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Mean  v. i.  To have a purpose or intention. (Rare, except in the phrase to mean well, or ill.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Mean" Quotes from Famous Books



... awakened from his horrid sleep, In fiery caves, a thousand fathoms deep, The Earthquake's Demon hies aloft; he waits, Nigh some high-turreted proud city's gates, As listening to the mingled shouts and din Of the mad crowd that feast or dance within. Mean time sad Nature feels his sway, the wave Heaves, and low sounds moan through the mountain cave; Then all at once is still, still as midnight, When not the lime-leaf moves: Oh, piteous sight! 90 For now the ...
— The Poetical Works of William Lisle Bowles, Vol. 1 • William Lisle Bowles

... "You mean," said Turnbull, in a voice surprisingly soft and gentle, "that there is something fine about fighting in a place where ...
— The Ball and The Cross • G.K. Chesterton

... that a family of ten persons might use five hundred gallons of water a day, and the most exacting conditions would never require the spring to hold more than one day's supply. This would mean a chamber four feet deep and in area four by five feet. If the average supply of the spring is less than the average consumption of the family, then the spring must become a storage basin for the purpose of ...
— Rural Hygiene • Henry N. Ogden

... baby, close youah lil winkahs fas', Loo-la, Loo-la, don' you gib me any sass. Youah mammy's ol', an' want you to de berry las', So, baby, honey, let dose mean ol' angels pass. ...
— The Doctor - A Tale Of The Rockies • Ralph Connor

... sir? Is it thus that you treat other women—your friends, those to whom you declare friendship? What did you mean me ...
— The Claverings • Anthony Trollope

... "If the matter is as you state it, some one has been mean enough to put the wallet into my pocket in order to implicate me in ...
— Hector's Inheritance - or The Boys of Smith Institute • Horatio Alger

... may mean for us all—I write as one of that great ill-informed multitude, sincerely and gravely patriotic, outside the echoes of Court gossip and the easy knowledge of exalted society—if our King does indeed care for these wider and profounder things! Suppose we have a King at last who cares ...
— An Englishman Looks at the World • H. G. Wells

... Giant. 'Do you mean to say that you believe you are all right when you feel as you do! ...
— Adventures in the Land of Canaan • Robert Lee Berry

... thousand other persons, exempt or redeemed from the conscription, even the married, even fathers of families, who, under the title of guards of honor, become soldiers, at first to be slaughtered in his service, and next, and in the mean time, to answer for the fidelity of their relatives. It is the old law of hostages, a resumption of the worst proceedings of the Directory for his account and aggravated for his profit.—Decidedly, the imperial ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 5 (of 6) - The Modern Regime, Volume 1 (of 2)(Napoleon I.) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... her a canary bird that I brought from the West Indies, if that is what you mean," replied the Captain. "But what harm was ...
— Dulcibel - A Tale of Old Salem • Henry Peterson

... not satisfy me. What business has my conscience, with a lash of scorpion stings, to punish me this and every day that I permit myself to think? Did I not try for years to be better? Did I not resist the infernal gravitation? and yet I am falling still. I never did anything so mean and low before as I am doing now. If it is my nature to do evil, why should I not do it without compunction? And as I look downward—there is no looking forward for me—there seems no evil thing that I could not do if so inclined. Here in this home of my childhood, this sacred ...
— Opening a Chestnut Burr • Edward Payson Roe

... their rugs—are covered with ice; the animals are standing deep in snow, the sledges are almost covered, and huge drifts above the tents. We have had breakfast, rebuilt the walls, and are now again in our bags. One cannot see the next tent, let alone the land. What on earth does such weather mean at this time of year? It is more than our share of ill-fortune, I think, but the luck may turn yet. I doubt if any party could travel in such weather even with the wind, certainly no one could ...
— Scott's Last Expedition Volume I • Captain R. F. Scott

... can say, "Such an orator, such a soldier, such a poet, or such a statesman is a Canadian." (Cheers.) Keep up a knowledge of your ancient language; for the exercise given to a man's mind in the power given by the ability to express his thoughts in two languages is no mean advantage. I would gladly have given much of the time devoted in boyhood to acquiring Greek to the acquisition of Gaelic. My friends, let me now tell you how happy it makes me to see that the valour, the skill, and the bravery which used to make you chief among your neighbours in the strife ...
— Memories of Canada and Scotland - Speeches and Verses • John Douglas Sutherland Campbell

