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noun
Rime  n.  A rent or long aperture; a chink; a fissure; a crack.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Rime" Quotes from Famous Books



... painting, and painting very inartistically, so little was the red shaded into the surrounding white. Now this was certainly not beautiful. Indeed, it occasioned a strange feeling, almost of terror, at first, for she reminded one of the spectre woman in the "Rime of the Ancient Mariner." But when I got used to her complexion, I saw that the form of her features was quite beautiful. She might indeed have been LOVELY but for a certain hardness which showed through the beauty. This might have been the result of ill health, ...
— Annals of a Quiet Neighbourhood • George MacDonald

... to the fireside, And set the wide oak chair, And with her warm hands brushed away The sea-rime from ...
— Ballads of Lost Haven - A Book of the Sea • Bliss Carman

... fireside and complained that the least breeze of wind seemed to blow through his frame. He also suffered much from cold during the night. We lay close to each other but the heat of the body was no longer sufficient to thaw the frozen rime formed by our breaths on ...
— The Journey to the Polar Sea • John Franklin

... grave to throw, No cypress, sombre on the snow; Snap not from the bitter yew His leaves that live December through; Break no rosemary, bright with rime And sparkling to the cruel clime; Nor plod the winter land to look For willows in the icy brook To cast them leafless round him: bring No spray ...
— A Shropshire Lad • A. E. Housman

... recognised the one-eyed man. He smiled. He must have understood. But he turned his head away. The sight of the one-eyed man, of his moustaches which congealed blood stiffened as with sinister rime, caused him profound grief. He would have liked to die in perfect peace. So he avoided the gaze of Rengade's one eye, which glared from beneath the white bandage. And of his own accord he proceeded to the end of the Aire Saint-Mittre, to the narrow lane ...
— The Fortune of the Rougons • Emile Zola

... And Kipling is not read so much as a certain American writer who discovered that by writing verse in prose form he could make the public forget their prejudice against poetry and indulge their natural pleasure in rhythm and rime. ...
— Definitions • Henry Seidel Canby

... that I may be more safe under the defense of your name and the shadow of your protection. In them all may see, who will, how purely and amply I have sought after and cherished the power of the Church and reverence for the keys; and, at the same rime, how unjustly and falsely my adversaries have befouled me with so many names. For if I had been such a one as they wish to make me out, and if I had not, on the contrary, done everything correctly, according to my academic privilege, the Most Illustrious Prince ...
— Works of Martin Luther - With Introductions and Notes (Volume I) • Martin Luther

... of that celestiall fire, The base-borne brood of Blindnes cannot gesse, Ne ever dare their dunghill thoughts aspire Unto so loftie pitch of perfectnesse, But rime at riot, and doo rage in love, 395 Yet little wote what doth ...
— The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 5 • Edmund Spenser

... he proposed to "read something in Miss Palmer's style," and taking up a volume of Hood, and avoiding both his serious and the best of his comic poems, turned to two or three of the worst he could find. After these he read a vulgar rime about an execution, pretending to be largely amused, making flat jokes of his own, and sometimes explaining elaborately ...
— What's Mine's Mine • George MacDonald

... that of the eighteenth century) be rejected, but the language of poetry should be a selection from that of ordinary people in real life, only purified of its vulgarities and heightened so as to appeal to the imagination. (In this last modification lies the justification of rime.) There neither is nor can be any essential difference between the language of ...
— A History of English Literature • Robert Huntington Fletcher

... "it may happen That we die before our time: Little Alice died last year; her grave is shapen Like a snowball in the rime. We looked into the pit prepared to take her: Was no room for any work in the close clay, From the sleep wherein she lieth none will wake her, Crying, 'Get up, little Alice! it is day.' If you listen by that grave, ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 6 • Various

... "La rime n'est pas riche" nor is the technique thoroughly assured; but the thought is poetical. Here is another, "In an Apple-Tree," which reads like a child variation of that haunting "Mimnermus in Church" ...
— De Libris: Prose and Verse • Austin Dobson

... of old a queen, untouched by Time, Resting the beauty that no seas could tire, Sparkling, as though the midnight's rain were rime, Like a man's ...
— Georgian Poetry 1913-15 • Edited by E. M. (Sir Edward Howard Marsh)

... we found the ground white with snow, and flakes of frost driving through the budding branches of the trees. Every bird was mute, as if with horror and the tender amber-and-green leaves of the maples shone through the rime with ...
— A Daughter of the Middle Border • Hamlin Garland

... spirit of their king. As the chill rainy night passed away he drew up his army on the twenty-fifth of October and boldly gave battle. The English archers bared their arms and breasts to give fair play to "the crooked stick and the grey goose wing," but for which—as the rime ran—"England were but a fling," and with a great shout sprang forward to the attack. The sight of their advance roused the fiery pride of the French; the wise resolve of their leaders was forgotten, and the dense mass of men-at-arms plunged heavily forward through miry ground on the ...
— History of the English People, Volume III (of 8) - The Parliament, 1399-1461; The Monarchy 1461-1540 • John Richard Green

... fared on until I came to the crest of a mountain where I took shelter for the night in a cave. When day arose I set out again, nor ceased after this fashion till I arrived at a fair city and a well filled. Now it was the season when Winter was turning away with his rime and to greet the world with his flowers came Prime, and the young blooms were springing and the streams flowed ringing, and the birds were sweetly singing, as saith the poet concerning a certain ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 1 • Richard F. Burton

