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Scape   Listen
noun
Scape  n.  
1.
(Bot.) A peduncle rising from the ground or from a subterranean stem, as in the stemless violets, the bloodroot, and the like.
2.
(Zool.) The long basal joint of the antennae of an insect.
3.
(Arch.)
(a)
The shaft of a column.
(b)
The apophyge of a shaft.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Scape" Quotes from Famous Books



... with a solemn dignity, "precisely such strangers as the scape-grace brother of a noble girl must be to those who rescued this girl in her earliest childhood, sheltered her, taught her, honored and loved her as true brothers should, and to whom she clung with all a sister's ...
— Donald and Dorothy • Mary Mapes Dodge

... Madam, will you do? Just gods! But someone comes. Go, fly from shame, You cannot 'scape if seen by ...
— Phaedra • Jean Baptiste Racine

... feels a pain in the same part oneself—a sympathetic pain. What more natural than to suppose that the pain really is transferred from the one person to the other? and how easy the inference that by tormenting a wretched scape-goat or crucifying a human victim in some cases the sufferings of people may be relieved ...
— Pagan & Christian Creeds - Their Origin and Meaning • Edward Carpenter

... distinguish, then pursue the right, Thy power the breast from every error frees And weeds out every error by degrees:— Illumined by thy beam, revenge we find The abject pleasure of an abject mind, And hence so dear to poor, weak womankind. But why are those, Calvinus, thought to 'scape Unpunished, whom in every fearful shape Guilt still alarms, and conscience ne'er asleep Wounds with incessant strokes 'not loud but deep', While the vexed mind, her own tormentor, plies A scorpion scourge, unmarked by human eyes? Trust me, no tortures which the poets feign, ...
— Post-Augustan Poetry - From Seneca to Juvenal • H.E. Butler

... all. It seemed as if Yerbury meant to make them the scape-goat of every thing. Robert Winston was broadly caricatured; and there was a bit of insulting abuse, calling them traders in their brethren's blood, pasted up on the gate-post. "The Evening Transcript" went over the system of co-operation, and showed ...
— Hope Mills - or Between Friend and Sweetheart • Amanda M. Douglas

... the Beautiful, shall ne'er From Hel return to upper air! Betrayed by Loki, twice betrayed, The prisoner of Death is made; Ne'er shall he 'scape the place of doom ...
— Myths of the Norsemen - From the Eddas and Sagas • H. A. Guerber

... food and drinks and cunning magic arts Turning the channel's course to 'scape from death.[B] The breeze which heaven has sent We must ...
— Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus • Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

... bloody flag Be once advanc'd on my vermilion tent, He dies, and those that kept us out so long; And, when they see me march in black array, With mournful streamers hanging down their heads, Were in that city all the world contain'd, Not one should scape, but perish by ...
— Tamburlaine the Great, Part I. • Christopher Marlowe

... more, Since thou art furnished with hidden lore, To 'scape thy due reward if any day Without some task ...
— Love and Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... she can but smile for glee. Was no pagan of such high chivalry. Comes through the press, above them all cries he, "Be not at all dismayed, King Marsilie! To Rencesvals I go, and Rollanz, he Nor Oliver may scape alive from me; The dozen peers are doomed to martyry. See here the sword, whose hilt is gold indeed, I got in gift from the admiral of Primes; In scarlat blood I pledge it shall be steeped. Franks shall ...
— The Song of Roland • Anonymous

... the appraising glint in the coot grey eyes of the foppish scape-grace before her. She lowered her own eys quickly to hid a hunted look in their dark depths as ...
— Down the Mother Lode • Vivia Hemphill

... root as in the pineapple, joined at the base, straight, ligulate, very fleshy and becoming thinner toward the end, with stiff thorns along the edges. Flowers between yellow and red outside and straw-colored inside, in racemes on a cylindrical scape 3 or more high, sometimes ramose, peduncles very short. Corolla cylindrical, somewhat incurved, cleft to the middle in 6 parts, 3 external, acute and superposed on the others, obtuse at the apex and of different color. Stamens 6, inserted at the nectiferous base of the ovary ...
— The Medicinal Plants of the Philippines • T. H. Pardo de Tavera

... ah! where, shall poverty reside, To 'scape the pressure of continuous pride? If to some common's fenceless limits stray'd, 305 He drives his flock to pick the scanty blade, Those fenceless fields the sons of wealth divide, And e'en ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Oliver Goldsmith • Oliver Goldsmith

... Black; the antennae and the head above their insertion ferruginous, the scape black, the head coarsely punctured. Thorax: coarsely punctured; the mesothorax with an abbreviated deeply impressed line in the middle of its anterior margin; wings fulvo-hyaline, the nervures ferruginous; the apex of the wings slightly fuscous, the anterior pair with two submarginal ...
— Journal of the Proceedings of the Linnean Society - Vol. 3 - Zoology • Various

... thou oft hast bid the world attend, Fond to forget the statesman in the friend; For Swift and him, despised the farce of state, The sober follies of the wise and great; 10 Dext'rous, the craving, fawning crowd to quit, And pleased to 'scape from Flattery ...
— The Poetical Works Of Alexander Pope, Vol. 1 • Alexander Pope et al

... here compares Israel to the scape goat, who had the sins of the people-laid upon him, and ...
— Five Pebbles from the Brook • George Bethune English

... redeem you from those rascals, Burr and Failer—that way, Sir Timorous, for fear of spies; I'll meet you at the garden door.—[Exit TIMOROUS.] I have led all women the way, if they dare but follow me. And now march off, if I can scape but spying, With my drums ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Vol. II • Edited by Walter Scott

... of my divorce to all On whom those fainter beams of love did fall; Marry those loves, which in youth scattered be On face, wit, hopes, (false mistresses), to thee. Churches are best for prayer that have least light: To see God only, I go out of sight; And, to 'scape stormy days, ...
— England's Antiphon • George MacDonald