... of old-fashioned ways," said the New Yorker suddenly, "that's a queer old clerk of yours,—Mr. McMurtagh, I mean." ...
— Pirate Gold • Frederic Jesup Stimson

... who 'ee may mean, Miss Luttrell,' replied the mother proudly, 'by a young man lounging about the place; but my son's at home from Oxford at present for his vacations, and he isn't in the fish-curing line at all, ma'am, but he's a Fellow of his college, as I've told 'ee more than ...
— Philistia • Grant Allen

... Susan announced suddenly, almost aggressively,—"I ain't discouraged 'n' I won't give up. I'm goin' to see Mr. Weskin, the lawyer, to-morrow. They say—'n' I never see nothin' to lead me to doubt 'em—'t he's stingy 'n' mean for all he's forever makin' so merry at other folks' expense; but I believe 't there's good in everythin' 'f you're willin' to hunt for it 'n' Lord knows 't if this game keeps up much longer I 'll get so used to huntin' ...
— Susan Clegg and Her Friend Mrs. Lathrop • Anne Warner

... turned pale with affright at these ominous words, and stood looking at each other and asking what they could mean. ...
— The Golden Dog - Le Chien d'Or • William Kirby

... object to allowing Lulu to drop her studies again just as she has made a fresh and fair start with them," said the captain; "so of course she will have to stay at home. Grace also, I think, as there would be the same objection to her absence from home—as regards the lessons I mean." ...
— Elsie's Vacation and After Events • Martha Finley

... words "nor any Crambo" mean that the sentiment expressed by Solomon is a truth which cannot be too often repeated. Crabbe says, "Crambo is a play, in rhyming, in which he that repeats a word that was said before forfeits something." In all the MSS. and editions of the Religio Medici, 1642, the ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 81, May 17, 1851 • Various

... equal share in the father's property with the children of the regular wife. Polyandry is said to be practised, but the fact is not mentioned by Mr. Gurdon; in any case it can prevail only among the poorer sort, with whom, too, it would often seem to mean rather facility of divorce than the simultaneous admission ...
— The Position of Woman in Primitive Society - A Study of the Matriarchy • C. Gasquoine Hartley

... activity of a complete soul, and not shallow titillations, or surface pleasures, such as the palate knows. Led by poetry, the intellect so sees truth that it glows with it, and the will is stirred to deeds of heroism. For there is hardly any fact so mean, but that when intensified by emotion, it grows poetic; as there is hardly any man so unimaginative, but that when struck with a great sorrow, or moved by a great passion, he is endowed for a moment with the poet's speech. A poetic fact, one may almost ...
— Browning as a Philosophical and Religious Teacher • Henry Jones

... the crude facts as Dr. Butts found them in books or gathered them from his own experience. He soon discovered that the story had got about the village that Maurice Kirkwood was the victim of an "antipathy," whatever that word might mean in the vocabulary of the people of the place. If he suspected the channel through which it had reached the little community, and, spreading from that centre, the country round, he did not see fit to make out of his suspicions a domestic casus belli. ...
— A Mortal Antipathy • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... of being poisoned, and stuck on a stamp (after tedious examination of it to see whether or not it had been used before, or had only been mauled in your vest pocket), the offence would have been mortal, and you would have been pronounced mean and unfit ...
— Around The Tea-Table • T. De Witt Talmage

... the captain heartily; "all one to me. I am not exactly sure of the place you mean; but just you stay ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 13 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... great majority of individuals, mean something outward, in space and time; what we have, and, for the time hold, rather than what we are. The average idea of enjoyment is something altogether superficial and transient. It is found, or supposed to be found, in variety of sensations, emotions ...
— The New Avatar and The Destiny of the Soul - The Findings of Natural Science Reduced to Practical Studies - in Psychology • Jirah D. Buck

... In the very next paragraph, a distinction is drawn between the rights of two different classes of men, the coloni and conditionarii, the latter being explained by the words of the charter itself, to mean free men ("liberos homines.") The Duke assigns to the abbey, the towns themselves, together with their inhabitants, mills, waters, meadows, pastures, and woods; and also with all the revenues ...
— Architectural Antiquities of Normandy • John Sell Cotman