... frosty rime upon the trees, which, in the faint light of the clouded moon, hung upon the smaller branches like dead garlands. Withered leaves crackled and snapped beneath his feet, as he crept softly on towards the house. The desolation of a winter night sat brooding on the earth, and in ...
— The Battle of Life • Charles Dickens

... handwriting of a person of the name of Richard Jackson, all copied prior to the year 1631, and including many unpublished pieces, by a variety of celebrated poets. One of the most curious is a song in five seven-line stanzas, thus headed: 'Shakespeare's Rime, which he made at the Mytre in Fleete Streete.' It begins: 'From the rich Lavinian shore;' and some few of the lines were published by Playford, and set as a catch. Another shorter piece is called ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 183, April 30, 1853 • Various

... continued its silent work, weaving its blanket softer, deeper. The straggling pedestrians of early morning bent their heads into it and drove first paths through the immaculate mantle. The fronts of owl cars and cabs were coated with a sugary white rime. Broadway lay in a white lethargy that is her nearest approach ...
— Every Soul Hath Its Song • Fannie Hurst

... Payne is a very great man, but they differ as two stars differ in glory. Burton is the magnificent man of action and the anthropologist, Mr. Payne the brilliant poet and prose writer. Mr. Payne did not go to Mecca or Tanganyika, Burton did not translate The Arabian Nights, [10] or write The Rime of Redemption and Vigil and Vision. He did, however, produce the annotations of The Arabian Nights, and a remarkable enough and ...
— The Life of Sir Richard Burton • Thomas Wright

... greatly risen, so that one who walked between the graves could see the whole interior of the place through the windows. The tiled roof, sparkling and white with the morning frost, was beginning to drip, and dew shone on the melting rime, while all around the enclosure orchards were planted, and the ...
— Fated to Be Free • Jean Ingelow

... is the door of Heaven opened for the blessed ones and the joy of its music known of them. Winsome is the plain with its wide green woods. And there is neither rain nor snow, nor breath of frost nor flame of fire, nor the rush of hail, nor the falling of rime, nor burning heat of the sun, nor everlasting cold, but blessed and wholesome standeth the plain, and full is the noble country of the ...
— Our Catholic Heritage in English Literature of Pre-Conquest Days • Emily Hickey

... at this unholy connection, for Morgan valued not their prayers a rush, Gideon strode forth, his eyes twinkling grievously as the drizzling rime came on his face. His long ungainly figure, surmounted by a high-peaked hat, was seen cautiously stealing through the trenches. Near to the embrasure by Morgan's mortar-piece he made a sudden halt. After preparing his drum, he first beat the roll to crave attention. ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) • John Roby

... O never now, Lord of the lofty and the tranquil brow Whereon nor snows of time Have fall'n, nor wintry rime, Shall men behold thee, sage and mage sublime. Once, in his youth obscure, The maker of this verse, which shall endure By splendour of its theme that cannot die, Beheld thee eye to eye, And touched through thee the hand Of every hero ...
— The Poems of William Watson • William Watson

... and with mossy rime Until they seem no monument of ours, But one more note in earth's ...
— Collected Poems - Volume One (of 2) • Alfred Noyes

... after leaving the lifeboat station, Condy and Blix reached the old, red-brick fort, deserted, abandoned, and rime-incrusted, at the entrance of the Golden Gate. They turned its angle, and there rolled the Pacific, a blue floor of shifting water, stretching out there forever and forever over the curve of the earth, over the shoulder of the world, with never a sail in ...
— Blix • Frank Norris

... a thousand shining points on the dingy fur. He rubbed his heavy eyes and looked about him. The misty rime of the night had frozen on hills and woods and river,—frosted the whole earth in one glittering, delicate sheath. The first level bar of sunlight put into the nostrils of the dead world of the night before the breath of life. Once in a lifetime, maybe, ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 13, No. 75, January, 1864 • Various

... fruits, though gathered ere their prime, Still showed a quickness, and maturing time But mellows what we write to the dull sweets of Rime. ...
— Ancient Ballads and Legends of Hindustan • Toru Dutt

... Stop your footfall on the rime! Hard you push, your hand is rough; You have swung me long enough. "Nay, no stopping," say you? Well, Some of your best stories tell, While you swing me—gently, do!— From the ...
— Journeys Through Bookland V2 • Charles H. Sylvester

... lor esser dritto sparte Tanto, che gli augelletti per le cime Lasciasser d' operare ogni lor arte: Ma con piena letizia l' aure prime, Cantando, ricevano intra le foglie, Che tenevan bordone alle sue rime Tal, qual di ramo in ramo si raccoglie Per la pineta in sul lito di Chiassi ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Second Series • John Addington Symonds

... tree! O Hemlock-tree! how faithful are thy branches! Green not alone in summer time, But in the winter's frost and rime! O Hemlock-tree! O Hemlock-tree! ...
— Yule-Tide in Many Lands • Mary P. Pringle and Clara A. Urann

... is English Heroic Verse without Rime as that of Homer in Greek, and of Virgil in Latin; Rime being no necessary Adjunct or true Ornament of Poem or good Verse, in longer Works especially, but the Invention of a barbarous Age, to set off wretched matter and lame Meeter; grac't indeed since by the ...
— The Poetical Works of John Milton • John Milton

