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Mistake   Listen
verb
Mistake  v. t.  (past mistook; past part. mistaken; pres. part. mistaking)  
1.
To take or choose wrongly. (Obs. or R.)
2.
To take in a wrong sense; to misunderstand misapprehend, or misconceive; as, to mistake a remark; to mistake one's meaning. "My father's purposes have been mistook."
3.
To substitute in thought or perception; as, to mistake one person for another. "A man may mistake the love of virtue for the practice of it."
4.
To have a wrong idea of in respect of character, qualities, etc.; to misjudge. "Mistake me not so much, To think my poverty is treacherous."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Mistake" Quotes from Famous Books



... there be any mistake about that face; besides, didn't you notice how she blushed ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII. No. 3. March 1848 • Various

... argument's sake, that General Cerale misunderstood the orders he had received, and that, by precipitating his movement, he dragged into the same mistake the whole of Durando's corps—assuming, I say, this to be the right version, you can easily explain the fact that neither of the two contending parties are as yet in a position clearly to describe the action of the 24th. Why did neither the ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... the words that he thought he should like to hear. But now they grated. They recalled the mistake he had lived, the anachronism of his life. They were scorpions. They stung like the needle in an ulcer. He turned sharply, in tearful reproach. But a sword flashed, the volley came, and the three men fell, as under a crushing rock, one against the wall; his head broken over upon his breast. ...
— The Missourian • Eugene P. (Eugene Percy) Lyle

... other birds' nests; but I have lately heard from Dr. Merrill, of Iowa, that he once found in Illinois a young cuckoo, together with a young jay in the nest of a blue jay (Garrulus cristatus); and as both were nearly full feathered, there could be no mistake in their identification. I could also give several instances of various birds which have been known occasionally to lay their eggs in other birds' nests. Now let us suppose that the ancient progenitor of our European cuckoo ...
— On the Origin of Species - 6th Edition • Charles Darwin

... North-west of China, both within and without the Wall. Skirting the northern frontier of China they at last reached the presence of the Kaan, who was at his usual summer retreat at Kai-ping fu, near the base of the Khingan Mountains, and nearly 100 miles north of the Great Wall at Kalgan. If there be no mistake in the time (three years and a half) ascribed to this journey in all the existing texts, the travellers did not reach the Court ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... certainly, if you wish it. But I think it is a great mistake. She really ought to have considered ...
— In The Far North - 1901 • Louis Becke

... "A mistake cannot be serious," said the Prince to himself, at the end of the review. "I will proceed upon the theory that the young ...
— The Prince of India - Or - Why Constantinople Fell - Volume 1 • Lew. Wallace

... "No mistake about that sort of thing," cried Bob, as he stumbled along after his chum. "There it comes again, Frank. I guess I'd better be picking out a good way up the wall somewhere, for it looks like ...
— The Saddle Boys of the Rockies - Lost on Thunder Mountain • James Carson

... "Some mistake!" said the Grumpy Saint. "I don't know what you are talking about, and I don't like ...
— The Silver Crown - Another Book of Fables • Laura E. Richards

... vs. Hunter's Lessee, * which was decided in February, 1816, Story, speaking for the Court, undertook to answer Roane. Roane's major premise he met with flat denial: "It is a mistake," he asserts, "that the Constitution was not designed to operate upon States in their corporate capacities. It is crowded with provisions which restrain or annul the sovereignty of the States in some of the highest branches of their ...
— John Marshall and the Constitution - A Chronicle of the Supreme Court, Volume 16 In The - Chronicles Of America Series • Edward S. Corwin

... heard the boys talking. Nothing very much, but some girls ran away, not scouts, mill girls, mill detectives on their trail, and the Girl Scouts went on a hike and lassoed some poor guy by mistake. Oh, you know a lot of stuff like that, everybody hears and no one knows the real sense of. Only I thought Molly, just taking up with the Flosston work, ought to keep both eyes open, and wear good sensible shoes. Night, Mom!" and he kissed ...
— The Girl Scout Pioneers - or Winning the First B. C. • Lillian C Garis

... gradually sinking, and only distressed at the thought of his being left; he bearing up in silent resignation and prayer till, on the 22nd of March, a mistake in using a cold instead of a hot bath brought on a shock, and in four days more, on Maundy-Thursday the 29th of March 1866, the voice of Hursley and Otterbourne was, "Thy master is taken from thy head to-day." It was ...
— John Keble's Parishes • Charlotte M Yonge

