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adjective
Red  adj.  (compar. redder; superl. reddest)  Of the color of blood, or of a tint resembling that color; of the hue of that part of the rainbow, or of the solar spectrum, which is furthest from the violet part. "Fresh flowers, white and reede." "Your color, I warrant you, is as red as any rose." Note: Red is a general term, including many different shades or hues, as scarlet, crimson, vermilion, orange red, and the like. Note: Red is often used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; as, red-breasted, red-cheeked, red-faced, red-haired, red-headed, red-skinned, red-tailed, red-topped, red-whiskered, red-coasted.
Red admiral (Zool.), a beautiful butterfly (Vanessa Atalanta) common in both Europe and America. The front wings are crossed by a broad orange red band. The larva feeds on nettles. Called also Atalanta butterfly, and nettle butterfly.
Red ant. (Zool.)
(a)
A very small ant (Myrmica molesta) which often infests houses.
(b)
A larger reddish ant (Formica sanguinea), native of Europe and America. It is one of the slave-making species.
Red antimony (Min.), kermesite. See Kermes mineral (b), under Kermes.
Red ash (Bot.), an American tree (Fraxinus pubescens), smaller than the white ash, and less valuable for timber.
Red bass. (Zool.) See Redfish (d).
Red bay (Bot.), a tree (Persea Caroliniensis) having the heartwood red, found in swamps in the Southern United States.
Red beard (Zool.), a bright red sponge (Microciona prolifera), common on oyster shells and stones. (Local, U.S.)
Red birch (Bot.), a species of birch (Betula nigra) having reddish brown bark, and compact, light-colored wood.
Red blindness. (Med.) See Daltonism.
Red book, a book containing the names of all the persons in the service of the state. (Eng.)
Red book of the Exchequer, an ancient record in which are registered the names of all that held lands per baroniam in the time of Henry II.
Red brass, an alloy containing eight parts of copper and three of zinc.
Red bug. (Zool.)
(a)
A very small mite which in Florida attacks man, and produces great irritation by its bites.
(b)
A red hemipterous insect of the genus Pyrrhocoris, especially the European species (Pyrrhocoris apterus), which is bright scarlet and lives in clusters on tree trunks.
(c)
See Cotton stainder, under Cotton.
Red cedar (Bot.)
(a)
An evergreen North American tree (Juniperus Virginiana) having a fragrant red-colored heartwood.
(b)
A tree of India and Australia (Cedrela Toona) having fragrant reddish wood; called also toon tree in India.
Red chalk. See under Chalk.
Red copper (Min.), red oxide of copper; cuprite.
Red coral (Zool.), the precious coral (Corallium rubrum).
Red cross
(a)
The cross of St. George, the national emblem of the English.
(b)
The Geneva cross. See Geneva convention, and Geneva cross, under Geneva.
Red currant. (Bot.) See Currant.
Red deer. (Zool.)
(a)
The common stag (Cervus elaphus), native of the forests of the temperate parts of Europe and Asia. It is very similar to the American elk, or wapiti.
(b)
The Virginia deer. See Deer.
Red duck (Zool.), a European reddish brown duck (Fuligula nyroca); called also ferruginous duck.
Red ebony. (Bot.) See Grenadillo.
Red empress (Zool.), a butterfly. See Tortoise shell.
Red fir (Bot.), a coniferous tree (Pseudotsuga Douglasii) found from British Columbia to Texas, and highly valued for its durable timber. The name is sometimes given to other coniferous trees, as the Norway spruce and the American Abies magnifica and Abies nobilis.
Red fire. (Pyrotech.) See Blue fire, under Fire.
Red flag. See under Flag.
Red fox (Zool.), the common American fox (Vulpes fulvus), which is usually reddish in color.
Red grouse (Zool.), the Scotch grouse, or ptarmigan. See under Ptarmigan.
Red gum, or Red gum-tree (Bot.), a name given to eight Australian species of Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus amygdalina, resinifera, etc.) which yield a reddish gum resin. See Eucalyptus.
Red hand (Her.), a left hand appaumé, fingers erect, borne on an escutcheon, being the mark of a baronet of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland; called also Badge of Ulster.
Red herring, the common herring dried and smoked.
Red horse. (Zool.)
(a)
Any large American red fresh-water sucker, especially Moxostoma macrolepidotum and allied species.
(b)
See the Note under Drumfish.
Red lead, (Chem) See under Lead, and Minium.
Red-lead ore. (Min.) Same as Crocoite.
Red liquor (Dyeing), a solution consisting essentially of aluminium acetate, used as a mordant in the fixation of dyestuffs on vegetable fiber; so called because used originally for red dyestuffs. Called also red mordant.
Red maggot (Zool.), the larva of the wheat midge.
Red manganese. (Min.) Same as Rhodochrosite.
Red man, one of the American Indians; so called from his color.
Red maple (Bot.), a species of maple (Acer rubrum). See Maple.
Red mite. (Zool.) See Red spider, below.
Red mulberry (Bot.), an American mulberry of a dark purple color (Morus rubra).
Red mullet (Zool.), the surmullet. See Mullet.
Red ocher (Min.), a soft earthy variety of hematite, of a reddish color.
Red perch (Zool.), the rosefish.
Red phosphorus. (Chem.) See under Phosphorus.
Red pine (Bot.), an American species of pine (Pinus resinosa); so named from its reddish bark.
Red precipitate. See under Precipitate.
Red Republican (European Politics), originally, one who maintained extreme republican doctrines in France, because a red liberty cap was the badge of the party; an extreme radical in social reform. (Cant)
Red ribbon, the ribbon of the Order of the Bath in England.
Red sanders. (Bot.) See Sanders.
Red sandstone. (Geol.) See under Sandstone.
Red scale (Zool.), a scale insect (Aspidiotus aurantii) very injurious to the orange tree in California and Australia.
Red silver (Min.), an ore of silver, of a ruby-red or reddish black color. It includes proustite, or light red silver, and pyrargyrite, or dark red silver.
Red snapper (Zool.), a large fish (Lutjanus aya syn. Lutjanus Blackfordii) abundant in the Gulf of Mexico and about the Florida reefs.
Red snow, snow colored by a mocroscopic unicellular alga (Protococcus nivalis) which produces large patches of scarlet on the snows of arctic or mountainous regions.
Red softening (Med.) a form of cerebral softening in which the affected parts are red, a condition due either to infarction or inflammation.
Red spider (Zool.), a very small web-spinning mite (Tetranychus telarius) which infests, and often destroys, plants of various kinds, especially those cultivated in houses and conservatories. It feeds mostly on the under side of the leaves, and causes them to turn yellow and die. The adult insects are usually pale red. Called also red mite.
Red squirrel (Zool.), the chickaree.
Red tape,
(a)
the tape used in public offices for tying up documents, etc. Hence,
(b)
official formality and delay; excessive bureaucratic paperwork.
Red underwing (Zool.), any species of noctuid moths belonging to Catacola and allied genera. The numerous species are mostly large and handsomely colored. The under wings are commonly banded with bright red or orange.
Red water, a disease in cattle, so called from an appearance like blood in the urine.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Red" Quotes from Famous Books



