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noun
Singe  n.  A burning of the surface; a slight burn.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Singe" Quotes from Famous Books



... Well, well, we will overlook thy letting the herd run off, and perhaps I will give thee one of the rupees of the reward when I have taken the skin to Khanhiwara. He fumbled in his waist-cloth for flint and steel, and stooped down to singe Shere Khan's whiskers. Most native hunters always singe a tiger's whiskers to prevent his ghost ...
— The Kipling Reader - Selections from the Books of Rudyard Kipling • Rudyard Kipling

... Mr. Barlow would heat all the pokers in the house, and singe him with the whole collection, to bring him better acquainted with the properties of incandescent iron, on which he (Barlow) would fully expatiate. I pictured Mr. Barlow's instituting a comparison between the clown's conduct at his studies,—drinking up the ink, ...
— The Uncommercial Traveller • Charles Dickens

... were piled around her in her narrow stall. On the shelves at the back were rows of melons, so-called "cantaloups" swarming with wart-like knots, "maraichers" whose skin was covered with grey lace-like netting, and "culs-de-singe" displaying smooth bare bumps. In front was an array of choice fruits, carefully arranged in baskets, and showing like smooth round cheeks seeking to hide themselves, or glimpses of sweet childish faces, half veiled ...
— The Fat and the Thin • Emile Zola

... it," said Kemble, "fine feathers, eh? I know, you're like a lot of other girls who have come and gone in this factory. You've heard of Chicago's bright lights and you want to singe your wings in them. Let me tell you something, my girl, girls in your position don't get eight dollar hats without paying for them and if they haven't got the money they ...
— Little Lost Sister • Virginia Brooks

... wind, and crack your cheeks! rage! blow! You cataracts, and hurricanes, spout Till you have drenched our steeples, drowned the cocks! You sulphurous and thought-executing fires, Vaunt-couriers to oak-cleaving thunderbolts, Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder, Strike flat the thick rotundity of the world! Crack nature's molds, all germens spill at once, That make ingrateful men! Rumble thy belly full! Spit fire! Spout rain! Nor rain, wind, thunder, fire, are my daughters; I tax not you, ...
— Shakspere, Personal Recollections • John A. Joyce

... 'nine-tenths of the English visitors to the Kursaal, play;' and he does not hesitate to say that the moths who flutter round the garish lamps at the Kursaal Van der Hohe, and its kindred Hades, almost invariably singe their wings; and that the chaseer at Roulette and Rouge, generally turn out edged tools, with which those incautious enough to play with them are apt to cut their fingers, sometimes ...
— The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims - Volume I (of II) • Andrew Steinmetz

... ignorant or malicious. The 103:24 malicious form of hypnotism ultimates in moral idiocy. The truths of immortal Mind sustain man, and they anni- hilate the fables of mortal mind, whose flimsy and gaudy 103:27 pretensions, like silly moths, singe their own wings and fall ...
— Science and Health With Key to the Scriptures • Mary Baker Eddy

... be a very good kind of a kettle after one got used to the nastiness of it, though the smell of burning hair from the kettles was disgusting. To this day, I have only to singe a few hairs in a candle to bring back to my mind's eye that first day in camp at Axminster, the hill, the valley ringed in by combes, the noise of the horses, the sputtering of the fires of green wood, the many men passing about aimlessly, wondering at the ...
— Martin Hyde, The Duke's Messenger • John Masefield

... representative from the mechanical department reported for the Recreation and Education Committee; all the night school classes had closed, with appropriate final exercises, for the season: the children's playground would be ready for use July 1st. The man from the "gray" room and singe house reported for the Working Conditions Committee. Something about watchmen and a drinking fountain, and wheels and boxes in the starch room; washing facilities for ...
— Working With the Working Woman • Cornelia Stratton Parker

... said—and say, for you are such another! Why, now I look at you, I see you are his brother! Yes, thank you for your kick: 'twas all that you could spare, For, sure, they clip and singe you very, very bare! ...
— Poetical Works of George MacDonald, Vol. 2 • George MacDonald

... them singe our scalp locks!" said Popovitch, prancing about before them on his horse; and then, glancing at his comrades, he added, "Well, perhaps the Lyakhs speak the truth: if that fat-bellied fellow leads them, they will all find ...
— Taras Bulba and Other Tales • Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol

... was working woe To the reserve of tallow in his frame— Said, with a sputtering, uncertain flow, And with a gesture like a shaken torch: "Yes, but I'm sure we'll not much longer scorch. Although this climate is not good for Hope, Whose joyous wing 'twould singe, I think the porch Of Hell we'll quit with a pacific slope. Last century I signified repentance And asked ...
— Black Beetles in Amber • Ambrose Bierce

... individual, male or female, reflected glory is better than none at all. And when two people stand in the most intimate relation to each other, the success of one lends a measure of its luster to the other. Those who had been so readily impressed by Andrew Bush's device to singe her social wings with the flame of gossip had long since learned their mistake. She had the word of Loraine Marsh and Jack Barrow that they were genuinely sorry for having been carried away by appearances. And she could nail her colors to the mast if she came home the wife of a man like ...
— North of Fifty-Three • Bertrand W. Sinclair