... seen both lynx and lion climb down out of a tree, but nothing except a squirrel could ever have beaten Takahashi. The spruce was fully one hundred and fifty feet high; and unless I made a great mistake the Jap descended in two minutes. He grinned ...
— Tales of lonely trails • Zane Grey

... clasping her hands and looking absently out the window, "I presume they want to make quite sure. Mrs. Withey's case is coming up again the first of the week, you know, and there must be no mistake." ...
— A Williams Anthology - A Collection of the Verse and Prose of Williams College, 1798-1910 • Compiled by Edwin Partridge Lehman and Julian Park

... point. It looks all right, so far. The local police say that the thief or thieves, whoever they were, apparently gained access by breaking a back window. That's mistake number one. Tell Mr. ...
— The Poisoned Pen • Arthur B. Reeve

... terrified by the propinquity of enemies who were entirely unknown to them. Sticklebacks will swim composedly among a number of voracious pike, knowing, as they do, that the pike will not touch them. For if a pike once by mistake swallows a stickleback, the stickleback will stick in its throat by reason of the spine it carries upon its back, and the pike must starve to death without being able to transmit his painful experience to his descendants. In some countries there are people who by choice eat dog's flesh; ...
— Unconscious Memory • Samuel Butler

... The old mistake of construing [Greek: antioosan] "sharing," which still clings to the translations, is exploded by Buttm. Lex. p. 144. Eust. and Heysch. both give [Greek: eutrepizonsan] as one of the interpretations; and that ...
— The Iliad of Homer (1873) • Homer

... attached themselves the stronger to the cause, and fell close in with the rear of the former; their partition was a mere point. Numbers of the moderate men, whose chief fault, at that time, arose from entertaining a better opinion of Britain than she deserved, convinced now of their mistake, gave her up, and publicly declared themselves good Whigs. While the Tories, seeing it was no longer a laughing matter, either sank into silent obscurity, or contented themselves with coming forth and abusing General Gage: not a single ...
— The Writings Of Thomas Paine, Complete - With Index to Volumes I - IV • Thomas Paine

... for long jumps." As a final warning Smith said: "Now, don't make no mistake in cuttin' out, for we've picked the top horses of the range. And remember, once you get 'em strung out, haze 'em along—for there'll be hell a-poppin' on the reservation ...
— 'Me-Smith' • Caroline Lockhart

... in my heart than a resigned toleration for any individual of my kind, I have lived till now alone in a house that even in this steaming climate could be considered as too big for one man. I have had him to live with me for some time past. It seems I haven't made a mistake." It seemed to me on reading this letter that my friend had found in his heart more than tolerance for Jim—that there were the beginnings of active liking. Of course he stated his grounds in a ...
— Lord Jim • Joseph Conrad

... of another." And a silence fell, till old Heythorp added: "You're getting a thousand a year out of my fees. Mistake to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs. I'll make it twelve hundred. If you force me to resign my directorships by bankruptcy, you won't get a ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... did he come from? I figured maybe somebody dropped something by mistake—a safe or something. Because there wasn't ...
— The Impossibles • Gordon Randall Garrett

... was the great mistake. I begin to see. Heaven, one might say, gave you to me. I felt that I must improve on the gift of Heaven before I accepted you. There was my fault. For that I must pay the great penalty. Kismet! And now, what ...
— Ronicky Doone • Max Brand

... Britain, Bougainville mistook for a deep gulph or bay, and which of course he had the utmost difficulty to get clear of, with an unfavourable wind, very bad weather, and a great south-eastern swell. This mistake seems to have occasioned him more danger and much greater hardships than had yet been experienced. To this imaginary gulph, Bougainville gave the name of Gulph of the Louisiade, and that of Cape Deliverance ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 13 • Robert Kerr

... thieves," said Tom. "Harry, we'll have to show him what we've got in the boat, and then he'll see his mistake." ...
— Harper's Young People, July 27, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... active poison; many persons have fallen victims to its virulence, by having swallowed it in mistake for Epsom salt, which it resembles in appearance. In all probability, this would not prove to be the only vegetable acid capable of acting as a poison. Chalk finely powdered, and diffused in water, is the proper antidote to the poison ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 20. No. 568 - 29 Sept 1832 • Various

