Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Walk   Listen
verb
Walk  v. i.  (past & past part. walked; pres. part. walking)  
1.
To move along on foot; to advance by steps; to go on at a moderate pace; specifically, of two-legged creatures, to proceed at a slower or faster rate, but without running, or lifting one foot entirely before the other touches the ground. "At the end of twelve months, he walked in the palace of the kingdom of Babylon." "When Peter was come down out of the ship, he walked on the water, to go to Jesus." Note: In the walk of quadrupeds, there are always two, and for a brief space there are three, feet on the ground at once, but never four.
2.
To move or go on the feet for exercise or amusement; to take one's exercise; to ramble.
3.
To be stirring; to be abroad; to go restlessly about; said of things or persons expected to remain quiet, as a sleeping person, or the spirit of a dead person; to go about as a somnambulist or a specter. "I have heard, but not believed, the spirits of the dead May walk again." "When was it she last walked?"
4.
To be in motion; to act; to move; to wag. (Obs.) "Her tongue did walk in foul reproach." "Do you think I'd walk in any plot?" "I heard a pen walking in the chimney behind the cloth."
5.
To behave; to pursue a course of life; to conduct one's self. "We walk perversely with God, and he will walk crookedly toward us."
6.
To move off; to depart. (Obs. or Colloq.) "He will make their cows and garrans to walk."
To walk in, to go in; to enter, as into a house.
To walk after the flesh (Script.), to indulge sensual appetites, and to live in sin.
To walk after the Spirit (Script.), to be guided by the counsels and influences of the Spirit, and by the word of God.
To walk by faith (Script.), to live in the firm belief of the gospel and its promises, and to rely on Christ for salvation.
To walk in darkness (Script.), to live in ignorance, error, and sin.
To walk in the flesh (Script.), to live this natural life, which is subject to infirmities and calamities.
To walk in the light (Script.), to live in the practice of religion, and to enjoy its consolations.
To walk over, in racing, to go over a course at a walk; said of a horse when there is no other entry; hence, colloquially, to gain an easy victory in any contest.
To walk through the fire (Script.), to be exercised with severe afflictions.
To walk with God (Script.), to live in obedience to his commands, and have communion with him.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Walk" Quotes from Famous Books



... the Tower; a hymn is sung, accompanied by the organ; a 'Grecian,' or head boy, reads the prayers from the pulpit, silence being enforced by three drops of a wooden hammer. After prayer the supper commences, and the visitors walk between the tables. At its close the 'trade-boys' take up the baskets, bowls, jacks, piggins, and candlesticks, and pass in procession, the bowing to the Governors being curiously formal. This spectacle was witnessed by Queen Victoria and Prince ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... overcome the prudery of the Lord Chamberlain's Licensing Department, and, in the second place, has he not introduced on the boards of the Haymarket a good old-fashioned Melodrama, brought "up to date," and disguised in a Comedy wrapper? Walk in, Ladies and Gentlemen, and see The Dancing Girl, a Comedy-Drama shall we call it, or, generically, a Play? wherein the prominent figures are a wicked Duke,—vice the "wicked Baronet," now shelved, as nothing under the ducal rank will suit us nowadays, ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100., Jan. 31, 1891 • Various

... had intervened between Phoebe's morning walk, and this darkling flight along the same road, had been full of agitation at the house of the Tozers. Phoebe, who would willingly have spared her lover anything more than the brief intercourse which was inevitable with her relations, could find no means of sending ...
— Phoebe, Junior • Mrs [Margaret] Oliphant

... go home last night," she continued; "and his brother wasn't any worse than usual. But Jack Carter must have been drinking before he came. He was very bad indeed—as bad," she said between her teeth, "as he could be and yet walk straight. As you say, most of the girls don't mind. They say, 'It's only Johnnie Carter; what do you expect?' But one of the girls—you know her, Laurie Flagg—cut a dance with him last night and told him exactly why. Of course, Carter was furious. He was sober enough ...
— Blix • Frank Norris

... we may judge by his equally severe strictures upon Cicero, Caesar, and Sallust. This much we know: the Patavian's heroes live; his events happen, and we are carried along upon their tide. Our sympathies, our indignation, our enthusiasm, are summoned into being, and history and fiction appear to walk hand in hand for our instruction and amusement. In this latter word—fiction—lies the charge most often and most strongly made against him—the charge that he has written a story and no more; that with him past time existed ...
— Roman History, Books I-III • Titus Livius