... tainted in desire. About him (Fairies) sing a scornfull rime, And as you trip, still pinch him to ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... hard and he tried to make himself believe that the lower boxes and the tables had caught it—that there was more in the mercury than there looked. But the tension as he took up riffle after rime with the one result was like watching a long-drawn-out race with all one's possessions staked on ...
— The Man from the Bitter Roots • Caroline Lockhart

... romantic love and knightly honor to a higher pitch than his model, Boccaccio. But the shrewdly practical Pandarus of the former poem—a character almost wholly of Chaucer's creation—is the very embodiment of the anti-romantic attitude, and a remarkable anticipation of Sancho Panza; while the "Rime of Sir Thopas" is a distinct burlesque of the fantastic chivalry romances.[2] Chaucer's pages are picturesque with tournament, hunting parties, baronial feasts, miracles of saints, feats of magic; but they are solid, ...
— A History of English Romanticism in the Eighteenth Century • Henry A. Beers

... his sleeve. There is no doubt, however, regarding the sincerity of his strictures upon the Della Cruscan Vocabulary of 1612, or the more famous inquiry into Petrarch's style. The Considerazioni sopra le Rime del Petrarca were composed in 1602-3 during a sea voyage from Genoa to Spain. They told what now must be considered the plain truth of common sense about the affectations into which a servile study of the ...
— Renaissance in Italy, Volumes 1 and 2 - The Catholic Reaction • John Addington Symonds

... know the Truth and in spite of Ruth tear piecemeal the Inexact, Come list to my Lay that I sing to-day, and choose betwixt him and me, And choosing show that ye always know the Lie from the Veritee! —The Rime of the ...
— Double Trouble - Or, Every Hero His Own Villain • Herbert Quick

... wise poet of Florence, That highte Dant, speken of this sentence: Lo, in swiche maner rime is Dantes tale. Ful selde up riseth by his branches smale Prowesse of man, for God of his goodnesse Wol that we claime of him our gentillesse." Wif ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 187, May 28, 1853 • Various

... gleam sparkles lush, As on the rime-kissed, deadened leaves. Upon her cheek a purple ...
— Enamels and Cameos and other Poems • Theophile Gautier

... sou cou! Tu feras bien, en train d'energie De rendre un peu la Rime assagie Si Ton n'y veille, ...
— Suspended Judgments - Essays on Books and Sensations • John Cowper Powys

... early nonage, when the sun Tempers his tresses in Aquarius' urn, And now towards equal day the nights recede, When as the rime upon the earth puts on Her dazzling sister's image, but not long Her milder sway endures, then riseth up The village hind, whom fails his wintry store, And looking out beholds the plain around All whiten'd, whence impatiently he ...
— The Divine Comedy, Complete - The Vision of Paradise, Purgatory and Hell • Dante Alighieri

... season is equally inviting with any of its predecessors; whilst he who can "suck melancholy from a song," will find melody in its storms and music in its wind. What are more beautiful than the fretwork frostings of rime and hoar spread on the hedges, glistening in the broad sun-beam, and in brilliancy and variety of colours vying with the richest display of oriental splendour—with here and there berries clustering on evergreens, or pendent ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, No. - 287, December 15, 1827 • Various

... marvellous sleep, which brought a dream. And it was this: that all at once she heard The pleasant babbling of a little stream That ran beside her door, and then a bird Broke out in songs. She looked, and lo! the rime And snow had melted; it ...
— Poems by Jean Ingelow, In Two Volumes, Volume I. • Jean Ingelow

... flowers beset; And oft the morning muser see Larks rising from the broomy lea, And every fairy wheel and thread Of cobweb dew-bediamonded. When daisies go, shall winter time Silver the simple grass with rime; Autumnal frosts enchant the pool And make the cart-ruts beautiful; And when snow-bright the moor expands, How shall your children clap their hands! To make this earth our hermitage, A cheerful and a changeful page, God's bright and intricate ...
— Underwoods • Robert Louis Stevenson

... sheepskins, concealed by the high collars which reached to the brim of their hats—showing nothing but eyes where the rime made old faces and young all alike, it was difficult for any to judge of his neighbour—whether he were Pole or Prussian, Dantziger or Swede. The women in thick shawls, with hoods or scarves concealing their faces, ...
— Barlasch of the Guard • H. S. Merriman

... home, please God, early on the evening of Saturday. It continues to be delightful weather here—gusty, but very clear and fine. Leech and I had a charming country walk before breakfast this morning at Poissy and enjoyed it very much. The rime was on the grass and trees, and ...
— The Letters of Charles Dickens - Vol. 1 (of 3), 1833-1856 • Charles Dickens

... draught four base beet heel but steaks coarse choir cord chaste boar butt stake waive choose stayed cast maze ween hour birth horde aisle core rice male none plane pore fete poll sweet throe borne root been load feign forte vein kill rime shown wrung hew ode ere wrote wares urn plait arc bury peal doe grown flue know sea lie mete lynx bow stare belle read grate ark ought slay thrown vain bin lode fain fort fowl mien write mown sole drafts fore bass beat seem steel dun bear there creak bore ball wave chews staid caste maize heel bawl ...
— The Art Of Writing & Speaking The English Language - Word-Study and Composition & Rhetoric • Sherwin Cody

... du s'cavoir Fit braver le Nord et les glaces; Boufflers se plait en nos vergers, Et veut 'a nos sons 'etrangers Plier sa voix enchanteresse. R'ep'etons son nom Mille fois, Sur tons les coeurs Bourflers aura des droits, Par tout o'u la rime et la Presse 'a l'amour pr'eteront ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole Volume 3 • Horace Walpole