... incapable of reasoning. All men are curious, inquisitive; their curiosity spurs them on to inquiry, and their imagination busies itself to clothe with mystery every thing the fancy conjures up as important to happiness. The vulgar mistake even what they have the means of knowing, or, which is the same thing, what they are least practised in they are dazzled with; they proclaim it, accordingly, marvellous, prodigious, extraordinary; it is a phenomenon. They neither admire nor respect much what ...
— Letters to Eugenia - or, a Preservative Against Religious Prejudices • Baron d'Holbach

... the old block," he growled, "and no mistake! Off with you, then; and may God keep ...
— Story Hour Readings: Seventh Year • E.C. Hartwell

... right, the litigant adversely affected is not deprived of any liberty or property without due process of law.[1002] Also, whenever a wrong judgment is rendered, property is taken when it should not have been; yet whatever the ground may be, if the mistake is not so gross as to be impossible in a rational administration of justice, it is no more than the imperfection of man, not a denial of constitutional rights.[1003] In conclusion, the decision of a State court upon a question of local law, however wrong, is not an infraction of ...
— The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation • Edward Corwin

... It is a mistake to confound the irresistible man with the fool. Neither is he stupid. Very often he is a man of no small amount of brain. He is, of course, always conceited, and generally, though not always, handsome. I am not ...
— From a Girl's Point of View • Lilian Bell

... what to make of Boyd, for the discovery of our mistake seemed to produce no impression on him. He stood at the edge of the woods, gazing vacantly across the little clearing where the Indian houses straggled on either side of ...
— The Hidden Children • Robert W. Chambers

... absence my officers appear to have made a small mistake. But I hope your Excellency may not be disappointed after all. I have never set eyes on either of these men before, but if that naked man be the Dustman I will put up a hundred pounds upon him, here and now; or on the other if that runs counter ...
— Merry-Garden and Other Stories • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... Dumoulin. "You must have made a mistake. Corporal Vinson was arrested yesterday at the Saint Lazare station: he was brought here and was registered for cell 26; besides, I was immediately informed of this arrest ...
— A Nest of Spies • Pierre Souvestre

... creature blind from birth, once said to his Mother: "I am sure than I can see, Mother!" In the desire to prove to him his mistake, his Mother placed before him a few grains of frankincense, and asked, "What is it?" The young Mole said, "It is a pebble." His Mother exclaimed: "My son, I am afraid that you are not only blind, but that you have lost your sense ...
— Aesop's Fables • Aesop

... mistake of forgetting that table decoration includes all china, glass, silver and linen used in ...
— The Art of Interior Decoration • Grace Wood

... often let his temper get the better of his prudence, but he could not resist saying mildly: "Kingship is like the musk-bag, friend, that was broken at the royal child's birth. It diffuses its perfume over the habitable world, and none can mistake it." ...
— The Adventures of Akbar • Flora Annie Steel

... in those secret negotiations with Parma the Queen was disposed to sacrifice the religious interests of the Netherlands. In this they were mistaken. But they had reason for their mistake, because the negotiator De Loo, had expressly said, that, in her overtures to Farnese, she had abandoned that point altogether. If this had been so, it would have simply been a consent on the part of Elizabeth, that the Catholic religion and the inquisition ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... inclement plain, like a great stork's nest around the romantic red steeple of its cathedral, Duke Carl became fairly captive to the Middle Age. Tarrying there week after week he worked hard, but (without a ray of light from others) in one long mistake, at the chronology and history of the coloured windows. Antiquity's very self seemed expressed there, on the visionary images of king or patriarch, in the deeply incised marks of character, the hoary hair, the massive proportions, telling ...
— Imaginary Portraits • Walter Pater

... the train by mistake, thinking it was my station, and before I discovered it the train had gone and left me," Margaret ...
— A Voice in the Wilderness • Grace Livingston Hill

... god since time out of mind, and an omnipotent priesthood, dominating a docile people, stood about the throne. The Assyrian conquerors had stiffened their backs in Egypt to save affronting the gods of their fatherland; but the Ptolemies, like the Persians, made no such mistake, and had three centuries of secure rule for their reward. The knowledge that what the East demanded could be provided easily and safely even by Macedonians in the Nile valley alone was doubtless present ...
— The Ancient East • D. G. Hogarth

... read the sign. "Hotel du Vesuve." It was the establishment he had been advised to stop at while in Naples. He compared the sign with a card which he drew from his pocket, and knew that he had made no mistake. ...
— Aunt Jane's Nieces Abroad • Edith Van Dyne