... everybody go they are socialistic. The government does not try to compel you to write letters any more than the private company tries to compel you to send packages. If you said that, rather than use the postal system, you would carry your own letter across the continent, even if you decided to walk all the way, the government would not try to stop you, any more than the express company would try to stop you from carrying your trunk on your shoulder across the country. But in the case of the express company you must pay tribute to ...
— The Common Sense of Socialism - A Series of Letters Addressed to Jonathan Edwards, of Pittsburg • John Spargo

... left to right. This habit was always most remarkable when his mind was absorbed in the consideration of any profound subject. It was often while walking that he dictated to me his most important notes. He could endure great fatigue, not only on horseback but on foot; he would sometimes walk for five or six hours in succession without ...
— Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte, Complete • Louis Antoine Fauvelet de Bourrienne

... all. When Ziyad bin Abihi was sent by Caliph Mu'awiyah to reform Bassorah, a den of thieves, he informed the lieges that he intended to rule by the sword and advised all evil-doers to quit the city. The people were forbidden, under pain of teeth, to walk the streets after prayers, on the first night two hundred suffered; on the second five and none afterwards. Compare this with our civilised rule in Egypt where even bands of brigands, a phenomenon perfectly new and unknown to ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 4 • Richard F. Burton

... nothing is found in his room, we get rid of the charge of receiving altogether, and there would be nothing but harboring, aiding, and abetting—a much less serious business. Look here, old friend, I will strain a point. I will go out into the garden again and walk about for an hour, and while I am out, if you should take advantage of my absence to creep up to your son's room and to search it thoroughly, examining every board of the floor to see if it is loose, and should you find anything concealed, to take it and hide it, of course I ...
— Colonel Thorndyke's Secret • G. A. Henty

... or slight silk, about five feet long, and worked or fringed at each end, called a salendang, is thrown across the back of the neck, and hangs down before; serving also the purpose of a veil to the women of rank when they walk abroad. The handkerchief is carried either folded small in the hand, or in a long fold over the shoulder. There are two modes of dressing the hair, one termed kundei and the other sanggol. The first resembles much the fashion in ...
— The History of Sumatra - Containing An Account Of The Government, Laws, Customs And - Manners Of The Native Inhabitants • William Marsden

... walk in upon him at any moment, Neale kept himself on the look out, in readiness to adopt a determined attitude whenever he was discovered. By that time he had come to the conclusion that whether force would be necessary or not ...
— The Chestermarke Instinct • J. S. Fletcher

... neither hesitation nor doubt. Rachel Conway puts her dreams away, she will henceforth walk in a sad and shady path; her interests are centred in the child of the man she loves, and as she looks for a last time on the cloud of trees, glorious and waving green in the sunset that encircles her home, her sorrow swells once again to passion, and, ...
— Confessions of a Young Man • George Moore

... the shops and warehouses, and, intra muros, those of public entertainment are close: the devotees go to church, and sanctify the sabbath. Others go to walk outside the towngates: after their walk, they hasten to fine public-play-gardens, where wine, thea, &c. is sold. Neither the mobility remains idle at these entertainments. Every one invites his damsel, and joyously they enter play-gardens of a little less brilliancy than the former. ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 79, May 3, 1851 • Various

... honest as you're guessin', if you feel you want to pay me fer anything I done for you, why, cut the gas an' take my dollars' an' I'll get the papers made out by a Spawn City lawyer. They're all that crooked they couldn't walk a chalk-line, but I guess they know how to bind a feller good an' tight, an' I'll see they bind you up so ther' won't be no room ...
— The Twins of Suffering Creek • Ridgwell Cullum

... reading the holy scriptures and in prayer; and this interest increasingly appeared as she lay on the bed of affliction, having them daily in her chamber, and again and again, in tender affection, impressing on their minds the importance of divine and eternal things, urging them to walk in the way of God's commandments, and to regard his favour and approbation as the one thing, beyond all other things, necessary both to their present peace and everlasting salvation: similar counsel was also extended ...
— The Annual Monitor for 1851 • Anonymous

... the fear in the minds of the others, and they slackened their advance to a slow walk, keeping a cautious eye on every bush or tree large enough to conceal ...
— The Boy Chums in the Forest - or Hunting for Plume Birds in the Florida Everglades • Wilmer M. Ely