... been read in your presence. I presume you all heard it, and that there can be no mistake as to its purport. All that remains now is to act upon it. I shall claim the usual privilege of twelve months before administering upon the estate or paying the legacies. In the mean time, I shall assume the charge of my ward's person, and convey her to my own residence, known as the Hidden House. Mrs. Rocke," he said, turning toward the latter, "your presence and that of your young charge is no longer required here. Be so good as to prepare Miss ...
— Capitola the Madcap • Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... a keg of powder within those walls," he said. "If we only had it here it might mean the ...
— Historic Tales, Vol. 1 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... Gladstonian tradition, it is a shock to be told by those who are in immediate contact with young men that for the rising generation he is only, or scarcely, a name. For my own part, I say advisedly that he was the finest specimen of God's handiwork that I have ever seen; and by this I mean that he combined strength of body, strength of intellect, and spiritual attainments, in a harmony which I have never known equalled. To him it was said when he lay dying, "You have so lived and wrought that you have kept ...
— Prime Ministers and Some Others - A Book of Reminiscences • George W. E. Russell

... more: that as she could discern the presumption of many, in curiously canvassing the Scriptures, and starting innovations, she would no longer endure this licentiousness; but meant to guide her people by God's rule in the just mean between the corruptions of Rome and the errors of modern sectaries: and that as the Romanists were the inveterate enemies of her person, so the other innovators were dangerous to all kingly government; and, under color of preaching the word of God, presumed to exercise their ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part D. - From Elizabeth to James I. • David Hume

... explain it all to me at the very first?" I exclaimed, all tremulous. "When you met me at Quebec, I mean—why didn't you tell me then? Did you and Elsie come there on purpose ...
— Recalled to Life • Grant Allen

... your husband never writes you any news. I suppose you mean military news, for I have written you a great deal about your sposo and how much he loves you. What do you want with military news? Don't you know that it is unmilitary and unlike an officer to write news respecting ...
— Stonewall Jackson And The American Civil War • G. F. R. Henderson

... I mean to say," interposed Elizabeth, "that this conspiracy is brought to a bloodless conclusion, and that, from this hour, there is but one woman in this great Russian realm who has any claim to the title of empress, and that woman is ...
— The Daughter of an Empress • Louise Muhlbach

... at length reached the close of the 17th century; but my limited knowledge of bibliographical literature supplies me with the recollection of two names which you have passed over: I mean, THOMAS BLOUNT and ANTONY-A-WOOD. There is surely something in these authors relating to editions of ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... deep hole somewhere if he expects to hide successfully. It's a hundred-to-one shot that father will never see his rug again. He probably realizes that, and he will be relentless. He'll coal at Manila and turn back. He'll double or triple the new crew's wages. Money will mean nothing if he starts after Cunningham. Of course I'll be out of the ...
— The Pagan Madonna • Harold MacGrath

... to my father for ten whole minutes yesterday; he wanted to avoid me when he saw me, but I caught him in a corner. He took advantage of the opportunity to try to prevent me from going to see Pigott, but I would not listen to him, so he gave it up. What did he mean by that? Why did he send her away? What does it all mean? Oh! Arthur, when will you come back, Arthur?" and, to Mr. Fraser's infinite distress, she burst ...
— Dawn • H. Rider Haggard

... in the mean time been occupying much of his leisure with inventions, more particularly in connection with the weaving of cotton and the preparation of the staple for spinning. One of his earliest contrivances was an embroidering-machine, in which twenty needles were employed, working ...
— Self Help • Samuel Smiles

... doubt, of whether the sea lies within the land or not, probably refers to the numerous inlets or fiords along the whole coast of Norway and Finmark, and may mean, that he did not examine whether the land might not be parcelled ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 1 • Robert Kerr

... I have no class, and there will be none ready till about the month of May, when there will be a class in "surveying." Even if you do not elect a superintendent in the mean time, Major Smith could easily teach this class, as he is very familiar with the subject-matter: Indeed, I think you will do well to leave the subject of a new superintendent until ...
— Memoirs of Three Civil War Generals, Complete • U. S. Grant, W. T. Sherman, P. H. Sheridan

... city was shaken by earthquakes, and a yawning chasm opened in the forum. The soothsayers declared that the gulf could never be filled up except by throwing into it that which Rome held most valuable. The tale runs that, when every one was doubting what the gods could mean, a noble youth named M. Curtius came forward, and, declaring that Rome possessed nothing so valuable as her brave citizens, mounted his steed and leaped into the abyss in full armor, whereupon the earth closed over him. This event is assigned ...
— A Smaller History of Rome • William Smith and Eugene Lawrence