... the shrill noise of drums oppresse our ears; Now peace and safety from our shores are fled To holes and cavernes to secure their head; Now all the graces from the land are sent, And the nine Muses suffer banishment; Whence spring these raptures? whence this heavenly rime, So calme and even in so harsh a time? Well might that charmer his faire Caelia crowne, And that more polish't Tyterus renowne His Sacarissa, when in groves and bowres They could repose their limbs on beds of flowrs: When wit had prayse, and merit had reward, And every noble spirit did accord ...
— Lucasta • Richard Lovelace

... chill fell on her, and a shadow; Her breath congealed, and on those rosy lips The white rime gathered. From behind a rock, Which crowned the mountain, there advanced to view WOLE, that old warrior who before OENE Rumbled his boastful story. In his hand He poised his massive spear in act to throw; Yet, seeing there, chilled in her loveliness, (Like some young rose-bud ...
— The Arctic Queen • Unknown

... to seek; and then his thoughts run over all the parts thereof, in the same manner, as one would sweep a room, to find a jewell; or as a Spaniel ranges the field, till he find a sent; or as a man should run over the alphabet, to start a rime. ...
— Leviathan • Thomas Hobbes

... earlier frosts of the season, after the first snows have fallen, but when there is still plenty of moisture in the ground, the loveliest fern-fronds of pure rime may be found in myriads on the meadows. They are fashioned like perfect vegetable structures, opening fan-shaped upon crystal stems, and catching the sunbeams with the brilliancy of diamonds. Taken at certain angles, they decompose ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete - Series I, II, and III • John Symonds

... kindnes she requited with dropping some dozen of short courtsies, and bidding God blesse the Dauncer. I bad her adieu; and to giue her her due, she had a good eare, daunst truely, and wee parted friendly. But ere I part with her, a good fellow, my friend, hauin writ an odde Rime of her, I will make bolde ...
— Kemps Nine Daies Wonder - Performed in a Daunce from London to Norwich • William Kemp

... their mirth-tide waxen less, Though the swooping mountain tempest howl round their ridgy ness, Though a house of the windy battle their streeted burg be grown, Though the heaped-up, huddled cloud-drift be their very hall-roofs crown, Though the rivers bear the burden, and the Rime-Gods grip and strive, And the snow in the mirky midnoon across the ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs • William Morris

... had removed the fires of the night, and the Sun, with its rays, had dried the grass wet with rime, {when} they met together at the wonted spot. Then, first complaining much in low murmurs, they determine, in the silent night, to try to deceive their keepers, and to steal out of doors; and when they have left the house, to quit the buildings of the ...
— The Metamorphoses of Ovid - Vol. I, Books I-VII • Publius Ovidius Naso

... To rout the flying foe. See, every patriot oak-leaf throws His elfin length upon the snows, Not idle, since the leaf all day Draws to the spot the solar ray, Ere sunset quarrying inches down, And halfway to the mosses brown; While the grass beneath the rime Has hints of the propitious time, And upward pries and perforates Through the cold slab a thousand gates, Till green lances peering through Bend ...
— Poems - Household Edition • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... and hard in men may conceal the remains of childhood's better feeling? And, also, shall it not make us deplore and guard against those influences which can change the sincere and loving child into the deceitful and selfish man-that cover the spring of genuine feeling with the thick rime of worldliness, and petrify the tender chords of the heart into rough, unfeeling sinews? The man should not be, in all respects, as the child. The child cannot have the glory of the man. If it is not polluted by his vices, ...
— The Crown of Thorns - A Token for the Sorrowing • E. H. Chapin

... was on that countenance. There was the youthful forehead under the brown hair, the almost indignant knitting of the eyebrows, the pinched nostrils, the closed eyelids, the lashes glued together by the rime, and from the corners of the eyes to the corners of the mouth a deep channel of tears. The snow lighted up the corpse. Winter and the tomb are not adverse. The corpse is the icicle of man. The nakedness ...
— The Man Who Laughs • Victor Hugo

... struggle with the redoubtable Silas Whipple. He was not afraid, but a poor young man as an applicant to a notorious dragon is not likely to be bandied with velvet, even though the animal had been a friend of his father. Dragons as a rule have had a hard rime in their youths, and believe in others ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... Not a word is said about beauty in Browning's theory. The average man regards poetry as being necessarily melodious, rhythmical, tuneful, above all, pleasing to the senses; but Browning makes no allusion here to rime or rhythm, nor to melody or music of any sort. To him the bard is a Reporter of Life, an accurate Historian of the Soul, one who observes human nature in its various manifestations, and gives a faithful record. Sound, rhythm, beauty are important, ...
— Robert Browning: How To Know Him • William Lyon Phelps

... bear the muffled tone of their engine bell from out the fog bank of their chilled breath, which announces that the cars are coming, without long delay, notwithstanding the veto of a New England northeast snow-storm, and I behold the plowmen covered with snow and rime, their heads peering, above the mould-board which is turning down other than daisies and the nests of field mice, like bowlders of the Sierra Nevada, that occupy an outside place in ...
— Walden, and On The Duty Of Civil Disobedience • Henry David Thoreau

