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Souse   Listen
noun
Souse, Sous  n.  A corrupt form of Sou. (Obs.)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Souse" Quotes from Famous Books



... heels, dragged him through the kitchen into a little larder, and there shut the door on him. "Lie there, nasty pig," cried Little John from outside with disgusted air, for his fellow-servants to note. "Lie there in a clean sty for once; and if you grunt again I will surely souse you under the pump!" At this threat Robin's snores abated ...
— Robin Hood • Paul Creswick

... heard, I swan if it don't! And they tell me that you captained them boys as played the Clifford football team to a stand this mornin'. I don't wonder at it; they ain't much as could stand up before such pluck! And so you went souse into the creek? Ugh! it must a been a cold bath, Frank. Go ...
— The Boys of Columbia High on the Gridiron • Graham B. Forbes

... me one day. "When you was spieling that Adam Strang yarn, I remember you mentioned playing chess with that royal souse of an emperor's brother. Now is that chess ...
— The Jacket (The Star-Rover) • Jack London

... in the water a figure made of branches, grass, and herbs, which is supposed to represent the saint. In Kursk, a province of Southern Russia, when rain is much wanted, the women seize a passing stranger and throw him into the river, or souse him from head to foot. Later on we shall see that a passing stranger is often taken for a deity or the personification of some natural power. It is recorded in official documents that during a drought in 1790 the peasants of Scheroutz ...
— The Golden Bough - A study of magic and religion • Sir James George Frazer

... de qui l'esprit guinde Sous un front jamais deride Ne souffre, n'approuve, et n'estime Que le pompeux, et le sublime; Pour moi j'ose poser en fait Qu'en de certains momens l'esprit le plus parfait Peut aimer sans rougir jusqu'aux marionettes; Et qu'il est des tems et des lieux, Ou le grave, ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. II (of 3) - Edited, With Memoir And Notes, By His Son, The Earl Of Beaconsfield • Isaac D'Israeli

... well-known popular sources of information about Scotland, Ireland, and Wales. For France, P. Viollet, Precis de l'histoire du droit francais. Droit prive, 1886, and several of his monographs in Bibl. de l'Ecole des Chartes; Babeau, Le Village sous l'ancien regime (the mir in the eighteenth century), third edition, 1887; Bonnemere, Doniol, etc. For Italy and Scandinavia, the chief works are named in Laveleye's Primitive Property, German version by K. Bucher. For the ...
— Mutual Aid • P. Kropotkin

... than of death. It did not occur to him that France could retain her soldiers by other and better motives. See Spirit of Laws, book vi, chap. 12. See Necker on the Finances, vol. ii, chap. 5; vol. iii, chap. 34. A day-labourer on the roads got fifteen sous a day; and a French soldier only six, at the very time that the mortality of an army of forty thousand men sent to the colonies was annually 13,333, or about one in three. In our native army the sepoy gets about ...
— Rambles and Recollections of an Indian Official • William Sleeman

... man, contemptuously snapping his fingers, emboldened by his compact with the caller. "Francs and sous are everything." ...
— The Strollers • Frederic S. Isham

... imagine is a scene of French revelry, do not know that the cancan-dancer there is paid for his jollity. The men who dance at the Jardin Mabille are not there for revelry's sake: they are earning a few sous from the manager, who knows that he must do something to amuse his usual spectators—viz., the tourists—who go back to Manchester or to Omaha and astonish their friends with tales of the goings-on of those dreadful Frenchmen in Paris. The women who disport in the cancan at the same place ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 15, - No. 90, June, 1875 • Various

... Supplement a la Zoologie du voyage autour du monde de la Favorite sous le commandement de M. Laplace capitaine ...
— Journals Of Two Expeditions Of Discovery In North-West And Western Australia, Vol. 2 (of 2) • George Grey

... "and see Mdlle. de Roberval for yourself. I wish no one but you to know for the present that she has returned to France. I will leave you with her, and attend to these Malouins, who have, no doubt, come to see what return I can give them for the sous they invested in ...
— Marguerite De Roberval - A Romance of the Days of Jacques Cartier • T. G. Marquis

... dis de 'mon courage au travail et a la lutte' me paye pour bien des heures de besogne. Tout ce qui me decourage parfois, c'est ma faible sante qui m'oblige souvent a paraitre paresseux sous ...
— Philip Gilbert Hamerton • Philip Gilbert Hamerton et al

... say ours, for I've sat behind the desk through all that time, like a poor dog in his kennel. Isn't it much better to come and visit our daughter after she is married to a notary of Paris, and live eight months of the year at Chinon, than to begin here to make five sous six blanks, and of six blanks nothing? Wait for a rise in the Funds, and you can give eight thousand francs a year to your daughter and we can keep two thousand for ourselves, and the proceeds of the business will allow us to buy Les Tresorieres. There in ...
— Rise and Fall of Cesar Birotteau • Honore de Balzac

... next Braith stood under the dark porch of the empty theater. The confusion was all at the stage entrance. Here, in front, the deserted street was white and black and silent under the electric lamps. All the lonelier for two wretched gamins, counting their dirty sous and draggled newspapers. ...
— In the Quarter • Robert W. Chambers

... to Frank Scott, 'was quite delightful: getting popped at and run at by horses, and giving sous for the wounded into little boxes guarded by the raggedest, picturesquest, delightfullest, sentinels; but the insurrection! ugh, I shudder to think at [SIC] it.' He found it 'not a bit of fun sitting boxed up in the house four days almost. . . I was the only GENTLEMAN to four ladies, and didn't ...
— Memoir of Fleeming Jenkin • Robert Louis Stevenson

... said he, "I must make haste, for I fear I may miss the train—and so manage as well as you can. You still have thirty sous left, haven't you?" ...
— Fruitfulness - Fecondite • Emile Zola

... Meadows green, and maidens mowing in the pleasant twilight shade: The crimson crown of sun-set on Mont Blanc's majestic head, And each lesser peak beneath him pale and ghastly as the dead: Eagle-nest-like mountain chalets, where the tourist for some sous Can imbibe milk by the bucket, and on Nature's grandeur muse: Mont Anvert, the "Pas" called "mauvais," which I thought was "pas mauvais," Where, in spite of all my boasting, I encountered some delay; For, much to my amazement, at the ...
— Sagittulae, Random Verses • E. W. Bowling

... come to the cashier of the Mutual Credit Society to put a few sous in his son's pocket, the too weak mother would have suggested to him the want of money in order to have the pleasure of ...
— Other People's Money • Emile Gaboriau