... found, and stony soils, are unfit for coffee. But I do not mean by "stony soils" land on which many stones are lying, for on that very account it may be most suitable; but I mean land which shows a pebbly stratum just below the surface, or such as is of a porous, stony nature. In the choice of situation ...
— The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom • P. L. Simmonds

... mean this: What is the building of this church to you? Are you so mightily interested in architecture, in clerical usefulness, in the ...
— The Servant in the House • Charles Rann Kennedy

... lies below that latitude. Computing the distance between the thirty-first and forty-fifth degrees, it amounts to nine hundred and seventy-three common miles; computing it from thirty-one to forty-two degrees, to seven hundred and sixty-four miles and a half. Taking the mean for the distance, the amount will be eight hundred and sixty-eight miles and three-fourths. The mean distance from the Atlantic to the Mississippi does not probably exceed seven hundred and fifty miles. On a comparison of ...
— The Federalist Papers • Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison

... slowly and turned his little beady, black eyes on Toddles, then he turned with a wink to the others, and for the first time in two years offered payment. He fished into his pocket and handed Toddles a twenty-dollar bill—there always was a mean streak in Hawkeye, more or less of a bully, none too well liked, and whose name on the pay roll, ...
— The Boy Scouts Book of Campfire Stories • Various

... you mean those large red clay things from England, or the Chinese figures that Mr. Wu had at ...
— St. Nicholas, Vol. 5, No. 2, December, 1877 • Various

... said Mr. Clarkson, "it has come to my knowledge that the person whose real name is Mrs. James, and who is charged with the felonious crime of bigamy, is now some hundreds of miles beyond your jurisdiction, and does not mean to appear. Accordingly, on behalf of the highly respectable Miss Heald, I now ask that the recognizances be forfeited. My client has been actuated all through by none but the purest motives, her one object being to remove the only son of a beloved brother from a marriage ...
— The Magnificent Montez - From Courtesan to Convert • Horace Wyndham

... how you mean, dear," she said, "I used to think like that myself. No, I don't know exactly the very words Mr. Sawyer said to himself, but, judging from my knowledge of the whole story, I put myself, as it were, ...
— Grandmother Dear - A Book for Boys and Girls • Mrs. Molesworth

... house for some time; for there will be people who will side with the Chandours against us. In our position, and in a small town, absence is the only way of softening down bad feeling. But I shall either succeed, and never see Angouleme again, or I shall not succeed, and then I mean to wait in Paris until the time comes when I can spend my summers at the Escarbas and the winters in Paris. It is the only life for a woman of quality, and I have waited too long before entering upon it. The one day will be enough for our preparations; ...
— Lost Illusions • Honore De Balzac

... occupancy of the village for several centuries, although, of course, the strict confines of these burial places may not have been determined by our excavations. The comparatively great depth at which some of the human remains were found does not necessarily mean great antiquity, for the drifting sands of the region may cover or uncover the soil or rocks in a very short time, and the depth at which an object is found below the surface is a very uncertain medium for estimating the ...
— Archeological Expedition to Arizona in 1895 • Jesse Walter Fewkes

... could!" thought Bunny to himself. "This rolling downhill isn't any fun. I didn't really mean to do it, but I couldn't help it. I wanted to run or slide down. There are ...
— Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Big Woods • Laura Lee Hope

... short space such prosperous successe, that he opened the way for king Henry the second to the speedy subjection of all that warlike nation to this crowne of England? The like conquest of Brasilia, and annexing the same to the kingdome of Portugall was first begun by mean and priuate men, as Don Antonio de Castillio, Ambassadour here for that realme and by office keeper of all the records and monuments of their discoueries, assured me in this citie in the yere 1581. (M356) Now if the greatnes of the maine of Virginia, and the large extension thereof, ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of - the English Nation. Vol. XIII. America. Part II. • Richard Hakluyt

... not give up Nelchen though all Europe depended upon it. I am a coward, perhaps; but I have my chance of happiness, and I mean to take it. So Cousin Otto is welcome to the duchy. ...
— Gallantry - Dizain des Fetes Galantes • James Branch Cabell