... was indeed foretold in the evening by the garden caterpillars, who refused to come out despite appearances which to my duller senses seemed to promise a continuation of the fine weather. At daybreak the rosemary-walks are all asparkle with rime and for the second time this year there is a sharp frost. The large pond in the garden is frozen over. What can the caterpillars in the conservatory be doing? Let ...
— The Wonders of Instinct • J. H. Fabre

... in the night, harder than was common on the Berg even in winter, and as I crossed the road next morning it was covered with rime. All my fears had gone, and my mind was strung high with expectation. Five pencilled words may seem a small thing to build hope on, but it was enough for me, and I went about my work in the store with a reasonably light heart. One of the first things I did was to ...
— Prester John • John Buchan

... second time. it is a kind of mean thing to say about my sister Cele but it is a good rime ennyway as long as i sed she was hansome i dont beleeve ...
— Brite and Fair • Henry A. Shute

... fell apart; each firm and dark, spicy and rich, under the frosty rime above; and laying a specially large piece in one of grandma's quaint little china plates, Polly added the flowers and handed it to Tom, with a look that said a good deal, for, seeing that he remembered her sermon, she was glad ...
— An Old-fashioned Girl • Louisa May Alcott

... jaws, the gesture and the attitude of apology brought him back to mind at once. Hornett's coat sleeve was torn, and showed his arm half way down to the elbow, but revealed no hint of linen, The collar of his frock-coat was buttoned tightly about his neck, and there was a sparkling metallic rime upon his cheeks and chin and upper lip. Bommaney was ashamed before him, and afraid of him, and only some faint reminder of self-respect and the pride of earlier days held him back from ...
— Young Mr. Barter's Repentance - From "Schwartz" by David Christie Murray • David Christie Murray

... the day to come broke clear and still, with the stars paling one by one at the pointing finger of the dawn, and the frost-rime lying thick and white like a snowfall of erect and glittering needles on iron and ...
— A Fool For Love • Francis Lynde

... regarded as one of the classics of our language, was first published in 1843, in a small volume entitled "Dramatic Lyrics." The same volume contained the well-known rime of "The Pied Piper of Hamelin." Robert Browning was at that time a young man of thirty, and most of the poems which afterwards made him famous were ...
— Eighth Reader • James Baldwin

... as "Goody Blake" and "The Idiot Boy" to the magnificent blank verse of "Tintern Abbey"; Coleridge's share consisted of a brief poem called "The Nightingale," two short extracts from "Osorio," and "The Rime of ...
— Coleridge's Ancient Mariner and Select Poems • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... love water as well. Though I never saw this preparation for sleep in windy weather, yet, setting out early in a morning from one of the huts, I have seen the marks of their lodging, where the ground has been free from rime or snow, which remained all round the spot where they had lain' (Letters from Scotland, Lond. 1754, 8vo, ...
— The Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... the animals were very thirsty, and in a great hurry to drink, they did not care to dispute the matter, but gabbled off the words without a second thought. Even the royal tiger, treating it as a jest, repeated the Jackal's rime, in consequence of which the latter became quite a cock-a-hoop, and really began to believe he was a personage of ...
— The Junior Classics, Volume 1 • Willam Patten

... great palace, built on the tree-tops of a forest ages old; where the buxom air bathed every limb, and was to his ethereal body as water—sensible as a liquid; whose every room rocked like the baby's cradle of the nursery rime, but equilibrium was the merest motion of the will; where the birds nested in its cellars, and the squirrels ran up and down its stairs, and the woodpeckers pulled themselves along its columns and rails by their beaks; ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... Poor Laura could not hear; Longed to buy fruit to comfort her, 310 But feared to pay too dear. She thought of Jeanie in her grave, Who should have been a bride; But who for joys brides hope to have Fell sick and died In her gay prime, In earliest Winter time With the first glazing rime, With the first snow-fall of ...
— Goblin Market, The Prince's Progress, and Other Poems • Christina Rossetti

... ceiling, but a sea in which we swam; a sea so cold that a shiver crept through our bones into our marrow. We had escaped the clutches of the wind, to drown in fog, and in five minutes I had beside me a small, ghostly form with frosted hair, and a white rime on his jacket. The Boy was like a figure on a great iced cake, for the ...
— The Princess Passes • Alice Muriel Williamson and Charles Norris Williamson

... shut his door, and listened. It came again—a strange unearthly musical cry! If ever disembodied sound went wandering in the wind, just such a sound must it be! Knowing little of music save in the forms of tone and vowel-change and rhythm and rime, he felt as if he could have listened for ever to the wild wandering sweetness of its lamentation. Almost immediately it ceased—then once more came again, apparently from far off, dying away on the distant tops of the billowy air, out ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... shoes, and began to walk up and down the floor to try and warm myself. I looked out; there was rime on the window; it was snowing. Down in the yard a thick layer of snow covered the paving-stones and the top of the pump. I bustled about the room, took aimless turns to and fro, scratched the wall with my nail, leant my head carefully against the door for a while, tapped with my forefinger on the ...
— Hunger • Knut Hamsun

... figlia, e madre, e sposa, Di quel Signor, che ti dette le chiave Del cielo e dell' abisso, e d' ogni cosa, Quel di che Gabriel tuo ti disse Ave! Perche tu se' de' tuo' servi pietosa, Con dolce rime, e stil grato e soave, Ajuta i versi miei benignamente, E'nsino al fine allumina ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 4 • Lord Byron