... up, and resolved to be cheated rather than go distracted. But indeed the Flemish are not cheats, as far as I have seen of them. They would go to the utmost borders of honesty for a couronne de Brabant, or a demi-couronne, or a double escalin, or a single escalin, or a plaquet, or a livre, or a sous, or a liard, or for any the vilest denomination of their absurd coin, yet I do not believe they would go beyond the bounds of honesty with any but an English Milor: they are privileged dupes. A maid at the hotel at Dunkirk ...
— The Life And Letters Of Maria Edgeworth, Vol. 1 • Maria Edgeworth

... progress she had made; she has been shown how to paint roses, and to embroider ties in such a way as to earn eight sous a day. She has learned the history of France in Ragois and chronology in the Tables du Citoyen Chantreau, and her young imagination has been set free in the realm of geography; all without any aim, excepting that of keeping away all that might be dangerous to her ...
— The Physiology of Marriage, Part II. • Honore de Balzac

... luxury being thus introduced into the town. Every one feared a rise in the price of rents and provisions, and a coming invasion of Parisian furniture. Some persons were sufficiently pricked by curiosity to give ten sous to Jacquelin to allow them a close inspection of the vehicle which threatened to upset the whole economy of the region. A pair of horses, bought in Normandie, were also ...
— An Old Maid • Honore de Balzac

... among the crowd, that civility which would have been thought nothing of at another time touched the feelings of the unhappy ladies. The queen was delighted with the manners of a lady at whose house they rested,— the wife of Monsieur Renard, the mayor of Ferte-sous-Jouarre. The mayor waited upon the king at table; and Madame Renard did all she could to make the ladies comfortable. Everything was done so quietly that the queen did not discover, for a long time, who she was. When, at length, the queen inquired whether she was not the mistress of the house, ...
— The Peasant and the Prince • Harriet Martineau

... the habit of carrying his money on him, and he had not had time to give me anything before he was dragged off. I had only a few sous in my pocket. Would it be enough to buy food for Pretty-Heart, the dogs, and myself? I spent the next two days in agony, not daring to leave the inn. The monkey and the dogs were also very downcast. At last, on the third day, a man brought me a letter from him. Vitalis wrote me that ...
— Nobody's Boy - Sans Famille • Hector Malot

... Gauls, were—vain and light. They are susceptible but of one sentiment—honour. It is right to afford nourishment to this sentiment: and to allow of distinctions. Observe how the people bow before the decorations of foreigners. Voltaire calls the common soldiers Alexanders at five sous a day. He was right: it is just so. Do you imagine that you can make men fight by reasoning? Never. You must bribe them with glory, distinctions, rewards. To come to the point: during ten years there has been a talk of institutions. Where are they? ...
— The History of Napoleon Buonaparte • John Gibson Lockhart

... entend, mal respond. Mal pense qui ne repense. Mal fait qui ne pairfait. Si tous les fols portoient marrottes, on ne scauroit pas de quell bois se chaufer Mieux vaut en paix vn oeuf, qu'en guerre vn boeuf. Couper l'herbe sous les pieds. Toutes les heures ne sont pas meures. Qui vit a compte, vit a honte. Meschante parole jettee, va par toute alia volee. Amour se nourrit de ieune chaire Innocence porte avec soy sa deffence. Il ne regard plus loin que le bout de son nez. A ...
— Bacon is Shake-Speare • Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence

... on songe que la vie moyenne est si courte, qu'un si grand nombre d'hommes meurent tout jeunes, on hesite d'abreger cette premiere, cette meilleure epoque de la vie, ou l'enfant, libre sous la mere, vit dans la grace et non dans la loi. Mais s'il est vrai, comme je pense, que ce temps qu'on croit perdu est justement l'epoque unique, precieuse, irreparable, ou, parmi les jeux puerils, le genius sacre essaye son premier essor, la saison ou les ailes poussent, ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 58, Number 358, August 1845 • Various

... ni du culte, ni de la politique, ni de la morale, ni des gens en place, ni des corps en credit, ni de l'opera, ni des autres spectacles, ni de personne qui tient a quelque chose, je puis tout imprimer librement; sous l'inspection ...
— Diary in America, Series Two • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... pour le Conseil de Guerre sont a peine revenus de Paris et notre plan de campagne est a peine arrete, que mes Plenipotentiaires pour la Conference de paix se mettent en route pour assister sous les yeux de V.M. a l'[oe]uvre de la pacification. Je n'ai pas besoin de vous recommander Lord Clarendon, mais je ne veux pas le laisser partir sans le rendre porteur de quelques mots ...
— The Letters of Queen Victoria, Volume III (of 3), 1854-1861 • Queen of Great Britain Victoria

... de M. Hart est tres curieux, tres utile et fort interessant. Il ne me reste plus qu'a souhaiter que l'auteur nous donne maintenant une traduction d'un autre ouvrage, tres precieux, qu'il a publie recemment sous ce titre: The Violin and its Music (Londres, Dulau, 1881, in 4o). Il nous aura rendu alors un ...
— The Violin - Its Famous Makers and Their Imitators • George Hart

... this lady was worthy to be the mother of the young man who, one day, pointing to a sheet of stamped paper, on which a bill of exchange might be drawn, said: "You see that; it is worth five sous now; but if I sign my name to it, it will be worth nothing!" This was a speech made by Junot's eldest son, known in Paris as the Duc d'Abrantes, and as the intimate friend of Victor Hugo, from whom at one ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 2, Issue 10, August, 1858 • Various

... hauled up one day on the same charge, and went her way with the gendarme, to be seen no more. A meeker-looking old creature I never saw as she leaned against the wall over the way, and collected sous industriously from the passers-by, and hid them in a pocket in the small of the poor baby's back; but I was told she displayed tremendous energy as a petroleuse in those other days when robbery was a better trade than even ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. 15, - No. 87, March, 1875 • Various

... been lost; but if anything here below can take the place of Providence, it is the post. Postal spirit, incomparably above public spirit, exceeds in brilliancy of resource and invention the ablest romance-writers. When the post gets hold of a letter, worth, to it, from three to ten sous, and does not immediately know where to find the person to whom that letter is addressed, it displays a financial anxiety only to be met with in very pertinacious creditors. The post goes and comes and ...
— The Celibates - Includes: Pierrette, The Vicar of Tours, and The Two Brothers • Honore de Balzac