... boll weevil in its northward migration from Brownsville, Texas, crossed Red river and, during the next seven years, continued to deprive the farmers in the country north of that river of all profit on the cotton, their principal money crop; and greatly to injure the corn, their food crop. ...
— The Choctaw Freedmen - and The Story of Oak Hill Industrial Academy • Robert Elliott Flickinger

... Eviradnus, where, from beginning to end, all that surrounds the actors in the story lives with a passionate life. The trees that overhear the plot of Sigismond and Ladislas tremble and moan, and the words that issue from the lips of the miscreants are dark with shadow or red with blood. The half-ruined castle of Corbus fights with the winter, like a strong man with his enemies; the gargoyles on its towers bark at the winds, the graven monsters on the ramparts snarl and snort, the ...
— La Legende des Siecles • Victor Hugo

... financial crisis of 1837." Her real history remained a secret, locked within their own breasts. Of their three children, the youngest was named Loo Loo, and greatly resembled her beautiful mother. When she was six years old, her portrait was taken in a gypsy hat garlanded with red berries. She was dancing round a little white dog, and long streamers of ribbon were floating behind her. Her father had it framed in an arched environment of vine-work, and presented it to his wife on her thirtieth ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II, No. 8, June 1858 • Various

... towns are seen in the distance, which stretches to the mouths of the Po and the shores of the Adriatic. The climate of these volcanic hills is warmer, and the vintage begins a week sooner than in the plains of Padua. Petrarch is laid, for he cannot be said to be buried, in a sarcophagus of red marble, raised on four pilasters on an elevated base, and preserved from an association with meaner tombs. It stands conspicuously alone, but will be soon overshadowed by four lately planted laurels. Petrarch's fountain, for here every thing is ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. XVII. No. 469. Saturday January 1, 1831 • Various

... was? He had heard nothing of it. He had evaded this omnipresence by utter insignificancy! The Duke should make that man his confidential valet. I proposed locking him up, barring him the use of his fiddle and red pumps, until he had minutely perused and committed to memory the whole body of the examinations, which employed the House of Commons a fortnight, to teach him to be more attentive to what concerns the public. I think I told you of Godwin's little book, and of Coleridge's prospectus, ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Vol. 5 • Edited by E. V. Lucas

... Let it be so." Here the little man took from his pocket a red label marked FIRST CLASS and tied it on the edge of the hand car. "It is more comfortable," he said. "Now seat yourself, seize hold of these two handles in front of you. Move them back and forward, thus. Beyond that you need do nothing. The working ...
— Further Foolishness • Stephen Leacock

... clad for dress parade. Is it because the male is so restricted to gloom in his every-day attire that he blossoms into gaudy colors in his pajamas and dressing-gowns? It would take a Turk to feel at home before an audience in my red and yellow bathrobe, a Christmas remembrance from Mrs. Klopton, with slippers ...
— The Man in Lower Ten • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... of red-brown hair back from her forehead and glanced over at him. She had a narrow, pretty face, marred only by a suggestion of hardness about the mouth—which was a little more than ordinarily noticeable just now. ...
— Watch the Sky • James H. Schmitz

... The upheaval of the middle class had disclosed the need, the passions, the aspirations of the suffering poor below; ferocious insurrections in France and England caused a reaction that retarded for centuries the readjustment of power, and the red spectre of social revolution arose in the track of democracy. The armed citizens of Ghent were crushed by the French chivalry; and monarchy alone reaped the fruit of the change that was going on in the position of classes, and stirred the ...
— The History of Freedom • John Emerich Edward Dalberg-Acton

... danger, I can hardly attribute their bright colour in other cases to mere physical conditions. Bates says the most gaudy caterpillar he ever saw in Amazonia (of a sphinx) was conspicuous at the distance of yards, from its black and red colours, whilst feeding on large green leaves. If any one objected to male butterflies having been made beautiful by sexual selection, and asked why should they not have been made beautiful as well as their caterpillars, what would you answer? I could not answer, but should maintain my ground. ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume II • Francis Darwin

... entire stranger to him—never seen him before. He was a man of less than thirty years of age, wearing a broad-brimmed hat upon his head, a cloth jacket, slashed calzoneras, and a red crape scarf around his waist—in short, the ranchero costume of the country. Still, there was a military bearing about him that corresponded to the title by which the lancer captain had ...
— The Lone Ranche • Captain Mayne Reid