... "I will walk too," Hilda said readily. "I should prefer it, truly." With her undamaged hand she produced a rupee from her pocket, where a few coins chinked casually, looked at it, and groped for another. "I really can't afford any more," she said. "He ...
— The Path of a Star • Mrs. Everard Cotes (AKA Sara Jeannette Duncan)

... there was a twofold calling: the one, an inward calling, when the Lord moved the heart of a man to take that calling upon him, and fitted him with gifts for the same; the second (the outward calling) was from the people, when a company of believers are joined together in covenant to walk together in all the ways of God." Thereupon the assembly proceeded to a written ballot, and its choice fell upon Mr. Skelton and Mr. Higginson. It remained for the ministers elect to be solemnly inducted into office, ...
— A History of American Christianity • Leonard Woolsey Bacon

... proposed to her. At last an opportunity occurred. She was walking in the convent garden with another novice, who left her for an instant to gather some flowers. I was watching all their movements, and at this moment I threw my letter at Natalie's feet. She took it up, retired into a shrubbery walk to read ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 56, Number 350, December 1844 • Various

... a lonely place where he was accustomed to pray. They bound him tightly and carried him between them on their shoulders to the water. On their way to the river they met one of the monks who used to walk around the cemetery every night. He said to them: "What is that you carry?" They replied that it was portion of the monastic washing which they were taking to the river. He however, under the insistent ...
— The Life of St. Mochuda of Lismore • Saint Mochuda

... moment her bag was in the omnibus, and she was climbing in after it in the wake of other persons, enough to fill the roomy vehicle. As she settled into her corner she saw a man walk slowly by at a distance. He was not looking at her for the moment, and she had no more than a glimpse of a dark, clearly drawn profile; yet she received a curious impression that he had just turned away from looking at her; and she was almost sure it was the man she ...
— The Guests Of Hercules • C. N. Williamson and A. M. Williamson

... morning.... He brought two other doctors with him.... There is no longer any doubt—it is paralysis of the lower limbs. He will never walk, they think." ...
— Together • Robert Herrick (1868-1938)

... him to Amelia we must do her the justice to relate the manner in which she spent this unhappy evening. It was about seven when Booth left her to walk in the park; from this time till past eight she was employed with her children, in playing with them, in giving them their supper, and ...
— Amelia (Complete) • Henry Fielding

... proved injurious to the instruments. Besides this inconvenience, there was another attached to the situation which had not been foreseen. The road from Simon's Town to a place called the Company's garden, led close past the observatory; and this was the sole ride or walk in the neighbourhood, which the inhabitants and the gentlemen belonging to the ships in the bay could enjoy. From those of the first rank, who took their morning's ride, to the sailor who staggered past on a Sunday, and even the slave with his bundle of fire wood, all stopped ...
— A Voyage to Terra Australis • Matthew Flinders

... taken my mother's place—I appropriated the gift in its entirety, and became extremely ill by reason of my many indiscreet purchases at a tuck-stall which stood, if I remember rightly, at a corner of the then renowned Kensington Flower Walk. This incident must have occurred late in Thackeray's life. My childish recollection of him is that of a very big gentleman with ...
— My Days of Adventure - The Fall of France, 1870-71 • Ernest Alfred Vizetelly

... "I could walk you out into a drove-road in the time you would be picking the bog from your feet I'm not making any brag of an art that's so common among old hunters as the snaring of conies; but give me a bush or a tree ...
— John Splendid - The Tale of a Poor Gentleman, and the Little Wars of Lorn • Neil Munro

... remember his tall, stalwart figure, his gray, silky, yellowish hair, his soft tread, rather waddling walk, and his piping voice, quite out of keeping with his majestic exterior. He had a chuckling kind of laugh, like a child's, and when he laughed his voice was more piping ...
— Reminiscences of Tolstoy - By His Son • Ilya Tolstoy

... also, on quite a new course of life and management of his time. For he was never seen to walk in any street but that which led to the marketplace and the council-hall, and he avoided invitations of friends to supper, and all friendly visiting and intercourse whatever; in all the time he had to do with the public, which was not a little, he was never known to ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... man, for I have got to pull myself together somehow. Let us walk. Take me somewhere I've never been before, somewhere quiet—only let ...
— The Far Horizon • Lucas Malet