... of carbon or soot. The distance of the vertical tubes, C; and of the fan-shaped burners is calculated so that the latter touch each other, and thus a continuous flame is formed, which is found to be the most effective for singeing cloth. Should it be deemed advisable to singe only part of the cloth, or a narrow piece, the arrangement admits of the taps, D, being ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 417 • Various

... blue sky, And through the fissures of her clouded fan Peeps at the naughty monster man. Go mount yon edifice, And show thy steady face In renovated pride, More bright, more glorious than before!" But ah! coy Surya still felt a twinge, Still smarted from his former singe; And to Veeshnoo replied, In a tone rather gruff, "No, thank you! one ...
— Rejected Addresses: or, The New Theatrum Poetarum • James and Horace Smith

... chief is absolutely firm. He looks upon you as the monkey pulling the chestnuts out of the fire for the Labour Party and he has made up his mind to singe your paws." ...
— Nobody's Man • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... And ravens, men say, do foster forlorn children. Take my point? Good, then; let us ravenous vagabonds take these two children for our own, Will,—thou one, I t' other,—and by praiseworthy fostering singe this ...
— Master Skylark • John Bennett

... to lift him, and shook him roughly, and took him by the nose, and pulled him by the beard; again to no purpose: he had tethered his ass to a stout pin. So the lady began to fear he must be dead: however, she went on to pinch him shrewdly, and singe him with the flame of a candle; but when these methods also failed she, being, for all she was a leech's wife, no leech herself, believed for sure that he was dead; and as there was nought in the world that she loved so much, it boots not to ask if she was sore distressed; ...
— The Decameron, Volume I • Giovanni Boccaccio

... priest as reported. Was he George Synge, the grandfather of George Synge, Bishop of Cloyne, born 1594? Of what family was Mary Paget, wife of the Rev. Richard Synge, preacher at the Savoy in 1715? The name appears to have been indifferently spelt, Sing, Singe, and Synge. And I believe an older branch than the baronet's still exists at Bridgenorth, writing themselves Sing. The punning motto of this family is worth noticing: ...
— Notes and Queries, No. 209, October 29 1853 • Various

... cooking commences, there should be for the most part red embers in the fireplace, capable of sending up great heat, with but a minimum of blaze. And there a cook can work in comfort, without dodging back every time a fierce blaze darts toward him, threatening to singe his eyebrows, and shorten his crop ...
— The Banner Boy Scouts Afloat • George A. Warren

... what flood soe'er it be." Scarce had he finish'd, when, with speckled pride, A serpent from the tomb began to glide; His hugy bulk on sev'n high volumes roll'd; Blue was his breadth of back, but streak'd with scaly gold: Thus riding on his curls, he seem'd to pass A rolling fire along, and singe the grass. More various colors thro' his body run, Than Iris when her bow imbibes the sun. Betwixt the rising altars, and around, The sacred monster shot along the ground; With harmless play amidst the bowls ...
— The Aeneid • Virgil

... Leila questioned. "And why have they called you to tell of her?" Her eyes blazed with a fire that seemed about to singe pretense ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1917 - and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... should be given it, feeding and nourishing it as we would a plant—giving it plenty of air and sunlight, carefully shampooing at least once in ten days. Massage the scalp to keep it loose and flexible. Use electricity, a good tonic, and occasionally singe the ...
— The Handy Cyclopedia of Things Worth Knowing - A Manual of Ready Reference • Joseph Triemens

... the right hand, if it cause to offend; much more to pare the nayles and superfluities: it consumes the strongest, dearest corruptions; much more will it singe off such haire and drosse as these: If ought be praise worthy, it imbraceth such things; if any be doubtfull, carrying shew of evill, of ill reporte, it dares not meddle with them; it feares that some of these are as indifferent, as fornication ...
— A Coal From The Altar, To Kindle The Holy Fire of Zeale - In a Sermon Preached at a Generall Visitation at Ipswich • Samuel Ward

... crack your cheeks. Rage! Blow! You cataracts and hurricanes, spout Till you have drench'd our steeples, drowned the cocks! You sulphurous and thought-executing fires, Vaunt couriers of oak-cleaving thunder-bolts, Singe my white head! And thou, all-shaking thunder, Strike flat the thick rotundity o' the world! Crack nature's moulds, all germens spill at once That make ungrateful man.... Rumble thy bellyful! Spit ...
— The Development of the Feeling for Nature in the Middle Ages and - Modern Times • Alfred Biese

... accompanied them, had so remained with me in encouragement that I longed to encounter her again. God knows what I hoped for, for I knew well it must all inevitably end in despair, yet like the moth I must continue to singe my wings until the flame devoured me. Now, however, as we actually drew near to where I supposed she might be, I felt my earlier courage fast deserting me. Nor was I furnished with even the slightest excuse for pressing on; my ...
— My Lady of the North • Randall Parrish

... Dir wird mit Recht der Vorzug zugesprochen; 15 Doch eins gefllt uns nicht an dir, Du singst das ganze Jahr nicht mehr als wenig Wochen." Doch Philomele lacht und spricht: "Dein bittrer Vorwurf krnkt mich nicht Und wird mir ewig Ehre bringen. 20 Ich singe kurze Zeit. Warum? Um schn zu singen. Ich folg' im Singen der Natur; So lange sie gebeut, so lange sing' ich nur. Sobald sie nicht gebeut, so hr' ich auf zu singen; Denn die Natur ...
— An anthology of German literature • Calvin Thomas