... is the admirable helpmate my scape-grace has had the saving good luck to find? A daughter of the worthy man who undertook the care of poor Dr. Lloyd's orphans,—the orphans who owed so much to your generous exertions to secure a provision for them; and that child, now just risen from her ...
— A Strange Story, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... Ghent; And—beat for jubilee the drum! A maid and minstrel with him come." Bertram, a Fleming, gray and scarred, Was entering now the Court of Guard, 115 A harper with him, and in plaid All muffled close, a mountain maid, Who backward shrunk, to 'scape the view Of the loose scene and boisterous crew. "What news?" they roared. "I only know, 120 From noon till eve we fought with foe, As wild and as untamable As the rude mountains where they dwell; On both sides store of blood is lost, Nor much success can either ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... to 1-1/2 in. wide, in 3-bracted whorls of 3, borne near the summit of a leafless scape 4 in. to 4 ft. tall. Calyx of 3 sepals; corolla of 3 rounded, spreading petals. Stamens and pistils numerous, the former yellow in upper flowers; usually absent or imperfect in lower pistillate flowers. Leaves: Exceedingly ...
— Wild Flowers Worth Knowing • Neltje Blanchan et al

... that stand upright. God gives thee this: They that are faithful to thy Faith, that walk Thy way, and keep thy covenant with God, And daily sing thy hymn, when comes the Judge With Sign blood-red facing Jehosaphat, And fear lays prone the many-mountained world, The same shall 'scape the doom." And Patrick said, "That hymn is long, and hard for simple folk, And hard for children." And the angel thus: "At least from 'Christum Illum' let them sing, And keep thy Faith: when comes the Judge, the pains Shall take not hold of such. Is that enough?" ...
— The Legends of Saint Patrick • Aubrey de Vere

... was much too shrewd a man not to see exactly the motives which had induced Mr. Stirn to incarcerate his agent, (barring only that of personal grudge, to which Lenny's account gave him no clue.) That a man high in office should make a scape-goat of his own watch-dog for an unlucky snap, or even an indiscreet bark, was nothing strange to the wisdom of the student of Machiavelli. However, he set himself to the task of consolation with equal philosophy and tenderness. He began by reminding, ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 3, February, 1851 • Various

... Mont St. Michael, on the Norman coast, A restless river, changing oft its course, Flows sullenly; and racehorse-like the tide, Which, going, leaves a wilderness of sand. Comes rushing back, a foam-topp'd, wat'ry wall; And those who, wand'ring, 'scape the quicksand's grip, Are often caught and drown'd ere help can come. But fair the prospect from the Mount when bright The sunshine falls on Avranches far away, A white town straggling o'er a verdant hill; And on the tree-clad country toward the west, On apple orchards, and the fairy ...
— Ideala • Sarah Grand

... never offered twice: seize, then, the hour When Fortune smiles and Duty points the way; Nor shrink aside to 'scape the fear.— Nor pause though Pleasure beckon from her bower, But bravely bear thee onward ...
— Medoline Selwyn's Work • Mrs. J. J. Colter

... my cause is just, I know my blood Tells me it is, and I will credit it: To take revenge, and lose my self withal, Were idle; and to scape impossible, Without I had the fort, which misery Remaining in the hands of my old enemy Calianax, but I ...
— The Maids Tragedy • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... preachers or religious books which do not go on the supposition that this doctrine is taught in Scripture. And you may hear sermon after sermon from some preachers, the chief object of which is to point out correspondences between the paschal lamb, the scape-goat, and other sacrifices under the Law, and Jesus and the sacrifice which He offered. Some preachers and religious writers take almost all things under the law to be types of Christ, or types of things ...
— Modern Skepticism: A Journey Through the Land of Doubt and Back Again - A Life Story • Joseph Barker

... day, — a golden crown For the kingly heads that bowed not down To win a smile or 'scape a frown, Except the smile and frown of Heaven! Dear heads, still dark with raven hair; Dear hearts, still white in spite of care; Dear eyes, still black and bright and fair As any eyes ...
— The Poems of Sidney Lanier • Sidney Lanier

... he views your Noon, And still broods o'er the closely-kept Lampoon; The lurking Presents o'er the Tomb he paid, And thus atton'd our British Virgil's Shade, A Mushroom [1] Satire in his Life conceal'd, Since chang'd to Libel, and in Print reveal'd; Who lets not [2] Beauty base Detraction 'scape, And mocks Deformity with AEsop's Shape; Who Cato's Muse with faithless Sneers belied, The Prologue father'd, and the Play decried, On [3] H——y's learned Page, dull-sporting trod, Betray'd his Patrons, and lampoon'd his God; Translator, Editor, could far out-go In Homer Ogleby, in ...
— Two Poems Against Pope - One Epistle to Mr. A. Pope and the Blatant Beast • Leonard Welsted

... Nor'-Westers' interests against those of the Hudson's Bay. It is not pleasant to recall what was done between the cedars and the shore. I do not attempt to justify our conduct. Does the physician justify medical experiments on the criminal, or the sacrificial priest the driving of the scape-goat into the wilderness? Suffice it to say, when I went down to the shore, Louis Laplante was sitting in the midst of empty drinking-flasks, and the wily, old Nor'-Wester was tempting the silly boy to ...
— Lords of the North • A. C. Laut

... at tellin' a story," the guide admitted. "Seems like he war askatin' home, arter killin' a deer, an' hed sum o' ther meat on his back, when ther wolves took arter him. They chased him right fast, and ther on'y way dad he cud 'scape ther fangs war by making a sharp turn every time they gut too clost. Yer see ther critters cudn't swerve fast enuff, an'd slide a long ways on ther ice 'cause it war so smooth. An' in that way he kept goin' till he gut nigh home; when sum o' ther ...
— The Boy Scouts in the Maine Woods - The New Test for the Silver Fox Patrol • Herbert Carter

