Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Order   Listen
verb
Order  v. i.  To give orders; to issue commands.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Order" Quotes from Famous Books



... condense it, just as a cold plate held in steam will collect drops of water. Sometimes the ore was mixed with copper and lead. In that case common salt and copper sulphate were used. Some ore had to be roasted in a furnace in order ...
— Diggers in the Earth • Eva March Tappan

... pack-horse and dog-train at enormous cost and risk. Food sold at extortionate prices. A meal cost two dollars and fifty cents, for beans, bacon, and coffee. Salmon, of course, was cheap. Fortunately, there was little whisky; so, though tattered miners were everywhere in the woods, order was maintained without vigilance committees. On one spectacle the far-travelled ragged Overlanders feasted their tired eyes. They saw miners everywhere along the banks of creeks washing gold. But there were more gold-seekers than claims, and those without ...
— The Cariboo Trail - A Chronicle of the Gold-fields of British Columbia • Agnes C. Laut

... rendered the royal lien indefeasible. [Footnote: In more modern times the pressing of ships, though still put forward as a prerogative of the Crown, was confined in the main to unforeseen exigencies of transport. On the fall of Louisburg in 1760, vessels were pressed at that port in order to carry the prisoners of war to France (Admiralty Records 1. 1491—Capt. Byron, 17 June 1760); and in 1764, again, we find Capt. Brereton, of the Falmouth, forcibly impressing the East India ship Revenge for ...
— The Press-Gang Afloat and Ashore • John R. Hutchinson

... the House was adjourned, and then he went away to dine at his club. He did go into the dining-room of the House, but there was a crowd there, and he found himself alone,—and to tell the truth, he was afraid to order ...
— Phineas Finn - The Irish Member • Anthony Trollope

... his wide-open eyes were endowed with sight; and, with similar facility, he unlocks the gates and church doors. It is curious to see him on the dark winter evenings, apparently guiding his steps by the light of a lanthorn, which he probably carries in order to prevent careless people, who are blessed with sight, from running against him. Like most (if not all) blind people, he has an extraordinary ear for music, and will quickly reproduce on his violin any tune that ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 217, December 24, 1853 • Various

... third, "do you wish us to take up the office of host in order to come to the same end at which ...
— Eastern Tales by Many Story Tellers • Various

... Florine was touched by it, and forgot the author's deformity—among many pieces of verse, we say, were divers other fragments, thoughts, and narratives, relating to a variety of facts. We shall quote some of them, in order to explain the profound impression that their perusal made ...
— The Wandering Jew, Complete • Eugene Sue

... it, she's had pie for breakfast ever since she was born," said Ajax, "and it's not agreed with her. She'll keep a foothill school in order just ...
— Bunch Grass - A Chronicle of Life on a Cattle Ranch • Horace Annesley Vachell

... maintains even when they work against itself; and if these considerations went to show that the retrocession of the Transvaal was a proper course, was it either wise or humane to prolong the war and crush the Boer resistance at the cost of much slaughter, merely in order to avenge defeats and vindicate a military superiority which the immensely greater forces of Britain made self-evident? A great country is strong enough to be magnanimous, and shows her greatness better by justice and lenity than by a sanguinary revenge. These moral arguments, which affect different ...
— Impressions of South Africa • James Bryce

... constitute the "apperceiving organs" which control the assimilation of new presentations, their character is all important. The effect of new presentations is to reinforce groupings previously formed. The business of the educator is, first, to select the proper material in order to fix the nature of the original reactions, and, secondly, to arrange the sequence of subsequent presentations on the basis of the store of ideas secured by prior transactions. The control is from behind, from the past, instead of, as ...
— Democracy and Education • John Dewey

... said Terry, "until one flies over the deck, so that he will drop down in order that the ...
— Fred Fearnot's New Ranch - and How He and Terry Managed It • Hal Standish

... first thing that comes off is the big clean-up. Uniforms are brushed up, and equipment put in order. Then comes the bath, the most thorough possible under the conditions. After that comes the "cootie carnival", better known as the "shirt hunt." The cootie is the soldier's worst enemy. He's worse than the Hun. You can't get rid of him wherever you are, ...
— A Yankee in the Trenches • R. Derby Holmes

... mass, and they were irrevocably gone. Next he took up de Bailleul's will—sorrowfully and hesitatingly, for it was his title to Eaux Tranquilles—but the following instant he threw it also on the flames. Then he deliberately cast in his Grand Cross of St. Louis and the insignia of the Order of the Holy Ghost. His Diamond Armorial followed, he tore his seal, cut with the pretended coat-of-arms, from his watch-chain, broke up with his foot his little portmanteau, and tearing down the de Lincy portraits one by one watched all blaze up and consume together. At last, ...
— The False Chevalier - or, The Lifeguard of Marie Antoinette • William Douw Lighthall

... did as his lord and sovereign desired. He went to Roncesvalles, accompanied by a moderate train of warriors, not dreaming of the atrocity that awaited him. Gan himself, meantime, had hastened on to France before Marsilius, in order to shew himself free and easy in the presence of Charles, and secure the success of his plot; while Marsilius, to make assurance doubly sure, brought into the passes of Roncesvalles no less than three armies, who were successively to fall on the Paladin, in case of the worst, ...
— Stories from the Italian Poets: With Lives of the Writers, Volume 1 • Leigh Hunt

... himself the while, and smiting so much the more pitilessly because of that bitter laugh. It was his custom, too, as it has been that of many other pious Puritans, to fast,—not, however, like them, in order to purify the body and render it the fitter medium of celestial illumination, but rigorously, and until his knees trembled beneath him, as an act of penance. He kept vigils, likewise, night after night, sometimes in utter darkness; sometimes with a ...
— The Scarlet Letter • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... reply, and put it down; but as it was awkward to leave the buffet without buying anything, he would order some seltzer-water and drink the whole bottle himself, and tears would come into his eyes. And Anna hated ...
— The Party and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... seemed to think she had said enough, for her son was generally a very obedient boy, and she turned to walk up the bluff towards the house. But she knew enough about the management of a boat to perceive that, in this instance, her order was not obeyed. ...
— Little By Little - or, The Cruise of the Flyaway • William Taylor Adams

... to night and morning for it! No—no! Churches are kept up for priests to make a fat living out of,—but there is never a God in them that I can see;—and as for the Christ, who had only to be asked in order to heal the sick, there is not so much as a ghost of Him anywhere! If what you priests tell us were true, poor souls such as I am, would get comfort and help in our sorrows, but it is all a lie!—the whole thing!—and ...
— The Master-Christian • Marie Corelli

... the wretched poltroon was receiving such degrading treatment without remembering that he had a sword hanging by his side, I left the room, and asked the landlord to order me a carriage ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... gone. Davy still stood in the cleared space before Mr. Kirby, his ragged overcoat on, his tattered hat in his hand, breathing fast, afraid to look at his mother. Everybody turned when Kelley came in with the block of wood. Everybody craned their necks to watch while, at the magistrate's order, Kelley weighed the block of wood on the store scales, which he ...
— Frank of Freedom Hill • Samuel A. Derieux