... resulte de cette correspondance, dont je serais heureux de mettre les originaux sous les yeux de Votre Excellence, Monsieur le Ministre, que partout mes ouvertures ont ete accueillies avec empressement; qu'en Baviere et en Autriche il a ete donne a mon plan un commencement d'execution, ...
— Movement of the International Literary Exchanges, between France and North America from January 1845 to May, 1846 • Various

... to be a swing in here," said Carhaix, "for the little girls of the neighbourhood. But the privilege was abused, as privileges always are. In the dusk all kinds of things were done for a few sous. The curate finally had the swing taken down and ...
— La-bas • J. K. Huysmans

... the whimsicalities of his small realm, to elicit something comical; but not even he expected anything so perfect as the last. To complete the picture of convict life in Tai-o-hae, it remains to be added that these criminals draw a salary as regularly as the President of the Republic. Ten sous a day is their hire. Thus they have money, food, shelter, clothing, and, I was about to write, their liberty. The French are certainly a good-natured people, and make easy masters. They are besides inclined to view the Marquesans with ...
— In the South Seas • Robert Louis Stevenson

... lady from this country, dressed after its fashion; the effect was so singular that it immediately induced me to distinguish her, from the rest of the audience, but her appearance seemed to excite no curiosity with any other person. Our breakfast cost us each fifteen sous, to which may be added two sols more, for the maids, who waited upon us with cheerful smiles, and habited in the full cushvois costume, and which also entitled us to kisses and curtsies. I beg leave to oppose our ...
— The Stranger in France • John Carr

... appraise her value, and to fill up the numerous forms, certificates, schedules, and other columned documents, I had hours of walking to perform, and most courteous and tedious attention to endure, and then paid for sanitary dues, "two sous per ton," that was threepence. Finally, there was this insurmountable difficulty, that though all my ship's papers were en regle, they must be signed "by two persons on board," so I offered to sign first as captain and then as cook. They ...
— The Voyage Alone in the Yawl "Rob Roy" • John MacGregor

... rated with sharp words, and sometimes a ready cuff, a mob of little boys who besieged the door, and implored every one who entered to give them tickets to see the Crucifixion. 'It's the last piece,' they perpetually exclaimed, 'and we may come in for five sous a head.' ...
— Tancred - Or, The New Crusade • Benjamin Disraeli

... who lived in the palace, that is, the girls, to club together occasionally, that they might have a little fete in the garden of the palace. It was a sort of pic-nic, to which every one contributed; some would bring cakes, some fruit; some would bring money (a few sous) to purchase bon-bons, or anything else ...
— Valerie • Frederick Marryat

... de la Divinit Je descends dans ce lieu, par la Grace habit. L'Innocence s'y plat, ma compagne ternelle, Et n'a point sous les cieux d'asile plus fidle. Ici, loin du tumulte, aux devoirs les plus saints 5 Tout un peuple naissant est form par mes mains. Je nourris dans son coeur la semence fconde Des vertus dont il doit sanctifier le monde. Un roi qui me protge, un ...
— Esther • Jean Racine

... told of congested movement over the bridge at La Ferte-sous-Jouarre, south of which masses of troops were awaiting their turn to cross. But the British advance was necessarily slow. The country was well suited to rearguard actions and skilful use was made of the ground by the German machine-gunners. By the evening the British ...
— The War in the Air; Vol. 1 - The Part played in the Great War by the Royal Air Force • Walter Raleigh

... other hand, "presque toutes les races a trois mues, que nous avons experimentees, ont fait quatre mues a la seconde ou a la troisieme annee, ce qui semble prouver qu'il a suffi de les placer dans des conditions favorables pour leur rendre une faculte qu'elles avaient perdue sous des ...
— The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication - Volume I • Charles Darwin

... Meanwhile the dog was at the hearth, but the wolf at the door. Now, this sagacious animal had been taught to perform the duties of messenger and major-domo. At stated intervals he applied to his master for sous, and brought back the supplies which the sous purchased. He now, as usual, came to the table for the accustomed coin—the last sou was gone,—the dog's occupation was at an end. But could not the dog be sold? Impossible: it was the property of another,—a sacred deposit; ...
— What Will He Do With It, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... not remain long amid this babel, although long enough to be offered six francs a day to remain. I never afterwards worked for a less rate of remuneration than six francs a day, but never succeeded in obtaining a sous more. I had many "Patrons" in Paris. In one establishment there were three workmen continually employed in making crosses of honour, in gold and silver, to reward the merit, or to purchase the affection and support, of the French people. I was variously ...
— A Tramp's Wallet - stored by an English goldsmith during his wanderings in Germany and France • William Duthie

... tired of these things, and of restaurants at thirty-two sous, of travelling in omnibuses, of enduring want and making futile efforts. He took up the papers again; there were others near them. They were prospectuses of the coal-mining company, with a list of the mines and the particulars as to their contents, Frederick ...
— Sentimental Education, Volume II - The History of a Young Man • Gustave Flaubert

... narrative, as well as in the Political Essay on New Spain, all the prices are reckoned in piastres, and silver reals (reales de plata). Eight of these reals are equivalent to a piastre, or one hundred and five sous, French money (4 shillings 4 1/2 pence English). Nouv. Esp. volume 2 pages 519, 616 ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America • Alexander von Humboldt

... a little shop full of trifles for sale, but so thronged at all hours of the day that you cannot get attended to; purchasers lay down their money, take up the object desired, and walk away. Here may be bought a medal for two sous, or a crucifix priced ...
— In the Heart of the Vosges - And Other Sketches by a "Devious Traveller" • Matilda Betham-Edwards

... paysans sous vos casques, Quels poings noueux et noirs vers le nord vous tendiez! "Les cerisiers!" criaient avec fureur les Basques; Et ceux ...
— Everyman's Land • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... that every man who pays a tax of sixty sous per annum (2s. 6d., English) is an elector. What will Mr. Burke place against this? Can anything be more limited, and at the same time more capricious, than the qualifications of electors ...
— The World's Greatest Books—Volume 14—Philosophy and Economics • Various

... seem how They would come dear; and then the fight At sea perhaps, our boats have heels And mostly they sail along at night, But once in a way they're caught; one feels Ivory's not better nor finer—why peels From an almond kernel are worth two sous. It's hard to sell them now," he sighed. "Purses are tight, but I shall not lose. There's plenty of cheaper things to choose." He picked some currants out of a wide Earthen bowl. "They make the tongue Almost fly out to suck them, bride Currants ...
— Men, Women and Ghosts • Amy Lowell

... eu sous le roi d'avantage sur l'epee (So far had the pen under the king the superiority over the sword).—SAINT SIMON: Memoires, vol. iii. p. ...
— Familiar Quotations • John Bartlett