... made it, "Very good" the Spirit called it. Happy valley! Peaceful shadows! Glorious sunlight of an epoch, Which the latter days can know not! For the stride of man's progression Desecrates these pristine beauties, Bends these gorgeous land-scape beauties, To his purposes ...
— The Song of Lancaster, Kentucky - to the statesmen, soldiers, and citizens of Garrard County. • Eugenia Dunlap Potts

... 'scape the rout, Their steeds they soundly switch; Some are thrown in, and some thrown out, And some thrown in the ditch. Yet a hunting we ...
— Old Ballads • Various

... dim, And sighs did raise a tempest, causing fears; The naked boy could not so wield his arms, But that the waves were masters of his might, And threatened him to work far greater harms If he devised not to scape by flight: Then for a boat his quiver stood instead, His bow unbent did serve him for a mast, Whereby to sail his cloth of veil he spread, His shafts for oars on either board he cast: From shipwreck safe this wag got thus to shore, And sware to bathe in ...
— Lyrics from the Song-Books of the Elizabethan Age • Various

... never offered twice; seize, then, the hour When fortune smiles, and duty points the way; Nor shrink aside to 'scape the specter fear, Nor pause, though pleasure beckon from her bower; But bravely bear ...
— Pushing to the Front • Orison Swett Marden

... sixpence to you in remembrance of the clever knave you used to be; but since you try to palm these stale tricks upon one you might have known better, I'll not part with a halfpenny—nor would I to save you from rotting. And remember this, 'scape-gallows,' said Ralph, menacing him with his hand, 'that if we meet again, and you so much as notice me by one begging gesture, you shall see the inside of a jail once more, and tighten this hold upon me in intervals ...
— The Life And Adventures Of Nicholas Nickleby • Charles Dickens

... Picardy).[13] Oh! Aa can stand nowt more; aa'm rait winded! Ah! good for nowt, thou's made me run well for it; thou'lt not 'scape me now. Joostice! Joostice! Aa forbid the weddin. (To ORONTE) He's my ain man, Mast-ther, and as sh'd joost loik to ave him stroong up, the precious ...
— Monsieur de Pourceaugnac • Moliere

... draw is measured from the locking edges M and N, Fig. 5. The locking planes when locked are inclined 12deg. from EB, and FB. In the case of the engaging pallet it inclines toward the center A. The draw is produced on account of MA being longer than RA, consequently, when power is applied to the scape tooth S, the pallet is drawn into the wheel. The disengaging pallet inclines in the same direction but away from the center A; the reason is obvious from the former explanation. Some people imagine that the greater ...
— An Analysis of the Lever Escapement • H. R. Playtner

... place and charge, and on his honour assured mee his returne shoulde bee verie short and succesfull, I, I, shorter by the necke, thought I, in the meane time let this be thy posie, I liue in hope to scape ...
— The Vnfortunate Traveller, or The Life Of Jack Wilton - With An Essay On The Life And Writings Of Thomas Nash By Edmund Gosse • Thomas Nash

... see their ships, how they were fyred fast, And how their men drowned themselves in the sea; There you might hear them cry, wayle and weep piteously, When they saw no shift to 'scape ...
— English Songs and Ballads • Various

... night From pain's crushed star-grapes pours The climbing light; There thou, beside me then, With moteless ken, Remembering these, thy pity and thy song, Dropped at the cross where thou didst nail me long, Shalt sereless 'scape the aim Of hot, lance-darting shame, For over thee shall fall The dawn-tressed coronal Of Love I then shall be, wrapping thee in The pity at whose touch ...
— Path Flower and Other Verses • Olive T. Dargan

... loss of the forts fell of course upon Schuyler, who was none too popular in Congress, and who with St. Clair was accordingly made a scape-goat. Congress voted that Washington should appoint a new commander, and the New England delegates visited him to urge the selection of Gates. This task Washington refused to perform, alleging as a reason that the northern department had always been ...
— George Washington, Vol. I • Henry Cabot Lodge

... abolishing differences of age between himself and others. The great rotary presses in the basement of the Record building had filled him with a new enthusiasm: he had painted there, and Sir James had bought at sight, what he called a machinery-scape in the manner of ...
— The Woman in Black • Edmund Clerihew Bentley

... have risked no man's life except my own— Of that be certain: he is one who may Make our assurance doubly sure, according[417] His aid; and if reluctant, he no less Is in our power: he comes alone with me, And cannot 'scape us; ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 4 • Lord Byron

... pictures for the page atone, And Quarles is saved by beauties not his own. Here swells the shelf with Ogilby the Great; There, stamp'd with arms, Newcastle shines complete; Here all his suff'ring brotherhood retire, And 'scape the martyrdom of jakes and fire: A Gothic library! of Greece and Rome Well purg'd, and worthy Settle, Banks, and Broome. "But, high above, more solid learning shone, The Classics of an age that heard ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 58, Number 358, August 1845 • Various

... The fallow stream; they fain would save their lives And seek a refuge in the mountain caves, Firm earth's support. An angel drove them back, 1540 Compassing all the town with gleaming fire, With savage flames. Wild beat the sea within; No troop of men could scape from out the walls. The waves waxed, and the waters thundered loud; The firebrands flew; the ...
— Andreas: The Legend of St. Andrew • Unknown

... "Swol'n with a thousand darts; his mighty bulk "Whole acres covering with pestiferous weight? "Content in vulgar hearts thy torch to flame, "To me the bow's superior glory leave." Then Venus' son: "O Phoebus, nought thy dart "Evades, nor thou canst 'scape the force of mine: "To thee as others yield,—so much my fame "Must ever thine transcend." Thus spoke the boy, And lightly mounting, cleaves the yielding air With beating wings, and on Parnassus' top Umbrageous rests. There from his quiver drew Two darts of different ...
— The Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidus Naso in English blank verse Vols. I & II • Ovid