... sensuous man. The sensuous man is already determined physically, and thenceforth he has no longer his free determinability; he must necessarily first enter into possession of this lost determinability before he can exchange the passive against an active determination. Therefore, in order to recover it, he must either lose the passive determination that he had, or he should enclose already in himself the active determination to which he should pass. If he confined himself to lose passive determination, he would at the same time lose with it the possibility ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... the strange signs and markings on the lining of the wigwam. He was never tired of hearing the pictures explained, for they showed in order the chief ...
— Two Indian Children of Long Ago • Frances Taylor

... dare snatch leisure for research in other directions, then could this charitable labour not long endure; for all that is best in the good that at this day is being done round about us, was conceived in the spirit of one of those who neglected, it may be, many an urgent, immediate duty in order to think, to commune with themselves, in order to speak. Does it follow that they did the best that was to be done? To such a question as this who shall dare to reply? The soul that is meekly honest must ever consider the simplest, the nearest ...
— Wisdom and Destiny • Maurice Maeterlinck

... will go in order to take leave of the Dal-elv at one of the most delightful of places, which vividly removes the stranger, as it were, into a far more southern land, into a far richer nature, than he supposed was to be found here. The road is so pretty—the oak grows here so strong and vigorously with mighty crowns ...
— Pictures of Sweden • Hans Christian Andersen

... clear and warm and there was no sleep for anyone in the Willis family after six o'clock. Shirley and Sarah had to be forcibly restrained from investigating the boxes on the kitchen table and Winnie finally decided to finish packing them before breakfast, in order to "get a ...
— Rosemary • Josephine Lawrence

... 1.) He began his cruelty by beheading one of the twelve original apostles, a kinsman and constant companion of the Founder of the religion. Perceiving that this execution gratified the Jews, he proceeded to seize, in order to put to death, another of the number,—and him, like the former, associated with Christ during his life, and eminently active in the service since his death. This man was, however, delivered from prison, as the account states miraculously, (Acts xii. ...
— Evidences of Christianity • William Paley

... throughout Europe, assigned an eminent rank among monastic virtues to the guardianship and reproduction of valuable manuscripts. In each Benedictine monastery a chamber was set apart for this sacred purpose, and Charlemagne assigned to Alcuin, a member of their order, the important office of preparing a perfect copy of ...
— International Weekly Miscellany Vol. I. No. 3, July 15, 1850 • Various

... fallen monarch.' What! have you so little knowledge of the nature of man as to be ignorant that a time of revolution is not the season of true Liberty? Alas, the obstinacy and perversion of man is such that she is too often obliged to borrow the very arms of Despotism to overthrow him, and, in order to reign in peace, must establish herself by violence. She deplores such stern necessity, but the safety of the people, her supreme law, is her consolation. This apparent contradiction between the principles ...
— The Prose Works of William Wordsworth • William Wordsworth

... it, may probably be caused by agreeable sensation; similar to that which induces them to swallow it both before and after this second mastication; and then this retrograde action, properly belongs to this place, and is erroneously put at the head of the order of irritative retrograde motions. Class I. 3. ...
— Zoonomia, Vol. II - Or, the Laws of Organic Life • Erasmus Darwin

... back and got some lumber, and loaded his tent and supplies on a wagon, and wrote Corydon that he would meet her the next afternoon. With the help of the farmer's boy he labored the rest of the day at building the platform, and putting up the tent, and getting their belongings in order. The next day he was up at dawn, constructing tables and stands; and later on he hired the farmer's "jagger-wagon", and drove in for Corydon and ...
— Love's Pilgrimage • Upton Sinclair

... order, we are not impressed by any striking change in the school influence. In many respects, no doubt, schools are better planned and more intelligently managed than they ever were before. More attention is paid to ventilation, hygiene, recreation, ...
— Heart and Soul • Victor Mapes (AKA Maveric Post)

... The 'Goddess Harmonia' plays a great part in Plato's ideas of education. The natural restless force of life in children, 'who do nothing but roar until they are three years old,' is gradually to be reduced to law and order. As in the Republic, he fixes certain forms in which songs are to be composed: (1) they are to be strains of cheerfulness and good omen; (2) they are to be hymns or prayers addressed to the Gods; (3) they are to sing only of the lawful ...
— Laws • Plato

... extensive are the sins which have been committed. Arrangements of words palaver with arrangements of words. There ensues a vast shuffling of words, a drone and a gurgle of syllables. The Case of the State of Illinois Versus Man. Order in the Court Room. "No talking, please...." "If it Please Your Honor, the Issue involved in this case is identical with the Issue as explicitly set forth in the Case of Matthews Versus Matthews, Illinois Sixth, Chapter Eight, Page ninety two, in which in the Third ...
— Erik Dorn • Ben Hecht

... I especially remember one at the expense of the late Lord Chancellors Westbury and Cranworth. Lord Cranworth, after the amalgamation of law and equity, was for some time in the habit of going to sit with the new judges in order to familiarize himself with the reformed practice, whereupon some one asked Lord Westbury, "Why does 'Cranny' go to sit with the judges?" to which Westbury answered, "Doubtless from a childish fear of being alone in ...
— Autobiography of Andrew Dickson White Volume II • Andrew Dickson White

... invested. To make the same things known to Joseph was a task of more difficulty. He could not here count on sympathetic intelligence; it was but too certain that his son would listen with disappointment, if not with bitterness. In order to mitigate the worst results, he began by making known the fact of his wealth and asking if Joseph had any practical views which could be furthered by a moderate ...
— The Nether World • George Gissing

... of my earliest years. Love in childhood, love in youth, so full of true, simple joy, that initiated me in the sweet pleasure of devotion, that taught me self-denial in order to give pleasure, that destroyed all egotism, by showing me the happiness ...
— Gold Dust - A Collection of Golden Counsels for the Sanctification of Daily Life • E. L. E. B.