... appears at a window with a lute, as if playing and singing to Millicent, his mistress, while his man Warner plays and sings. Absorbed in looking at the lady, Sir Martin foolishly goes on opening and shutting his mouth and fumbling on the lute after the man's song, a version of Voiture's 'L'Amour sous sa Loi', is ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... were willing to have farms in the "second range" on the uplands away from the stream. At any rate, the habitant took his land subject to yearly payments known as the cens et rentes. The amount was small, a few sous together with a stated donation in grain or poultry to be delivered each autumn. Reckoned in terms of present-day rentals, the cens et rentes amounted to half a dozen chickens or a bushel of grain for each fifty or sixty acres of ...
— Crusaders of New France - A Chronicle of the Fleur-de-Lis in the Wilderness - Chronicles of America, Volume 4 • William Bennett Munro

... Paris with so much ability, have assisted me in all my researches. I wish specially to thank in this place M. Leopold Delisle and M. Leon Dorez of the Bibliotheque Nationale; M. A. Franklin of the Bibliotheque Mazarine; M. H. Martin of the Bibliotheque de l'Arsenal; and M. A. Perate, Sous-Conservateur du Chateau ...
— The Care of Books • John Willis Clark

... Although he is a member of a well-known English family, he seems to have devoted his whole life to the exciting career of a soldier of fortune. He told me that in early life he had served three years in a French lancer regiment, and had risen from a private to be a sous-lieutenant. He afterwards became a sort of consular agent at Tangier, under old Mr Drummond Hay. Having acquired a perfect knowledge of Arabic, he entered the service of Abd-el-Kader, and under ...
— Three Months in the Southern States, April-June 1863 • Arthur J. L. (Lieut.-Col.) Fremantle

... which he never tasted except in his dreams; these are the leavings of the twenty-four-franc prisoners; and as he eats and drinks, at dessert he cries 'Long live the King,' and blesses the Bastile; with a couple bottles of champagne, which cost me five sous, I make him tipsy every Sunday. That class of people call down blessings upon me, and are sorry to leave the prison. Do you know that I have remarked, and it does me infinite honor, that certain prisoners, who have been set at liberty, have, almost immediately afterwards, ...
— Ten Years Later • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... flattened-out biscuit tins and making a pipe of tin cans of various sorts, managed to get along very well. Here we received our first pay since arriving in France; fifteen francs each. It doesn't sound like much but, believe me, we made those "sous" go a long way and bought lots of little delicacies we ...
— The Emma Gees • Herbert Wes McBride

... Sentinelle des Vosges contained the following paragraph, written with the official sorrow found in all death-notices at thirty sous per line: ...
— Serge Panine • Georges Ohnet

... pockets and pulled out all the money he found there, which amounted to thirteen sous, and said: "That is all I have, upon my honor!" "All ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume II (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... answered Janey. "Il est sous-lieutenant dans les Berkshires a Aldershot Pourquoi ne doit il pas ecrire a moi, il est ...
— The Mark Of Cain • Andrew Lang

... pains these hundred sous in gold and this ring of mine," she said. "Return promptly to thy lord. If he would have my hand in marriage, let him send messengers without delay to demand me of my uncle Gondebaud; and bid him direct his messengers, as soon as they obtain permission, to take me away in haste. If they delay, ...
— Historical Tales, Vol. 6 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality. French. • Charles Morris

... features of a sphinx,—she looked to me, as she towered there in the gold light, a symbolic statue of Africa. Seeing me smoking one of those long thin Martinique cigars called bouts, she begged one; and, not happening to have another, I gave her the price of a bunch of twenty,—ten sous. She took it without a smile, and went her way. About an hour and a half later she came back and asked for me,—to present me with the finest and largest mango I had ever seen, a monster mango. She said she wanted to see me eat it, and sat down on the ground to look on. While eating it, I learned ...
— Two Years in the French West Indies • Lafcadio Hearn

... classes here have a taste for amusement, and pursue it with much earnestness. The audience behaved very well—every thing was quiet. I noticed a great many well-dressed women who carried round crickets to the ladies, for their feet, and for this they got a few sous. ...
— Young Americans Abroad - Vacation in Europe: Travels in England, France, Holland, - Belgium, Prussia and Switzerland • Various

... idea whither he is going. He followed the rue de la Sante and the rue Saint Jacques. He stopped in front of an old-clothes shop, removed his jacket and his vest, sold his vest on which he realized a few sous; then, replacing his jacket, he proceeded on his way. He crossed the Seine. At the Chatelet an omnibus passed him. He wished to enter it, but there was no place. The controller advised him to secure a number, so he ...
— The Extraordinary Adventures of Arsene Lupin, Gentleman-Burglar • Maurice Leblanc

... you are no longer angry, are you? No! So much the better! It is I who should be provoked at those tipsters. Suppose the fury raging in your blood had stifled you! But, bah! those brutes care little for making me lose twenty-five or thirty gold sous,[15] which you will presently be worth to me, my fine Bull. But for greater safety I'll have you taken to a shelter where you will be alone and better off than here. It was occupied by a wounded fellow who died last night—a superb fellow. That was a loss! Ah, commerce ...
— The Brass Bell - or, The Chariot of Death • Eugene Sue

... puissances occultes, C'est votre ame qui bat au bleu de nos poignets; Notre orgueil s'est enfin cabre sous les insultes Dont, depuis quarante ...
— Three French Moralists and The Gallantry of France • Edmund Gosse

... without noticing the interruption, otherwise than by a downward movement of the corners of her mouth—"I had a thousand times rather be hated by him, than be liked in the way in which he seems to like any one, qui lui tombe sous ...
— Ellen Middleton—A Tale • Georgiana Fullerton

... vents retenaient leurs haleines. On entendait dans les bois, au fond des vallees, au haut des rochers, de petits cris, de doux murmures d'oiseaux, qui se caressaient dans leurs nids, rejouis par la clarte de la nuit et la tranquillite de l'air. Tous, jusqu'aux insectes, bruissaient sous l'herbe. Les etoiles etincelaient au ciel, et se reflechissaient au sein de la mer, qui repetait ...
— The Beauties of Nature - and the Wonders of the World We Live In • Sir John Lubbock

