellion and promotes assassination in the land, we look back with gratitude to the timely interposition of Great Britain, which has more than once rescued us from that infidel yoke under which so great a portion of distracted Europe at this moment groans. ...
— William Pitt and the Great War • John Holland Rose

... elapsed since the hope of wealth and greatness had impelled him to bely the boastful professions of his whole life, to desert the royal cause, to join with the Wildmans and Fergusons, nay, to propose that the King should be sent a prisoner to a foreign land and immured in a fortress begirt by pestilential marshes. The lure which had produced this strange transformation was the Viceroyalty of Ireland. Soon, however, it appeared that the proselyte had little ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 2 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... have gone to the Hills to settle a whole clan of tenants whose leases are out, and who expect that because they have all lived under his Honour, they and theirs these hundred years, that his Honour shall and will contrive to divide the land that supported ten people amongst their sons and sons' sons, to the number of a hundred. And there is Cormac with the reverend locks, and Bryan with the flaxen wig, and Brady with the long brogue, and Paddy with the short, and Terry with the butcher's-blue coat, and Dennis with no coat at all, ...
— The Life And Letters Of Maria Edgeworth, Vol. 1 • Maria Edgeworth

... wherever this subject was mentioned, never failed to produce his supplement upon the occasion: "It is strange," said he, "that the country, which is little better than a gallows or a grave for young people, is allotted in this land only for the unfortunate, and not for the guilty! poor Lady Chesterfield, for some unguarded looks, is immediately seized upon by an angry husband, who will oblige her to spend her Christmas at a country-house, a hundred and fifty miles from London; while here there are a thousand ladies ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... again on her own ground, back from the land of enchantment and anguish. It was like returning to an empty home after a journey of poignant romance. She was mistress of herself again, mistress of her secret and her loneliness. She could command her voice, too. ...
— The Street Called Straight • Basil King

... these things could not be any use at all in a gale; if you tried to run before the wind, you would make a mess of it, for there isn't anyway to shorten sail—like reefing, you know—you have to take it ALL in—shut your feathers down flat to your sides. That would LAND you, of course. You could lay to, with your head to the wind—that is the best you could do, and right hard work you'd find it, too. If you tried any other ...
— Captain Stormfield's Visit to Heaven • Mark Twain

... "The land of the free," he interrupted suavely. "Yes—I know those lands, on both sides of the Atlantic. But even there curious things happen. And you're going to marry me—you will say 'Yes' to the sleek English clergyman when he asks you whether you will take this man to ...
— The Green Rust • Edgar Wallace

... pleased Almighty God to hearken to the supplications and prayers of an afflicted people, and to vouchsafe to the army and navy of the United States victories on land and on the sea so signal and so effective as to furnish reasonable grounds for augmented confidence that the Union of these States will be maintained, their Constitution preserved, and their peace and prosperity permanently restored. But these victories have been accorded ...
— The Papers And Writings Of Abraham Lincoln, Complete - Constitutional Edition • Abraham Lincoln

... of a few weeks ago, I wish to inform you that the Tsarskoe Selo will touch at Tilbury on Tuesday next, the 10th. I shall land there, and immediately go up to London by the first train I can get. If you like, you may meet me at Fenchurch Street Station, in the first-class waiting-room, in the late afternoon. Since I surmise that after thirty years' absence my face may ...
— The Old Man in the Corner • Baroness Orczy

... Tammany Hall in New York on July 4. Their platform approved the pension laws, advocated the sale of public land to actual occupants, praised the administration of President Johnson, arraigned the radicals and declared the reconstruction acts "unconstitutional, revolutionary, and void." If the radical party should win in the election, the Democrats asserted, ...
— The United States Since The Civil War • Charles Ramsdell Lingley

... little as she looked out from under the hood of the ambulance. Yet she imagined there was a ridge of land behind the compound at the entrance ...
— Ruth Fielding at the War Front - or, The Hunt for the Lost Soldier • Alice B. Emerson

... cleansing is not complete until a skeletal condition is reached—that is, absolutely no fat reserves are left. Up until that time I did not even know that I had fat on my feet, but much to my surprise, as the weeks went on, not only did my breasts disappear except for a couple of land marks well-known to my babies, but my ribs and hip bones became positively dangerous to passersby, and my shoes would not stay on my feet. This was not all that surprising because I went from 135 pounds down to 85 on a 5' 7" frame ...
— How and When to Be Your Own Doctor • Dr. Isabelle A. Moser with Steve Solomon