... when Drake undertook to "singe the King of Spain's beard," and carried out his threat, our sailors and those of Philip II., some time "King of England," as the Spaniards still insist on calling him, met often in mortal combat, and learned to recognise and honour in ...
— Spanish Life in Town and Country • L. Higgin and Eugene E. Street

... and, thinks I 'there's sprightly doin's hereabouts. I'll tarry a while and see 'em singe the fowl. I like the smell of burning pin feathers; it ...
— Pardners • Rex Beach

... of Pickwick, in which the general spirit of the "Trial" is happily conveyed. Thus Mr. Phunky's name is given as "M. Finge," which the little judge mistakes for "M. Singe." Buzfuz's speech too is excellent, especially his denouncing the Defendant's coming with his chops "et son ignoble ...
— Bardell v. Pickwick • Percy Fitzgerald

... their fellow-men With most prevailing tinsel: who unpen Their baaing vanities, to browse away The comfortable green and juicy hay From human pastures; or, O torturing fact! Who, through an idiot blink, will see unpack'd Fire-branded foxes to sear up and singe Our gold and ripe-ear'd hopes. With not one tinge Of sanctuary splendour, not a sight Able to face an owl's, they still are dight By the blue-eyed nations in empurpled vests, And crowns, and turbans. ...
— Famous Reviews • Editor: R. Brimley Johnson

... "I'll singe the eyebrow offa him myself if he don't git outa here," growled the cow hand, turning back ...
— Louisiana Lou • William West Winter

... Memoires Secrets sur la Russie (vide, e.g., ed. 1800, i. 311): "Souvorow ne scroit que le plus ridicule bouffon, s'il n'etoit pas montre le plus barbare guerrier. C'est un monstre, qui renferme dans le corps d'un singe l'ame d'un chien de boucher. Attila, son compatriote, et don't il descend, peut-etre ne fut ni ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 6 • Lord Byron

... daies, children be strangelie decked and apparayled to counterfeit Priests, Bishopes, and Women, and so be ledde with Songes and dances from house to house, blessing the people and gathering of money; and boyes do singe masse and preache in the pulpitt, with other such onfittinge and inconuenient vsages which tend rather to derysyon than enie true glorie of God, or honour of his Sayntes: the Kynges maiestie, therefore, myndynge nothinge so muche as to aduance the true glory ...
— The Customs of Old England • F. J. Snell

... voice. My blood ran cold with horror; I screamed and tumbled out of my hiding-place into the floor. Coppelius immediately seized upon me. "You little brute! You little brute!" he bleated, grinding his teeth. Then, snatching me up, he threw me on the hearth, so that the flames began to singe my hair. "Now we've got eyes—eyes—a beautiful pair of children's eyes," he whispered, and, thrusting his hands into the flames he took out some red-hot grains and was about to strew them into my eyes. Then my father clasped his hands and entreated ...
— Weird Tales. Vol. I • E. T. A. Hoffmann

... he confuted be, for Phaetons losse, would needs afresh complaine Thinking therewith to singe as sweet as he, but pittiles he sung and dyed in vaine. Eccho was pleas'd with voice resounding brim as proud to loose her shape to answer him. Hether resorted more then wel could heare, but on my Muse, ...
— Seven Minor Epics of the English Renaissance (1596-1624) • Dunstan Gale

... wealthy, I and wise, continue so sweet duck, continue so. Take heed of young smooth Varlets, younger Brothers: they are worms that will eat through your bags: they are very Lightning, that with a flash or two will melt your money, and never singe your purse-strings: they are Colts, wench Colts, heady and dangerous, till we take 'em up, and make 'em fit for Bonds: look upon me, I have had, and have yet matter of moment girle, matter of moment; you may meet with a worse back, I'le not ...
— The Scornful Lady • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... the fire began to singe the badger's back, so that he fled, howling with pain, and jumped into a river hard by. But, although the water put out the fire, his back was burnt as black as a cinder. The hare, seeing an opportunity for torturing ...
— Tales of Old Japan • Algernon Bertram Freeman-Mitford

... vais frotter mon fusil. J'ai vu un singe!" said Jaques Bourcier to his daughter, the pretty Adrienne, who was coming out of the room ...
— Alice of Old Vincennes • Maurice Thompson

... I tell you. Why, bless me, they're sitting down now; I shall have to singe 'em with my torch to make 'em stir! What an impudent ...
— The Eleven Comedies - Vol. I • Aristophanes et al

... Singe by holding the fowl over a flame from gas, alcohol or burning paper. Pick off pin feathers. Cut off the nails, then cut off the head, turn back the skin and cut the neck off quite close; take out windpipe ...
— The International Jewish Cook Book • Florence Kreisler Greenbaum

... entirely demolished the French, and the city-bonfires all believe it. However, as no officer is yet come, nor confirmation, my crackers suspend their belief. Our great fleet is stepped ashore again near Cherbourg; I suppose, to singe half a yard more of the coast. This is all I know; less, as you may perceive, than any ...
— The Letters of Horace Walpole, Volume 2 • Horace Walpole