... asked for a night's accommodation was less than a farmer would ask in France or Germany for leave to sleep in his barn; but there was always an extra charge of a 'pizetta por el ruido'. The pizetta is worth four reals; about twenty-one French sous. ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... concerning this commerce:—"Quelque perquisition qu'on ait faite dans ce dernier temps aux Indes pour decouvrir les biens des Francois, ils ont plustost souffert la prison que de rien declarer ... toute les merchandises qu'on leur donne a porter aux Indes sont chargees sous le nom d'Espagnols, que bien souvent n'en ont pas connaissance, ne jugeant pas a propos de leur en parler, afin de tenir les affaires plus secretes et qu'il n'y ait que le commissionaire a le savoir, lequel en rend compte a son retour des Indes, directement a celui qui en a ...
— The Buccaneers in the West Indies in the XVII Century • Clarence Henry Haring

... something far more genteel.... Well, have you thought of anything, Polenka? If only you'd help your mother! My memory's quite gone, or I should have thought of something. We really can't sing 'An Hussar.' Ah, let us sing in French, 'Cinq sous,' I have taught it you, I have taught it you. And as it is in French, people will see at once that you are children of good family, and that will be much more touching.... You might sing 'Marlborough s'en va-t-en guerre,' for that's quite ...
— Crime and Punishment • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... en l'honneur de recevoir les deux memoires que vous avez bien voulu m'adresser en date du 10 Novembre dernier (1846) sur la situation des Israelites de l'Empire et du Royaume de Pologne. L'une et l'autre de ces pieces out ete placees sous les yeux de l'Empereur, et Sa Majeste Imperiale, appreciant les sentimens de philantropie qui les out dictees, a daigne a cette occasion exprimer une fois de plus tout l'interet qu' Elle porte a Ses sujets Israelites, dont le bien-etre et l'avancement moral ne ...
— Diaries of Sir Moses and Lady Montefiore, Volume I • Sir Moses Montefiore

... told her to take the little one to Lourdes, where the Blessed Virgin would have pity on her. Acquainted with nobody, not knowing even how the pilgrimages were organised, she had had but one idea—to work, save up the money necessary for the journey, take a ticket, and start off with the thirty sous remaining to her, destitute of all supplies save a bottle of milk for the child, not having even thought of purchasing a crust of bread ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... any lynx; Sometimes, if 'tis not blind, at least it blinks. If it extols the ancient sous of song As though they were unrivalled, it goes wrong: If it allows there's much that's obsolete, Much hasty work, much rough and incomplete, 'Tis just my view; 'tis judging as one ought; And Jove was present when ...
— The Satires, Epistles, and Art of Poetry • Horace

... ten miles away to the westward, on the main road to Paris by way of La Ferte-sous-Jouarre, lay the village of Montmirail. As many miles beyond Montmirail, on the same Paris road, Sacken, with twenty thousand men, had been advancing. From Montmirail a road led northward to Chateau Thierry ...
— The Eagle of the Empire - A Story of Waterloo • Cyrus Townsend Brady

... and, I must confess, seemed rather more respectable than the Zangiacomo musical enterprise. It was less pretentious also, more homely and familiar, so to speak, insomuch that in the intervals when all the performers left the platform one of them went amongst the marble tables collecting offerings of sous and francs in a battered tin receptacle recalling the shape of a sauceboat. It was a girl. Her detachment from her task seems to me now to have equalled or even surpassed Heyst's aloofness from all the ...
— Victory • Joseph Conrad

... was execrable—they only, however, charged us nine sous for it, and on our giving half a franc and thinking ourselves exceedingly stingy for not giving a whole one, they shouted out "Voila les Anglais, voila la generosite des Anglais," with evident sincerity. I thought to myself that the less we English corrupted the primitive ...
— Samuel Butler's Cambridge Pieces • Samuel Butler

... who is a long-headed gentleman, and does not spit on his own blanket, knows well enough that one can't do all this for five thousand pounds; make it a thousand a year—that is, give me a cool twenty thousand—and I won't exact another sous. Egad, this drinking makes one deuced thirsty—Mr. Pelham, just reach me that glass of water—I hear ...
— Pelham, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... France); there are no first-order administrative divisions as defined by the US Government, but there are five archipelagic divisions named Archipel des Marquises, Archipel des Tuamotu, Archipel des Tubuai, Iles du Vent, Iles Sous-le-Vent ...
— The 2008 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... and fourteen sous," replied Turner, with a promptness which seemed to suggest that he kept no diary or note-book on the table before him because ...
— The Last Hope • Henry Seton Merriman

... the Chasseurs de Vincennes who occupied the courtyard. Some had voted for him, and reminded him of the fact. They added, "Ah! We would again vote for the 'Red' list." One of them, quite a young man, took him aside, and said to him. "Do you want any money, sir? I have a forty-sous piece in my pocket." ...
— The History of a Crime - The Testimony of an Eye-Witness • Victor Hugo

... Where are you going, Madame de Floras?—to show that sketch to M. le Comte? Dear me! I don't fancy that M. de Florac can care for such things! I am sure I have seen many as pretty on the quays for twenty-five sous. I wonder the carriage is ...
— The Newcomes • William Makepeace Thackeray

... they must. We have our omens too! The other day A mighty deluge swam into our hall, As if it meant to wash away the law: Lawyers were forced to ride on porters' shoulders: One, O prodigious omen! tumbled down, And he and all his briefs were sous'd together. Now, if I durst my sentiments declare, I think it is not ...
— Miscellanies, Volume 2 (from Works, Volume 12) • Henry Fielding

... so I took as a guide one of the villagers who seemed to me to be the least stupid. My column had been going along in good order for half an hour, when suddenly I saw camp fires on the slopes overlooking the marsh. I halted the column and sent two sous-officiers to have a look. They reported that there was a large force barring our advance and another in our rear. I could now see fires between me and the village which I had just left and it appeared that I had ...
— The Memoirs of General the Baron de Marbot, Translated by - Oliver C. Colt • Baron de Marbot

... started again at a gallop, which proclaimed that the citizen travellers, as the postilion called them, although the title of Monsieur was beginning to reappear in conversation, paid a fee of at least thirty sous. ...
— The Companions of Jehu • Alexandre Dumas, pere

... or English "chay," Dog-cart, droschky, and smart coupe, A desobligeante quite bulky (French idea of a Yankee sulky); Band in the distance playing a march, Footman standing stiff as starch; Savans, lorettes, deputies, Arch- Bishops, and there together range Sous-lieutenants and cent-gardes (strange Way these soldier-chaps make change), Mixed with black-eyed Polish dames, With unpronounceable awful names; Laces tremble and ribbons flout, Coachmen wrangle and gendarmes shout— Bless us! what ...
— Complete Poetical Works of Bret Harte • Bret Harte