... in a bleak, unsheltered place, now, and had to trudge right along, in order to keep warm, though we rather expected to go over a precipice, sooner or later. About nine o'clock we made an important discovery —that we were not in any path. We groped around a while on our hands and knees, but we could not find it; so we ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... actually endowed with reason. It took a long gaze at Annatock, and then dived. But the Eskimo was prepared for this. He changed his position hastily and played his line the meanwhile, fixing the point 5 of his lance into the ice in order to give him a more effective hold. Scarcely had he done so when the spot he had just left was smashed up, and the head of the walrus appeared, grinning, and bellowing as if ...
— Story Hour Readings: Seventh Year • E.C. Hartwell

... the gale was such that it became necessary to shout at times, in order to make one's self heard ...
— Darry the Life Saver - The Heroes of the Coast • Frank V. Webster

... Gefe Politico, I merely told the officer that he, the officer, was an insolent fellow, and that I would cause him to be punished. He subsequently confessed that he was an instrument of the Vicar General, and that he merely came to my apartment in order to obtain a pretence for making a complaint. He has been dismissed from his situation and the Queen [Regent] has expressed her sorrow at my imprisonment. If there be any doubt entertained on the matter, pray let Sir George ...
— The Life of George Borrow • Herbert Jenkins

... that they had been simultaneously stricken with the picturesque appearance of one of those high and pointed arches, which that eminent antiquary, Mr. Horseley Curties, has described in his Ancient Records, as "a Gothic window of the Saxon order"; and then the ivy clustered so thickly and so beautifully on the other side, that they went round to look at that; and then their proximity deprived it of half its effect, and so they walked across ...
— Humorous Ghost Stories • Dorothy Scarborough

... did not come down until the evening was well along, but the delay produced the effect she intended. As she appeared, fresh and cool with her hair in perfect order, at the end of a number which left the dancers red and dishevelled, she caused a sensation that could not well have been otherwise than flattering. Crowheart stared ...
— The Lady Doc • Caroline Lockhart

... of undisciplined valour, no nervous enthusiasm weakened the stability of their order; their flashing eyes were bent on the dark columns in their front; their measured tread shook the ground; their dreadful volleys swept away the head of every formation; their deafening shouts overpowered the dissonant cries that broke from all parts of the tumultuous ...
— The Glory of English Prose - Letters to My Grandson • Stephen Coleridge

... not pleasant to Richard to imagine any one with rights over him. It may be that some persist in calling up the false idea of such a one hitherto presented to them, in order to avoid feeling obligation to believe in him. For the notion of a God is one from which naturally a thoughtful man must feel more or less recoil while as yet he knows nothing of the being himself, or of the nature of his creative rights, the rights of perfect, self-refusing, ...
— There & Back • George MacDonald

... country parishes, now either become commonplace, like the rest of the world, or removed altogether, and shut up in poorhouses or madhouses—I mean the individuals frequently called parochial idiots; but who were rather of the order of naturals. They were eccentric, or somewhat crazy, useless, idle creatures, who used to wander about from house to house, and sometimes made very shrewd sarcastic remarks upon what was going on in the ...
— Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character • Edward Bannerman Ramsay

... districts lying between Apulia and Umbria, but not given in their geographical order. 15. faustum (for favostus, fav-eo) that which is done under the blessing of the gods: felix that which succeeds in consequence of having this blessing upon it. —Stephenson. 16-17. damnarentur ... votorum condemned (to pay) their vows. Cf. Verg. Voti reus bound to ...
— Helps to Latin Translation at Sight • Edmund Luce

... of his wife and his garden, marry his daughter, play whist in the evenings, keep the run of all the gossip in the neighborhood, meddle with the elections, squabble with the large proprietors, and order good dinners; or else trot along the embankment to find out what was going on in Tours, torment the cure, and finally, by way of dramatic entertainment, assist at the sale of lands in the neighborhood of his vineyards. In short, he led the true Tourangian life,—the life ...
— The Illustrious Gaudissart • Honore de Balzac

... it had become plain that Irving could write with far more effect than he could ever hope to practice law. Yet the idea of using his pen in order to earn a living, not merely for his own amusement, was so distasteful to him that he put aside the thought of a literary career. Had he not had two kind and indulgent brothers, it might have gone hard with him at this time; but he was ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8 • Charles H. Sylvester

... had had to find out the riddle in order to see Mr. Raymond again, I doubt if he would ever have ...
— At the Back of the North Wind • George MacDonald

... out the stores, say our prayers, and prevent each other from running away with adventurers! I won't be always in leading-strings. I won't acknowledge that Catherine is bound to be an old maid to keep me in order. I hate it! It is ...
— Robert Elsmere • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... now, being on half-pay, lives with him as his companion. The lieutenant is a very brave man, a great joker, and, as the saying is, hath got the length of his commander's foot—though he has another favourite in the house called Tom Pipes, that was his boatswain's mate, and now keeps the servants in order. Tom is a man of few words, but an excellent hand at a song concerning the boatswain's whistle, hustle-cap, and chuck-farthing—there is not such another pipe in the county—so that the commodore lives very happy in his own ...
— The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, Volume I • Tobias Smollett

... Rose had thought of something the night before, and they had planned this ride in order to do it. They had remembered Black Bear's wild Indians and the strange soldiers in blue. The two older Bunker children decided to try to find those strange people again, and the man and woman ...
— Six Little Bunkers at Cowboy Jack's • Laura Lee Hope

... retreat to town and shop and unfinished jobs. But they were too often successful. When I went to get a pail of water early in the morning I frequently saw this stately bird sailing out of my cove within a few rods. If I endeavored to overtake him in a boat, in order to see how he would manoeuvre, he would dive and be completely lost, so that I did not discover him again, sometimes, till the latter part of the day. But I was more than a match for him on the surface. He commonly ...
— Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience • Henry David Thoreau

... back over his shoulder, and contended in the palaestra. Furthermore it was said he gave over to the soldiers the property of the allies to plunder, and he was suspected of delaying the voyage to Carthage purposely, in order that he might hold office for a longer time; but it was principally at the instigation of men who all along had been jealous of him that they wished to summon him. Still, this proposition was not carried out because of the ...
— Dio's Rome, Vol VI. • Cassius Dio

... by no means anxious to take a hand in the game: he spurred his horse in order to free himself, and tried to strike the ploughman's hands with his stick and make him relax his hold; but Germain eluded the blow, and, taking him by the leg, unhorsed him and brought him to the heather, where he knocked ...
— The Devil's Pool • George Sand

... some of the witnesses said that he had a brother who would release him; then they gave securities to bring him to the market-place, and separated and went away. 10. The next day for the sake of his indictment (against me) and this suit, I thought I should be present (at court) with witnesses, in order to know who would release him and what he would say to get him off. Now as to the conditions on which he was released on bail, neither a brother nor any one else came, but a woman who claimed he was her slave, laying claim against Nicomedes, and she refused to let him take Pancleon. 11. It would ...
— The Orations of Lysias • Lysias

... me! And yet it was because of Ruth I wanted to stay. I would look at the matter again. I wanted to make Ruth happy; but what was the course I must take in order to do that? The great hindrance to her happiness was myself. I was the black cloud that hid her sun. If I did not exist her joy would be complete, for then she would be free to wed the man ...
— Roger Trewinion • Joseph Hocking

... supplement this supply and "with a view to possible contingencies, about the middle of July, 1899, commissions of officers, to make preliminary enquiries, were sent to the United States of America, to Spain and to Italy."[30] In order that these preparations, indispensable if war was declared, should not tend to excite war, the Secretary of State had given instructions that these officers should not attract attention to their mission. They were not allowed to make any purchases until they received instructions. These were ...
— History of the War in South Africa 1899-1902 v. 1 (of 4) - Compiled by Direction of His Majesty's Government • Frederick Maurice