... learning; that no sooner did he discover the heretical nature of their teachings than he removed them from the posts to which they had been assigned; and that he spent the residue of his life in the vain endeavor to retrieve the fatal consequences of his mistake.[165] But this view is confirmed by nothing in the prelate's extant correspondence. Everywhere there is evidence that until his courage broke down, Briconnet was in full accord with the reformers. His first step may possibly have been justified at the bar of conscience by the plausible ...
— The Rise of the Hugenots, Vol. 1 (of 2) • Henry Martyn Baird

... 'You mistake me, sir,' said Emily. 'Allow me to thank you for the interest you express in my welfare, and to decide by my own choice. I shall remain under the protection of ...
— The Mysteries of Udolpho • Ann Radcliffe

... afford, should not be wanting to the people. In conjunction with Richard Dalton Williams—"Shamrock" of the Nation—he established the Irish Tribune, the first number of which saw the light on the 10th of June, 1848. There could be no mistake about the objects of the Tribune, or the motives of its founders in establishing it. The British government could ill afford to endure the attacks on their exactions and usurpations thundered forth weekly in its articles. Its career was cut short by the mailed hand of authority ...
— Speeches from the Dock, Part I • Various

... this, I ventured to speak too freely; and during his absence calumniated him to the Donna Sophia, hoping by these means to regain my place in her affections; but I made a sad mistake: for not only were my services dispensed with for the future, but, as I afterwards discovered, she stated to her cousin the grounds upon which ...
— The Pacha of Many Tales • Frederick Marryat

... mistake my words, Monsieur l'Abbe" (yawning). "I mean—what cursed chocolate!—that I was dying for want of excitement. Not that I cared for dying; no, ...
— Catherine: A Story • William Makepeace Thackeray

... try it! You needn't buy it— The last New Patent—and nothing comes nigh it For affording the Deaf, at a little expense, The sense of hearing, and hearing of sense! A Real Blessing—and no mistake, Invented for poor Humanity's sake; For what can be a greater privation Than playing Dummy to all creation, And only looking at conversation— Great Philosophers talking like Platos, And Members of Parliament moral as Catos, And your ears as dull as waxy potatoes! Not to name the mischievous ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... offer at the bar of God, favoured as you have been with the benefits of a refined education, and through a long life with the gospel of love, should you, when arraigned there, find that you have, all your life long, laboured under a great mistake in regard to slavery, and that in this mistake you had died, and only lifted up your eyes in the light of eternity to be corrected, when it was too late to be corrected in any ...
— The Fugitive Blacksmith - or, Events in the History of James W. C. Pennington • James W. C. Pennington

... first cases," she said, "was a surgical operation. I was very young at the time, and I made rather an awkward mistake—I don't mean a professional mistake—but a mistake nevertheless that I ought to have had more sense ...
— Novel Notes • Jerome K. Jerome

... shilling a word. When the whole thing was over, Mrs Chaucer Munro's bevy, lying about on the benches in fatigue before they went away, declared that, as far as they were concerned, the thing was a mistake. The expenditure in gloves and muslin had been considerable, and the returns to them had been very small. It is not only that men will not flirt with draggled girls, but they will carry away with them unfortunate remembrances of what they have seen and ...
— Miss Mackenzie • Anthony Trollope

... young couple from Chicago, who decide to go to London, travelling as brother and sister. Their difficulties commence in New York and become greatly exaggerated when they are shipwrecked in mid-ocean. The hero finds himself stranded on the island of Nedra with another girl, whom he has rescued by mistake. The story gives an account of their finding some of the other passengers, and the circumstances which resulted from the ...
— The Coast of Chance • Esther Chamberlain

... dey's a mistake about it somers—dey mos' sholy is. I's religious myself, en I knows plenty religious people, but I hain't run across none ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... determination, it was an error on the part of the States, before becoming thoroughly acquainted with the man's character, to confer upon Leicester the almost boundless authority which they granted on, his first arrival. It was a still graver mistake, on the part of Elizabeth, to give way to such explosions of fury, both against the governor and the States, when informed of the offer and acceptance of that authority. The Earl, elevated by the adulation of others, and by his own vanity, into an almost sovereign attitude, ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... away from me, and presently I saw him admitted at the side entrance. Surely, thought I, there must be some mistake. The public would not "stand ...
— The Trail of '98 - A Northland Romance • Robert W. Service

... have reached us, that I could wish there were some warrant for supposing that this tragedy was composed in the age, indeed, and in the school of Sophocles, perhaps by his son Iophon, and that it was by mistake attributed to the father. There is much both in the structure and plan, and in the style of the piece, calculated to excite suspicion; and many critics have remarked that the introductory soliloquy of Dejanira, which is wholly uncalled-for, is very unlike the general character of Sophocles' prologues: ...
— Lectures on Dramatic Art - and Literature • August Wilhelm Schlegel trans John Black