... flies and moths!" said Uncle Paul testily. "Who's to work with them circling round and round the candles, trying to singe themselves to death? What's that white ...
— The Ocean Cat's Paw - The Story of a Strange Cruise • George Manville Fenn

... Of such fine steel was Balisarda's blade, That arms against it little shelter were; And by a person of such puissance swayed, By Roland, singe in the world or rare, It splits the shield, and is in nowise stayed, Though bound about with steel the edges are: It splits the shield, and to the bottom rends, And on the shoulder ...
— Orlando Furioso • Lodovico Ariosto

... sitting down. Shall I singe you with my torch? That's vulgar! O I couldn't do it ... yet If it would gratify the ...
— Lysistrata • Aristophanes

... draw and truss them, and put them to a good fire; singe, dust, and baste them with butter. Cover the breast with a sheet of buttered paper; remove it ten minutes before it is enough; that it may brown. A chicken will take 15 to 20 minutes. ...
— Burroughs' Encyclopaedia of Astounding Facts and Useful Information, 1889 • Barkham Burroughs

... and other ports of Spain and Portugal, and, despite assurances to the contrary, there was a growing belief that England was to be invaded. To destroy those ships before the monarch's face, would be, indeed, to "singe his beard." But whose arm was daring enough for such a stroke? Whose but that of the Devonshire skipper who had ...
— The Rise of the Dutch Republic, 1555-1566 • John Lothrop Motley

... to the end; But war-paint shows the streaks of weather; War yet shall be, but warriors Are now but operatives; War's made Less grand than Peace, And a singe runs through ...
— John Marr and Other Poems • Herman Melville

... have said years not a few, instead of some weeks, but her truthfulness did not drive her so far. She turned, and left the house, carrying with her the fowl to singe. ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... invincible on the sea; England's fight with the Spanish Armada was yet to come. But there were already Englishmen of the Drake and Frobisher type who liked nothing better than to capture a Spanish galleon, and "singe the king of Spain's beard"; and these independent sea-rovers were becoming so bold and numerous as to put the Spaniards to serious inconvenience and loss. But the latter could not be ousted from their vantage ground; so the English presently bethought themselves that ...
— The History of the United States from 1492 to 1910, Volume 1 • Julian Hawthorne

... must, nevertheless, beware of being thereby hurried on to form a hasty judgment, for that is the rock on which so many make shipwreck; that is the flare of the torch in which so many thoughtless moths singe their tiny wings. ...
— The Spirit of St. Francis de Sales • Jean Pierre Camus

... iambics which I wrote, When anger made me piping hot, And give them to your cook, To singe your fowl, or save your paste The next time when you have a feast; They'll save you many ...
— Poems (Volume II.) • Jonathan Swift

... of Sent Martyn livying he let rere, In whyche yet man should Goddy's seruys do, And singe for his soule, ...
— Old and New London - Volume I • Walter Thornbury

... sit easy. Nothing's going to hurt you." Long Jim shoved fresh cartridges into his forty-five. "That is, unless you're unlucky. Line up there, boys, one at a time now. Bud, you and Tim and Dough-head give them guys a singe, their hair's getting too long. The rest of you boys just content yourselves doing a fancy decoration on the canvas all around 'em. I'll deevote my entire attenshun to trimming them lugshuriant whiskers, ...
— The Black Box • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... deceit, and will endeavor to hide himself from your eyes. When you have recognized him—an old man, brown as an Indian, with a white beard—point him out to the angels, and say: 'This is Nuflo, the bad man that lied to Rima.' Let them take him and singe his wings with fire, so that he may not escape by flying; and afterwards thrust him into some dark cavern under a mountain, and place a great stone that a hundred men could not remove over its mouth, and leave him there alone and in the dark ...
— Green Mansions - A Romance of the Tropical Forest • W. H. Hudson

... throughout the yeare to have good lucke in play, And not to lose: then straight at game till day-light do they strive, To make some present proofe how well their hallowde pence wil thrive. Three Masses every priest doth singe upon that solemn day, With offrings unto every one, that so the more may play. This done, a woodden childe in clowtes is on the aultar set, About the which both boyes and gyrles do daunce and trymly jet; And Carrols sing in prayse of Christ, and, for to helpe them heare, The organs ...
— Christmas: Its Origin and Associations - Together with Its Historical Events and Festive Celebrations During Nineteen Centuries • William Francis Dawson

... near the Object, between that and the light; then with a good large Burning-Glass I so collect and throw the Rayes on the Paper, that there may be a very great quantity of light pass through it to the Object; yet I so proportion that light, that it may not singe or burn the Paper. Instead of which Paper there may be made use of a small piece of Looking-glass plate, one of whose sides is made rough by being rubb'd on a flat Tool with very find sand, this will, ...
— Micrographia • Robert Hooke

... from the yawning bowl, even as did the flaming poison tongues of the cruel dragon that St. George of England conquered so valiantly, each one of the revellers sought to snatch a raisin from the burning bowl without singe or scar. And he who drew out the lucky raisin was winner and champion, and could claim a boon or reward for his superior skill. Rather a dangerous game, perhaps it seems, but folks were rough players in those ...
— The Children's Book of Christmas Stories • Various