... opinion, as far as St. Luke states the circumstances, that they related solely to the disciples themselves. Jesus Christ recommends it to those who were present, and to those only, to do this in remembrance of him. But he no where tells them to order or cause it to be done by the whole Christian world, as he told them to "preach ...
— A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume II (of 3) • Thomas Clarkson

... some cadence use, Forthright the river flows, In order fall the dews, Love blows as the wind blows: Blows! . . . and what reckoning shows The courses of his chart? A spirit that comes and goes, Love blows ...
— Poems by William Ernest Henley • William Ernest Henley

... be kinder to do it for once. What do you think they will do as they grow older, if you don't keep them in order ...
— The Daisy Chain, or Aspirations • Charlotte Yonge

... of Anne's power. He was no longer to sleep in her chamber, but in one of his own with Ralph for his protector, and he was to begin Latin with Dr. Woodford. So great was his delight that he had gone to bed all the sooner in order to bring the great day more quickly, and Anne was glad of the opportunity of finishing the kite, which was to be her present, for Ralph to help him fly upon ...
— A Reputed Changeling • Charlotte M. Yonge

... Dilettantism gave way to learning and speculation; in the place of Bolingbroke came Adam Smith; in the place of Addison, Johnson. In a way it is the solidest and sanest time in English letters. Yet in the midst of its urbanity and order forces were gathering for its destruction. The ballad-mongers were busy; Blake was drawing and rhyming; Burns was giving songs and lays to his country-side. In the distance—Johnson could not hear them—sounded, like the horns of elf-land faintly blowing, the trumpet calls ...
— English Literature: Modern - Home University Library Of Modern Knowledge • G. H. Mair

... you trouble yourself about that sort of thing?" Rastignac said, laughing. "Are you putting them in order, my dear boy? I did not think ...
— The Collection of Antiquities • Honore de Balzac

... once the value of the advice, as his eye ran over the chief's costume, for he was gorgeously arrayed in a military tunic and trousers undoubtedly made in London to order, the tailor having had instructions to prepare for his highness a dress that would be striking and impressive, and from this point of view he had done his work well. The trousers were blue with gold stripes, of the most ...
— The Rajah of Dah • George Manville Fenn

... carrying out its enumerated powers. Jefferson, on the other hand, maintained that the "necessary and proper" clause was a restrictive clause, meant to safeguard the rights of the States, that a law in order to be "necessary and proper" must be both "necessary" AND "proper," and that both terms ought to be construed narrowly. Jefferson's opposition, however, proved unavailing, and the banking institution which was created continued till 1811 without ...
— John Marshall and the Constitution - A Chronicle of the Supreme Court, Volume 16 In The - Chronicles Of America Series • Edward S. Corwin

... good man when the shadows of evening came and they were alone. "I see the boy can never appreciate the toil of our years. He must return and climb the mount for himself. He has no appreciation of all this accumulation which we have been years in gaining, nor can he have. It is not in the order of life: each must climb the summit himself. A mistake lies in our taking any one in our arms and raising ...
— Allegories of Life • Mrs. J. S. Adams

... the morning of the 7th, while the ships were unmooring, I went ashore with Captain Furneaux and Mr Forster, in order to make some return to the king, for his last night's present. We no sooner landed than we found Attago, of whom we enquired for the king, whose name was Kohaghee- too-Fallangou. He accordingly undertook to conduct us to him; but, whether he mistook the man we wanted, or was ignorant ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 14 • Robert Kerr

... make constant use of them. If the acquisition of new information depends so much upon the right use of previous knowledge, we are called upon to build constantly upon this foundation. This is true whether the child's knowledge has been acquired at school or at home. In order to make things clear and interesting to boys and girls we must refer every day to what they have before learned in school ...
— The Elements of General Method - Based on the Principles of Herbart • Charles A. McMurry

... this makes clear that little children do not come at once after death into an angelic state, but are gradually brought into it by means of knowledges of good and truth, and in harmony with all heavenly order; for the least particulars of their nature are known to the Lord, and thus they are led, in accord with each and every movement of their inclination, to receive the truths of good and the goods ...
— Heaven and its Wonders and Hell • Emanuel Swedenborg

... offences and irregularities, and promise of perpetuating their original Charter, with feelings of inexpressible gratitude and delight; but they did not publish the King's letter for nearly two years, notwithstanding his command to do so; and when they did publish it, they appended an order that the conditions were not to be acted upon ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 1 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Egerton Ryerson

... that others of the Philippine animals are also of the toy order; tiny but lovely specimens, like your spirited but ...
— Fil and Filippa - Story of Child Life in the Philippines • John Stuart Thomson

... for sixty-one years with a power and wisdom which made him one of the greatest monarchs of any age. His grandson, Kien Lung, inherited all his excellent qualities, and when he had ruled China for nearly sixty-one years he abdicated simply in order that, out of respect to his ancestor, the years of his reign ...
— From Pole to Pole - A Book for Young People • Sven Anders Hedin

... exquisitely any appropriate home comforts, when for a brief while procurable, but also how to surrender them unmurmuringly at a moment's notice when duty so requires. We had been in possession of our well-appointed hotel table only two days when a sudden order sent us ...
— With the Guards' Brigade from Bloemfontein to Koomati Poort and Back • Edward P. Lowry

... soon sees to that! I closed in like a concertina, Bunny, and I only hope I shall be able to pull out like one. You see, it's the custom of the accursed place for one to telephone for a doctor the moment one arrives. I consulted the hunting man, who of course recommended his own in order to make sure of a companion on the rack. The old arch-humbug was down upon me in ten minutes, examining me from crown to heel, and made the most unblushing report upon my general condition. He said I had a liver! I'll swear I hadn't before I went ...
— Mr. Justice Raffles • E. W. Hornung

... an impression on an assembled multitude the following circumstance deserves to be weighed, in order to ascertain the whole amount of its importance. In ordinary intercourse men exhibit only the outward man to each other. They are withheld by mistrust or indifference from allowing others to look into what passes ...
— Lectures on Dramatic Art - and Literature • August Wilhelm Schlegel trans John Black

... must assail a perfect teacher! How should he write on the blackboard so that the children seated at a distance may see? for if they do not see his work is of no avail. And how much light shall fall upon the blackboard, in order that all may see clearly the white characters on the black surface? Of what size should be the script specially chosen by the master to suit distant vision? This is a serious matter, because if the child, obliged ...
— Spontaneous Activity in Education • Maria Montessori