... old," thought Baucis to herself, "and apt to be forgetful. I suppose I must have made a mistake. At all events, the pitcher cannot help being empty now, after filling ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... thought she must have made a mistake, and, letting go the Jackal's leg in a hurry, seized an old root close by, and held on. Whereupon Mr. Jackal jumped nimbly to shore, and ran off with his tail up, calling out, "Have a little patience, my beauty! The ...
— The Junior Classics, Volume 1 • Willam Patten

... because the man had some influence and was ready, as he had said and declared on oath, to assist him in every way possible. Sulla himself, though an adept at discovering the minds of men and inferring correctly in regard to the nature of things, made a thorough mistake in this matter and bequeathed a great war to the State. ...
— Dio's Rome, Volume 1 (of 6) • Cassius Dio

... however, that one person was the author of Confederation, in the sense that the others played subordinate parts and were mere satellites revolving round the sun, is to mistake the nature and history of the movement. It was a long battle against adverse influences. If left unchallenged, they forbade the idea of a Dominion stretching from sea to sea. It was not Macdonald who forced the issue to the front, who bore down stubborn opposition, ...
— The Fathers of Confederation - A Chronicle of the Birth of the Dominion • A. H. U. Colquhoun

... This marks, however, the limit of Louis's success. Instead of pushing his advance rapidly forward against the one important enemy, the king himself, he turned aside to undertake some difficult sieges, and made the further mistake of angering the English barons by showing too great favour to his French companions. Dover castle seemed to the military judgment of the French particularly important as "key of England," and for more than three months Louis gave himself up to the ...
— The History of England From the Norman Conquest - to the Death of John (1066-1216) • George Burton Adams

... first of many such actions. Further and further south the rebels were driven. Kitchener pushed a light railroad across the desert as he advanced, so that he would not suffer from the same mistake which had ended Gordon—getting cut off from ...
— Boys' Book of Famous Soldiers • J. Walker McSpadden

... they were in for an adventure this time, and no mistake. Slowly the dragon raised himself out of the rocks, so that they saw his whole scaly length, like a huge crocodile. Then he began to move along the path away from them. He moved quite slowly now, so there was no difficulty in keeping up with him; but his tail was so ...
— Fairy Tales from the German Forests • Margaret Arndt

... nothing to excuse," Daisy began, in perfectly well-bred tones, "the mistake was natural. Lady Oakley did occupy this room, I believe, but she is now in the north wing, as Mrs. Smithers kindly gave this room to me so that I might be near you; that is, if, as I suppose, you are Lady Jane McPherson?" ...
— Bessie's Fortune - A Novel • Mary J. Holmes

... thought that he had killed Antinous by mistake, and did not perceive that death was hanging over the head of every one of them. But Ulysses glared ...
— The Odyssey • Homer

... said Ferdinand. They now discovered what apprehension had before prevented them from perceiving, that the sounds of pursuit were ceased, and all again was silent. As this could happen only by the mistake of their pursuers, in taking the wrong route, they resolved to preserve their advantage, by concealing the light, which Ferdinand now covered with his cloak. The door was opened, and they passed on; but ...
— A Sicilian Romance • Ann Radcliffe

... crown, and preserved the peace of the nation. Exposed, without revenue, without arms, to the assault of furious, implacable, and bigoted factions, it was never permitted him, but with the most fatal consequences, to commit the smallest mistake; a condition too rigorous to be imposed on the ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part E. - From Charles I. to Cromwell • David Hume

... thou, now, for shame; With Jesus thou hast no secrets: Surely not! I believe Thou art a sinner, without a mistake; The greatest that was in the country By every ...
— Everyman and Other Old Religious Plays, with an Introduction • Anonymous

... It was several typewritten sheets. "Peter Gudge," he said, "I been looking up your record, and I've found out what you did in this case. You'll see when you read how perfectly I've got it. You won't find a single mistake in it." Guffey meant this for wit, but poor Peter was too far gone with terror to have any idea that there was such a thing as a ...
— 100%: The Story of a Patriot • Upton Sinclair

... bird, Mas'r Harry, and no mistake," muttered Tom, as he hastily set my uncle at liberty. "It was that darkness as done it. He slipped away like an eel just as the ...
— The Golden Magnet • George Manville Fenn