... sweethearts; a dozen outsiders like myself tried not to be too conspicuous in a city smartness; but the great multitude was composed of the men of the woods. I sat, chair-tilted by the hotel, watching them pass. Their heavy woollen shirts crossed by the broad suspenders, the red of their sashes or leather shine of their belts, their short kersey trousers "stagged" off to leave a gap between the knee and the heavily spiked "cork boots"—all these were distinctive enough of their class, but most interesting to me were the eyes that peered from beneath ...
— Americans All - Stories of American Life of To-Day • Various

... the choir from the west, the pavement between the stalls is of tesselated Roman mosaic, in an effective geometrical pattern of squares, and oblongs of red, green and white marbles. The first bay of the chancel is also in Roman mosaic, but of more elaborate design, the central portion being a framework of interlacing cream bands, forming diamond shaped panels alternating with circles, the centres of these panels ...
— The Cathedral Church of Peterborough - A Description Of Its Fabric And A Brief History Of The Episcopal See • W.D. Sweeting

... red, ferrety eyes, and they looked fiercely at me —fiercely but not suspiciously, I thought. He waved my hospitality aside, and said, "You ...
— The Yeoman Adventurer • George W. Gough

... than I concluded it to be that of which I was in search. To be sure, it was, to all appearance, radically different from the one of which the Prefect had read us so minute a description. Here the seal was large and black, with the D— cipher; there it was small and red, with the ducal arms of the S— family. Here, the address, to the Minister, diminutive and feminine; there the superscription, to a certain royal personage, was markedly bold and decided; the size alone formed a point of correspondence. ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 2 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... fast taking its place, and has lived a much freer life than is usual with the fowl in Europe. It is a rather small, lean, extremely active bird, lays about a dozen eggs, and hatches them all, and is of a yellowish red colour—a hue which is common, I believe, in the old barn-door fowl of England. The creolla fowl is strong on the wing, and much more carnivorous and rapacious in habits than other breeds; mice, frogs, and small snakes are eagerly hunted and devoured by it. At my home on the pampas a number of these ...
— The Naturalist in La Plata • W. H. Hudson

... "the most accurate knowledge of the essential organism reveals to us only matter in motion; but between this material movement and my feeling pain or pleasure, experiencing a sweet taste, seeing red, with the conclusion 'therefore I exist,' there is a profound gulf; and it 'remains utterly and forever inconceivable why to a number of atoms of carbon, hydrogen, etc., it should not be a matter of indifference ...
— What is Darwinism? • Charles Hodge

... again and again, while the slowly ascending sun brought the glory of colour to the world, turning the islets green, the sea blue, the brig below her white—dazzlingly white in the spread of her wings—with the red ensign streaming like a tiny ...
— 'Twixt Land & Sea • Joseph Conrad

... under the name of Adrastus, king of the Daunians, it was clearly seen whom I had in view, and the remark had not escaped critics, because Madam de Boufflers had several times mentioned the subject to me. I was, therefore, certain of being inscribed in red ink in the registers of the King of Prussia, and besides, supposing his majesty to have the principles I had dared to attribute to him, he, for that reason, could not but be displeased with my writings and their ...
— The Confessions of J. J. Rousseau, Complete • Jean Jacques Rousseau

... laughter. In the morning I was anxious to try this lower lake with the fly rod, though warned by the farmer that it was of little use. For the good of A.'s piscatorial soul I, nevertheless, insisted, and the capture of two quarter-pounders with a red palmer, and several short rises, rewarded my efforts in his interests. If he has not received my counsel, and laid it to heart, it will not be because he did not have ocular demonstration of the virtues of fly-fishing. I was not surprised ...
— Lines in Pleasant Places - Being the Aftermath of an Old Angler • William Senior

... loyalty and patriotism, notwithstanding their revered abbot, unable to remain longer inactive, had donned the warrior's dress, and departed to join and fight with his king. Assuming the cowl and robes of one of the lay brothers, and removing the red wig and beard he had adopted with his former costume, the young lord took the staff in his hand, and with difficulty bringing his hasty pace to a level with the sober step and grave demeanor of a reverend monk, reached Stirling just as the cavalcade, with the litter intended ...
— The Days of Bruce Vol 1 - A Story from Scottish History • Grace Aguilar

... "David Copperfield," which Dickens has told us was real, so far as he himself was concerned, must have occurred about this period. The reference is to the visit to "Ye Olde Red Lion" at the corner of Derby Street, Parliament Street, near Westminster Bridge, which house has only recently disappeared. He has stated that it was an actual experience of his own childhood, and how, being such a little fellow, the landlord, instead of drawing the ale, called his wife, who gave ...
— Dickens' London • Francis Miltoun

... somethin' the matter with your mind or your eyesight, one or t'other. You peaked? Why, your face was swelled up like a young one's balloon Fourth of July Day. And as for bein' pale! My soul! I give you my word I couldn't scurcely tell where your neck left off and the strip of red flannel you made me tie ...
— The Rise of Roscoe Paine • Joseph C. Lincoln

... wagons were sent out to collect them. He also said that Bismarck spoke highly to him regarding the martial and civil qualities of the crown prince, afterward the Emperor Frederick, but that regarding the Red Prince, Frederick Charles, he expressed a very ...
— Volume I • Andrew Dickson White

... fork of the Platte, about ninety miles from the principal Pawnees, and number two hundred and eighty men. The fourth band originally resided on the Kanzas and Arkansaw, but in their wars with the Osages, they were so often defeated, that they at last retired to their present position on the Red river, where they form a tribe of four hundred men. All these tribes live in villages, and raise corn; but during the intervals of culture rove in the plains ...
— History of the Expedition under the Command of Captains Lewis and Clark, Vol. I. • Meriwether Lewis and William Clark

... note: strategic location on Horn of Africa along southern approaches to Bab el Mandeb and route through Red Sea and ...
— The 1997 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... or to similar schools. The Carvakas did not believe in the authority of the Vedas or any other holy scripture. According to them there was no soul. Life and consciousness were the products of the combination of matter, just as red colour was the result of mixing up white with yellow or as the power of intoxication was generated in molasses (madas'akti). There is no after-life, and no reward of actions, as there is neither virtue nor ...
— A History of Indian Philosophy, Vol. 1 • Surendranath Dasgupta