... Reddens laudes Domino. The Boar's heade in hande bring I, With garlandes gay and rosemary: I pray you all singe ...
— Coningsby • Benjamin Disraeli

... sat massively upright on the bench, letting his thick cloak fall backward from his broad shoulders to the floor, for, though the heat of the flames might well-nigh singe one's eyebrows, it would be cold behind. I looked upon his great girth of chest, upon his strong hands, which yet showed delicately fair when they were ungloved, and upon his round, full-colored, amiable face with much ...
— In the Valley • Harold Frederic

... Singe the chickens; cut them in pieces; pepper, salt, and flour them; fry them in fresh butter, till they are very brown: take the chickens out, and make a good gravy, into which put sweet herbs (marjoram or sage) according to your taste; if necessary, add pepper and salt; butter and flour must ...
— The American Frugal Housewife • Lydia M. Child

... habit, no doubt I shouldn't take it so hard. But the simple truth, though I am thirty years old, is that I have never before felt so much as a heart-flutter for any woman. And, since you cite your reading, I have read that a fire which may merely singe the surface of green wood, will ...
— My Friend Prospero • Henry Harland

... yarn dyed or piece dyed or printed, are given some kind of finish; sometimes it is no more than is necessary to smooth out the wrinkles. There are many finishing processes by which goods may be treated. They are run through gas flames to singe off loose fiber, and over steam cylinders to dry and straighten them, over a great variety of sizing machines to stiffen them with starch or glue. There are calenders or heavy rolls to smooth and iron them, steam presses of great power to press them out, breaking ...
— Textiles • William H. Dooley

... are held over in the hand of that God whose wrath is provoked and incensed as much against you as against many of the damned in hell: you hang by a slender thread, with the flames of divine wrath flashing about it, and ready every moment to singe it and burn it asunder; and you have no interest in any Mediator, and nothing to lay hold of to save yourself, nothing to keep off the flames of wrath, nothing of your own, nothing that you ever have done, nothing that you can do, ...
— Crime: Its Cause and Treatment • Clarence Darrow

... picked, &c. and break the breast-bone (to make them look plump), twist up a sheet of clean writing-paper, light it, and thoroughly singe the turkey all over, turning ...
— The Cook's Oracle; and Housekeeper's Manual • William Kitchiner

... Woman. CONCHUBOR — stiffly. — A night with thunder coming is no night to be abroad. LAVARCHAM — more uneasily. — She's used to every track and pathway, and the lightning itself wouldn't let down its flame to singe the beauty of her like. FERGUS — cheerfully. — She's right, Con- chubor, and let you sit down and take your ease, (he takes a wallet from under his cloak) and I'll count out what we've brought, and put it in the presses within. [He goes into the inner room with the Old Woman. ...
— Deirdre of the Sorrows • J. M. Synge

... poem: Mallarme was spelled with one L, and E. Burne-Jones (a pre-Raphaelite painter and associate of Rossetti) was given as F. B. Jones. These names are corrected in this text, as is Synge, given as Singe in ...
— Ballads of a Bohemian • Robert W. Service

... hang as long as it can be kept without being offensive. Pick it carefully, and singe it; wipe the inside thoroughly with a clean cloth, truss it with the head turned under the wing and the legs drawn close together, but not crossed. Flour partridges prepared in this manner when first laid to the fire, and baste ...
— Enquire Within Upon Everything - The Great Victorian Domestic Standby • Anonymous

... monsters with a sturdy courage. Arrows were useless against the smooth, bull-like hides. Even the throwing fire could not so much as singe them; nothing but twenty axe blows delivered on an attacking head together could beat it back, and even these succeeded only through sheer weight of metal, and did not make so much as the scratch ...
— The Lost Continent • C. J. Cutcliffe Hyne

... impetuous old master dashed his horse to one side, and discharged a pistol at our hero, and this failing, he discharged another. Thanks to Lanigan, however, they were both harmless, that worthy man having forgotten to put in bullets, or even as much powder as would singe an ordinary whisker. ...
— Willy Reilly - The Works of William Carleton, Volume One • William Carleton

... all chickens except very young ones, whether they are home dressed or not, hairs will be found on the skin; and, as has been mentioned, the older the bird the more hair will it have. The next step in preparing a chicken for cooking, therefore, is to singe it, or burn off these hairs. However, before singeing, provided the head has not been removed, cut it off just where the neck begins, using a kitchen cleaver or a butcher knife, as in Fig. 3. To singe a dressed chicken, grasp it ...
— Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 3 - Volume 3: Soup; Meat; Poultry and Game; Fish and Shell Fish • Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

... ones: men who would take hardships without grumbling, and who, with a prospect of good reward in addition to their pay, would go without question where they were told, and do as they were ordered—were it to singe the beard of the Grand Turk, himself, in his own palace. He charged them, therefore, to find for him men of this kind, among their relations, or men ...
— By Right of Conquest - Or, With Cortez in Mexico • G. A. Henty