... above, wide-spreading plane trees grow on the topmost point. And from it towards the land a hollow glen slopes gradually away, where there is a cave of Hades overarched by wood and rocks. From here an icy breath, unceasingly issuing from the chill recess, ever forms a glistening rime which melts again beneath the midday sun. And never does silence hold that grim headland, but there is a continual murmur from the sounding sea and the leaves that quiver in the winds from the cave. And here is the outfall of the river Acheron which bursts its way through the ...
— The Argonautica • Apollonius Rhodius

... in the evening the frost became very intense. At South Lambeth, for the four following nights, the thermometer fell to 11 deg., 7 deg., 0 deg., 6 deg.; and at Selborne to 7 deg., 6 deg., 10 deg.; and on the 31st of January, just before sunrise, with rime on the trees, and on the tube of the glass, the quicksilver sunk exactly to zero, being 32 deg. below freezing point; but by eleven in the morning, though in the shade, it sprung up to 16-1/2 deg.—a most unusual degree of cold this for the south of England. During these four nights the ...
— MacMillan's Reading Books - Book V • Anonymous

... as this spelling clearly betrays what that wrong etymology is. 'Rhyme' with a 'y' is a modern misspelling; and would never have been but for the undue influence which the Greek 'rhythm' has exercised upon it. Spenser and his cotemporaries spell it 'rime'. 'Abominable' was by some etymologists of the seventeenth century spelt 'abhominable', as though it were that which departed from the human (ab homine) ...
— English Past and Present • Richard Chenevix Trench

... had gone with Mr. Henry, I will give some words of his, uttered (as I have cause not to forget) upon the 26th of February 1757. It was unseasonable weather, a cast back into winter: windless, bitter cold, the world all white with rime, the sky low and grey: the sea black and silent like a quarry-hole. Mr. Henry sat close by the fire, and debated (as was now common with him) whether "a man" should "do things," whether "interference was wise," ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition, Vol. XII (of 25) - The Master of Ballantrae • Robert Louis Stevenson

... storm which had rendered it so gloomy, and the fair cold day shone upon a world shrouded in icy cerements; a hushed, windless world, as full of glittering rime-runes as the frozen fields of Jotunheim. Each tree and shrub seemed a springing fountain, suddenly crystallized in mid-air, and not all the mediaeval marvels of Murano equalled the fairy fragile tracery of fine spun, glassy web, and film, and fringe that stretched along fences, hung from ...
— Infelice • Augusta Jane Evans Wilson

... employed instead of verse, for two reasons. In the first place, no metrical form has yet been found which, in the writer's judgment, at all adequately represents in modern English the effect of the Old English alliterative verse, or stave-rime. And in the second place, to the writer's thinking, no one but a poet should attempt to write verse: and on that principle, translations would be few and far ...
— Genesis A - Translated from the Old English • Anonymous

... Coleridge's 'Rime of the Ancient Mariner' is an imaginative expression of that divine love which embraces all creatures, from the highest to the lowest, of the consequences of the severance of man's soul from this animating principle of the universe, and of those spiritual ...
— Introduction to Robert Browning • Hiram Corson

... his window; it communicated with a balcony, built out to command the wide view which, from a certain height, that part of the park affords. He stepped into the balcony and bared his breast to the keen air. The uncomfortable and icy heavens looked down upon the hoar-rime that gathered over the grass, and the ghostly boughs of the deathlike trees. All things in the world without brought the thought of the grave, and the pause of being, and the withering up of beauty, closer and closer ...
— Ernest Maltravers, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... whites and natives, the door opened and, with an inrush of cold air that condensed the moisture at that end of the room into a cloud and shot along the floor like steam from an engine exhaust, there entered an Indian covered with rime, his whole head-gear one mass of white frost, his snow-shoes, just removed, under his arm, and a beaded moose-skin wallet over his shoulder. Every eye was at once turned to him as he beat the frost from his ...
— Ten Thousand Miles with a Dog Sled - A Narrative of Winter Travel in Interior Alaska • Hudson Stuck

... the first days of the holidays, and had shown Diana quite a story-book aspect of Christmas, with a light fall of snow on the fells, hoar-frost on all the plants and ferns in the garden, and the sun a red ball seen through a rime-tipped tracery of trees. After that, however, it revenged itself in rain, steady rain that came down from a hopelessly grey sky without the least glint of sunlight in it. It was very mild too; the air had a heavy languor that made everybody feel tired and disinclined ...
— A harum-scarum schoolgirl • Angela Brazil

... lime to tangle her desires By wailful sonnets whose composed rime Should be full fraught with serviceable vows . . . Say that upon the altar of her beauty You sacrifice your sighs, your ...
— A Life of William Shakespeare - with portraits and facsimiles • Sidney Lee

... melt through my prison bars, Last night across my damp earth-floor fell the pale gleam of stars; In the coldness and the darkness all through the long night-time, My grated casement whitened with autumn's early rime. Alone, in that dark sorrow, hour after hour crept by; Star after star looked palely in and sank adown the sky; No sound amid night's stillness, save that which seemed to be The dull and heavy beating of the pulses of ...
— The Complete Works of Whittier - The Standard Library Edition with a linked Index • John Greenleaf Whittier

... toward—he did not acknowledge what. Young men as a type did not seem to Elsa of special interest any more than a hundred other objects on earth. And then the cold weather before long put an end to the little promenades of rime by the shore, and Gard had to try other lines of attack on this radiant and beflowered ...
— Villa Elsa - A Story of German Family Life • Stuart Henry