... appearance, built of the barks of trees and puncheons, slabs, etc., often without doors. Their windows are without sashes, but small pieces of broken glasses of all shapes pasted ingeniously together with paper serve to admit the light upon a motley family, between white, red and black. Many of those wretched hovels are ready to tumble down on the heads of starving Indians, French and negroes, all mixed together. Negro-French is the common language of this town. Indeed, unless you can speak some French it is with much difficulty you can ...
— Narrative of Richard Lee Mason in the Pioneer West, 1819 • Richard Lee Mason

... me with the universe, and gave me hope and patience to persevere. At that loud tinkling, interrupted sound (now and then,) the long line of blue hills near the place where I was brought up waves in the horizon, a golden sunset hovers over them, the dwarf-oaks rustle their red leaves in the evening breeze, and the road from —— to ——, by which I first set out on my journey through life, stares me in the face as plain, but from time and change not less visionary and mysterious, than the pictures in the ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 17, No. - 480, Saturday, March 12, 1831 • Various

... thousands of acres occur in continuous belts. Indeed, viewed comprehensively the entire Basin seems to be pretty evenly divided into level plains dotted with sage-bushes and mountain-chains covered with Nut Pines. No slope is too rough, none too dry, for these bountiful orchards of the red man. ...
— The Mountains of California • John Muir

... promise bringing to men, laden and burdened with their sins, the good news that it is possible for them to be purged from them entirely by the fiery ministration of that Divine Spirit. Just as we take a piece of foul clay and put it into the furnace, and can see, as it gets red-hot, the stains melt away, as a cloud does in the blue, from its surface, so if we will plunge ourselves into the influences of that divine power which Christ has come to communicate to the world, our sin and all our impurities will melt from off us, and we shall ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - St. Mark • Alexander Maclaren

... catastrophe referred to, it is only necessary to add that if you enter from the main route from Hazebrouck you will find just off the road a convoy of some sixty dear things seeing as much life as can be beheld while groping into the insides of the Red Cross motor ambulance which it is their job to feed, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, Jan. 15, 1919 • Various

... He had a broad, open, amiable, red face, with a short black beard and a round head covered with thick hair in curls, beautifully parted. "I do not think I belong," he said; "my house of business, it is at Milan, and I am born at Finalmarina. But I come much ...
— A Voyage of Consolation - (being in the nature of a sequel to the experiences of 'An - American girl in London') • Sara Jeannette Duncan

... winter, she enjoyed them immensely. They were all interesting; all "did things"; widely various things, yet, somehow, related. There was a red-haired fire-brand whose specialty seemed to be bailing out girls arrested for picketing and whose Sunday diversion consisted in going down to Paterson, New Jersey, making the police ridiculous and unhappy for an hour ...
— The Real Adventure • Henry Kitchell Webster

... government must be that which succeeds in achieving national unity on a grand scale, without weakening the sense of personal and local independence. For in the body politic this spirit of freedom is as the red corpuscles in the blood; it carries the life with it. It makes the difference between a society of self-respecting men and women and a society ...
— The Beginnings of New England - Or the Puritan Theocracy in its Relations to Civil and Religious Liberty • John Fiske

... terribly when in love. But that of M. de Saint-Cande, girdled, like Saturn, with an enormous ring, was the centre of gravity of a face which composed itself afresh every moment in relation to the glass, while his thrusting red nose and swollen sarcastic lips endeavoured by their grimaces to rise to the level of the steady flame of wit that sparkled in the polished disk, and saw itself preferred to the most ravishing eyes in the ...
— Swann's Way - (vol. 1 of Remembrance of Things Past) • Marcel Proust

... still was Alexander Hamilton of New York, who was only thirty, one of the most remarkable examples of a statesman who developed very early and whom Death cut off before he showed any signs of a decline. One figure we miss—that of Thomas Jefferson of Virginia, tall and wiry and red-curled, who was absent in Paris as Minister ...
— George Washington • William Roscoe Thayer

... house, explosions follow, like distant shots, and the thin, misty silver is changed to a red glow. The volcano is in action,—a dull, reddish-yellow light mounts slowly up behind the black trees, thick smoke rises and rises, until it stands, a dark monster, nearly touching the zenith, its foot still in the red glare. Slowly the fire dies out, the cloud ...
— Two Years with the Natives in the Western Pacific • Felix Speiser

... of the principal temple are wretched daubs in fresco, representing the state of eternal punishment. Some of the figures are being roasted, twitched with red-hot pincers, partly baked, or forced to swallow fire. Others again, are jammed between rocks, or having pieces of flesh cut out of their bodies, etc., but fire appears to play the principal ...
— A Woman's Journey Round the World • Ida Pfeiffer

... "I'll have these little medicine cases finished by then. Mother has been helping me with them. She used to belong to the Red Cross Society at one time; and besides, a doctor's wife has need of knowing about stuff that's good for stomach-aches, colds, ...
— The Banner Boy Scouts on a Tour - The Mystery of Rattlesnake Mountain • George A. Warren

... and down dale—I suppose some of them could. I saw their races up at Red Cloud last year, and old Spotted Tail brought over a couple of ponies from Camp Sheridan that ran like a streak, and there was a Minneconjou chief there who had a very fast pony. Some of the young Ogallallas had ...
— Starlight Ranch - and Other Stories of Army Life on the Frontier • Charles King