... What do'st thou thinke? Iago. Thinke, my Lord? Oth. Thinke, my Lord? Alas, thou ecchos't me; As if there were some Monster in thy thought Too hideous to be shewne. Thou dost mean somthing: I heard thee say euen now, thou lik'st not that, When Cassio left my wife. What didd'st not like? And when I told thee, he was of my Counsaile, Of my whole course of wooing; thou cried'st, Indeede? And ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... hardly to be wondered at, that they are not interested, when the thunder is all that is shown them. They are told they ought "to quake and tremble," and if they do not, they "show by their actions that they mean to go to hell." ...
— The American Missionary, October, 1890, Vol. XLIV., No. 10 • Various

... my plighted lord? If guilt pollute him, as unless mine ear Deceive me in the purport of thy word, Thou mean'st t' imply—kind spirit ...
— Zophiel - A Poem • Maria Gowen Brooks

... want with him? I mean to force him to take me back to my rightful place, that's what I ...
— Up in Ardmuirland • Michael Barrett

... by the morning's Times that the mayor is appointing a watch-dog commission. I guess you all saw it, too. The Department of Water and Power of the City of Los Angeles is going to be badly—and I mean badly—in the red at the ...
— New Apples in the Garden • Kris Ottman Neville

... of such a privilege was, indeed, remarkable, when it is remembered how strict the rules as to mourning were, not only at Court, but all over the country; for so strict are the mourning rules of the country, that the slightest exception to them may mean the loss of one's head. The precaution, however, was taken to bind me to secrecy, on the ground that a bad example of this kind coming from royalty might actually cause a revolutionary outbreak. It was naturally with the greatest pleasure, at my success, and the courtesy shown me, that I went ...
— Corea or Cho-sen • A (Arnold) Henry Savage-Landor

... to be ashamed of yourself, Cheapside. Don't you realize that this bird has come thousands of miles to see me—only to be insulted by your impertinent tongue as soon as she reaches my garden? What do you mean by it?—If she had gone away again before I got back to-night I would never have forgiven ...
— The Voyages of Doctor Dolittle • Hugh Lofting

... depended upon the issue of this appeal to the mechanical genius of England. When the advertisement of the prize for the best locomotive was published, scientific men began more particularly to direct their attention to the new power which was thus struggling into existence. In the mean time public opinion on the subject of railway working remained suspended, and the progress of the undertaking was watched with ...
— Lives of the Engineers - The Locomotive. George and Robert Stephenson • Samuel Smiles

... your life," he declared, "and I mean to do it. At the same time, I cannot forget your crime or my ...
— The Devil's Paw • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... hidden while Farmer Brown's boy was there, and he felt quite sure that Farmer Brown's boy didn't know who had built the dam. But for this reason he might, he just might, try to find out all about it, and that would mean that Paddy would always have ...
— The Adventures of Paddy the Beaver • Thornton W. Burgess

... silly talk!" broke in the student rudely. "A bunch of ignorant peasants like you hear somebody bawling a few catch-words. You don't understand what they mean. You just echo them like a lot of parrots." The crowd laughed. "I'm a Marxian student. And I tell you that this isn't Socialism you are fighting for. It's just plain ...
— Ten Days That Shook the World • John Reed

... utterly unable to answer; then I gasped, "Sister Sarah wrote for me yesterday! What does it mean?" ...
— The House of Martha • Frank R. Stockton

... shows us the meaning of the thing. He generally gives an explanation which is so ridiculously simple that everybody is ashamed that he did not find it out before; and the way such a discoverer is often rewarded is by finding out that some one had made the discovery before him! I do not mean to say that it was so in this particular instance, because the great man who played the part of Columbus and the egg on this occasion had, I believe, always had the full credit which he so well deserves. The discoverer of the key to these problems was a man whose name you know very ...
— Coral and Coral Reefs • Thomas H. Huxley

... moments, I called his attention to what seemed like an unusual hurrying to and fro on the part of the enemy. It was as if they were making ready for some important movement, and, according to my way of thinking, that could only mean an assault, improbable as our officers believed it ...
— The Minute Boys of the Mohawk Valley • James Otis

... records very little in the way of mental activity on the part of the mass of mankind except a series of stampedes from affirmative errors into negative ones and back again. It must therefore be said very precisely and clearly that the bankruptcy of Darwinism does not mean that Nobodaddy was Somebodaddy with 'body, parts, and passions' after all; that the world was made in the year 4004 B.C.; that damnation means a eternity of blazing brimstone; that the Immaculate Conception means that sex is sinful and that Christ was parthenogenetically ...
— Back to Methuselah • George Bernard Shaw