... Penelope spoke very quietly. "There's a mistake somewhere. I'm absolutely sure Maryon cares for you—and cares pretty ...
— The Moon out of Reach • Margaret Pedler

... air, to call our coach. The girls were amazed at the command; but I repeated it with more solemnity than before. 'Surely, my dear, you jest,' cried my wife; 'we can walk it perfectly well: we want no coach to carry us now.'—'You mistake, child,' returned I, 'we do want a coach; for if we walk to church in this trim, the very children in the parish will hoot after us.'—'Indeed,' replied my wife, 'I always imagined that my Charles was fond ...
— Goldsmith - English Men of Letters Series • William Black

... travels, and upon which sufficient ridicule has already been thrown in the Edinburgh Geographical Journal, may be considered as an error entirely of the editor's, who, by taking it upon himself, will relieve the burden of the mistake from the traveller, and thus lighten the weighty doubts which might in consequence bear upon the remainder of the details; for the situation of that city, as given by Jomard, is quite inconsistent with the situation it must be in, from ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 17, - Issue 495, June 25, 1831 • Various

... difficult to discover, that a principle of this kind gives greater scope to foreign corruption, as well as to domestic faction, than that which permits the sense of the majority to decide; though the contrary of this has been presumed. The mistake has proceeded from not attending with due care to the mischiefs that may be occasioned by obstructing the progress of government at certain critical seasons. When the concurrence of a large number is required by the Constitution to the doing ...
— The Federalist Papers • Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, and James Madison

... Wilderness." Jackson rode round him, cutting his communications and so forcing him to fight, and Lee beat him soundly at Chancellorsville. The battle was, however, won at a heavy cost to the Confederacy, for towards the end of the day the mistake of a picket caused the death by a Southern bullet of the most brilliant, if not the greatest, of Southern captains. As to what that loss meant we have the testimony of his chief and comrade-in-arms. "If I had had Jackson ...
— A History of the United States • Cecil Chesterton

... My mistake flashed upon me, too, at the instant, and I hastened to explain myself in the simplest manner my ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 80, June, 1864 • Various

... crystallum? Nix est glacie durata per multos annos, ita ut a sole vel igne facile dissolvi non possit. So too in Beaumont and Fletcher's tragedy of Valentinian, a chaste matron is said to be 'cold as crystal never to be thawed again.'] and Pliny, backing up one mistake by another, affirmed that it was only found in regions of extreme cold. The fact is, that the Greek word for crystal originally signified ice; but after a while was also imparted to that diaphanous quartz which has ...
— On the Study of Words • Richard C Trench

... fellow did not mistake your meaning! Cora Haught! I could not have believed that any girl who had any of my blood in her veins could be guilty of such black treachery as to break faith with her betrothed husband, and wish to marry another, just for the snobbish ambition to be a duchess ...
— For Woman's Love • Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth

... test showed an apparent overcharge by the Edison company. Mr. Morgan was exultant, while Mr. Edison was still confident and suggested a continuation of the test. Another month's trial showed somewhat similar results. Mr. Edison was a little disturbed, but insisted that there was a mistake somewhere. He went down to Drexel, Morgan & Company's office to investigate, and, after looking around, asked when the office was cleaned out. He was told it was done at night by the janitor, who was ...
— Edison, His Life and Inventions • Frank Lewis Dyer and Thomas Commerford Martin

... The common mistake in our houses is, that they are designed, as inexperienced persons choose their paper-hangings, to be something of themselves, and not as mere background, as they should be. Thus it is that people seek to beautify their houses by ornamenting them, as a vulgar person sticks himself over with ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. I., No. 3, January 1858 - A Magazine of Literature, Art, and Politics • Various

... there, he went further and said, "And to all them that are afar off." That does take us in. We are the Gentiles who were once "afar off," but now "made nigh by the blood of Christ" (Eph. ii. 13, 17). But lest there be any mistake about it whatever, Peter adds "even as many as the Lord our God shall call unto Him." So on the very day of Pentecost, Peter declares that the baptism with the Holy Spirit is for every child of God in ...
— The Person and Work of The Holy Spirit • R. A. Torrey

... made to feel that while arithmetic and reading are essential, hygiene is not essential. Whatever may be the facts regarding the relative value of arithmetic and hygiene, whether or not our state legislators have made a mistake in declaring hygiene to be essential, are questions altogether too important for child and state to be left to the discretion of the individual teacher or superintendent. It is fair to the teachers who say they cannot afford to turn aside from the three R's to teach hygiene, ...
— Civics and Health • William H. Allen