... the terrier understood, he did, at all events, walk off toward the veranda of his master's quarters without further demonstrations of belligerency. Captain Arnutt joined enthusiastically with Dick in bestowing praises upon Jan ...
— Jan - A Dog and a Romance • A. J. Dawson

... ad Deen and the fair Persian to walk into a room; and when she had pulled off the veil that covered her face, "Sir," said Hagi Hassan, in surprise, "if I am not mistaken, this is the slave your father, the late vizier, gave ten thousand pieces of gold for?" Noor ad Deen assured ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Complete • Anonymous

... the king who, upon returning from a victorious campaign, was told that his son and his servant were waiting with wreaths in their hands, and were asking who should first crown him. The king said, "O ye fools, to question if my servant should walk before my son! No, let my son ...
— THE LEGENDS OF THE JEWS VOLUME III BIBLE TIMES AND CHARACTERS - FROM THE EXODUS TO THE DEATH OF MOSES • BY LOUIS GINZBERG

... does not want to go; but the hostess is obstinate: he appeals to her feelings as an orphan, without home or domesticity; but the lady, having been in business for a dozen years, has lost all sympathy for orphans of six-and-twenty. In short, Mrs. Walker determines he shall walk, and so shall his luggage (a plethoric trunk and an obese carpet-bag are on the stage); for she has dreamt even that has legs—such dreams being, we suppose, very frequent to persons ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 1, December 18, 1841 • Various

... Miss Lawton! The trap has been baited again, and unless I am greatly mistaken, the murderer will walk straight into it.—There is the bell! I gave orders that you were to be at home to no one except the man I expect and that he was to be ushered in here immediately upon his arrival, without being announced—so ...
— The Crevice • William John Burns and Isabel Ostrander

... the points of which turn down, whereas those of the wild boar are turned up. Before my voyage to Africa I had been told that the elephant could not bend its knee, and slept standing; but this is an egregious falsehood for the bending of their knees can be plainly perceived when they walk, and they, certainly lie down and rise again like other animals. They never shed their large teeth before death; neither do they do any harm to man unless provoked. In that case the elephant makes his attack with his trunk, which is a kind of nose, protruded ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. II • Robert Kerr

... face rosy with indignation, called across the yard to her; her clear voice raised so that all should hear. "Millie, will you come for a walk when we come out of school this afternoon?" Then going over and thrusting her arm through Millie's, she led her back to where ...
— The Making of Mona • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... man should have no other purpose than to seek, not whether he has some other life within him, but the secret springs of his actual form, in order that he may prolong its existence at his will. That is the desire which has whitened my hair; but I walk boldly in the darkness, marshalling to the search all those great intellects that share my faith. Life will some ...
— Catherine de' Medici • Honore de Balzac

... he shook hands with me right before all the men—and you ought to seen 'em look! And he's going to teach me how to walk on snowshoes! Oh, ain't you glad! 'Cause ...
— The Promise - A Tale of the Great Northwest • James B. Hendryx

... places in the paper 755 To steal in something to intrap her Till, with her worldly goods and body, Spight of her heart, she has endow'd ye, Retain all sorts of witnesses, That ply i' th' Temple under trees; 760 Or walk the round, with knights o' th' posts, About the cross-legg'd knights, their hosts; Or wait for customers between The pillars-rows in Lincoln's-Inn Where vouchers, forgers, common-bail, 765 And affidavit-men, ne'er fail T' expose to sale all sorts of oaths, According ...
— Hudibras • Samuel Butler

... his room a short time before setting out for his evening walk. His eye fell upon the Bible his mother had given him when he left home, and he opened it in the New Testament at a venture. It happened that the first words he read were these,—"Lest, coming suddenly, he find you sleeping." In the state of mind in which he was at the moment, the text startled ...
— Atlantic Monthly Volume 7, No. 39, January, 1861 • Various

... flowed by; I saw young boys in service clothes And flags flung out from tradesmen's doors; I saw some thousand drifting men Some thousand aimless women; I saw some thousand wearied eyes That caught no sparkle from the myriad lights Which blazoned everywhere; I saw a man stop in his walk To pet ...
— The Broadway Anthology • Edward L. Bernays, Samuel Hoffenstein, Walter J. Kingsley, Murdock Pemberton

... she is able to leave the house. Our physician has forbidden her to take any long walk or ...
— For Woman's Love • Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth

... on a tack," answered the elephant, "and it is sticking in my foot. I can't walk, and I can't dance and I can't get back to the circus. Oh, dear! Oh, dear me, suz-dud and a red balloon! Oh, ...
— Uncle Wiggily's Adventures • Howard R. Garis

... as much as we can do to find time to listen to them. Goethe says, "He who looks forward sees only one way to pursue, but he who looks backward sees many." This is the last word on the subject. It speaks volumes. But as you cannot walk through any of those backways, what is the use of bothering to look for them? True, your own experience enables you to give advice to others. But advice is a drug in the market. What am I saying? A drug! No, no! Even a drug is taken sometimes. ...
— Without Prejudice • Israel Zangwill

... supposes or assumes that a person will always pay for a thing purchased. If I should go into a store, inquire the price of a book, and, after learning the price, should say to the salesman, "I will take the book," and he should wrap it up and give it to me and I should then walk out with the book under my arm, he doubtless would come to me and say in his politest manner: "Why, sir, you have forgotten to pay me for it." Suppose I should say: "Oh, yes; but I will come in to-morrow and pay." But ...
— Up To Date Business - Home Study Circle Library Series (Volume II.) • Various

... the Med Ship to murder Calhoun, so that there would be no danger of any report favorable to Dara ever being presented anywhere. If so, such a stowaway would be in the sleeping-cabin now, waiting for Calhoun to walk unsuspiciously ...
— Pariah Planet • Murray Leinster

... mistress is gone out to take a walk in the park, as I avised her to divart her mellicholy; and so the dear young lady has bin here; Miss—! I had forgotten! I munna tell her name. But if ever there wur an angel upon arth she is one; she says such kind things to my dear mistress, and does not blame her for ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... recalling the past, which urged him to distrust this man. Spurling must have seen the change, for he leant over towards him appealingly, as if he were about to entreat him to be patient. With a gesture of annoyance Granger rose to his feet and commenced to walk away; but he halted sharply and drew into the shadow, signing to Spurling to keep quiet. From very far away, borne on the stillness of the night, they could hear the ...
— Murder Point - A Tale of Keewatin • Coningsby Dawson

... and the Mother met as usual in the cloistered garden, and when Convent affairs had been disposed of, they continued their walk in silence ...
— The White Sister • F. Marion Crawford

... no reason to complain of their treatment during the day. A guard was set upon them, but the ropes by which they were tied were loosened, and they were allowed from time to time to walk about. Most of the morning they passed in much-needed sleep. In the afternoon Carlos visited them again with some of his men, and set to work to satisfy his curiosity as to their country, translating their answers to his friends. His Castalian was very bad, ...
— Captain Jinks, Hero • Ernest Crosby

... something aloud to her guest, the sound of her own quavering voice made her think more of that baleful day at Cambridge than even of the fact that at that very moment Verena was "off" with Mr. Ransom—had gone to take the little daily walk with him to which it had been arranged that their enjoyment of each other's society should be reduced. Arranged, I say; but that is not exactly the word to describe the compromise arrived at by a kind of tacit exchange of tearful entreaty and tightened ...
— The Bostonians, Vol. II (of II) • Henry James

... wait to be asked. Indeed the man did not know him; did not even know his name. "Wilt thou be made whole?" "Sir, I have no man, when the water is troubled, to put me into the pool: but while I am coming, another steppeth down before me." "Rise, take up thy bed, and walk." ...
— Miracles of Our Lord • George MacDonald

... rage—leave that for the heathen; it's bad form, and useless besides. Craig will walk his way where his light falls; and by all that's holy, I should hate to see him fail; for if he weakens like the rest of us my North Star will have dropped from ...
— Black Rock • Ralph Connor

... man," the Ghost returned, "that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide; and if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death. It is doomed to wander through the world—oh, woe is me!—and witness what it cannot share, but might have shared ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 6 • Charles H. Sylvester

... dream, the dream of the quietist who may slumber too long and be roused to a rude awakening or perish, perhaps, in his sleep. His dream is not so dangerous as the contrasted dream of the socialist, now threatening to walk abroad in his sleep, but both in their degree ...
— The Unsolved Riddle of Social Justice • Stephen Leacock