... wonder at it: you are made Rather to wonder at the things you heare, Then to worke any. Will you Rime vpon't, And vent it for a Mock'rie? Heere is one: "Two Boyes, an Oldman (twice a Boy) a Lane, "Preseru'd the Britaines, was the ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... ensure condemnation. But there ought to be a place for any story, which, although founded in the marvellous, is true to human nature and to itself. Truth to Humanity, and harmony within itself, are almost the sole unvarying essentials of a work of art. Even The Rime of the Ancient Mariner—than which what more marvellous?—is true in these respects. And Shakespere himself will allow any amount of the marvellous, provided this truth is observed. I hope my story is thus true; and therefore, while it claims some place, undeserving ...
— The Portent & Other Stories • George MacDonald

... Coleridge, and homely every-day subjects, which Wordsworth loved to beautify. Occasionally Coleridge tried himself in the other field, as in his "Lines to a Young Ass." In the same year Coleridge brought out the famous "Rime of the Ancient Mariner," his "Odes," and wrote his first version of "Christabel." The period at Nether Stowey, from 1797 to 1798, was Coleridge's most fruitful year as a poet. All his best poetic ...
— A History of the Nineteenth Century, Year by Year - Volume Two (of Three) • Edwin Emerson

... sky; the market people and other early stragglers, trotting to circulate their almost frozen blood; the hospitable light and warmth of the few coffee-shops and public-houses that were open for such customers; the hard, dry, frosty rime with which the air was charged (the wind had already beaten it into every crevice), and which lashed my ...
— The Holly-Tree • Charles Dickens

... their gray steeds set to gallop amain, and ran a race when the road seemed fair. From time to time, a thane of the king, who had made many vaunts, and was mindful of verses, stored with sagas and songs of old, bound word to word in well-knit rime, welded his lay; this warrior soon of Beowulf's quest right cleverly sang, and artfully added an excellent tale, in well-ranged words, of the warlike deeds he had heard in saga of Sigemund. Strange the story: he said it all, — the Waelsing's wanderings wide, his struggles, ...
— Beowulf • Anonymous

... lived inside the tall fir-tree, kept rubbing each other's noses to keep themselves warm, and the Rabbits curled themselves up in their holes, and did not venture even to look out of doors. The only people who seemed to enjoy it were the great horned Owls. Their feathers were quite stiff with rime, but they did not mind, and they rolled their large yellow eyes, and called out to each other across the forest, 'Tu-whit! Tu-whoo! Tu-whit! Tu-whoo! what delightful ...
— A House of Pomegranates • Oscar Wilde

... clear, and the morning was bitterly cold, with rime hanging like a filmy veil in the air and glistening like flakes of silver in the sunshine. Doctor Joe and Eli ran in turns by the side of the komatik, ...
— Troop One of the Labrador • Dillon Wallace

... green! O Fir-tree green! Your leaves are constant ever, Not only in the summer time, But through the winter's snow and rime You're ...
— Christmas - Its Origin, Celebration and Significance as Related in Prose and Verse • Various

... rime n'est pas riche, et le style en est vieux: Mais ne voyez-vous pas que cela vaut bien mieux Que ces colifichets dont le bon sens murmure, Et que la passion parle la ...
— Ballads of Romance and Chivalry - Popular Ballads of the Olden Times - First Series • Frank Sidgwick

... this boc, Efft otherr sithe writenn, Himm bidde icc thatt hett write rihht, Swa sum thiss boc himm taechethth; All thwerrt utt affterr thatt itt iss Oppo thiss firrste bisne, Withth all swilc rime als her iss sett, Withth alse fele wordess: And tatt he loke well thatt he An boc-staff write twiggess,[47] Eggwhaer thaer itt uppo thiss boc Iss writenn o thatt wise: Loke he well thatt hett write swa, Forr he ne magg noht elless, On Englissh ...
— A Handbook of the English Language • Robert Gordon Latham

... of Bacchus at this present time, Was by the giddie Menades intended There Mirrha daunc'd, and Orpheus sung in rime crownd with green thirses, now yet y[u]hes ended with praise to Bacchus all depart with spright, vnto their feastes, feasts that deuoure the night, for loe, the stars, in trauaile in the skie, brought forth their brightnes to each ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... leave to the vile herd the existence of the brutes. Cato has compared the life of man to the tool of iron: use it well, it shines, cease to use it and it rusts." It was not until 1502 that Aldus adopted a Mark, the well-known anchor, and this appears for the first time in "Le Terze Rime di Dante" (1502), which, being a duodecimo, is the first edition of Dante in portable form. This Mark, and one or two others with very slight alterations which naturally occurred in the process of being re-engraved, ...
— Printers' Marks - A Chapter in the History of Typography • William Roberts

... may naturally enough present itself is, that these curious bodies are the result of some process of aggregation which has taken place in the carbonate of lime; that, just as in winter, the rime on our windows simulates the most delicate and elegantly arborescent foliage—proving that the mere mineral matter may, under certain conditions, assume the outward form of organic bodies—so this mineral substance, carbonate of lime, hidden away in ...
— Young Folks' Library, Volume XI (of 20) - Wonders of Earth, Sea and Sky • Various

... santo monte; Non pero dal loro esser dritto sparte Tanto, che gli augelletti per le cime Lasciasser d'operare ogni lor arte; Ma con piena letizia l'ore prime Cantando ricevieno intra le foglie Che tenevan bordone alle sue rime, Tal qual di ramo in ramo si raccoglie Per la pineta in sul lito di Chiassi, Quand'Eolo scirocco fuor discioglie. Gia m'avean trasportato i lenti passi Dentro all'antica selva tanto, ch'io Non potea rivedere ond'io m'entrassi; ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 20, No. 118, August, 1867 • Various