... technical science and a knowledge of the results of the investigations of many others, and it has often been wondered how a man not technically educated could have seemed so well to know. There was a mistake. He is educated; a ...
— Steam Steel and Electricity • James W. Steele

... way to make a man is to invest him with the rights, duties and responsibilities of a man, and he generally rises in intellectual and moral greatness to a position corresponding to these circumstances.' It is a mistake to suppose the great body of the people ignorant of their position, or unconscious of their growing importance and dignity as representatives of a mighty empire. Vice and poverty have indeed well-nigh quenched ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. I., No. IV., April, 1862 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... Though none of these were equal to his great discovery, yet many were exceedingly valuable. Some were almost immediately utilized; some waited many years for utilization; and some have never yet been utilized. We must avoid, however, falling into the common mistake of holding in little esteem those parts of Faraday's work that did not immediately result either in the production of practical apparatus, or in valuable applications in the arts and sciences, or those which have not even yet proved fruitful. Some discoveries and devices ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume XIV • John Lord

... Lassalle's mistake lies in this, that he seeks the motor force of development in the "spirit" of the nations, instead of looking for an explanation of their spiritual life in the peculiar circumstances which condition ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. X. • Kuno Francke

... looked up, and as her eyes rested upon him, she started to her feet and struck her hands together, uttering an involuntary exclamation of surprise. The name of Mr. Lyon was half uttered, when she saw her mistake, and made a strong effort to compose her ...
— The Good Time Coming • T. S. Arthur

... of hysteric motions are feeble, as they are caused by debility; but those of epilepsies, as they are used to relieve pain, are of the most violent kind; insomuch that those who have once seen these ineffectual efforts to vomit in some epilepsies, can never again mistake them for symptoms of hysteria. See a ...
— Zoonomia, Vol. II - Or, the Laws of Organic Life • Erasmus Darwin

... his pocket he drew out a hand-bill and tossed it upon the blankets. "'Tis na news to ye, bein' I mistrust, the same as the one ye concealed in ye're bosom by the corral gate—'twas seein' that loosed my tongue. For, I love ye, lass—an' 'twad be sair hard to see ye spend ye're life repentin' the mistake of a moment. A mon 'twad steal anither's wife, wad scarce hold high his ain. Gude night." McWhorter turned abruptly, and passing into his ...
— Prairie Flowers • James B. Hendryx

... automobiles and red flannel petticoats, the white misery of Alice Greggory's face and the weary despair of her attitude were tragic—specially to one who knew her story as did Billy Neilson. And it was because Billy did know her story that she did not make the mistake now of offering pity. Instead, she said with a bright smile, and a casual manner that gave no ...
— Miss Billy's Decision • Eleanor H. Porter

... short-sighted mistake. No valuable or lasting peace will come till jealousy is exorcised. There are ominous signs of the possible triumph of a deadly Saxon insularity, but there are other signs that give us hope. When so ardent a combatant as Mr. ...
— The Better Germany in War Time - Being some Facts towards Fellowship • Harold Picton

... conceive, gentlemen, that I was determined to make no mistake in my final venture. There were other reasons, beside the one of caution, which persuaded me to begin with a moderate investment; so I bought one cow. It was impossible for me to make a mistake from such a beginning. Every person in Texas that ...
— The Busted Ex-Texan and Other Stories • W. H. H. Murray

... worked steadily forward, moving with the infinite caution of one who knows that there will be no chance to remedy later any mistake. A slight error in judgment, the failure in response of any one of fifty muscles, would send ...
— The Yukon Trail - A Tale of the North • William MacLeod Raine

... Another chef-d'oeuvre was, "On Tintock tap there is a mist, and in the mist there is a kist (a chest), and in the kist there is a cap (a wooden bowl), and in the cap there is a drap, tak' up the cap, and sup the drap, and set the cap on Tintock tap." This he could say, if I mistake not, five times without drawing breath. It was a favorite passage this, and he often threatened to treat it exegetically; laughing heartily when I said, in that case, he would not have great trouble with the context, which in others cost him a ...
— Spare Hours • John Brown

... from Havana, Stuart had rehearsed this scene. He did not want to make the same mistake that he had made with the vice-consul, and he told his story as clearly as he could, bearing in mind the "Who," "What," "Why," "When" and "Where" of ...
— Plotting in Pirate Seas • Francis Rolt-Wheeler