... ISLAND, October 16, 1833. I do hereby certify, that Makataimeshekiakiak, or Black Hawk, did call upon me, on his return to his people in August last, and expressed a great desire to have a History of his Life written and published, in order (as he said) "that the people of the United States, (among whom he had been traveling, and by whom he had been treated with great respect, friendship and hospitality,) might know the cause that had impelled him to acts as ...
— Autobiography of Ma-ka-tai-me-she-kia-kiak, or Black Hawk • Black Hawk

... curate, the Reverend George Lawless, on a piece of ground at the rear of the manse. The Reverend Frank was a genial Lowlander of the muscular type. The Reverend George was a renegade Highland-man of the cadaverous order. The first was a harum-scarum young pastor with a be-as-jolly-as-you-can spirit, and had accepted his office at the recommendation of a relative in power. The second was a mean-spirited wolf in sheep's clothing, who, like his compatriot ...
— Hunted and Harried • R.M. Ballantyne

... Yea, to that purpose desperately she clings. This evening, if she rouse, she makes confession. Even now a holy friar waits without, Fra Bruno, of the order of Carthusians, Beyond Palermo. ...
— The Poems of Emma Lazarus - Vol. I (of II.), Narrative, Lyric, and Dramatic • Emma Lazarus

... parish clerk, or the housekeeper at Larks' Hall, dreamt of subjecting to the wholesome medicine of contradiction—unless it might be Granny, when she came in with her staff in her hand. She would laugh at their excess of care, and order them to leave off spoiling that child; but even Granny herself would let fall a tear from her dim eyes when she read the register of the child's age in ...
— Girlhood and Womanhood - The Story of some Fortunes and Misfortunes • Sarah Tytler

... clean, spicy smell of the pine. The heat from our big fire came in and we were warm as toast. It was so good to stretch out and rest. I kept thinking how superior I was since I dared to take such an outing when so many poor women down in Denver were bent on making their twenty cents per hour in order that they could spare a quarter to go to the "show." I went to sleep with a powerfully self-satisfied feeling, but I awoke to realize that pride ...
— Letters of a Woman Homesteader • Elinore Pruitt Stewart

... influences, he has more to answer for. But after he has repeated his attendance several times, this fear and reverence wear away with the novelty. As he begins to be familiar with the words of the prayers, and the order of the Service, so does he both hear and receive with less emotion and solemnity. It is not that he is a worse man than he was at first, but he is exposed to a greater temptation to be profane. He had no deeper religious principle when he first communicated than he has now (probably ...
— Parochial and Plain Sermons, Vol. VII (of 8) • John Henry Newman

... him anywhere," Isabel calmly interpolated. "They are going to stay in and amuse us. At least, that is what I say, if he is going to stand for it. He said he would, but it's some large order." ...
— From the Car Behind • Eleanor M. Ingram

... Champignons, with all the Species of the Boletus, &c. for being, as some hold, neither Root, Herb, Flower, nor Fruit, nor to be eaten crude; should be therefore banish'd entry into our Sallet, were I to order the Composition; however so highly contended for by many, as the very principal and top of all the rest; whilst I think them tolerable only (at least in this Climate) if being fresh and skilfully chosen, they are accommodated with the ...
— Acetaria: A Discourse of Sallets • John Evelyn

... They may be caused by sparks or hot ashes from a locomotive. Lightning strikes in many forests every summer, particularly those of the Western States, and ignites many trees. In the South people sometimes set fires in order to improve the grazing. Settlers and farmers who are clearing land often start big brush fires that get out of their control. Campers, tourists, hunters, and fishermen are responsible for many forest fires ...
— The School Book of Forestry • Charles Lathrop Pack

... for others. For this one woman he was perfectly ready to throw everything aside. A man lived but once; and he was a fool who would hold to tinsel in preference to such happiness as he thought he saw opening out before him. Nora saw, but she did not care. That in order to reach another she was practising infinite cruelty on this man (whose one fault lay in that he loved her) did not appeal to her pity. But her arrow flew wide of the target; at least, there appeared no ...
— The Place of Honeymoons • Harold MacGrath

... cried Sue, and she could think of nothing else to say just then. But you can guess that she very quickly finished dressing in order to go down and look for herself to see what had ...
— Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue and Their Shetland Pony • Laura Lee Hope

... scenery and orchards when visiting San Diego in March, and says: "Orange orchards are rare and beautiful sights, but when I can sit in this warm room, gathered about a big coal fire, and see miles of them from the window, why should I put on my fur overcoat and a mackintosh in order to freeze and cry out with assumed delight every half-mile while I gradually get ...
— A Truthful Woman in Southern California • Kate Sanborn

... spoiling all, I let myself go the most natural and simple way, as I always do, and invited them all to come in. And in truth I am naturally very little inclined to suspicion and distrust; I willingly incline towards excuse and the gentlest interpretation; I take men according to the common order, and do not more believe in those perverse and unnatural inclinations, unless convinced by manifest evidence, than I do in monsters and miracles; and I am, moreover, a man who willingly commit myself to Fortune, and throw myself headlong into her arms; and I have hitherto found more reason ...
— The Essays of Montaigne, Complete • Michel de Montaigne

... appropriated towards paying the national debt of France, upon condition that the kings, our good lords and masters, shall be entreated to order the comptrollers-general of the finances to undergo in future an examination in arithmetic before they enter on the ...
— Chambers' Edinburgh Journal, No. 421, New Series, Jan. 24, 1852 • Various

... princely mansions, heated staircases, laden with flowers at every landing, upholstered and silky alcoves, where disease was transformed into something discreet, elegant, where nothing suggested that brutal hand which throws on a bed of pain those who only cease to work in order to die. They were not in any true speech, sick people, these clients of the Irish doctor. They would have been refused admission to a hospital. Their organs not possessing even strength to give them a shock, ...
— The Nabob • Alphonse Daudet

... the Eastern sage, as he looked down from the mountain height upon the camp of Israel, abiding among the groves of the lowland, according to their tribes, in order, discipline, and unity. Before a people so organized, he saw well, none of the nations round could stand. Israel would burst through them, with the strength of the wild bull crashing through the forest. He would couch as a lion, ...
— Discipline and Other Sermons • Charles Kingsley

... as if by system, to render eminently and basely wicked, Welford slowly ascended the stairs, and re-entered his chamber. His wife was still sleeping. Her beauty was of the fair and girlish and harmonized order, which lovers and poets would express by the word "angelic;" and as Welford looked upon her face, hushed and almost hallowed by slumber, a certain weakness and irresolution might have been discernible in the strong lines of his haughty features. At that moment, as if forever to ...
— Paul Clifford, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... forced to leave their pursuit and return homeward; and the very next week the enemy came upon our town, like bears bereft of their whelps, or so many ravenous wolves, rending us and our lambs to death. But what shall I say? God seemed to leave his People to themselves, and order all things for His own holy ends. Shall there be evil in the City and the Lord hath not done it? They are not grieved for the affliction of Joseph, therefore shall they go captive, with the first that go captive. ...
— Captivity and Restoration • Mrs. Mary Rowlandson