... young bullock was offered for a sin-offering for the High-Priest, and a goat for a sin-offering for the people: and lots were cast upon two goats to determine which of them should be God's lot for the sin-offering; and the other goat was called Azazel, the scape-goat. The High-Priest in his linen garments, took a censer full of burning coals of fire from the Altar, his hand being full of sweet incense beaten small; and went into the most holy place within the veil, and put the incense upon the fire, and sprinkled the blood of the bullock with his ...
— Observations upon the Prophecies of Daniel, and the Apocalypse of St. John • Isaac Newton

... against all. There is another man within me that's angry with me, rebukes, commands, and dastards me. I have no conscience of marble, to resist the hammer of more heavy offences: nor yet so soft and waxen, as to take the impression of each single peccadillo or scape of infirmity. I am of a strange belief, that it is as easy to be forgiven some sins as to commit some others. For my original sin, I hold it to be washed away in my baptism; for my actual transgressions, I compute and reckon with God but from my last repentance, ...
— Religio Medici, Hydriotaphia, and the Letter to a Friend • Sir Thomas Browne

... allows me plenty of time to admire the strangely beautiful surroundings. Above is the inverted bowl of blue, bright for the most part, but duller towards the horizon-rim. The sun pours down a vivid light, which spreads quicksilver iridescence over the cloud-tops. Below is the cloud-scape, fantastic and far-stretching. The shadow of our machine is surrounded by a halo of sunshine as it darts along the irregular white surface. The clouds dip, climb, twist, and flatten into every conceivable shape. Thrown together as they never could be ...
— Cavalry of the Clouds • Alan Bott

... much better: use Every man after his desert, and who shall 'scape Whipping? use them after your own honour And dignity: the less they deserve, the more ...
— Satanstoe • James Fenimore Cooper

... doubt the goodness o' God—I never war so ongrateful nohow as that comes to." He resented being thus publicly reproached, as if he were individually responsible for the iniquity of the bran dance—the scape-goat for the sins of all this merry company. Many of the whilom dancers had pressed forward, crowding up behind the old mountaineer and facing the flushed Brent and the flowerlike Valeria, the faint green leaves of her muslin ...
— Una Of The Hill Country - 1911 • Charles Egbert Craddock (AKA Mary Noailles Murfree)

... and 'scape-valve jetted clouds of flat-driven steam. No. 4 had suddenly "shut off," and was now coasting ...
— To The Front - A Sequel to Cadet Days • Charles King

... while the wagon was slowly ascending, to make a cross-cut on foot through some woodland, saw a bear—yes, a bear! face to face, and made, you may be sure, a forced march to the highway. The mountaineers were not at all surprised when we recounted what we fancied a hair-breadth 'scape, but quietly told us that 'three bears had been seen in that neighborhood lately, but bears did no harm unless provoked, or desperately hungry!' It was not a very pleasant thought that our lives depended on the chances of ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2 No 4, October, 1862 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... de Lucelles was a scape-grace of good family, who, after having spent all that he had inherited from his father, and having incurred debts by all kinds of doubtful means, had been trying to discover some other way of obtaining money, and he had discovered this method. ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume III (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... they sailed, the denser were the thickets of papyrus on the shore. Thousands of birds were roosting there, but they were all asleep; a "dark ness that might be felt" brooded over the silent land scape. The image of the moon floated on the dark water, like a gigantic lotos-flower below the smaller, fragrant lotos-blossoms that it out-did in sheeny whiteness; the boat left a bright wake in its track, and every stroke of the oar broke the blackness of the water, which ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... innocents 'scape not the thunderbolt. Melt Egypt into Nile! and kindly creatures Turn all to serpents! Call the slave again; Though I am mad, I ...
— Characteristics of Women - Moral, Poetical, and Historical • Anna Jameson

... of heaven! and welcome night Of victory, that hast our might With all the glories crowned! On towers of Ilion, free no more, Hast flung the mighty mesh of war, And closely girt them round, Till neither warrior may 'scape, Nor stripling lightly overleap The trammels as they close, and close, Till with the grip of doom our foes In ...
— The House of Atreus • AEschylus

... far as it is true. In its construction it is light and airy, therefore in its appearance it must be light and airy. It dare not, if it wishes to be beautiful, lay claim to what it is not. And it should not bulk on the city-scape like Leviathan; it should rise and soar, light and airy ...
— Revolution and Other Essays • Jack London

... golden opportunity Is never offered twice; seize then the hour When fortune smiles and duty points the way; Nor shrink aside to 'scape the spectre fear, Nor pause, though pleasure beckon from her bower; But bravely bear thee onward ...
— Architects of Fate - or, Steps to Success and Power • Orison Swett Marden

... attack me, But the wit of the Skald is my weapon, And the wine of the gods will uphold me. And this they shall feel in its fulness; Here my fame has its birth and beginning; And the stout spears of battle shall see it, If I 'scape from ...
— The Life and Death of Cormac the Skald • Unknown

... long labyrinth had run, Nor made atonement when he did amiss, Had sighed to many, though he loved but one, And that loved one, alas, could ne'er be his. Ah, happy she! to 'scape from him whose kiss Had been pollution unto aught so chaste; Who soon had left her charms for vulgar bliss, And spoiled her goodly lands to gild his waste, Nor calm domestic peace had ...
— Childe Harold's Pilgrimage • Lord Byron

... Halleck, dated November 26, 1864, this expedition seems not to have been even moderately successful. In it he said: "I will soon commence work on Mosby. Heretofore I have made no attempt to break him up, as I would have employed ten men to his one, and for the reason that I have made a scape-goat of him for the destruction of private rights. Now there is going to be an intense hatred of him in that portion of this Valley, which is nearly a desert. I will soon commence on Loudoun County, and let them know there is a ...
— History and Comprehensive Description of Loudoun County, Virginia • James W. Head