... the ravine, near which was situated the gold cavern, had burst open and was vomiting forth vast volumes of flame and smoke. As they looked the top of the hill visibly crumbled and melted away, the flames shot up in fiercer volumes, vast quantities of red-hot ashes, mingled with huge masses of glowing incandescent rock, were projected far into the air; a terrific storm of thunder and lightning suddenly burst forth to add new terrors to the scene; and to crown all, a new rift suddenly burst open in the side of the ...
— The Pirate Island - A Story of the South Pacific • Harry Collingwood

... with the pleasure from scenery, though not directly recognised as such. The sandy plain before the house has left a strong impression, which is obscurely connected with an indistinct remembrance of curious insects, probably a Cimex mottled with red, and Zygaena, the burnet-moth. I was at that time very passionate (when I swore like a trooper) and quarrelsome. The former passion has I think nearly wholly but slowly died away. When journeying there by ...
— More Letters of Charles Darwin - Volume I (of II) • Charles Darwin

... taking a bit of red chalk from his pocket, and figuring against a whitewashed wall, "twenty times eight is so and so; then forty-two times thirty—nine is so and so—ain't it, sir? Well, add those together, and subtract this here, then that makes so ...
— I and My Chimney • Herman Melville

... forced to compound my physic for the mind with a large dose of nonsense in order to make it go down. To own the truth to you, if I had not so frequently put on the fool's-cap, the freedoms I took in other places with cowls, with Red Hats, and the Triple Crown itself, would have brought me into great danger. Not only my book, but I myself, should, in all probability, have been condemned to the flames; and martyrdom was an honour to which I never aspired. ...
— Dialogues of the Dead • Lord Lyttelton

... openness, characteristic of a peasant, nor yet that indefinable finish which only culture can give. In spite of his jaunty, fashionable attire, you would have put him down at once as belonging to what in the Old World is called "the middle class." His blue eyes indicated shrewdness, and his red cheeks habitual devotion to the national beverage. He was apparently a youth of the sort that Nature is constantly turning out by the thousand—mere weaker copies of progenitors, who by an unpropitious marriage ...
— Ilka on the Hill-Top and Other Stories • Hjalmar Hjorth Boyesen

... nose-bags, and the driver had disappeared. The Americans hadn't happened to meet with any Highlanders before, and were curious. This one must be a good fighter, they thought; a brawny giant with a bulldog jaw, and a face as red and knobby as his knees. More because he admired the looks of the man than because he needed information, Hicks went up and asked him if he had noticed a military cemetery on the road back. ...
— One of Ours • Willa Cather

... where she stands! the shawl of gorgeous red Wound like a Turk's great turban round her head; A finer shawl far trailing on the floor, Just shews her bare black elbows, and ...
— Pictures and Stories from Uncle Tom's Cabin • Unknown

... and turned quickly. John Gay's kindly eyes were beaming upon her. He had come with Jemmy Spiller, and with a stout man from whose broad red face a look of drollery was rarely absent. This was Hippisley, a comedian with a natural humour which was wont to set an ...
— Madame Flirt - A Romance of 'The Beggar's Opera' • Charles E. Pearce

... saw her first," they read. "You have three girls at K now.... Get out. I'll tell Maggie O'Rorke, and she'll pick your eyes out.... No, sir. You can have the two old maids just back of you, and the fat party with the red hair. That's your taste anyway.... If you spoke she'd freeze you so you'd ...
— The Young Railroaders - Tales of Adventure and Ingenuity • Francis Lovell Coombs

... in the London warehouse; it would need repairs, improvements. Now Lily seemed intractable. She was vexed at having to earn money for two, pretended to have none too much for herself; it was her costumes now: six sets of tights, one for each evening, pink, green, red, blue, gray, white and ...
— The Bill-Toppers • Andre Castaigne

... our carriage again, and are debating as to whither we shall go next, when we are addressed from the road-side in English. There, dressed in the red shirt, are three young men, all not far from twenty years of age, members of the British regiment of "Excursionists." They are out foraging for their mess, and ask a ride with us to Santa Maria. We are only ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 7, Issue 42, April, 1861 • Various

... marched, leaving in their track the desolation of a desert. I have thought of harvests trampled down—of towns and villages once the seat of happiness and prosperity, reduced to heaps of smoking ruins—of battle-fields red with blood which has been shed by those who ought to have been brothers—of families broken up, or reduced to poverty; of widowed wives, of orphan children, and all the other misfortunes which are inseparably connected with ...
— A Report of the Debates and Proceedings in the Secret Sessions of the Conference Convention • Lucius Eugene Chittenden

... tribe of Red Indians, now much reduced, and partially settled in the Indian Territory, U.S.; noted ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... was suddenly so close to her, partly because she disapproved of the cunning expression on his red, seamed face and was afraid he might divine her thoughts, and partly because she recalled the violent things she had said against him to Louis. But as soon as Thomas Batchgrew caught sight of her the expression of his faced ...
— The Price of Love • Arnold Bennett

... marvellous little family circle of children of genius in Charlotte Street, he had also the power of looking at it from the outside. It would be strange, indeed, if this or any other power should be found lacking in him. I have often heard Rossetti—by the red flicker of the studio fire, when the gas was turned down to save his eyesight—give the most graphic and fascinating descriptions of the little group and the way in which they grew up to be what they were under the tuition of a father whose ...
— Old Familiar Faces • Theodore Watts-Dunton

... knowing Just what I did, perhaps I wished to see The American who brought the money—well, No matter what it was, I walked in view Upon the landing, stood there for a moment And saw our visitor, a clergyman From all appearances. He stared, grew red, Large eyed and apoplectic, then he rose, Walked side-ways, backward, stumbled toward the door, Rattled with shaking hand the knob and jerked The door ajar, with open mouth backed out Upon the street and ran. I heard him run A square ...
— Toward the Gulf • Edgar Lee Masters

... did have a high nose and terribly keen eyes with something behind the keenness that baffled her. And his mouth was pleasant, especially when that smile hid just behind his lips; also, she liked his hair, which was thick and brown, with hints of red in it here and there, and a strong inclination to curl where it was longest. She had known he was tall when he stepped into the light of the door; now she saw that he was slim to the point of leanness, with square shoulders and a nervous quickness when he moved. His fingers ...
— The Ranch at the Wolverine • B. M. Bower

... hiding-place as children; it was a secret refuge now against hunger or darkness when they were hunting in the woods. The primitive meal was finished; ashes were raked over the red coals; the slice of bacon and the little bag of meal were hung high against the rock wall; and the two stepped from the cavern into ...
— A Cumberland Vendetta • John Fox, Jr.