... was a master in college, who read evening prayers, gave leaves and allowances, and was consulted on matters of business, he had practically nothing to do with the discipline. That was all in the hands of the sixth form, who kept order, put up notices, and were allowed not only to cane but to set lines. No one ever thought of appealing to the master against them, and their powers were never abused. But there was very little overt discipline anywhere. The masters could not inflict corporal punishment. They could set punishments, ...
— Escape and Other Essays • Arthur Christopher Benson

... down there!" The boys pitched down the rails in two or three places. An order was passed back, and in an instant a stir of preparation was noticed all down ...
— Two Little Confederates • Thomas Nelson Page

... be up while the moon casts a shadow is the carter, who must begin to feed his team very early in order to get them to eat sufficient. If the manger be over-filled they spill and waste it, and at the same time will not eat so much. This is tedious work. Then the lads come and polish up the harness, and so soon as it is well light get out to plough. The custom with the horses is to begin to work as ...
— Hodge and His Masters • Richard Jefferies

... the Christian state, is a striking one. It is midnight, a great house is without its master, the lord of the palace is absent, but expected back, the servants are busy in preparation, each man with his robe tucked about his middle, in order that it may not interfere with his work, his lamp in his hand that he may see to go about his business and his eye ever turned to the entrance to catch the first sign of the coming of his master. Is that like your Christian life? If we are His servants that is what we ought to be, having three ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... here, sir," he said, "from down stream ask me to speak, and say we thank you for what you've done. We want protection, and law, and order, and for every man to make his pile in peace. We see you've got half a dozen men with you, and you talk of sending four down the ...
— To The West • George Manville Fenn

... a gathering together of the faculties of the soul within itself, in order that it may have the fruition of that contentment in greater sweetness; but the faculties are not lost, neither are they asleep: the will alone is occupied in such a way that, without knowing how it has become a captive, it gives ...
— The Life of St. Teresa of Jesus • Teresa of Avila

... Homage to Beaudy! Vollow me! Zam! Vinzent! Rober! Neego! Eddie! [The men put themselves behind him, in single file, in the order in which he calls them, with the exception of JEYES, who deliberately sits at the writing-table, and FARNCOMBE, who is embarrassed. JIMMIE claps her hands and MRS. UPJOHN, who is pouring out tea, laughs ...
— The 'Mind the Paint' Girl - A Comedy in Four Acts • Arthur Pinero

... is called to be holy and separate from other men, lives in constant dread lest he should touch something unclean, and so forfeit his own purity. There are clean animals, and unclean ones which he must not eat; various washings of the hands and of domestic utensils are needed in order to keep up the state of purity; many trades involve contact with substances which make purity almost impossible. Above all, it is defiling to eat what a heathen has cooked, or to sit at the same table with heathens. Thus the Jew was confirmed in the belief of his own superiority ...
— History of Religion - A Sketch of Primitive Religious Beliefs and Practices, and of the Origin and Character of the Great Systems • Allan Menzies

... In order to avoid his visits I kept away from the study in which I had habitually spent my mornings, and to which he had been accustomed to so ready an access; and if he called at the front door, I directed my servant to tell him ...
— A Strange Story, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... are driven to commit crimes, through a certain moral necessity; other men are compelled, by a similar necessity, to hate and despise them for their commission. The indignation of the sufferer is at least as natural as the guilt of him who makes him suffer; and the good order of society would probably be as well preserved, if our sympathies were sometimes called forth in behalf of the former. At all events, the same apology ought certainly to be admitted for the wealthy, as for the needy offender. They are ...
— Famous Reviews • Editor: R. Brimley Johnson

... in person on the 27th of June. In his speech his majesty expressed a hope "that the present circumstances of France might, in their effects, hasten the return of such a state of order and regular government, as might be capable of maintaining the accustomed relations of peace and amity with other powers." He also remarked that our main reliance for success must be on our naval and military forces: thereby indicating ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... members of the team arrived at the field half an hour later in order to prepare themselves leisurely for the game, Teeny-bits had ...
— The Mark of the Knife • Clayton H. Ernst

... country reveals another difficulty which later events have obscured. Few people realised the developments which chemical warfare would produce. The early production of chemicals for gas warfare was grouped under some such designation as trench warfare stores, and graded in order of importance, from the point of view of supply organisation with catapults and spring guns, flame projectors and body shields! It is no unfair criticism to state that hard facts rather than vision forced the importance of chemical warfare upon those responsible for munition ...
— by Victor LeFebure • J. Walker McSpadden

... sandwiches or knitting or powder-puffs or tea; but those also are rotten hypotheses. I have too much faith in the good sense of my fellow-countrywomen to believe that they would cart a horrible thing like a cheap attache-case about simply in order to convey a sandwich or a powder-puff from one end of London to the other. So I had to fall ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 158, April 7, 1920 • Various

... A mounted figure of the Saint in the act of piercing the dragon with his lance, and worn as a pendant to the collar of the Order of the Garter; added to the insignia of the Order, with the Collar, by HENRYVII. The Lesser George has the same group on an enamelled field, and surrounded by the Garter of the Order, the whole forming a "jewel," generally oval in shape: it was introduced by HENRYVIII., and is now worn ...
— The Handbook to English Heraldry • Charles Boutell

... addressed, Kunti's son Yudhishthira of great wisdom commanded Sudharma (the priest of the Kauravas) and Dhaumya, and Sanjaya of the Suta order, and Vidura of great wisdom, and Yuyutsu of Kurus race, and all his servants headed by Indrasena, and all the other Sutas that were with him, saying, 'Cause the funeral rites of the slain, numbering by thousands, to be duly performed, ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 - Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 • Unknown

... found a curious correspondence between the ostensibly chance position of the cows and her wishes in this matter, till she felt that their order could not be the result of accident. The dairyman's pupil had lent a hand in getting the cows together of late, and at the fifth or sixth time she turned her eyes, as she rested against the cow, full of ...
— Tess of the d'Urbervilles - A Pure Woman • Thomas Hardy

... different from the position of serfs. The rents of these tenants, usually about half the gross produce, are the basis of the livelihood of the gentry. One part of a gentry family normally lives in the country on a small home farm in order to be able to collect the rents. If the family can acquire more land and if this new land is too far away from the home farm to make collection of rents easy, a new home farm is set up under the control of another branch of the family. But the original ...
— A history of China., [3d ed. rev. and enl.] • Wolfram Eberhard

... order—but I did as well as I could. I went down on my knees to Mr. Gibson and craved his paternal blessing; and made my best French bow with my heels together to old Mrs. Bletchley; and kissed my sister, ...
— The Martian • George Du Maurier