... certain benefits. They worked for pay. Many years ago, I stepped into a court-house, in a small town in Tennessee, and immediately after I had seated myself, a lawyer arose, and made a very vehement speech in favor of some scape-gallows who was arraigned before the court. After he had taken his seat, another gentleman of the bar arose, and replied to him. The two gentlemen alternately speechified the judge and jury for several hours; after which the judge passed sentence on the culprit, ...
— A Review of Uncle Tom's Cabin - or, An Essay on Slavery • A. Woodward

... remorse for it. "This cause," says De Thou, "was pleaded with much warmth, and occupied fifty audiences, with a large concourse of people, but the judgment took all the world by surprise. Guerin alone, advocate-general in 1545, having no support at court, was condemned to death, and was scape-goat for all the rest. D'Oppede defended himself with fanatical pride, saying that he only executed the king's orders, like Saul, whom God commanded to exterminate the Amalekites. He had the Duke of Guise to protect him; and he was ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume IV. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... the bill, and to-morrow our correction goes to the Lords. It will be a day of wonderful expectation.. to see in what manner they will swallow their vomit. The Duke of Bedford, it is conjectured, will stay away:—but what will that scape-goose, Lord Halifax, do, who is already convicted of having told the King a most notorious lie, that if the Princess was not given up by the Lords, she would be unanimously excluded by the Commons! The Duke of Bedford, who had broke the ground, is little ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole Volume 3 • Horace Walpole

... by over 100,000 natives, black cannibals of the ugliest description; but at this day not a hundred of them remain. The natives were exceeding stupid and useless; the first settlers, who, as Capt. Rocksalt observes, were jail-birds and scape-gallows, were not very dainty in dealing with the obnoxious natives; so they determined to get rid of them as fast and easy as possible. For this purpose, they used to gather a horde of them together, ...
— The Humors of Falconbridge - A Collection of Humorous and Every Day Scenes • Jonathan F. Kelley

... growing plant ceases the moment that plant is out of the ground. It is then, as we say, dead—that is, it ceases to be a plant. So also we never scruple to pluck the flowers, or the whole flower-scape from a plant, to put it in our buttonhole or in the bosom of our friend, and thereafter to cease our interest in the plant as such. It now becomes a memory, a gage d'amour, a token or a sudden glory—what you will. This is the habit of mankind; but I know of rare ones, both men and women, who ...
— Lore of Proserpine • Maurice Hewlett

... greatness in mortality Can censure 'scape; back-wounding calumny The whitest virtue strikes. What king so strong, Can tie the gall up ...
— Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare • E. Nesbit

... befell the Spaniards in the death of their creature, the young Inca Toparca. Suspicion, of course, fell on Challcuchima, now selected as the scape-goat for all the offences of his nation.18 It was a disappointment to Pizarro, who hoped to find a convenient shelter for his future proceedings under this ...
— History Of The Conquest Of Peru • William Hickling Prescott

... infidels." Yet did these words sink nothing unto their stomachs; they did it for a good intent. So did Saul save the fattest oxen to offer unto the Lord, and they to serve their own turn. But neither did Saul scape the wrath of God therefor, neither had these that thing which they desired so, and did thirst after. Such is God's justice. He that they put their trust in to deliver them from the tyrannous hands of their enemies, he, I say, could supply their ...
— Voyager's Tales • Richard Hakluyt

... Fur de brooms uv de Lord is er sweepin', An' all de trash dey's er heapin' Outside er de golden gate. "So, sinners, yer'd better be er tu'nin', Er climin' an' er scramblin' an' er runnin', Fur ter 'scape dat drefful burnin' In de awful ...
— Diddie, Dumps, and Tot • Louise-Clarke Pyrnelle

... quarter-deck of the Constant Warwick, a fine frigate (the first launched by the new government) Lempriere and Prynne—now completely reconciled—paced slowly up and down, talking of the present situation and future policy. As they did so their eyes glanced from time to time on the fair sea scape, illumined by the early autumn sunlight, and shaded by the ...
— St George's Cross • H. G. Keene

... a plant of the same family commonly found in sterile soil from Virginia to Illinois and south, and blossoming much more frequently. In Mexico the century plant is turned to practical account and made a profitable investment to its owners. After the scape has reached its full growth it is hewn down, and the sap, which fills the hollow at its base, is ladled out and converted by fermentation into "agave wine," or "pulque," the favorite drink of the Mexicans. This pulque, ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 561, October 2, 1886 • Various

... wonderfull scape and deliuerance. A great distresse. A desperate resolution.] In the meane season, certaine, to the number of fourteene persons, leaped into a small Pinnesse (the bignes of a Thames barge, which was made ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, Vol. XII., America, Part I. • Richard Hakluyt

... capital of Pithoria[3] from a similar epidemic, he had, he said, tried the same thing with still greater effect; but, on that occasion, he had the aid of a man very learned in such matters. This man caused a small carriage to be made up after a plan of his own, for a pair of scape- goats, which were harnessed to it, and driven during the ceremonies to a wood some distance from the town, where they were let loose. From that hour the disease entirely ceased in the town. The goats never ...
— Rambles and Recollections of an Indian Official • William Sleeman

... so much as to forget to sympathise with you, dear Mrs. Martin, or to neglect to apprise you ourselves of our movements. Indeed, a letter to you should have been written among my first letters on arriving in London, only Henrietta (my scape-goat, you will say) said, 'I will write to Mrs. Martin.' And then after I had waited, and determined to write without waiting any longer, we heard of poor Mrs. Hanford's affliction and your anxiety, and I have considered day after day whether or not I should intrude upon ...
— The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning (1 of 2) • Frederic G. Kenyon

... than makes felons scape, Less human genius than God gives an ape, Small thanks to France, and none to Rome or Greece, A patch'd, vamp'd, future, old, revived new piece; 'Twixt Plautus, Fletcher, Congreve, and Corneille, Can make ...
— Calamities and Quarrels of Authors • Isaac D'Israeli