... bottled beer 'nd wine, 'Nd a kag of Burbun whiskey of the run of '59; Upon the walls wuz pictures of hosses 'nd of girls,— Not much on dress, perhaps, but strong on records 'nd on curls! The which had been identified with Casey in the past,— The hosses 'nd the girls, I mean,—and both wuz mighty fast! But all these fine attractions wuz of precious little note By the side of what wuz offered at Casey's ...
— A Little Book of Western Verse • Eugene Field

... them than you might think," she said, with her shy, neat little smile. "I mean by reading; I have read a great deal I have not only read Byron; I have read histories and guidebooks. I know I ...
— Four Meetings • Henry James

... Ada dear. Now, good-bye, and take care of yourself, and don't be nervous. It may mean only that young Japs has twisted his ...
— Beechcroft at Rockstone • Charlotte M. Yonge

... word "visible" in these rules when applied to lights shall mean visible on a dark ...
— Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Volume 8, Section 2 (of 2): Grover Cleveland • Grover Cleveland

... me so as plainly as was proper," she said; "standing there, near the fire, before dinner. He makes himself very agreeable, the great doctor. I don't mean his saying that has anything to do with it. But he says such things with great tact. I had told him I felt ill at my ease, staying here at such a time; it seemed to me so indiscreet—it wasn't as if I could nurse. 'You must remain, you must remain,' he answered; ...
— The Portrait of a Lady - Volume 1 (of 2) • Henry James

... The church is gorgeous; late Renaissance, of great proportions, and full, like so many others, but in a pre-eminent degree, of seventeenth and eighteenth century Romanism. It doesn't impress the imagination, but richly feeds the curiosity, by which I mean one's sense of the curious; suggests no legends, but innumerable anecdotes a la Stendhal. There is a vast dome, filled with a florid concave fresco of tumbling foreshortened angels, and all over the ceilings and cornices a wonderful outlay of dusky gildings and mouldings. ...
— Italian Hours • Henry James

... A. I mean an outward and visible Sign of an inward and spiritual Grace, given unto us, ordained by Christ himself, as a Means whereby we receive the same, and a ...
— The A, B, C. With the Church of England Catechism • Unknown

... as Glacier deserves and to draw freely on its abundant resources of pleasure and inspiration, one must travel the trails and pitch his tent where day's end brings him. But that does not mean that Glacier cannot be seen and enjoyed by those to whom comfortable hotel accommodations are a necessity, or even by those ...
— The Book of the National Parks • Robert Sterling Yard

... heavens! you don't mean to say she's lost!" exclaimed the father, turning, and staring at the nurse ...
— Outpost • J.G. Austin

... of the railroads, is the prevention of competition and the making possible of higher rates and larger dividends. The statement that competition is not an effective regulator of railroads often is misunderstood to mean that it in no way acts on rates. It is true that competition between roads does not prevent discrimination and excessive charges between stations on one line only; but competition usually has acted powerfully at well-recognized "competing ...
— Modern Economic Problems - Economics Vol. II • Frank Albert Fetter

... In the mean time, Oliver opened the great barn doors, and, taking a shovel, he began to clear away the snow from before them. The sky in the east was by this time beginning to be quite bright; and a considerable degree ...
— Jonas on a Farm in Winter • Jacob Abbott

... alone by Marston, but by southern ministers and southern philosophers. The thing was very good- looking, very black;-it had straight features, differing from the common African, and stood very erect. We have said he differed from the common African-we mean, as he is recognised through our prejudices. His forehead was bold and well-developed-his hair short, thick and crispy, eyes keen and piercing, cheeks regularly declining into a well-shaped mouth and chin. Dejected ...
— Our World, or, The Slaveholders Daughter • F. Colburn Adams

... him: wherefore, of accord with Bruno, he betook himself to Florence to Calandrino's wife and said to her, 'Tessa, thou knowest what a beating Calandrino gave thee without cause the day he came back, laden with stones from the Mugnone; wherefore I mean to have thee avenge thyself on him; and if thou do it not, hold me no more for kinsman or for friend. He hath fallen in love with a woman over yonder, and she is lewd enough to go very often closeting herself with him. A little while agone, they appointed each other to foregather together this ...
— The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio • Giovanni Boccaccio

... But then, in the case of so satiric a book, I suppose one is hardly expected to agree or disagree. What I cannot doubt is the literary faculty displayed. "Thou com'st in such a questionable shape!" I feel inclined to say on finishing your book; "shape" morally, I mean; not in ...
— Confessions of a Young Man • George Moore