... continued but two days at N.W. and S.W.; then veered to the S.E., where it remained two days longer; then fixed at N.W., which carried us to our intended port. As we approached the land, the sea-fowl, which had accompanied us hitherto, began to leave us; at least they did not come in such numbers. Nor did we see gannets, or the black bird, commonly called the Cape Hen, till we were nearly within sight of the Cape. Nor did we ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 14 • Robert Kerr

... governments at Montreal, Three Rivers, and Quebec; there towns arose. She divided the rich banks of the St. Lawrence and of the Richelieu into seigneuries; there population spread. She placed posts on the lakes and rivers of the Far West; there the fur-traders congregated. She divided the land into dioceses and parishes, and appointed bishops and curates; a portion of all produce of the soil was exacted for their support. She sent out the people at her own cost, and acknowledged no shadow of popular rights. She organized the inhabitants by an unsparing conscription, and placed ...
— The Conquest of Canada (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Warburton

... male member of a noble family a title equivalent to that of its chief, so that a simple viscount with ten stalwart and penniless sons gave ten stalwart and penniless viscounts to the aristocracy of his country, had filled the whole land with a race of men proud of their origin, filled with reckless courage, careless of life, and despising all honest means of employment by which their fortunes might have been improved. Mounted on a sorry steed and begirt with a sword of good steel, ...
— Political Women (Vol. 1 of 2) • Sutherland Menzies

... PROFESSIONAL STATUS: A woman as a free-holder or lease-holder may vote at a county election to decide as to the adoption or non-adoption of a law permitting stock to run at large. If a widow and the head of a family, she may vote on leasing certain portions of land in the township which are set apart for school purposes. Widows in country districts may also vote for school trustees. Women cannot be notaries public. 13 women in ministry, 2 dentists, 19 journalists, 4 lawyers, 16 doctors, 3 professors, ...
— A Short History of Women's Rights • Eugene A. Hecker

... woke. My windows face due east—I was instantly aware that the sun had either risen or was just about to rise. Springing out of bed and drawing up the blind of one of the three tall, narrow windows of my room, I saw him mounting behind a belt of pine and fir which stretched along a bluff of land that ran down to the open sea. And I saw, too, that it was high tide—the sea had stolen up the creek which ran right to the foot of the park, and the wide expanse of water glittered and coruscated in the brilliance of ...
— Ravensdene Court • J. S. (Joseph Smith) Fletcher

... Holland and Rouen, wine, vinegar, oil, olives, capers, preserves, hams and fat bacon, flour, soap, hats, netted hose, Cordovan leather, raisins, almonds, and many other articles from the produce of Espana and Nueva Espana. All these things are in this land usually worth double their value and cost in Nueva Espana. Many times we have experienced lack of wine for saying mass and for the sick; sometimes a jar holding an arroba of wine has been worth at least one hundred gold pesos, and even much more. These things which are brought from Nueva ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume VI, 1583-1588 • Emma Helen Blair

... appropriately punished by a chastisement of an opposite tendency, to which he added, that some moralists who indulged in an endeavour to connect causes and effects, might think it rather incompatible with their notions of eternal equity, to endeavour to clothe the ladies, by stripping the land to nakedness—here the old lady could not help smiling. Her amicable adversary pursued the advantage which his pleasantry had produced, by informing her, that prognostications had been for a long period discountenanced, and that ...
— The Stranger in France • John Carr

... dishonored in his own? Could he look with affection and veneration to such a country as his parent? The sense of having one would die within him; he would blush for his patriotism, if he retained any, and justly, for it would be a vice. He would be a banished man in his native land. ...
— The World's Best Orations, Vol. 1 (of 10) • Various

... going to box your husband's ears," said M. Blampignon; "he is a blackguard who will land you both in the workhouse unless we look out. He may be Prime Minister, but he ...
— Penguin Island • Anatole France

... take salts as this Blunt did, it would perhaps be the death of him; but at sea the salt air and the salt water prevent you from catching cold so readily as on land; and for my own part, on board this very ship, being so illy-provided with clothes, I frequently turned into my bunk soaking wet, and turned out again piping hot, and smoking like a roasted sirloin; and yet was never the worse for it; for then, I bore a charmed ...
— Redburn. His First Voyage • Herman Melville