... motley procession, the by-product of the more or less conservative, sometimes politically or religiously intolerant, aristocratic tide-water settlements. Yet do not make the mistake of thinking that it was slag or refuse humanity, such as camps in the narrow zone around the gates of Paris. It is rather like an industrial by-product that has needed some slight change or adaptation to make it more valuable to society ...
— The French in the Heart of America • John Finley

... mistake to suppose that we cannot be holy except on the condition of a situation and circumstances in life such as shall suit ourselves. It is one of the first principles of holiness to leave our times and our places, our going out and our coming; ...
— Daily Strength for Daily Needs • Mary W. Tileston

... surprised Kit. He had been disposed to think that what clowns were before the public they were in private life also. Now he saw his mistake. ...
— The Young Acrobat of the Great North American Circus • Horatio Alger Jr.

... beautiful crystal which I had brought from the Moon, insisted on showing it to a jeweller, who said that it was an unusually hard stone, and that if it were a diamond, it would be worth upwards of 150,000 dollars. I know not whether the mistake that ensued proceeded from my friend, who is something of a wag, or from one of the lads in the jeweller's shop, who, hearing a part of what his master had said, misapprehended the rest; but so it was, that the next day I had more visiters than ever, and among them my kinsman, who was ...
— A Voyage to the Moon • George Tucker

... visible side of these things, then, is not only to miss a refining pleasure, but to mistake altogether the medium in which the most intellectual of the creations of Greek art, the Aeginetan or the Elgin marbles, for instance, were actually produced; even these having, in their origin, depended for much of [191] their charm on the mere material in which ...
— Greek Studies: A Series of Essays • Walter Horatio Pater

... eyes burning, shrugged his shoulders and did not budge. If they thought to rid themselves of him by this fooling they would learn their mistake. They wished him to go: the greater reason he should stay. A little thing—the sight of a small brown hand twitching painfully, while her face and all the rest of her was still and impassive, had expelled his doubts for the time—had driven all but love and ...
— The Long Night • Stanley Weyman

... as a politician of his adversary, with the fierce, implacable envy which writhes with physical pain in the face of success, which is transported with a sensual joy in the face of disaster. It is a great mistake to limit the ravages of that guilty passion to the domain of professional emulation. When it is deep, it does not alone attack the qualities of the person, but the person himself, and it was thus that Lydia envied ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... you got below and took Port Gibson, Grand Gulf, and vicinity, I thought you should go down the river and join General Banks [besieging Port Hudson]; and when you turned northward, east of the Big Black, I feared it was a mistake. I now wish to make a personal acknowledgment that you were right ...
— Ulysses S. Grant • Walter Allen

... speech, and the rebuke she gave him, made the man look at her; and looking at her, he began to tremble inside his foolish body, and wonder whether he might not have made a mistake. He raised his hand in ...
— A Double Story • George MacDonald

... conscience, since there is much idolatry committed against the glory of God.' And then she was committed. Justice didn't love his work o'er well, and Master Benden, as he was a-coming away, looked as sour as crabs. And old Tabby—Oh, lack-a-daisy-me! didn't she have at him! She's a good un, and no mistake! She stuck to his heels all the way along, and she beat him black and blue with her tongue, and he looked like a butt of alegar with a hogshead o' mustard in it. Hooray for old Tabby!"—and Silas announced that sentiment to the neighbourhood ...
— All's Well - Alice's Victory • Emily Sarah Holt

... foolish thing you are doing, Bess,' said Miss Palliser, when—reluctant to the last—she had written her acceptance, Bessie looking over her shoulder all the while. 'Foolish for you, foolish for me. It is a mistake to associate yourself with paupers. You will feel ashamed of me half-a-dozen times ...
— The Golden Calf • M. E. Braddon



Words linked to "Mistake" :   folly, misprint, misreckoning, slip, lapse, fault, identify, nonachievement, misidentify, mess-up, oversight, spot, omission, boner, parapraxis, blot, slip up, cockup, miscalculation, bloomer, ballup, smear, revoke, erratum, smirch, foolishness, misestimation, flub, misunderstanding, literal error, mix-up, err, confusion, offside, skip, blunder, trip up, error, imbecility, renege, fall for, fuckup, misstatement, bungle, distortion, incursion, misremember, stain, misconception, pratfall, slip-up, stumble, foul-up, typographical error, misapprehension, confound, corrigendum, misjudge, nonaccomplishment, stupidity, miscue



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