... And she does not mean either the house at Sciennes or the Kirkpatrick mansion near the Water of Leith. She is thinking of that once open space by the Greyfriars where, to the accompaniment of keen chisel-stroke and dull mallet-thud, once on a day she came ...
— The Dew of Their Youth • S. R. Crockett

... before we see our laws transgressed." So they threw themselves down upon their faces, and stretched out their throats, and said they were ready to be slain; and this they did for forty days together, and in the mean time left off the tilling of their ground, and that while the season of the year required them to sow it. [31] Thus they continued firm in their resolution, and proposed to themselves to die willingly, rather than to see the ...
— The Antiquities of the Jews • Flavius Josephus

... say'—and there she stops for coughin, 'That dratted copper flue has took to smokin very often, But please the pigs,'—for that's her way of swearing in a passion, 'I'll blow it up, and not be set a coughin in this fashion!' Well down she takes my master's horn—I mean his horn for loading. And empties every grain alive for to set the flue exploding. 'Lawk, Mrs. Round?' says I, and stares, 'that quantum is unproper, I'm sartin sure it can't not take a pound to sky a copper; You'll powder both ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 14, - Issue 403, December 5, 1829 • Various

... thoughtfully. "They're not only violent themselves, but they expect violence from others. I see what you mean. You'll ...
— Millennium • Everett B. Cole

... Lord, I mean," faltered the Count. "The indignity was of his own seeking; he sat down in my chair, where he had no right to place himself, and I—I—persuaded him ...
— The Strong Arm • Robert Barr

... playlet is nothing if it is not action, so a comedy playlet is nothing if its comedy does not develop from situations. By "action," as the word is used here, I mean that the story of the playlet is told by the movements of its characters. In real life, you know, comedy and tragedy do not come from what persons say they are going to do—but from what they actually do. Therefore, the merry jests that one character perpetrates ...
— Writing for Vaudeville • Brett Page

... determine, on the whole, what objects shall mean to us, and how we shall behave toward them. We cannot say, however, that a perception or an object is ever wholly without meaning to us. The flame to which the child stretches out its hand means, even before he has any experience of it, "something ...
— Introduction to the Science of Sociology • Robert E. Park

... you mean?" The colonel stared at his junior a moment; then, taking him by the arm, ...
— A Nest of Spies • Pierre Souvestre

... show you how easy it is to do.' So she took an old ram and killed him, and put him in a cauldron with magic herbs; and whispered her spells over him, and he leapt out again a young lamb. So that 'Medeia's cauldron' is a proverb still, by which we mean times of war and change, when the world has become old and feeble, and grows young again through ...
— The Heroes • Charles Kingsley

... made to mean something allied to magnetism, some poorly explained phenomena become easily understood. But what are the circumstances affording proof of the identity of these forces? First, gravitation acts upon all kinds of ...
— New and Original Theories of the Great Physical Forces • Henry Raymond Rogers

... Chrysostom, in eight large folio volumes, was published at Eton, 1610-12. Savile was an imperious scholar, but when Clarendon says that Hales 'had borne all the labour' of this great edition, he can only mean that Hales had given his assistance at all stages of its production. In Brodrick's Memorials of Merton College, p. 70, it is stated that Hales was voted an allowance for the help he had given. Savile was ...
— Characters from 17th Century Histories and Chronicles • Various

... be what everybody had long before talked about, the postponement of the Committee. This was done by the Duke in a very bad speech, so bad that Fitzgerald and others were obliged to try and do away its effect by making out that he did not mean what he said. On the division the Government had greater numbers than usual. It then remained to be seen what Lord John Russell would do, and it was reported that he meant to retaliate by postponing the Tithe Bill, but he did no such thing. He came down and ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. III • Charles C. F. Greville

... ii. 8, with the notes of Wetstein and Kypke. Although [Greek: agrauloi] may simply mean "dwelling in the fields," as in Apollon. Rh. iv. 317, it is better to follow the interpretation of Hesychius: [Greek: Oi en ayrois dianuktereyontes]. But cf. Alberti, t.i. ...
— The Iliad of Homer (1873) • Homer

... not been idle; but had writ from time to time, how he, by sly, mean degrees, exposed his wicked views, but somebody stole my letter, and I know not what is become of it. I am watched very narrowly; and he says to Mrs. Jervis, the housekeeper, "This girl is always scribbling; I think she may be better employed." And yet ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol VII • Various