... Alauda: the larke is a lytel birde, & w{i}t{h} euery man well beknowen through his songe / in {th}e somer {the}i begy{n}neth to singe in the dawning of {th}e day, geuynge knowlege to the people of {th}e cominge of the daye; and in fayre weder he reioyseth sore / but wha{n} it is rayne weder, than it singeth selden / he singeth nat sittinge on the grownde nouther / but whan he assendith ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... in 1745. It suffered no second burning, though the Highlanders had possession of it, and Prince Charlie held a stormy council of war in the old Drummond Arms, at the foot of Hill's Wynd. Since then, Crieff has become a "braw toon" without the other "singe" its Highland neighbours destined for it. The coming of the railway in 1856, and the adoption of the Police Act in 1864, have done wonders, enabling it to take full advantage of its many attractions. It was loyal to the Hanoverian dynasty during the ...
— Chronicles of Strathearn • Various

... cxar. Since then de tiu tempo. Since (adv.) antaux ne longe. Sincere sincera. Sincerity sincereco. Sinecure senlaborofico. Sinew tendeno. Sinful pekema. Sing kanti. Singing (the art) kantarto. Single (alone) sola. Single unuobla. Singe bruleti, flameti. Singular (gram.) ununombro. Singular stranga. Sinciput verto. Sinister funebra. Sink sxtonlavujo. Sink malflosi, igxi. Sinner pekulo. Sinovia (anat) sinovio. Sip trinketi. Siphon sifono. Sir sinjoro. Sire patro. Sire mosxto. Siren sireno. Sister ...
— English-Esperanto Dictionary • John Charles O'Connor and Charles Frederic Hayes

... monotonous food, the lack of fire, he did not dwell upon, but singeing, that is to say burning down through the eternally frozen ground, was to begin at once. To singe a hole into the soil ten or fifteen feet deep in the midst of the sunless seventy of the arctic circle is no light task, but these men will do it; if hardihood and honest toil are of any avail they will all share in the precious sand whose shine has lured them through ...
— The Trail of the Goldseekers - A Record of Travel in Prose and Verse • Hamlin Garland

... Director of Music in the chief church in Berlin, in ten folio parts, each containing twelve songs, in 1666-67. It seems that Gerhardt never derived any pecuniary advantage from their publication. Tradition says, that after a warm conflict with the enemy he wrote the hymn "Wach auf mein Herz und Singe," in proof of which the second verse is quoted. But he wrote no song after leaving Berlin. Schultze mentions that there is no song bearing his name that had ...
— Paul Gerhardt's Spiritual Songs - Translated by John Kelly • Paul Gerhardt

... that the month of May Is comen, and that I hear the foules singe, And that the flowers 'ginnen for ...
— Old English Libraries, The Making, Collection, and Use of Books • Ernest A. Savage

... the ship of fleet-footed Aiakides, and he gave them ample funeral feast. Many sleek oxen were stretched out, their throats cut with steel, and many sheep and bleating goats, and many white-tusked boars well grown in fat were spitted to singe in the flame of Hephaistos; so on all sides round the corpse in ...
— The Iliad of Homer • Homer (Lang, Leaf, Myers trans.)

... secret, of course," he was told. "I merely possess a slight comprehension of it. I know that it is an adaptation of that discovery of Professor Singe, two years ago—cosmic attraction. Eventually, perhaps, it will permit interplanetary travel. This use of it is simply the beginning. But it is to America's everlasting glory that a scientist of ...
— Astounding Stories, February, 1931 • Various

... welcome. It is long since you went a salamander-gathering down AEtna. Worse than samphire-picking by some odds. 'Tis a mercy your worship did not singe your mustachios. ...
— The Works of Charles and Mary Lamb, Volume 2 • Charles Lamb

... Satan singe your skin for you! Do you want to bring a hue and cry upon us? Don't you know a light in the outer cavern can be seen from the ...
— Capitola the Madcap • Emma D. E. N. Southworth

... supposed to find a musquet fit for immediate use, so I had full time. To ascend the tree was no more than I had done many times before, and I went high in the branches, but cautiously, not to give Monsieur le Singe the idea of being pursued, lest he should leap to a bough incapable of supporting me. When I had reached a fork tolerably high, and where he could see me, I settled myself, took out a letter, which fortunately was in my pocket, read it with the greatest deliberation, the monkey watching ...
— A Reputed Changeling • Charlotte M. Yonge

... hunt wild pig in the mountains, and after some time they speared and killed one, but they had no fire over which to singe it. ...
— Philippine Folk Tales • Mabel Cook Cole

... to erudition formed no part of the programme which she was mentally arranging as she sat there watching a moth singe its filmy, spotted wings in the gas-flame; for she was obstinately wedded to the unpardonable heresy that, in the nineteenth century, it was a woman's privilege to be as learned as Cuvier, or Sir William Hamilton, or Humboldt, provided the learning was accurate, and gave out no hollow, ...
— St. Elmo • Augusta J. Evans

... poem is almost wholly figurative; yet they are so fearful of a metaphor that no example of Virgil can encourage them to be bold with safety. Sure, they might warm themselves by that sprightly blaze, without approaching it so close as to singe their wings; they may come as near it as their master. Not that I would discourage that purity of diction in which he excels all other poets; but he knows how far to extend his franchises, and advances to the verge without venturing a ...
— Discourses on Satire and Epic Poetry • John Dryden