... perfect model of gastronomy. It was in such a manner that our fathers, who so well knew what good living was, used to eat; while we," added his majesty, "can do nothing but trifle with our food." And as he spoke he took the breast of a chicken, with ham, while Porthos attacked a dish of partridges and land-rails. The cup-bearer filled his majesty's glass. "Give M. de Valon some of my wine," said the king. This was one of the greatest honors of the royal table. ...
— The Vicomte de Bragelonne - Or Ten Years Later being the completion of "The Three - Musketeers" And "Twenty Years After" • Alexandre Dumas

... meditate an escape, and carefully avoided their suspicions, continuing with them at Old Chelicothe until the first day of June following, and then was taken by them to the salt springs on Sciotha, and kept there, making salt, ten days. During this time I hunted some for them, and found the land, for a great extent about this river, to exceed the soil of Kentucke, if possible, and remarkably ...
— The Adventures of Colonel Daniel Boone • John Filson

... for thought after that, for the men were halted on the level grass land in front of the terrace garden, and he found himself one of the officers who, after an advance guard had ridden up to the front, and others had been despatched to form piquets surrounding the place, rode up in the train ...
— Crown and Sceptre - A West Country Story • George Manville Fenn

... staple has been cacao. The cacao or chocolate tree grows in a number of the West India Islands, but in none of them is it cultivated to such an extent as in Santo Domingo. Cacao is peculiarly fitted to be a "poor man's crop," as little land and labor are required and, while the trees are growing, corn, bananas and other crops can be raised on the same field. Most of the cacao is raised on small plantations, producing from fifty to one hundred ...
— Santo Domingo - A Country With A Future • Otto Schoenrich

... great highway. Though there is, between every village, population enough to remind one constantly that he is in a settled country, the broad extent yet unoccupied proclaims that there is still room enough. Below Sauk Rapids a good deal of the land on the road side is in the hands of speculators. This, it is understood, is on the east side of the Mississippi. On the west side there are more settlements. But yet there are many farms, with tidy white ...
— Minnesota and Dacotah • C.C. Andrews

... shore; and Hilary, alarmed at not seeing him reappear, ran in. The water was not deep. Mr. Stone, seated at the bottom, was doing all he could to rise. Hilary took him by his bathing-dress, raised him to the surface, and supported him towards the land. By the time they reached the shore he could just stand on his legs. With the assistance of a policeman, Hilary enveloped him in garments and got him to a cab. He had regained some of his vitality, but did not seem aware of what ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... Liverpool became what it is; and so it is that Manchester became what it is. But who was watching this great design of Providence in its small beginning? Who was fostering the trade? Who was promoting the internal communications with Manchester? Who was spending money and giving land for the benefit of the infant trade? It was the corporation of Liverpool.... Where was representation and taxation then, sir?... You cannot have it till the port is made. You cannot have it till the risk has been run, till the ratepayers have been created. Then, no doubt, you ...
— Memoirs of James Robert Hope-Scott, Volume 2 • Robert Ornsby

... self-written press notices of your unapproachable superiority," Larry interrupted. "If you use your breath up like that you'll drown on dry land. Besides, I just heard something better than this mere articulated air of yours. Better because from a person ...
— Children of the Whirlwind • Leroy Scott

... try and film the mitrailleuse outpost on a little spot of land in the floods, only connected by a narrow strip of grass-land just high enough to be out of reach of the water. Still keeping low under cover of the trenches, I made my way in that direction. Several officers tried ...
— How I Filmed the War - A Record of the Extraordinary Experiences of the Man Who - Filmed the Great Somme Battles, etc. • Lieut. Geoffrey H. Malins

... "Good land o' massy! Ef it ain't young Mistah Swift!" cried the darky. "Howdy, Mistah Swift! Howdy! I'm jest tryin' t' saw some wood, t' make a livin', but Boomerang he doan't seem t' want t' lib," and with that Eradicate looked ...
— Tom Swift and his Motor-cycle • Victor Appleton