... d'un blocus en dehors de l'etat de guerre ne doit etre considere comme permis par le droit des gens que sous les conditions suivantes:— ...
— Letters To "The Times" Upon War And Neutrality (1881-1920) • Thomas Erskine Holland

... decouvertes aux Terres Australes, execute sur les corvettes Le Geographe, Le Naturaliste, et la goelette La Casuarina—pendant les annees 1801 a 1804, sous le commandement du Capitaine de vaisseau N. Baudin. Redige par M. Louis Freycinet. Navigation et Geographie page 462 ...
— Narrative Of The Voyage Of H.M.S. Rattlesnake, Commanded By The Late Captain Owen Stanley, R.N., F.R.S. Etc. During The Years 1846-1850. Including Discoveries And Surveys In New Guinea, The Louisiade • John MacGillivray

... seeks for happiness in material prosperity alone. As well undertake to fill the cask of the Danaides. To those who have millions, millions are wanting; to those who have thousands, thousands. Others lack a twenty-franc piece or a hundred sous. When they have a chicken in the pot, they ask for a goose; when they have the goose, they wish it were a turkey, and so on. We shall never learn how fatal this tendency is. There are too many humble people who wish to imitate the great, too many poor working-men ...
— The Simple Life • Charles Wagner

... buttons now copper-colored. The whole was so shabby that I tried not to look at it. The hat—an opera hat of a kind we then carried under the arm, and not on the head—had seen many governments. Nevertheless, my poor friend must have spent a few sous at the barber's, for he was neatly shaved; and his hair, gathered behind his head with a comb and powdered carefully, smelt of pomade. I saw two chains hanging down on his breeches,—two rusty steel chains,—but no appearance ...
— The Brotherhood of Consolation • Honore de Balzac

... five sous that you expect to make me rich? Perhaps you are like the Wandering Jew with ...
— The Illustrious Gaudissart • Honore de Balzac

... in Picardy, a Gipsy offered a stolen sheep to a butcher for one hundred sous, or five francs; but the butcher declined to give more than four francs for it. The butcher then went away; whereupon the Gipsy pulled the sheep from a sack into which he had put it, and substituted for it a child belonging to his tribe. He then ran after the butcher, ...
— Gipsy Life - being an account of our Gipsies and their children • George Smith

... was delivered, but of all the objects which had been stolen from me by these gentlemen I was able to find only my revolver. My memorandum book and my purse, which contained 165 francs and some sous, without doubt stayed in the hands of these gentlemen.... I beg you to reclaim them in my name. You will send them to me when ...
— Violence and the Labor Movement • Robert Hunter

... de Novembre fut destine pour leur supplice; on entendit des le matin des trompettes et des herauts de la part du Prince, qui defendoient a qui que ce fut de sortir de la ville, sous peine de la vie: toute la garrison etoit sous les armes: il y avoit des corps de garde aux portes, et dans toutes les places. Le canon pret a tirer etoit dans la grande place, la bouche tournee contre les principals rues; tout le monde etoit dans une profonde consternation; ou ...
— Gustavus Vasa - and other poems • W. S. Walker

... I understand What fights thou mean'st at sea and land, And who those were that run away, And yet gave out th' had won the day; 310 Although the rabble sous'd them for't, O'er head and ears in mud and dirt. 'Tis true, our modern way of war Is grown more politick by far, But not so resolute, and bold, 315 Nor ty'd to honour, as the old. For now they laugh at giving battle, Unless it be to herds of cattle; Or fighting ...
— Hudibras • Samuel Butler

... mieux deguise, et plus capable de tromper, que lorsqu'il se cache sous la figure ...
— In Convent Walls - The Story of the Despensers • Emily Sarah Holt

... of a monument in memory of his best beloved brother, Augustus William, he alluded to the statue of Winterfeldt, and added: "L'abus des richesses et du pouvoir eleve des statues de marbre et de bronze a ceux qui n'etaient pas dignes de passer a la posterite sous l'embleme de ...
— Frederick The Great and His Family • L. Muhlbach

... and profit. He questioned M. Nioche about his own manner of life, and felt a friendly mixture of compassion and respect over the recital of his delicate frugalities. The worthy man told him how, at one period, he and his daughter had supported existence comfortably upon the sum of fifteen sous per diem; recently, having succeeded in hauling ashore the last floating fragments of the wreck of his fortune, his budget had been a trifle more ample. But they still had to count their sous very narrowly, and M. Nioche intimated with a sigh that Mademoiselle Noemie did not bring ...
— The American • Henry James

... la fable, le fait d'une pucelle pouvant seule servir de piege a la licorne, en l'attirant par le charme et le parfum de son sein virginal qu'elle lui presentoit; enfin l'ange Gabriel concourant au mystere etoit bien reconnoissable sous les traits du venenr aile lancant les levriers ...
— Legends of the Madonna • Mrs. Jameson

... all important news, official and semiofficial. For details you can apply to Saint-Potin, who is posted; you will see him to-morrow. Above all, you must learn to make your way everywhere in spite of closed doors. You will receive two hundred francs a months, two sous a line for original matter, and two sous a line for articles you are ordered ...
— Bel Ami • Henri Rene Guy de Maupassant

... quantity of food in the dining-hall two hours before, soup, beef, potatoes, cabbage, pudding, cheese. But he had not eaten stewed figs. His whole boy's nature rose in him in one fierce longing for stewed figs. He remembered. Before he went into the attack he had possessed half a franc and two sous. He thrust his hand into his one trouser pocket. It was empty. He tore at the string with which he had laced up the slit in his trousers. On that side there was not a pocket left. It and all it ever contained, were gone. He fumbled in ...
— Our Casualty And Other Stories - 1918 • James Owen Hannay, AKA George A. Birmingham

... that a railway magnate entered and gave his celebrated rendering of a boiler explosion. It appeared—when every one had partially recovered—that he was the proud possessor of ten francs and three sous. He also admitted to a wife suffering from something with a name that hurt, and various young railway magnates of both sexes. It transpired that the ten francs and three sous had been laboriously collected from his menage ...
— No Man's Land • H. C. McNeile

... said Mother Arsene, "what has he done with his false money? He pays me always in sous for the bit of bread and the radish I ...
— The Wandering Jew, Complete • Eugene Sue

... if M. Auguste is not here." M. Auguste does not answer, and the spectators look at each other in surprise. "M. Antoine!" Silence again. "Well, gentlemen, I am the victim of the dishonesty of the chef and sous-chef of the claque. I gave them forty francs this morning to call me out, and neither of them is here. You perceive, gentlemen, how grossly I ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 15, No. 89, May, 1875 • Various