... drunken, dronken. Finde, fand, fond, funden. Fi[gh]te, fa[gh]t, fe[gh]t, fo[gh]ten. Helpe, halp, holpen. Kerve (cut), carf, corven. Melte, malt, molten. Renne (run), ran, runnen. Ringe, rong, rungen, rongen. Singe, song, sang, sungen. Steke, stac, stoken. Sterve (die), starf, storven. Werpe (throw), warp, worpen. Win, wan, won, wonnen, wunnen. [Gh]elde ...
— Early English Alliterative Poems - in the West-Midland Dialect of the Fourteenth Century • Various

... I can't let the Beverly-Joneses know that it was a put-up job. I must set fire to the office as soon as I get back. But it's worth it. And I'll have to singe Robinson about the face and hands. But ...
— Frenzied Fiction • Stephen Leacock

... which, and the still, a space of two inches ought to be left for the action of the heat, which space preserves, and prevents the wall or fender, from burning the still; the mode in common practice, being to place it against the still, which will certainly singe or burn her. When this defender is finished, commence a wall, which continue round, laying a brick for a foundation, about four inches from the lower rivets; thus raising this wall for the flue, continuing ...
— The Practical Distiller • Samuel McHarry

... chuckling, but most discordant laugh. "These citizen chuffs and clowns will press in amongst us, when there is but an inch of a door open. And what remedy?—Just e'en this, that as their cash gies them confidence, we should strip them of it. Flay them, my lord—singe them as the kitchen wench does the rats, and then they winna long to come back again.—Ay, ay—pluck them, plume them—and then the larded capons will not be for flying so high a wing, my lord, among the goss- hawks and ...
— The Fortunes of Nigel • Sir Walter Scott

... ignorant, and a terrible mess they made of the poor carcass in their varied efforts. In despair Mrs Brook suggested to Mrs Scholtz, who was now the chief and acknowledged operator, that they had better cut it up without skinning, and singe off the wool and skin together; but on attempting this Mrs Scholtz found that she could not find the joints, and, being possessed of no saw, could not cut the bones; whereupon Mrs Merton suggested that she should ...
— The Settler and the Savage • R.M. Ballantyne

... to see what the sentry at the gun-room door was about, and found that he had sat down on a chest, and was fast asleep. I knew immediately that the man was in my power, and I did not fear him; and then it was that the idea came into my head, that I would singe the purser's wig. I went softly to the sentry's light, took it from the hook, and went down with it into the cockpit, as being the best place for carrying on my operations. The wig was very greasy, and every curl, as I held it in the candle, flared up, and burned beautifully to within ...
— Percival Keene • Frederick Marryat

... since, according to Gabalis and Swedenborg, the Spirits of the Elements are not to be trusted at all?—notwithstanding, my best friends must now avoid my embrace; fearing lest, in some sudden exuberance, I dart out a flash or two, and singe their hair-curls, and Sunday frocks; notwithstanding all this, I say, it is still my purpose to assist you in the completion of the Work, since much good of me and of my dear married daughter (would ...
— The German Classics of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries: - Masterpieces of German Literature Translated into English, Volume 5. • Various

... a light; apply the match to, apply the torch to; rekindle, relume[obs3]; fan the flame, add fuel to the flame; poke the fire, stir the fire, blow the fire; make a bonfire of. melt, thaw, fuse; liquefy &c. 335. burn, inflame, roast, toast, fry, grill, singe, parch, bake, torrefy[obs3], scorch; brand, cauterize, sear, burn in; corrode, char, calcine, incinerate; smelt, scorify[obs3]; reduce to ashes; burn to a cinder; commit to the flames, consign to the flames. boil, digest, stew, cook, seethe, scald, parboil, simmer; ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... in a nervous fashion. "And we were fairly cornered before we knew where we were. One great brute came at me straight in the face. I knocked him off with my fist and fumbled for my barker, but shot wild and did no more damage than to singe the hair off another brute's back; but I managed to edge a bit closer to Stee, who was getting it rough, and hadn't even a chance to draw his knife. But we should have been down and done for to a dead certainty, if it hadn't been for Miss Radford and Miles. They let the ...
— A Countess from Canada - A Story of Life in the Backwoods • Bessie Marchant

... clean, without tearing the skin, and without scalding. Singe slightly if need be. Dip in hot water for three or four seconds and in ...
— Soil Culture • J. H. Walden

... doing the most youth-preserving things, chasing over the world after adventures, like a boy after butterflies, seeing new peoples, walking in untrodden ways. If he had lived in more spacious days he would have sailed with Francis Drake and helped to singe the King of Spain's beard. Oh, I do think you will still like Biddy. The charm he had at fifteen he hasn't lost one little bit. He has still the same rather shy manner and slow way of speaking and sudden, affection-winning smile. The War has changed him ...
— Penny Plain • Anna Buchan (writing as O. Douglas)

... Singe the chickens, and remove the head and feet; place the chicken on the table with the breast down. Take a small, sharp-pointed sabatier knife and cut the skin from neck to rump right down the back bone. Carefully and slowly run the knife between the bones and the flesh, ...
— Ice Creams, Water Ices, Frozen Puddings Together with - Refreshments for all Social Affairs • Mrs. S. T. Rorer