... time of fleecy rime And falling flakes, and O The glad surprise in baby eyes That never saw ...
— Child Songs of Cheer • Evaleen Stein

... in the opening—an indescribably dirty, unutterably weary face, with matted white hair and a rime of whitish beard stubble on the jaws. It was fallen in and sunken and it drooped on the chest of its owner. The mouth, swollen and pulpy, as if from repeated hard blows, hung agape, and between the purplish parted lips showed the stumps of broken teeth. ...
— The Escape of Mr. Trimm - His Plight and other Plights • Irvin S. Cobb

... face betrays no gloom, And the primrose pants in its heedless push, Though the myrtle asks if it's worth the fight This year with frost and rime To venture one more time On delicate leaves and buttons of white From the selfsame bough as at last year's prime, And never to ruminate on or remember What happened to it ...
— Moments of Vision • Thomas Hardy

... some moments looking out over the sea, through the rime-covered windows, in a breathless silence. The cure spoke ...
— Tomaso's Fortune and Other Stories • Henry Seton Merriman

... the burlesque poets of Italy. This praise of poverty in the reply of Ver to the accusation of Summer is one proof of his acquaintance with them. See "Capitolo sopra l'epiteto della poverta, a Messer Carlo Capponi," by Matteo Francesi in the Rime Piacevoli del Berni, Copetta, Francesi, &c., vol. ii. ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... from the sea, But the sea-rime blinded the glass, And "Heard ye nothing, mother?" she said, "'Tis the child that waits ...
— Verses 1889-1896 • Rudyard Kipling

... stars of fire spotting the stream below; And from above into the Sun's dominions 395 Flinging a glory, like the golden glow In which Spring clothes her emerald-winged minions, All interwoven with fine feathery snow And moonlight splendour of intensest rime, With which frost paints the pines in ...
— The Witch of Atlas • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... have you of jokin' at this hour of the day or night?" said Mrs. M'Gurk, feeling the unseasonableness acutely as a bitter gust came swooping up the slope and indiscriminatingly ruffled the rime-dusted grass-tufts and her ...
— Strangers at Lisconnel • Barlow Jane

... ponds on Mellor common, and the stagnant pool in the midst of the village, whence it drew its main water supply, were frozen hard. But the ploughed chalk land itself lay a dull grey beside the glitter of the pastures, and the woods under the bright sun of the days dropped their rime only to pass once more with the deadly cold of the night under the fantastic empire of the frost. Every day the veil of morning mist rose lightly from the woods, uncurtaining the wintry spectacle, and melting into the brilliant ...
— Marcella • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... upon the window-seat half laughing, yet the tears in her eyes. And there, with her face pressed against the glass, she waited while the dawn stole upon the night, while in the park the trees emerged upon the grass white with rime, while on the face of the down thickets and paths became slowly visible, while the first wreaths of smoke began to curl and hover in the ...
— The Testing of Diana Mallory • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... that card With rime and diction far from subtle, Hear what a now rebellious bard Says in ...
— Tobogganing On Parnassus • Franklin P. Adams

... they had disappeared without my having seen how or where they went. Then he told me that he had found them drowned in a water-hole. I thought he was going to scold me for not having watched them better, but he said gently, "Go and get warm; you have got all the rime of Sologne in your hair." I made up my mind that I would go and see the waterhole. But during the night snow fell so quickly that we couldn't go out to the ...
— Marie Claire • Marguerite Audoux

... origin of the sisters throughout, and, consequently, adduces little evidence in favour of the theory. One of his points is the derivation of the word "weird" or "wayward," which, as will be shown subsequently, was applied to witches. Another point is, that the witch scenes savour strongly of the staff-rime of old German poetry. It is interesting to find two upholders of the Norn-theory relying mainly for proof of their position upon a scene (Act I. sc. i.) which Mr Fleay says that the very statement of this theory (p. 249) must brand as spurious. The question of the sisters' beards ...
— Elizabethan Demonology • Thomas Alfred Spalding

... who first gave to English blank verse those qualities which make it an extraordinarily perfect medium of expression. Before him, blank verse had no advantages to offer in compensation for the abandonment of rime. It was stiff, monotonous, and cold. Marlowe began to vary the position of the pauses within the line, and to do away with the pause at the end of some lines by {32} placing the breaks in thought elsewhere. Thus he gave to his verse ease, flexibility, and movement, ...
— An Introduction to Shakespeare • H. N. MacCracken

... of her window, and gave a gasp of delight as she saw the shimmering, rime-covered trees, with the sunshine striking full upon them and bringing out sparks of light from every branch and twig. Whatever sounds there were in the streets came to her softened and mellowed over the snow-laden ground, and as she listened she ...
— The Governess • Julie M. Lippmann



Words linked to "Rime" :   assonance, alliterate, beginning rhyme, eye rhyme, fit, water ice, alliteration, vowel rhyme, hoar, hoarfrost, ice, rhyme, consonance, agree, assonate, versification, internal rhyme, check, match, create verbally, initial rhyme, tag, tally, assonant, jibe, poesy, double rhyme, verse, consonant rhyme, verse form, gibe, correspond, frost, poetry, poem



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