... enceintes ne devraient pas ce cacher, ni jamais avoir honte de porter un enfant dans leur ventre; elles devraient au contraire en etre fieres. Pareille fierte serait certes bien plus justifiee que celle des beaux officiers paradant sous leur uniforme. Les signes exterieurs de la formation de l'humanite font plus d'honneur a leurs porteurs que les symboles de sa destruction. Que les femmes s'impregnent de plus en plus de cette profonde verite! Elles cesseront alors de cacher leur grossesse et d'en avoir honte. ...
— Woman and Womanhood - A Search for Principles • C. W. Saleeby

... cache sous une autre aventure, D'une ame plus commune ai pris quelque teinture." Heraclius, ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 191, June 25, 1853 • Various

... Monsieur Staps, Sous-Chef of the "Guides," the best military band in Brussels, was a friend of ours. He had invited us to one of the famous Concerts du Conservatoire, a treat in anticipation of which du Maurier at once takes to the pen, and shows us in classical ...
— In Bohemia with Du Maurier - The First Of A Series Of Reminiscences • Felix Moscheles

... epoques. On peut cependant deja dire que le caractere religieux et martial tout a la fois, qui parait avec des traits si heroiques dans la plupart des Jeshts, n'a pas du etre sans action sur la male discipline sous laquelle ont grandi les commencements de la ...
— Chips From A German Workshop - Volume I - Essays on the Science of Religion • Friedrich Max Mueller

... the latter refused. "Have you any money?" asked the holy father of his companion. "I have not been permitted to enter my apartment," said the cardinal; "and I did not think of bringing my purse." The Pope had a papetto, value twenty sous. "This is all that remains tome of my principality," said he, smiling. "We are travelling in apostolic fashion," responded Pacca. "We have done well in publishing the bull of the 10th of June," replied Pius VII.; "now it would ...
— Worlds Best Histories - France Vol 7 • M. Guizot and Madame Guizot De Witt

... de Beaurepaire, De l'administration de la Normandie sous la domination Anglaise, Caen, 1859, in 4to; and Etats de Normandie sous la domination Anglaise, Evreux, 1859, in 8vo. De Beaucourt, Histoire de Charles VII, vol. ...
— The Life of Joan of Arc, Vol. 1 and 2 (of 2) • Anatole France

... (overseas territory of France); there are no first-order administrative divisions as defined by the US Government, but there are 5 archipelagic divisions named Archipel des Marquises, Archipel des Tuamotu, Archipel des Tubuai, Iles du Vent, and Iles Sous-le-Vent note: Clipperton Island is administered ...
— The 2004 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... General Macard. Capture of enemy cannons. I am promoted to Sous-lieutenant. I become aide de camp ...
— The Memoirs of General the Baron de Marbot, Translated by - Oliver C. Colt • Baron de Marbot

... Francaise etablie sous Charles IX. comprenoit la partie meridionnale de la Caroline Angloise, la Nouvelle Georgie, d'aujourd'hui (1740) San Matteo, appelle par Laudonniere Caroline en l'honneur du roi Charles, St. Augustin, et tout ce que les Espagnols ont sur cette cote jusqu'au Cap Francois, n'a jamais ete appellee ...
— The Conquest of Canada (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Warburton

... in abundance to complete several unfinished works; and when in 1818, through the influence of the Duke of Decazes, their banishment was pronounced at an end, Francois had completed his great work, "L'Egypte sous les Pharaons." ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 4 of 8 • Various

... she did not see a single suspicious looking person. Some Englishmen—those strange travellers, who are at the same time so foolishly prodigal and so ridiculously miserly—were making a great hue and cry over the four sous gratuity claimed by a poor commissionaire; but these were the only persons ...
— The Count's Millions - Volume 1 (of 2) • Emile Gaboriau

... lay a wager, monsieur," said he, audaciously, "that you dine for forty sous at Hurbain's in the ...
— The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... the earth, once set in motion in vacuum, does not stop, can also be elucidated by experiment, as follows:—Take Captain Noah Poke, provided as he is by nature with legs and the power of motion; lead him to the Place Vendome; cause him to pay three sous, which will gain him admission to the base of the column; let him ascend to the summit; thence let him leap with all his energy, in a direction at right angles with the shaft of the column, into the open ...
— The Monikins • J. Fenimore Cooper

... ses autels, qu'il ne saurait defendre, Calixte, l'oeil en pleurs, le front convert de cendre, Conjure la comete, objet de tant d'effroi: Regarde vers les cieux, pontife, et leve-toi! L'astre poursuit sa course, et le fer d'Huniade Arrete le vainqueur, qui tombe sous Belgrade. Dans les cieux cependant le globe suspendu, Par la loi generale a jamais retenu, Ignore les terreurs, l'existence de Rome, Et la Terre peut-etre, et jusqu'au nom de l'homme, De l'homme, etre credule, ...
— Young Folks' Library, Volume XI (of 20) - Wonders of Earth, Sea and Sky • Various

... Comorre. Comorre was a chief who ruled at Carhaix, in Finistere, and his tale, which owes its modern dress to Emile Souvestre, himself a Breton, and author of Derniers Bretons and the brilliant sketch Un Philosophe sous les Toits. The ...
— Legends & Romances of Brittany • Lewis Spence

... de Theologie et de Philosophie Chretienne, publiee sous la direction de M. Colani, de 1850 a 1857.—Nouvelle Revue de Theologie, faisant suite a la precedente ...
— The Life of Jesus • Ernest Renan

... Lieutenant Colonel Resigni. Le Lieutenant Colonel Schultz. Le Capitaine Autrie. Le Capitaine Mesener. Le Capitaine Prontowski. Le Lieutenant Riviere. Le Sous Lieutenant ...
— The Surrender of Napoleon • Sir Frederick Lewis Maitland

... Head was a name the beach-combers gave to a wretched inn off the Rue Bouterie, kept by a one-eyed Chinaman, where for six sous you could sleep in a cot and for three on the floor. Here they made friends with others in as desperate condition as themselves, and when they were penniless and the night was bitter cold, they were glad to borrow from ...
— The Moon and Sixpence • W. Somerset Maugham

... plains, with the mountains of Sous on the north. A tribe of pacific Arabs (i.e. not bandits), numbering about three thousand, having ...
— Narrative of a Mission to Central Africa Performed in the Years 1850-51, Volume 2 • James Richardson

... Comment, sous la sainte lumiere, Voit-on des actes si hideux, Qu'ils font expirer la priere Sur les levres ...
— The Heavenly Father - Lectures on Modern Atheism • Ernest Naville