... in which we are now living, nor can we now continue longer together." Eric returned home to Brattahlid, and Leif pursued his way to the ship with his companions, thirty-five men; one of the company was a German named Tyrker. They put the ship in order, and when they were ready, they sailed out to sea, and found first that land which Biarni and his ship-mates found last. They sailed up to the land and cast anchor, and launched a boat and went ashore, and saw no grass there; great ice mountains ...
— The Northmen, Columbus and Cabot, 985-1503 • Various

... A very short time before, this tenant had taken a grass farm from an adjoining landlord, and he was so anxious to get it that he showed the landlord a bundle of large notes, amounting to rather more than L300 sterling, in order to prove his solvency! The same tenant has since written a letter to Mr. Richardson offering L50 a year ...
— Ireland Under Coercion (2nd ed.) (2 of 2) (1888) • William Henry Hurlbert

... busy morning for Heidi, who put the hut in order for the expected visitor. The time went by quickly, and soon everything was ready to welcome the ...
— Heidi - (Gift Edition) • Johanna Spyri

... life. A train of ponies carried our tents and camping necessaries and there was a pony for each of us. And so, in the cool grey of a divine morning, with little rosy clouds flecking the eastern sky, we set out from Islamabad for Vernag. And this was the order of our going. She and I led the way, attended by a sais (groom) and a coolie carrying the luncheon basket. Half way we would stop in some green dell, or by some rushing stream, and there rest and eat our little meal while the rest of ...
— The Ninth Vibration And Other Stories • L. Adams Beck

... know nothing, but only that, by your master's order, I was to receive the two ladies into my house, ...
— The Works Of John Dryden, Volume 4 (of 18) - Almanzor And Almahide, Marriage-a-la-Mode, The Assignation • John Dryden

... a good deal of company in a quiet way. The Holts took pains to invite, at one time or another, the greater part of Mr Maxwell's friends, in order that Mr Langden and his daughter might make their acquaintance, and both in different ways won golden opinions ...
— David Fleming's Forgiveness • Margaret Murray Robertson

... be treated with a fresh dose of the old remedy. We teach the new souls not to steal, not to lie, to save their clothes, to learn their lessons, to economise their money, to obey commands, not to contradict older people, say their prayers, to fight occasionally in order to be strong. But who teaches the new souls to choose for themselves the path they must tread? Who thinks that the desire for this path of their own can be so profound that a hard or even mild pressure towards uniformity can make the ...
— The Education of the Child • Ellen Key

... their money in iron pots and chests and things in order to keep the soldiers from getting it. In Wabbaseka [HW: Ark.] there they had money buried. They buried their money to keep the soldiers from ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States - Volume II. Arkansas Narratives. Part I • Work Projects Administration

... diminished the chances of detection. The only hope was, that an increased reward might induce one of the gang to betray his confederates; and as the property was of large value, this was done, and one hundred guineas was promised for the required information. I had been to the printer's to order the placards announcing the increased recompense; and after indulging in a long gossip with the foreman of the establishment, whom I knew well, was passing at about a quarter past ten o'clock through Ryder's-court, Newport-market, where a tall man met and ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Vol. 2, No. 8, January, 1851 • Various

... fly off at every turn or impediment. It needs a couple of good conductors who understand the engineering of life. Good watch must be kept for breakers ahead. The fires must be kept up by a constant addition of the fuel of affection. The boilers must be kept full and the machinery in order, and all hands at their posts, else there will be a smashing up, or life will go hobbling or jolting along, wearing and tearing, breaking and bruising, leaving some heads and hearts to get well the best way they can. It requires skill, prudence, and judgment ...
— Aims and Aids for Girls and Young Women • George Sumner Weaver

... variations in the wax-like cylinders, due to the warping under atmospheric changes. Consequently, with the early types of commercial phonographs, it was first necessary to shave off the blank accurately before a record was formed thereon, in order that an absolutely true surface might be presented. To overcome these troubles, the very ingenious suggestion was then made and adopted, of connecting the recording and reproducing styluses to their respective diaphragms through ...
— Edison, His Life and Inventions • Frank Lewis Dyer and Thomas Commerford Martin

... and peradventure his estate is no better than it is set at, while our estates are L3 or L4 in the Queen's books, and it is not the hundredth part of our wealth?' But he knew all must be taxed, in order that the necessary sums might be levied. In his Prerogative of Parliaments he mentions that he once moved an exemption 'by commandment of Queen Elizabeth, who desired much to spare the common people.' On calculation, it was found that the exemption reduced the subsidy ...
— Sir Walter Ralegh - A Biography • William Stebbing

... Monmouth desired his grandson to meet him in his apartments on the morrow, before quitting his roof. This farewell visit was as kind and gracious as the first one had been repulsive. Lord Monmouth gave Coningsby his blessing and ten pounds; desired that he would order a dress, anything he liked, for the approaching Montem, which Lord Monmouth meant to attend; and informed his grandson that he should order that in future a proper supply of game and venison should be forwarded to Eton for the use of himself ...
— Coningsby • Benjamin Disraeli

... render the country a service which will never be forgotten. In 1861, he appeared before the navy department with a plan for an iron-clad consisting of a revolving turret mounted upon an armored raft. He secured an order for one such vessel, to be paid for only in the event that it proved successful. The majority of the board which gave the order doubtless laughed in their sleeves as the inventor withdrew, for what chance of success ...
— American Men of Mind • Burton E. Stevenson

... his return here, he became the terror of all our gamesters, who offered him an annuity of one hundred thousand livres—not to play; but as this sum would have been deducted from what is weekly paid to Fouche, this Minister sent him an order not to approach a gambling-table, under pain of being transported to Cayenne. He obeyed, but the bankers soon experienced that he had deputies, and for fear that even from the other side of the Atlantic he might forward his calculations ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... a spectator of the scene, and she could not but admire the quickness of the ambitious Eiko, and in order to pacify the rivals she determined to appoint them both to the ...
— Japanese Fairy Tales • Yei Theodora Ozaki

... that either struggle had terminated differently, but they were both in keeping with the tenacious character of the Cornish people. As a striking proof of their desperate resolution, the defenders of Pendennis themselves fired the manor-house of Arwenack, in order that it might not be occupied by the Parliamentary troops, and these had to be content with such trenches and defences as they could contrive from the ruins. The mansion was never suitably restored, and there are only a few relics ...
— The Cornwall Coast • Arthur L. Salmon

... to one you are not the same man you were the day before," replied Watson, calmly, laying down his pipe. "You have had bad news from home or your liver is out of order, or worse still, you have seen some new subject which has taken hold of you and your first enthusiasm has oozed away. If you persist in going on you will either undo what you did yesterday or you will trust to your memory of what ...
— The Fortunes of Oliver Horn • F. Hopkinson Smith

... classic mythology, "The last of the four great ages of the world described by Hesiod. Ovid, etc. It was supposed to be characterized by abounding oppression, vice, and misery."— International Dictionary. The preceding ages, in order, were the age of gold, the age of silver, and ...
— Matthew Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum and Other Poems • Matthew Arnold