... sport at our calamities, And count'st us happy to 'scape prisonment? Why, the wide world, that blesseth some with weal,[106] Is to our chained ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. IX • Various

... fingers. Crooked fingers hard as iron, Took the hundred nets, and spread them Right across the stream of Tuoni, Both across and also lengthwise, And in an oblique direction So that Vaino should not 'scape him, Nor should flee Uvantolainen, In the course of all his lifetime, While the golden moon is shining, 360 From the dread abode of Tuoni, From the ...
— Kalevala, Volume I (of 2) - The Land of the Heroes • Anonymous

... 'tis done: more durable than brass My monument shall be, and raise its head O'er royal pyramids: it shall not dread Corroding rain or angry Boreas, Nor the long lapse of immemorial time. I shall not wholly die; large residue Shall 'scape the Queen of funerals. Ever new My after fame shall grow, while pontiffs climb With silent maids the Capitolian height. "Born," men will say, "where Aufidus is loved, Where Danaus scant of streams beneath ...
— Horace • William Tuckwell

... stringently applied.[162] By this stand the Professor places himself in sweet accord with the re-actionists of all shades, who otherwise are mortally opposed to him. Haeckel is of the opinion that incorrigible scape-graces must be uprooted like weeds that take from plants light, air and space. Had Haeckel turned his mind slightly toward social, instead of engaging it wholly with natural science, he would know that these criminals could, in most instances, be transformed ...
— Woman under socialism • August Bebel

... the mead, the bough burst forth, As wildly rang that Runic strain; Sir Thunye fiercely spurred his steed, But, ah! to ’scape ...
— Ermeline - a ballad - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... here delivered are his exultant treachery in proposing to use his colleague Lepidus as at once the pack-horse and the scape-goat of the Triumvirate, and his remorseless savagery in arranging for the slaughter of all that was most illustrious in Rome, bartering away his own uncle, to glut his revenge with the blood of Cicero; though ...
— The New Hudson Shakespeare: Julius Caesar • William Shakespeare

... cuckoo Upon the oaken tree; Your wives you well should look to, If you take advice of me. Cuckoo! cuckoo! alack the day! For married men But now and then, Can 'scape to bear ...
— Ancient Poems, Ballads and Songs of England • Robert Bell

... preparation was the work of a moment. Then One-Eye gave the door a vigorous and imperative kick. At the same time he began to talk to Johnnie, anxiously, soothingly: "It's all right, sonny! It's all right! Keep a stiff upper lip! 'Cause y're home now. Pore kid! My! That was a lucky 'scape!" ...
— The Rich Little Poor Boy • Eleanor Gates

... man after his desert, and who shall 'scape whipping? Use them after your own honour and dignity: The less they deserve, the more merit is in your bounty. Take ...
— Hamlet • William Shakespeare

... and wretched to resent the reproach, Arthur sank his head with a heavy groan, that almost disarmed Percy; then looking up, with sparkling eyes, he exclaimed, 'No! I did not know his baseness; I thought him a careless scape-grace, but not much worse than he has made me. I would as soon have believed myself capable of the treachery, the unfeeling revenge—' Again he was unable to say more, and struggling for utterance, he stamped ...
— Heartsease - or Brother's Wife • Charlotte M. Yonge

... which doth save in way of works Prescribed[FN4] by reason; next, the Yog, which bids Attain by meditation, spiritually: Yet these are one! No man shall 'scape from act By shunning action; nay, and none shall come By mere renouncements unto perfectness. Nay, and no jot of time, at any time, Rests any actionless; his nature's law Compels him, even unwilling, ...
— The Bhagavad-Gita • Sir Edwin Arnold

... he's welcome to it, and much good may it do him. 'Set a beggar on horseback, and he'll ride to the devil,' and in double quick time too. I won't hinder him. I wash my hands of the young scape-grace. But he'd better not come near ...
— Mistress and Maid • Dinah Craik (aka: Miss Mulock)

... cold Foresight move, Shunning the rose to 'scape the thorn; And Prudence every fear approve, And ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel , Volume I. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... beyond the boundary, and that he, the incarnation of the evil, will go with them. Of course, the scourge diminishes from that day. Several who have witnessed this practice in India, have been struck with the remarkable analogy it bears to the scape-goat of the Mosaic dispensation, sent into the wilderness burdened with the sins ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 457 - Volume 18, New Series, October 2, 1852 • Various

... cut-throats in his pay, Tried, all five, and found guilty and put to death By heading or hanging as befitted ranks, At Rome on February Twenty-Two, Since our salvation Sixteen Ninety-Eight: Wherein it is disputed if, and when, Husbands may kill adulterous wives, yet 'scape The customary forfeit." (vol. ...
— A Handbook to the Works of Browning (6th ed.) • Mrs. Sutherland Orr

... to accompany him. They separated at Liverpool, 24th August 1861. An embrace, "a heart wrench;" and then a wave of the handkerchief, while "the Blackbird" African steam ship fussed its way out of the Mersey, having on board the British scape-goat sent away—"by the hand of a fit man"—one "Captain English"—into the wilderness of Fernando Po. "Unhappily," commented Burton, "I am not one of those independents who can say ce n'est que le premier pas qui coute." The stoic, however, after a fair fight, ...
— The Life of Sir Richard Burton • Thomas Wright

... Maria. The people were slowly, but with resistless power, rising against the abuses, enormous and hoary with age, of the aristocracy and the monarchy. Louis, a man of unblemished kindness, integrity, and purity, was made the scape-goat for the sins of haughty, oppressive, profligate princes, who for centuries had trodden, with iron hoofs, upon the necks of their subjects. The accumulated hate of ages was poured upon his devoted head. The irresolute ...
— Madame Roland, Makers of History • John S. C. Abbott