Words linked to "Land" :   Republic of Cape Verde, plot of land, state, Republic of the Marshall Islands, arena, Saint Lucia, Bahama Islands, French, dominion, island, overburden, Comoros, crash land, force-land, North American country, Republic of the Philippines, undershoot, major power, Sion, object, Republic of Palau, Republic of Turkey, sultanate, permafrost, Eelam, rangeland, land-office business, mainland, department, tax haven, farmland, Democratic Republic of Sao Tome and Principe, Tonga, USSR, Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka, farming, estate of the realm, woodland, land agent, dry land, line, industrialist, plowland, ally, Queen Maud Land, Land of Enchantment, sphere, earldom, land rail, commonwealth, Republic of Mauritius, Republic of Kiribati, modify, land tenure, earth, Upper Volta, French people, archduchy, Indonesia, world, homestead, Turkmen, Federated States of Micronesia, Soviet Union, estate, Haiti, Dominican Republic, set down, viscounty, Bahamas, Cape Verde, subject, piece of land, Trinidad and Tobago, glebe, Turkomen, immovable, down, English, feoff, sod, African nation, job, Maldives, coastland, Republic of Fiji, disembark, Yisrael, superpower, Russian Federation, Barbados, land site, business, territorial division, America, isthmus, land cress, British, Independent State of Papua New Guinea, polder, State of Israel, Vanuatu, bring down, Commonwealth of Dominica, Rus, Reich, land office, the three estates, Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, European country, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, alight, timberland, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, fatherland, soil, Sao Tome e Principe, badlands, Tamil Eelam, national, neck, land resources, physical object, Cuba, Turkmenistan, aviation, land area, Edwin Herbert Land, scablands, landing, coastal plain, belly-land, tillage, Mauritius, Asian country, entail, Enderby Land, city state, Kingdom of Tonga, Sri Lanka, Turkmenia, Republic of Nauru, get, landmass, ground, plain, Sao Tome and Principe, seigniory, Saint Christopher-Nevis, Kiribati, Grenada, region, sheikdom, beachfront, Adelie Land, Ukraine, Etruria, administrative district, English people, South American country, African country, native land, Burkina Faso, bottom, Western Samoa, political entity, land mine, ness, people, Irish people, great power, landed estate, fiefdom, realm, Commonwealth of the Bahamas, Friendly Islands, champaign, commonwealth country, parcel of land, sward, suzerainty, power, Marshall Islands, convey, buffer country, developing country, foreign country, greensward, Republic of Vanuatu, fief, drive home, Sao Thome e Principe, Republic of Indonesia, wonderland, discoverer, timber, tilled land, British people, rogue state, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, country of origin, land reform, strand, empire, land line, deliver, law of the land, lander, Saint Kitts and Nevis, North American nation, sheikhdom, lotusland, sea power, port, seigneury, terra firma, plantation, foreland, suzerain, common land, forest, midland, farmstead, arrive, banana republic, tilth, wetland, Dutch East Indies, principality, Polaroid Land camera, country, field, dukedom, imperium, Republic of Maldives, light, Wilkes Land, administrative division, line of work, grand duchy, Republic of Cuba, TT, realty, no man's land, European nation, political unit, khanate, come, Dutch, world power, beach, real estate, air travel, Israel, touch down, perch, Antigua and Barbuda, never-never land, Solomon Islands, Nauru, Samoa, duchy, real property, ploughland, peninsula, Swiss people, body politic, domain, princedom, emirate, Russia, St. Lucia, freehold, bring, Irish, Swiss, occupation, lotus land, grazing land, cultivated land, cloud-cuckoo-land, province, Commonwealth of Australia, solid ground, shoot down, globe, Jamaica, demesne, signory, New Hebrides, change, Federation of Saint Kitts and Nevis, Independent State of Samoa, rogue nation, put down, Tuvalu, manor, Republic of Cyprus, mother country, Federal Islamic Republic of the Comoros, Seychelles, renegade state, Land of Opportunity, land mass, Ceylon, shore, land up, Crown land, homeland, Micronesia, area, Asian nation, inventor, slash, air, debark, acres, kingdom, oxbow, Spanish people, Samoa i Sisifo, Republic of Malta, take, cape, Zion, Republic of Seychelles, orbit, countryseat, Ukrayina, land mile, Spanish, Din Land, promised land, Palau, barony, run aground, South American nation, land grant, Coats Land



Copyright © 2021 Diccionario ingles.com