... making an annual payment of five sols to the cathedral of Bayeux, for its Boy-Bishop. The entry is in the following terms: "Au petit eveque de Bayeux, pour sa pension, ainsi qu'il est accoutume, V. sous." During the early part of the preceding century, the abbot of St. Stephen was also accustomed to pay twenty sols per annum, on the same account; but his payment was probably discontinued immediately after the edict ...
— Architectural Antiquities of Normandy • John Sell Cotman

... "Sous les clamations de la foule, les marins gagnent par les Champs-Elysees, la rue Royale et le boulevard Malesherbes, le Lycee Carnot, ou M. Breakfast ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, April 30, 1919 • Various

... reaching for the weed the Colonel now held toward him. "Lawsy, ain't dat jus' a whoppuh? Whah you-all git sech mon'sous big cigahs ...
— In Old Kentucky • Edward Marshall and Charles T. Dazey

... est doux, qu'il est doux d'ecouter les histoires Des histoires du temps passe Quand les branches des arbres sont noires, Quand la neige est essaisse, et charge un sol glace, Quand seul dans un ciel pale un peuplier s'elance, Quand sous le manteau blanc qui vient de le cacher L'immobile corbeau sur l'arbre se balance Comme la girouette ...
— Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Vol. I • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... vivais; c'est encore du commerce. Tu vois done que ni l'imprimerie, ni les petits dessins, a cinq sous, ni la privation, ni la misere ne t'ont ...
— On the Old Road Vol. 1 (of 2) - A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature • John Ruskin

... un certain role. Si la fille a atteint cet age et qu'elle n'ait pas encore ses regles, la mere ne saurait etre trop soigneuse; il est probable que la fille est pale et maigre, et que son teint montre cette couleur livide qui nous fait craindre qu'elle ne devienne sous peu la victime de la phthisie et qu'elle ne devienne fortement neurasthenique. Pour empecher un tel malheur rien n'egale "Lydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound." Il produit d'une maniere salutaire et prompte le changement qui devrait alors avoir lieu, en prevenant ainsi de longues ...
— Treatise on the Diseases of Women • Lydia E. Pinkham

... itself, in fact, very readily to the arrangement. It was merely the clan or sept re-organized upon a religious footing. "Les premieres grands monasteres de l'Irelande," says M. de Montalembert in his "Moines d'Occident," "ne furent done autre chose a vrai dire qui des clans, reorganises sous une forme religieuse." New clans, that is to say, cut out of the old ones, their fealty simply transferred from a chief to an abbot, who was almost invariably in the first instance of chieftain blood. "Le prince, en se faisant moine, devenait naturellement abbe, et restait ainsi ...
— The Story Of Ireland • Emily Lawless

... "Six sous!" cried the old man. "The devil! was it not prepaid? Ah! true enough," he sighed, as he regretfully handed the man the coin he had ...
— A Cardinal Sin • Eugene Sue

... found him. He got neither coffee, wine, nor butter; and his other food, as a matter of course, was much inferior to that he had been accustomed to receive with me. His pay, after deducting the necessary demands on it in the shape of regular contributions, amounts to about two sous a day, instead of the two francs he got in ...
— Recollections of Europe • J. Fenimore Cooper

... maiden skirts untarnished by the gilded dust of the boulevards or the filth of by-ways; knew all the best shops for her friends, and the cheapest for her own scant purchases; discovered breakfasts for a few sous with pale sempstresses, whose sadness she understood, and reckless chorus girls, whose gayety she didn't; she knew where the earliest chestnut buds were to be found in the Bois, when the slopes of the Buttes Chaumont ...
— Tales of Trail and Town • Bret Harte

... window that took my fancy, so I stopped the carriage and went in. Who should be there but Spicca, hat and all, looking like old Father Time. He was bargaining for something—a wretched old bit of brass—bargaining, my dear! For a few sous! One may be poor, but one has no right to be mean—I thought he would have got the ...
— Don Orsino • F. Marion Crawford

... said to the bookseller, tossing it down again. "Give me 'Ars ne Lupin'." And he paid two sous for a paper-covered, dog-eared, much-thumbed copy of the famous detective story, not because he intended to read it, but in payment for his hour of disillusionment. Then he slung his pack over his shoulders and tramped out ...
— O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1921 • Various

... was asleep; a man jogged him to wake him, and he started to drive. I noticed that during the drive he looked at his watch and then drove on for all that he was worth, as fast as the harness and reins would stand. When I got to the hotel I handed him his fare and a four sous' tip. He bawled out that it was not enough; he had been de remise; he had taken me for someone else, being waked so suddenly; he had been bespoken by another gentleman. I laughed and replied that that was his affair, not ...
— Recollections Of My Childhood And Youth • George Brandes

... present even conceivable."[940] The principles expressed in the foregoing recall to one's mind the decree of the French Convention, dated June 28, 1793, which runs as follows: "La nation se charge de l'education physique et morale des enfants abandonnes. Desormais ils seront designes sous le seul nom d'orphelins. Aucune autre qualification ne sera permise"; and the principle of the French Code, "La recherche de la paternite est interdite," will become a principle of British law. The State will have to become ...
— British Socialism - An Examination of Its Doctrines, Policy, Aims and Practical Proposals • J. Ellis Barker

... vie du comte de Grammont; contenant particulierement l'histoire amoureuse de la cour d'Angleterre, sous le regne de Charles II. A Cologne, chez Pierre Marteau, 1713. 12^o, pp. 4 ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 219, January 7, 1854 • Various

... guide for tourists to the Gulf; edited a comic weekly at Quebec, "illustrated" it, itself cheerfully and truly confessed, "with execrable wood-engravings;" as Papal Zouave, he embarked for Rome to gallant in voluminous trousers on four sous a day; fought wildly, for the fun of it, at the Pia Gate against Victor Emmanuel's red-shirted patriots,—and came back to Dormilliere disgusted. The Registrarship of the county being vacant, a pious government appointed him ...
— The Young Seigneur - Or, Nation-Making • Wilfrid Chateauclair

... death, for all sense of shame was lost in intense apprehension. Still her trembling hands did their duty, and her purse was produced. A gold napoleon promised well, but it had no fellow. Seven more francs appeared in single pieces. Then two ten-sous were produced; after which nothing remained but copper. The purse was emptied, and the reticule rummaged, the whole amounting to just twenty-eight ...
— Autobiography of a Pocket-Hankerchief • James Fenimore Cooper



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