... to declare this was all gammon. They knew Jessup too well to 'allow' he cared any thing about it, not he. Nothing but the fear of that honest young Meeker led to the disgrace of Pease, who no doubt would now be made the scape-grace for all Jessup's shortcomings in the store-way. So it went. But in the balance of accounts Jessup was a great gainer. Of course, numerous were the questions put to Hiram. He preserved great discretion—would say little. It did not become him to speak of ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. II. July, 1862. No. 1. • Various

... exception of Capell, are unanimous in rejecting Titus Andronicus as unworthy of Shakspeare, though they always allow it to be printed with the other pieces, as the scape-goat, as it were, of their abusive criticism. The correct method in such an investigation is first to examine into the external grounds, evidences, &c., and to weigh their value; and then to adduce the internal reasons derived from the quality of the work. The critics of Shakspeare follow ...
— Lectures on Dramatic Art - and Literature • August Wilhelm Schlegel trans John Black

... caitiff! whither shall I flee, That I might scape this endless sorrow? Now, gentle Death, spare me till to-morrow, That I may amend me With ...
— Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse • Various

... she was a scape-goat, but there was such terrible suffering in her father's face that she had no impulse to rebel. She smelled of the canister which her father held out towards her with a nervously trembling hand. "Why, father, this is tea; it isn't coffee," ...
— By the Light of the Soul - A Novel • Mary E. Wilkins Freeman

... Court. Give Wolsey then a tender thought. His main ambition that the King Should be supreme in everything; Thomas And Thomas Cromwell followed suit Cromwell To make his master absolute Head of the Church within his realm. These two most able at the helm; But not with skill enough endued To 'scape their King's ingratitude. Despotical the King's power grew. He's England's Pope by Act of Su- Premacy; as, to gain divorce, The foreign Pope is banned perforce. 1537 Now Bluff King Harry gives the Monks A series of most awful funks; Three thousand odd of ...
— A Humorous History of England • C. Harrison

... to seek out "Mary Stuart." All hope of a comfortable future was not lost. "Mary Stuart" must provide for her scape-goat. It should be her pleasing duty to clothe and feed that hapless animal for the ...
— The Missing Link • Edward Dyson

... or tree days after dis we take anoder prize, which was robbed ob eberyting ob value on board, and was den treated same as Les deux Amis had been. I was very glad to get off wid my life, but I berry much wish myself out of de ship again, and determined to make my 'scape as soon as I ...
— The Missing Ship - The Log of the "Ouzel" Galley • W. H. G. Kingston

... so green and gay, The faire tilths of Bethulia, Encompasse thee, old Salem's fruitfull Land, Or else Capharnia low doth stand. At length give o're thy sad and carefull flight: Thou shalt not scape me, th'evening bright With its so watchfull Centry, thee'l betray, And th'Moone with golden hornes doth stray. By th'grones of the neglected shores I'le find Thee; and by th'sighs o'th' Westerne wind; Thee the night's watch, the ...
— The Odes of Casimire, Translated by G. Hils • Mathias Casimire Sarbiewski

... "Let it be understood, once for all, Mr. Bentley, that I am not the scape-goat for all the other departments! I have cut it off short; I am not ...
— The Honorable Senator Sage-Brush • Francis Lynde

... fool of a knight!" quoth Jocelyn. "So now will I show thee how by the wit of a brave and noble lady we may yet 'scape the hangman. Hearken ...
— The Geste of Duke Jocelyn • Jeffery Farnol

... of the appeal was no doubt distinctly visible in the lady's mind, though it was not accurately worded. I saw that I stood marked to be the scape goat of the day, and humbly continued to deserve well, notwithstanding. By dint of simple signs and nods of affirmative, and a constant propulsion of my friend's arm, I drew him into the boat, and thence projected him up to the level with his wife, who had perhaps deigned to ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... I did show All signs of loathing; but since I am in, I must pay mine and my forefathers' sin To the last farthing: therefore to my power Toughly and stubbornly I bear this cross; but th' hour Of mercy now was come: he tries to bring Me to pay a fine to 'scape his torturing, And says, Sir, can you spare me? I said, Willingly. Nay, Sir, can you spare me a crown? Thankfully I Gave it as ransom. But as fiddlers still, Though they be paid to be gone, yet needs ...
— English Satires • Various

... is truly guessed; But know, 'tis from no nightly sexton's hand. There's not a damned ghost, nor hell-born fiend, That can from limbo 'scape, but hither flies; With leathern wings they beat the dusky skies, To sacred churches all in swarms repair; Some crowd the spires, but most the hallowed bells, } And softly toll for souls departing knells: } Each chime, thou hear'st, a future death foretells, ...
— The Works Of John Dryden, Vol. 7 (of 18) - The Duke of Guise; Albion and Albanius; Don Sebastian • John Dryden

... soul! my son, Prince John, my son, With several troops hath circuited the court, This house, the city, that thou canst not 'scape. ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VIII (4th edition) • Various

... was at work. In my diary of this date I find these words, "This is living! The sunlight floods our tiny sitting-room whose windows look out on a blue-and-white mountainous 'scape of city roofs. We have dined and the steam is singing in our gilded radiator. The noise and bustle of the city is far away.—I foresee that I shall be able to do a great deal of work on ...
— A Daughter of the Middle Border • Hamlin Garland

... of Suffolk: he mostly puts up at the King's Head when he cometh to town. And quoth he, 'There shall shortly be another search made for Gospel books,—ay, and Gospellers belike: and they be not like to 'scape so well as they did last year.' And John Love saith—he was there, John Love of the Heath; you know him?—well, he saith he heard Master Simnel the bailiff to swear that the great Doctors of Colchester should find it warm work ere long. There's an ill ...
— The King's Daughters • Emily Sarah Holt