... introduction to Dr. Spencer's laboratory, where he compounded mixtures that Dr. Spencer promised should do no more harm than was reasonable to himself, or any one else. Ethel suspected that, if Tom had chanced to singe his eyebrows, his friend would not have regretted a blight to his nascent coxcombry, but he was far too careful of his own beauty to do ...
— The Daisy Chain, or Aspirations • Charlotte Yonge

... long; he sprang into the midst of the flames, but they did not hurt him, and could not even singe a hair of his head. He carried the log out, and laid it down. Hardly, however, had the wood touched the earth than it was transformed, and the beautiful maiden who had helped him in his need stood before him, and by the silken and shining golden garments ...
— Household Tales by Brothers Grimm • Grimm Brothers

... a Norman peer, but, lest this should be thought too strong, she dilutes it by the addition of a pet name drawn from the nursery. By this title her fame is celebrated amongst many foolish young men who singe themselves at the flame of her friendship, and many others who, wishing to be thought wise, pretend to know her. Like all doves, she plumes herself on her good looks. Unlike them, she is proud of her bad habits; but she is a stern censor, and shows scant mercy to those colleagues ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Volume 98, March 1, 1890 • Various

... made any deafe to heare it, but I am suer I was almost sicke to see't. Whyle they are brablinge in the cittye I am sent backe to the villadge to cheire up the too younge mermaydes; for synce theire throates have bin rincht with salt water they singe with no lesse sweatenes. But staye; I spy a fisherman drawinge his nett upp to the shore; I'l slacke som of my speede to see how hee hathe spedd ...
— A Collection Of Old English Plays, Vol. IV. • Editor: A.H. Bullen

... your cheeks! rage! blow! You cat[)a]r[)a]cts and hurricanoes, spout, Till you have drench'd our steeples, drown'd the cocks! You sulphurous and thought-executing fires, Vaunt couriers of oak-cleaving thunderbolts, Singe my white head! and thou, all-shaking thunder, Strike flat the thick rotundity o' ...
— English Critical Essays - Nineteenth Century • Various

... not in tressed hair and gay perrie,* *jewels As pearles, nor with gold, nor clothes rich.' After thy text nor after thy rubrich I will not work as muchel as a gnat. Thou say'st also, I walk out like a cat; For whoso woulde singe the catte's skin Then will the catte well dwell in her inn;* *house And if the catte's skin be sleek and gay, She will not dwell in house half a day, But forth she will, ere any day be daw'd, To ...
— The Canterbury Tales and Other Poems • Geoffrey Chaucer

... the trooper, impatiently, "let the rascals singe their whiskers at the muzzles of the British muskets, if they can be driven there. But, enough of them. Archibald, do you deem that moon to be a world like this, ...
— The Spy • James Fenimore Cooper

... has no comparative or superlative, but takes the place of a positive to better and best. There was an old comparative bet, which has gone out of use; as in the sentence (14th century), "Ich singe bet than thu dest" (I sing better than thou dost). The superlative I form was betst, which has softened to the ...
— An English Grammar • W. M. Baskervill and J. W. Sewell

... any-thing to torne, Than cessed she Fortune anoon to be: Now, sith hir wheel by no wey may soiorne, 850 What wostow if hir mutabilitee Right as thy-selven list, wol doon by thee, Or that she be not fer fro thyn helpinge? Paraunter, thou hast cause for to singe! ...
— Troilus and Criseyde • Geoffrey Chaucer

... the game and describing the handsomest cup-and-balls recorded in history, after relating what fabulous custom it had formerly brought to the Singe-Vert and to all dealers in toys and turned ivories, and finally, after proving that the game attained to the dignity of statics, Gourdon ended the first canto with the following conclusion, which will remind ...
— Sons of the Soil • Honore de Balzac

... of Love's favorite haunts, From its dimple he could not get loose; Though now the neat hand of a barber it wants, Or a singe, like the ...
— The Poetical Works of Thomas Hood • Thomas Hood

... he thinks he shall take to the sea again For one more cruise with his buccaneers, To singe the beard of the King of Spain, And capture another Dean of Jaen And ...
— Lyra Heroica - A Book of Verse for Boys • Various

... paw, instead of getting his own burnt), in those utterances of Voltaire; some of which the reader will grin over too, without much tragic feeling,—the rather as they did our Felis Leo no manner of ill, and show our incomparable SINGE with a sparkle of the TIGRE in him; theoretic sparkle merely and for moments, which makes him all the more entertaining and interesting at ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XVIII. (of XXI.) - Frederick The Great—Seven-Years War Rises to a Height.—1757-1759. • Thomas Carlyle

... LYONNAISE—Singe off all the hair from pig's ears, scrape and wash well and cut lengthwise into strips. Place them in a saucepan with a little stock, add a small quantity of flour, a few slices of onion fried, salt and pepper to taste. Place the pan over a slow fire and simmer until the ears ...
— Good Things to Eat as Suggested by Rufus • Rufus Estes



Words linked to "Singe" :   blacken, swinge, burn, scorch, sear, combust, char



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