... to meet Gertie, and, as the three went towards the red-bricked lions' house, mentioned that he proposed to write a dialogue sketch of the Zoo; up to the present little worth recording had been overheard, and he expected he would, as usual, be compelled ...
— Love at Paddington • W. Pett Ridge

... sight of colours which they disliked, patients flew into the most violent rage, and, like the St. Vitus's dancers when they saw red objects, could scarcely be restrained from tearing the clothes of those spectators who raised in them ...
— The Black Death, and The Dancing Mania • Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker

... could not understand which was the brougham she meant—there was so many broughams. "The black one with the red blinds was it? Oh, that—that was a very old friend—yes, old Lord Cripplegate, was in the brougham: he had the gout, ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 2, January, 1851 • Various

... Pastorale," which Rickie had thought too sentimental, but which Agnes had persuaded him to include. The stories were sent to another publisher, who considered them for six weeks, and then returned them. A fragment of red cotton, Placed by Agnes between the leaves, ...
— The Longest Journey • E. M. Forster

... Early one season, and before her time, A weakly lamb. It chanced to be upon Jesus' birthday, when he was eight years old. So Mary said—"We'll name it after him,"— (Because she ever thought to please her child)— "And we will sign it with a small red cross Upon the back, a mark to know it by." And Jesus loved the lamb; and, as it grew Spotless and pure and loving like himself, White as the mother's milk it fed upon, He gave not up his care, till it became Of strength enough to browse and then, because Joseph had no land of his ...
— The Germ - Thoughts towards Nature in Poetry, Literature and Art • Various

... sailor's mind, when they were landing a cable out of a store into a ship, and one of 'em said: ''T is a long heavy cable, I wish we could see the end of it.' 'Damn me,' says another, 'if I believe it has any end; somebody has cut it off.'" A cable twisted of British red tape was indeed a coil without an end. In this case, before the patent was granted, Franklin had become so unpopular, and the Revolution so imminent, that the matter was dropped by a sort oL ...
— Benjamin Franklin • John Torrey Morse, Jr.

... curious and important portion of the work of Agatharcides on the Red Sea, relates to Abyssinia; for in this work we meet with the first genuine characteristics of this nation. He specifies particularly the gold mines wrought by the kings of Egypt on the coast of the Red Sea;—the process which they followed ...
— Robert Kerr's General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 18 • William Stevenson

... window, the frame of which was made of fine black ebony; and, as she was looking out upon the snow, she pricked her finger, and three drops of blood fell upon it. Then she gazed thoughtfully down on the red drops which sprinkled the white snow and said, "Would that my little daughter may be as white as that snow, as red as the blood, and as black as the ebony window-frame!" And so the little girl grew up; her skin was a white as snow, her cheeks as rosy as blood, and her ...
— Grimm's Fairy Stories • Jacob Grimm and Wilhelm Grimm

... region indicate, it was once famous as a hunting ground, and so, as a fighting ground, for the powerful tribes of early days. And an ample Reservation in this basin—ending just where the good lands begin—is the stamping ground of the last of the mountain red men. ...
— Laramie Holds the Range • Frank H. Spearman

... staple fare is drama—red-blooded drama, where one is never in doubt as to who is in love with whom, and how much. Sometimes, to be frank, there is a passing flirtation, due to pique, between a wife and a third party, leading to misunderstandings, complications and blank despair ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, March 18, 1914 • Various

... rocking-chair that rocked on a track of its own, and thus saved the yellow-and-red hotel carpet, the Honourable Dave Beckwith patiently explained the vexatious process demanded by his particular sovereign state before she should consent to cut the Gordian knot of marriage. And his state—the Honourable Dave remarked—was in the ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... grows red, and your nose it grows thin, And your bones they stick out, till they comes through ...
— Alton Locke, Tailor And Poet • Rev. Charles Kingsley et al

... on her, Mary Ellen was dragging the broom feebly across the gigantic green and red lilies of the carpet, her bare red arms moving like listless antennae. She could, when she willed, work vigorously and well, but no one knew when a heavy mood might seize her, and render her as useless as was compatible with ...
— Explorers of the Dawn • Mazo de la Roche

... warms with all her fires; Above the Greeks his deathless fame to raise, And crown her hero with distinguish'd praise. High on his helm celestial lightnings play, His beamy shield emits a living ray; Th' unwearied blaze incessant streams supplies. Like the red star that ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. in Nine Volumes - Volume the Eighth: The Lives of the Poets, Volume II • Samuel Johnson

... up the lamp, and looked long and earnestly into the fever-flushed face. His own seemed to have caught the reflection of that red glow, when at last ...
— Kate Danton, or, Captain Danton's Daughters - A Novel • May Agnes Fleming

... sitting at a side-table drinking a glass of cognac and talking with Monsieur de Puymaigre, one of the Prince de Conde's officers. As his glance met that of Mr. Calvert, he bowed constrainedly, and the red of his face deepened. He was more dissipated-looking, less debonair than he had seemed to Calvert in Madame d'Azay's salon. There was an uneasiness, too, in his manner that was reflected in the attitude toward him ...
— Calvert of Strathore • Carter Goodloe

... Grace's red face and swimming eyes told how this shaft went home. In short, she made a coy promise that she would co-operate with Mrs. Little "and," said she, "how lucky! he has almost promised to grant me the first favor I ask him. Well, I shall entreat him to be a good ...
— Put Yourself in His Place • Charles Reade