... nineteenth century it is the custom to admit that the climate is bad and dangerous; but that it has often been made the scape-goat of European recklessness and that much of the sickness and death might be avoided. The improvement is attributed to the use of quinine, unknown to the early settlers, and much is expected from sanatoria and from planting the blue gum (Eucalyptus globulus), which ...
— To the Gold Coast for Gold - A Personal Narrative in Two Volumes.—Vol. I • Richard F. Burton

... forward with uncontrolable fury) Oh! God of wrath and vengeance! hear thou a husband's and a father's prayer! strike the pale villain! oh! with thy hottest lightning blast him dead! a curse, a tenfold curse o'erwhelm his death-bed! Traitor! thou shalt not 'scape, this hand shall rend thy heart-strings, I'll smite ...
— The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor - Volume I, Number 1 • Stephen Cullen Carpenter

... hardly three feet square; Not enough to stow Queen Mab in— Who the deuce can harbor there?" "Who, sir? plenty— Nobles twenty Did at once my vessel fill."— "Did they? Jesus, How you squeeze us! Would to God they did so still; Then I'd 'scape the heat and racket Of the good ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... interests, political and municipal, at work in this conspiracy. They would not hesitate to try to make the old offender a scape-goat, and you know what sort of treatment he would receive in the hands of the police. Play the game, Guy; stick to the job. I'm not asking this of you for my own investigation. I have a dozen, a score ...
— The Crevice • William John Burns and Isabel Ostrander

... seeing it: and the people did do better, without the great actors, than I did expect, but yet far short of what they do when they are there, which I was glad to find the difference of. Thence to rights home, and there to the office to my business hard, being sorry to have made this scape without my wife, but I have a good salvo to my oath in doing it. By and by, in the evening, comes Sir W. Batten's Mingo to me to pray me to come to his master and Sir Richard Ford, who have very ill ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... away. To-morrow, if he dare but to abide 620 My lance, he shall not want occasion meet For show of valor. But much more I judge That the next rising sun shall see him slain With no few friends around him. Would to heaven! I were as sure to 'scape the blight of age 625 And share their honors with the Gods above, As comes the morrow fraught with wo to Greece. So Hector, whom his host with loud acclaim All praised. Then each his sweating steeds released, And rein'd them safely at his chariot-side. 630 ...
— The Iliad of Homer - Translated into English Blank Verse • Homer

... King now must we tell, Who sat devising means to 'scape that shame, Until the frightened people thronging came About the palace, and drove back the guards, Making their way past all the gates and wards; And, putting chamberlains and marshals by, Surged round the very throne tumultuously. Then knew the ...
— The Earthly Paradise - A Poem • William Morris

... her swivel pealed, her burgee ran down the jack-staff, a soft, continuous tremor set in among all her parts, her scape-pipes ceased their alternating roars, her engines breathed quietly through her vast funnels, the flood spurted at her cutwater, white torrents leaped and chased each other from her fluttering wheels, ...
— Gideon's Band - A Tale of the Mississippi • George W. Cable

... all our factories, acquaint them with these blessed tidings: If we can 'scape so cheap, 'twill be no matter what villanies ...
— The Works of John Dryden, Volume 5 (of 18) - Amboyna; The state of Innocence; Aureng-Zebe; All for Love • John Dryden

... It seemed I was going to be made the scape-goat. I did not care. I would not have taken a year of Sir Louis' pay for those two days and nights. When he spoke again I expected something drastic addressed to me, ...
— Jimgrim and Allah's Peace • Talbot Mundy

... unlarded nose And bulging eyes are all that shows Above it, as he puffs and blows! And now—to 'scape the scathing Of that black host of furious bees His nose and eyes he fain would grease And bobs below those golden seas Like an ...
— Collected Poems - Volume Two (of 2) • Alfred Noyes

... grant me time, give me the management And manufacture of a model me, Me fifty-fold, a prince without a flaw,— Why, there's no social grade, the sordidest, My embryo potentate should brink and scape. King, all the better he was cobbler once, He should know, sitting on the throne, how tastes Life to who ...
— Browning as a Philosophical and Religious Teacher • Henry Jones

... Acherousian ford He has sent floating, by self-homicide, His beautiful boy-garland,—he may know First, Here's anger, what it is to him, And then learn mine. The gods are vile indeed And mortal matters vast if he 'scape free. ...
— Story of Orestes - A Condensation of the Trilogy • Richard G. Moulton

... from the vanquished fell, The marshes stagnate, and the rivers swell. Mountains of slain lie heaped upon the ground, Or 'midst the roarings of the Danube drowned; Whole captive hosts the conqueror detains In painful bondage and inglorious chains; Even those who'scape the fetters and the sword, Nor seek the fortunes of a happier lord, Their raging king dishonours, to complete Marlborough's great work, and finish the defeat. 360 From Memminghen's high domes, and Augsburg's walls, The distant battle drives ...
— The Poetical Works of Addison; Gay's Fables; and Somerville's Chase • Joseph Addison, John Gay, William Sommerville

... know me, boy; and well for thee Thou dost not. I'm the father of a son About thy age. Thou, I see, wast horn, like him, upon the hills: If thou shouldst 'scape thy present thraldom, he May chance to cross thee; if he should, I pray thee Relate to him what has been passing here, And say I laid my hand upon thy head, And said to thee, if he were here, as thou art, Thus would I bless him. Mayst thou live, my boy, To see thy country free, or die for her, As ...
— McGuffey's Fifth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... confusion I had not been able to recall Job's instructions in opening the latch; at last I remembered, and pressed, the screw—the latch rose—I opened the door; but not wide enough to scape through the aperture. The ruffians saw my escape at hand. "Rush the b—cove! rush him!" cried the loud voice of one behind; and at the word, Fib was thrown forwards upon the extended edge of my blade; scarcely with an effort of my own arm, the sword entered his ...
— Pelham, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton



Words linked to "Scape" :   column, shaft, pillar, stem, flower stalk



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