... the order shall give notice eight days before the time for striking, that he will attend before the clerk of the county in which the venue is laid, for the purpose of having ...
— Civil Government for Common Schools • Henry C. Northam

... his journal, "by Colonel Thomas Polk to the several militia companies of the county for two men, selected from each beat or district to meet at the Court House in Charlotte, on the 19th day of May, 1775, in order to consult upon such measures as might be thought best to be pursued. Accordingly, on said day, a far greater number than two out of each company were present." Drawn by the great excitement of the occasion, surpassing ...
— Sketches of Western North Carolina, Historical and Biographical • C. L. Hunter

... In order the better to appease James, she committed Davison to prison, and ordered him to be tried in the star chamber for his misdemeanor. The secretary was confounded; and being sensible of the danger which must attend his entering into a contest with the queen, he expressed penitence ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part D. - From Elizabeth to James I. • David Hume

... Austria-Hungary have been concluded since my last annual message. Under these trade arrangements a free or favored admission has been secured in every case for an important list of American products. Especial care has been taken to secure markets for farm products, in order to relieve that great underlying industry of the depression which the lack of an adequate foreign market for our surplus often brings. An opening has also been made for manufactured products that will undoubtedly, if this policy is maintained, greatly augment ...
— Complete State of the Union Addresses from 1790 to the Present • Various

... upper church contains frescoes wonderfully fresh, by Cimabue, of Scriptural subjects, and frescoes of scenes from the life vowed to poverty of St Francis. In the lower church, over the tomb of St Francis, are the four masterpieces with which we have to do. These are the three vows of the order figuratively represented. Mark the fitness and grandeur of two of the figures, the suggestion of which has been attributed to Dante, the woman Chastity seated beyond assault in her rocky fortress, and Obedience bowing the neck to curb and ...
— The Old Masters and Their Pictures - For the Use of Schools and Learners in Art • Sarah Tytler

... he said; a blind instrument of Rodin, ignorant of the end in view, he believed firmly, that, in forcing Frances to place these young girls in a convent, he was performing a pious duty. Such was, and is, one of the most wonderful resources of the order to which Rodin belonged—to have for accomplices good and sincere people, who are ignorant of the nature of the plots in which they are the ...
— The Wandering Jew, Complete • Eugene Sue

... gave this order, it was a sure sign that he would not open his mouth except for conversation about his dog, ...
— Selected Polish Tales • Various



Words linked to "Order" :   order Podicipitiformes, regulate, succession, in good order, order Trichoptera, seed, money order, chapter, order Foraminifera, society, order Dinoflagellata, order Musales, order Aspergillales, organisation, armed forces, harmony, deacon, edict, order Apodiformes, unsnarl, tidy up, order Crocodylia, order Spirochaetales, order Pedipalpi, atheneum, rank-order correlation coefficient, order Primulales, order Salientia, synchronize, order Sirenia, bookclub, class, synchronise, large order, order Haemosporidia, order Sauropterygia, order Collembola, ordinate, arrange, order Hypericales, disorder, order Psilotales, order Pycnogonida, square away, bull, order Tuberales, order Accipitriformes, glee club, order Sarcosporidia, order Plantaginales, judicial separation, rule, rule of law, order Cydippida, genetic code, short order, order Cycadales, order oedogoniales, order Amoebida, rate, order Xiphosura, order Saprolegniales, rescript, monastic order, order Actiniaria, order Uredinales, enjoin, natural order, decree nisi, order Dictyoptera, order Dinornithiformes, order Solenogastres, order Geraniales, market order, concord, tidiness, order Acarina, decree, pecking order, reader, order Anostraca, mover, disorderliness, interpellation, order Saurischia, ban, court order, sorority, order Edentata, plural form, order book, kilter, taxon, order Primates, open order, order Mecoptera, side order, order Mycoplasmatales, bespeak, production order, order Testudines, short-order, order Artiodactyla, order Chelonia, order Lepidodendrales, order Lechanorales, order Helotiales, order Piperales, order Actinaria, parliamentary law, order Polemoniales, order Apodes, command, consent decree, Jesuit order, order Lagomorpha, order of magnitude, marching orders, straighten, systemise, require, systematize, order Siphonophora, plural, word order, fraternity, order Actinomyxidia, summons, Ionic order, order Rodentia, Order Osteoglossiformes, prescript, position, fungus order, order Proteales, order Pectinibranchia, order Charales, phrase, order of payment, standing order, taxonomic category, enactment, order Insessores, Doric order, subordinate, order Amphipoda, club, bring down, order Pandanales, in short order, order Hyracoidea, order Hymenoptera, order Platyctenea, order Umbellales, request, grade, order Cydippea, order Mysidacea, warn, Augustinian order, order Tetraodontiformes, order Conodontophorida, order Scrophulariales, place, gag law, artistic style, order Peronosporales, order Pseudoscorpiones, order Cypriniformes, yacht club, systematise, order of the day, prioritise, boat club, upgrade, order Phalangida, superordinate, genome, orderliness, Carthusian order, order Campanulales, order Naiadales, order Orchidales, golf club, order Jungermanniales, spit and polish, order Insectivora, clean up, anagnost, ordination, contemporize, order Juglandales, order Filicales, order Cilioflagellata, order Proboscidea, stop order, straighten out, quiet, order Andreaeales, bill-me order, order Marsupialia, order Ornithischia, Carmelite order, order Thecodontia, Orange Order, dictation, order Notostraca, order Opiliones, order Caudata, order Casuariiformes, cloture, order Chytridiales, order Nidulariales, order Torpediniformes, judge, Dorian order, order Psilophytales, order Orthoptera, order Percomorphi, credit order, order Ciconiiformes, order Piciformes, holy order, family, determine, reorder, order Opuntiales, order Hypocreales, subdeacon, order Scleroparei, Corinthian order, order Coniferales, order Hypermastigina, order Picariae, order Endomycetales, order Gaviiformes, order Pseudoscorpionida, order Heliozoa, order Urticales, order Myrtales, call, commercial instrument, closure, order Pleuronectiformes, order Coleoptera, order Myricales, enthrone, Tuscan order, order Anura, order Psittaciformes, order Siluriformes, order Alismales, order Mycelia Sterilia, order Gadiformes, decide, military, order Hymenogastrales, order Myxosporidia, order Gregarinida, tranquillity, order Phallales, bidding, collate, order Embiodea, call to order, alphabetization, disentangle, turnverein, ostiary, send for, Composite order, order Ophioglossales, acolyte, order Branchiura, order Chelonethida, order Diapensiales, arrangement, Dominican order, order Chlorococcales, prioritize, order Ericales, order Actinomycetales, order Perissodactyla, order Pholidota, order Araneae, order Madreporaria, order Stereospondyli, order Spatangoida, order Pediculati, order code, order Fucales, hunt club



Copyright © 2019 Diccionario ingles.com