... dinner hour was long past. Alec was disinclined for a heavy meal; so he went to his private suite, where he changed his clothes, contenting himself with some sandwiches, which he ate in a hurry and washed down with a glass of red wine. ...
— A Son of the Immortals • Louis Tracy

... in the many reaches between Abingdon and Wallingford, the sights would have been those which a man sees now. And though at Wallingford he would have had before him a town of brilliant red tiles and timberwork, and a town perhaps larger than that which we see to-day, yet (could such a man come to life again) the contrast would not strike him here, and still less in the fields below, so much as when he came near ...
— The Historic Thames • Hilaire Belloc

... fouled out, however, and the next one sent a red-hot liner directly at Merriwell. There was no time to get out of the way, so Frank caught it, snapped the ball to third, found Hinkley off the bag, and retired the side ...
— Frank Merriwell at Yale • Burt L. Standish

... introduced, providing for a constitutional amendment permitting a national initiative and referendum on suffrage in the states, thereby forcing upon women the very course we had sought to circumvent. This red herring drawn across the path had been accepted by the conservative suff- ragists evidently in a moment of hopelessness, and their strength put behind it, but the politicians who persuade them to back it knew that it was merely an ...
— Jailed for Freedom • Doris Stevens

... little creature in a straw hat, playing on what the nurses used to call "the libery lawn"— a beautiful stretch of sward, upon which the Great Parlour window opened. This lawn is half surrounded by an old red sandstone battlement wall, with a long, terrace-like mound in front of it. Suddenly, in the middle of our play, I saw the Great Parlour window open and my father, with his hand held to shelter his eyes from the glare, stepping on to the gravel path. He called to my elder ...
— The Adventure of Living • John St. Loe Strachey

... the catalogue). A folio volume bound in red morocco, bearing the Bethune arms. This MS. is on ruled paper, and only one leaf, ...
— The Tales Of The Heptameron, Vol. V. (of V.) • Margaret, Queen Of Navarre

... out his red cotton handkerchief from his pocket and began to wipe his forehead, on which the beads of perspiration ...
— Robert Coverdale's Struggle - Or, On The Wave Of Success • Horatio, Jr. Alger

... million sq km note: includes Andaman Sea, Arabian Sea, Bay of Bengal, Flores Sea, Great Australian Bight, Gulf of Aden, Gulf of Oman, Java Sea, Mozambique Channel, Persian Gulf, Red Sea, Savu Sea, Strait of Malacca, Timor Sea, and other tributary ...
— The 2004 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... seventeen articles of faith wholly satisfactory to Catholics, and who allowed himself to be consecrated according to the Catholic ritual. He promised also to use his influence to secure the adhesion of the other bishops. In 1576 the king issued a new liturgy, /The Red Book of Sweden/, which was adopted by the Diet in 1577, and accepted by a large body of the clergy. Its principal was the king's brother, Karl, Duke of Suthermanland, who for political reasons had constituted himself head of ...
— History of the Catholic Church from the Renaissance to the French • Rev. James MacCaffrey

... I saw Chopin angry, it was at this moment. It was beautiful to see how a light red coloured his ...
— Frederick Chopin as a Man and Musician - Volume 1-2, Complete • Frederick Niecks

... bivouac of negro soldiers, with the brilliant fire lighting up their red trousers and gleaming from their shining black faces, eyes and teeth all white with tumultuous glee. Overhead, the mighty limbs of a great live-oak, with the weird moss swaying in the smoke, and the ...
— Army Life in a Black Regiment • Thomas Wentworth Higginson

... "The knight that was in the Red Launde at the assembly, that jousted with Messire Gawain, and had ...
— High History of the Holy Graal • Unknown

... they came to the first landing. Entering the library, with its bright red lacquer, they sat down to await events. But Tabs did not sit long; he was too restless. Having flung wide the French windows which opened out on to the veranda, he kept going to the ...
— The Kingdom Round the Corner - A Novel • Coningsby Dawson

... engulfed now. I drew a deep breath and surrendered myself. The tall, energetic figure of Anna Mihailovna, the lady to whose practical business gifts and unlimited capacity for compelling her friends to surrender their last bow and button in her service we owed the existence of our Red Cross unit, was to be seen like a splendid flag waving its followers on to glory and devotion. We were devoted, all of us. Even I, whose second departure to the war this was, had after the feeblest resistance surrendered myself to the drama of the occasion. I should have ...
— The Dark Forest • Hugh Walpole

... usual striped wall, red and white; the red is a fine terra-cotta, the colour of the sand. The central block, the shrine itself, has inlays of green, red, and blue; there is more terra-cotta in the roof, some yellow too, and white. Beyond on ...
— Things as They Are - Mission Work in Southern India • Amy Wilson-Carmichael

... about a certain easterly fisher-village, where they tasted in a high degree the glory of existence. The place was created seemingly on purpose for the diversion of young gentlemen. A street or two of houses, mostly red and many of, them tiled; a number of fine trees clustered about the manse and the kirkyard, and turning the chief street into a shady alley; many little gardens more than usually bright with flowers; nets a-drying, and fisher-wives scolding in the ...
— Across The Plains • Robert Louis Stevenson

... the red and heaving earth My mother rose, whose broad and queenly limbs A fiery arrow did impale, and round Pursuing tongues oozed up of nether fire, And fastened on her: like a winter-blast Among the steeples, then she shrieked aloud, 'Pray ...
— The Saint's Tragedy • Charles Kingsley

... as a lily of the field, and her skin was white as the purest wax, save where a damask rose-leaf red glowed through her cheeks. Her black hair curled about her slender neck. Her gown was crimson, slashed with gold, cut square across the breast and simply made, with sleeves just elbow-long, wide-mouthed, and lined with creamy silk. Her slippers, too, were of crimson silk, high-heeled, ...
— Master Skylark • John Bennett