... in the coveted seat beside her on the couch, and the fire burned low and red. They had ceased to talk of games and dances. They were talking of each other, those intimate nothings that mean a breaking down of distance and ...
— The Witness • Grace Livingston Hill Lutz

... mean 'that'; but tena implies the idea of nearness, 'that near you,' tera the idea of distance, 'that (or there) away yonder.' Hence, while Tena koe is a welcome, Tera koe would be ...
— A Dictionary of Austral English • Edward Morris

... thus spurned to mother a brood, the little girl sought the biggest brother. "Oh, no wonder the mean thing crows," she said to him, as ...
— The Biography of a Prairie Girl • Eleanor Gates

... Master Jesus Christ in saying: Poenitentiam agite! meant that the whole life of the faithful should be repentance. And these words cannot refer to penance—that is, confession and satisfaction." The Latin phrase "poenitentiam agere" has a double meaning: it may mean "repent" and "do penance." Our Lord used the phrase in the first, the indulgence-sellers in the second sense. Since the people had been raised in the belief that the Church had the authority from God to impose church fines on them ...
— Luther Examined and Reexamined - A Review of Catholic Criticism and a Plea for Revaluation • W. H. T. Dau

... one." With these words he nodded and went out. The brilliant sunlight in the courtyard made him wink faster than ever. Had any of his old enemies been with him, they would have whispered within themselves, "If you mean to come back at all, Citizen Lomaque, it will ...
— After Dark • Wilkie Collins

... Roger replied. "I took that sight six times in a half hour and got a mean average on all of them that came out within a few miles of each other. If I'm wrong, I'm very wrong, but if I'm right, we're within three to five miles of the position I ...
— Stand by for Mars! • Carey Rockwell

... that is a vast ransom still such as is never paid but for lords of the highest degree. Four and twenty thousand sequins!" And again he laughed aloud. "It is easily spoken, children, but you cannot even guess what it would mean. Believe me when I tell you that many a well-to-do merchant in Nuremberg, who is at the head of a fine trade, would be at his wits' end if he were desired to pay down half of your four and twenty thousand sequins in ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... I think you are a mean coward to set us afloat in a hostile country without giving us our arms,” said Simpson, who had once before asked for the weapons, and had had ...
— The Great Salt Lake Trail • Colonel Henry Inman

... was his intellect, puzzled beyond description, demanding, Why, why, why? Why was it allowed? How was it conceivable that God did not intervene, and that the Father of men could permit His dear world to be so ranged against Him? What did He mean to do? Was this eternal silence never to be broken? It was very well for those that had the Faith, but what of the countless millions who were settling down in contented blasphemy? Were these not, too, His children ...
— Lord of the World • Robert Hugh Benson

... It seemed also good that as St. John the Apostle says, "If ye shall say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves and the truth is not in us"; whosoever thinks that this should be so understood as to mean that out of humility we ought to say that we have sin, and not because it is really so, let him be anathema. For the Apostle goes on to add, "But if we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive ...
— A Source Book for Ancient Church History • Joseph Cullen Ayer, Jr., Ph.D.

... unkind word to me since I was born over again, and it was mean in me to say anything which would cut you to the quick. I did not know what I was saying, and I ...
— Asiatic Breezes - Students on The Wing • Oliver Optic

... it is said. And melting hardened hearts, and laying hand in hand Establish peace upon the reconciled earth. I do not know the doctrine well, but dimly have I In my better moments guessed what it may mean,— And every human heart at times divines as well. I know the time will come when it will lightly wave Its white dove-pinions over all our northern hills; But that day come, the North will be no more to us; The oaks will sigh ...
— Fridthjof's Saga • Esaias Tegner

... "They mean something!" said Emlyn to herself, "and I'll know what it is. They have no right to keep me out of the plot; I am not like stupid little Rusha! I have been in a siege, and four battles, besides skirmishes! I'll watch till they think I'm asleep, if I pull all the hulls out of my bed! ...
— Under the Storm - Steadfast's Charge • Charlotte M. Yonge

... my dagger, ere I taste of his discipline," said the page, giving way to his restrained passion. "Lady, I have been too long the vassal of a pantoufle, and the slave of a silver whistle. You must henceforth find some other to answer your call; and let him be of birth and spirit mean enough to brook the scorn of your menials, and to call a church ...
— The Abbot • Sir Walter Scott



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