... Charlotte, "pray don't you believe That I'm better than Jenny my nurse? Only see my red shoes, and the lace on my sleeve; Her clothes are ...
— Cole's Funny Picture Book No. 1 • Edward William Cole

... The morning-red is on our brow, The brand, the curse grows pale with night; The sword is in our hands, and now All gleams in glory's golden light: We're free! Ye nations, hear the call— We see! and now ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol 2, No 6, December 1862 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... offers of assistance. With Sumter in flames above his head, Anderson replied that he had not surrendered; he declined assistance; and he hauled up his flag. Later in the day the flagstaff was shot in two and again the flag fell, and again it was raised. Flames had been kindled anew by red-hot shot, and now the magazine was in danger. Quantities of powder were thrown into the sea. Still the rain of red-hot shot continued. About noon, Saturday, says the Courier, "flames burst out from every quarter of Sumter and poured from many of its portholes... the ...
— The Day of the Confederacy - A Chronicle of the Embattled South, Volume 30 In The - Chronicles Of America Series • Nathaniel W. Stephenson

... his head in amazement, which gave place to rage at the red thing flashing before his sullen eyes. Snorting, he charged just as the lad snatched the hat from the ground and, ...
— Rodney, the Ranger - With Daniel Morgan on Trail and Battlefield • John V. Lane

... abuses; and at this very time the Bourbon princes declared themselves at Nancy and Bordeaux. The tactless Comte d'Artois was at Nancy, striving to whip up royalist feeling in Lorraine, and his eldest son, the Duc d'Angouleme, entered Bordeaux with the British red-coats (March 12th). ...
— The Life of Napoleon I (Volumes, 1 and 2) • John Holland Rose

... I felt sure he was not able to work, but was anxious, nevertheless, though in vain, to gratify his wish. One evening I communicated to him a slight hope of an opening to some employment. The increased brightness of his eye, the red spot on each cheek, and his sleeplessness that night, proved that he was not able to bear even the excitement of a sudden hope. Poor fellow! it was plain he would never work ...
— Gathering Jewels - The Secret of a Beautiful Life: In Memoriam of Mr. & Mrs. James Knowles. Selected from Their Diaries. • James Knowles and Matilda Darroch Knowles

... of the smaller vessels and capillaries are formed, and the products of the internal divisions of the cells become the corpuscles within the vessels. The red blood corpuscles of the rabbit, it may be added, are nucleated for a considerable portion of embryonic life. Larger vessels and the heart are burrowed, as it were, out of masses of mesoblast cells. The course of the blood in the embryo is by the veins to the right auricle, thence through the imperfection ...
— Text Book of Biology, Part 1: Vertebrata • H. G. Wells

... extremities. They were of various sizes, from that of a mustard seed, up to that of a grain of Indian corn. Some were slightly elevated, but most of them were not in the least so. In the majority, there was a minute central spot, or little point, more red or pink coloured than the blue areola, by which it was surrounded. In many instances, these little points projected, so as to become manifest to the touch. In the course of twenty-four hours, the spots, which ...
— North American Medical and Surgical Journal, Vol. 2, No. 3, July, 1826 • Various

... the trouble is,' resumed the young man, 'my governor, who's the head of the firm, is all for doing things according to precedent. He loves red tape—wears it wrapped round him in winter instead of flannel. He's all for doing things in the proper legal way, which, as I dare say you know, takes months. And, meanwhile, everybody's wondering what's happening and who has got the money, and so on and so forth. I thought I would ...
— Uneasy Money • P.G. Wodehouse

... I'm coming to. We've got to get down to business. The little lady is worth a ton of men, composers or not. She's got us to the point, and now there's no getting away from it. I'm stuck, dead stuck, on this libretto. Now, it's not a bit of use your getting red and firing up, my boy. I'm not saying a word against you and your music. But the first thing is the libretto. Why, how could you write an opera without a libretto? Just tell me that! Very well, then. You've ...
— The Way of Ambition • Robert Hichens

... part which he sustains in the contest with Godly Fear, or the Red-cross knight, see ...
— Stones of Venice [introductions] • John Ruskin

... strip of coast, protected on the south by the low-lying lake Mareotis and on the north by the Mediterranean, he built there a magnificent Greek city. On the south it was connected by canal with the Canopic arm of the Nile. Alexander thus diverted to this new metropolis the rich trade of the Red Sea and the Nile. A mile distant was the island of Pharos, which was connected with the mainland by a great moll. On either side, protected from the storms, were the eastern and western harbors, large enough to accommodate the merchant-men and navies of the ancient world. On the ...
— The Makers and Teachers of Judaism • Charles Foster Kent

... and washing themselves daily with cows' urine), and are exquisite cooks, reaching in many respects a higher stage of civilization, in Schweinfurth's opinion, than is elsewhere attained in Africa, only the women wear aprons. The neighboring tribes of the red soil—Bongo, Mittoo, Niam-Niam, etc.—are called "women" by the Dinka, because among these tribes the men wear an apron, while the women obstinately refuse to wear any clothes whatsoever of skin or stuff, going into the woods every day, however, to get a supple bough ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 1 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... place as any, I may say frankly that I never fully understood this side of Ephraim Yeates. Like all the hardy borderers, he was a fighter by instinct and inclination; and I can bear him witness that when he smote the "Amalekites," as he would call them—red skin or red coat—he smote them hip and thigh, and was as ruthless as that British Captain Turnbull who slew the wounded. Yet withal, on the very edge of battle, or mayhap fair in the midst of it, he was like to fall upon his knees ...
— The Master of Appleby • Francis Lynde

... look like you'd take a red-hot stove if you wanted to; but they said—Say; is your maiden name 'Kurt?' No! It ...
— Penny of Top Hill Trail • Belle Kanaris Maniates



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