... unusual in Indian pueblos, and gave to it a remarkable appearance. "There were three sorts of broad and spacious streets," Herrera remarks; "one sort all water with bridges, another all earth, and a third of earth and water, there being a space to walk along on land and the rest for canoes to pass, so that most of the streets had walks on the sides and water in the middle". [Footnote: History ...
— Houses and House-Life of the American Aborigines • Lewis H. Morgan

... stuck full of assegais till I couldn't see. The next thing I knew was that we were being carted along in the middle of a big impi—Heaven knew where. One thing, we were both alive—alive and kicking, too. As soon as we were able to walk they assegaied our bearers, ...
— The Sign of the Spider • Bertram Mitford

... is!' suddenly exclaimed Avice, whose attention had wandered somewhat from his retrospective discourse. She was looking from the window towards the cliffs, where, upon the open ground quite near at hand, a slender female form was seen rambling along. 'She is out for a walk,' Avice continued. 'I wonder if she is going to call here this afternoon? She is living at ...
— The Well-Beloved • Thomas Hardy

... I was in my room in Mme. de Saint-Loup's house in the country; good heavens, it must be ten o'clock, they will have finished dinner! I must have overslept myself, in the little nap which I always take when I come in from my walk with Mme. de Saint-Loup, before dressing for the evening. For many years have now elapsed since the Combray days, when, coming in from the longest and latest walks, I would still be in time to see the reflection of the sunset glowing in the panes of my bedroom window. ...
— Swann's Way - (vol. 1 of Remembrance of Things Past) • Marcel Proust

... to her feet to walk over and stand beside Bunny. She was tired of the dark car and of not being able to look from a window. That was half the fun of ...
— Bunny Brown and His Sister Sue in the Sunny South • Laura Lee Hope

... well as with the mind, is a wish so universal that the benignant Creator Himself seems to recognise it in that most attractive passage in Holy Writ, wherein it is said that believers shall "mount up with wings as eagles, they shall run and not be weary, they shall walk ...
— Up in the Clouds - Balloon Voyages • R.M. Ballantyne

... barracks across the parade, the twinkling lights of the sergeants as they took their stations, the soldierly forms of the officers hastening to their companies far across the frozen level. Suddenly she became aware of two forms coming down the walk. They issued from Major Waldron's quarters, and the door closed behind them. One was a young officer; the other, she speedily made out, a Chinese servant, who was guiding his master. She knew the pair in ...
— The Deserter • Charles King

... what noun substantive were formed the verbs to stand or to lie; because we have not properly the name of the abstract ideas from which these verbs arose, except we use the same word for the participle and the noun substantive, as standing, lying. But the verbs, to sit, and to walk, are less difficult to trace to their origin; as we have names for the nouns substantive, a ...
— The Temple of Nature; or, the Origin of Society - A Poem, with Philosophical Notes • Erasmus Darwin

... the soul. The inquiry should be, not what we shall eat, but how shall we resist temptation; how shall we keep the soul pure; how shall we arrive at virtue; how shall we best serve our country; how shall we best educate our children; how shall we expel worldliness and deceit and lies; how shall we walk with God?—for there is a God, and there is immortality and eternal justice: these are the great certitudes of human life, and it is only by these that the soul will expand and ...
— Beacon Lights of History, Volume I • John Lord

... Italian, were taught, one in each of three rooms. The price was twenty-five dollars for one language, or three for fifty dollars. The student was provided with a set of cards for each room and supposed to walk from one apartment to another, changing tongues at each threshold. With his unusual enthusiasm and prodigality, the young pilot decided to take all three languages, but after the first two or three round ...
— Mark Twain, A Biography, 1835-1910, Complete - The Personal And Literary Life Of Samuel Langhorne Clemens • Albert Bigelow Paine

... family were lucky enough to catch the last train conveying troops westward. They traveled for two days without food or water, one of the ladies fainting from exhaustion, and after the train reached its destination they had to walk several miles across the frontier, where they were taken on board a French troop train. ...
— Paris War Days - Diary of an American • Charles Inman Barnard

... don thy buff coat and cap of steel, and walk with thy swashing step, and whistling thy pibroch of 'Broken Bones at Loncarty'; and if they take me for thee, there dare not four of ...
— The Fair Maid of Perth • Sir Walter Scott

... the rest of the world would, in all probability, be as obtuse as Ellwood; and to that suspicion or conviction we appear to owe Paradise Regained. The Plague over, Milton returned to London, settling in Artillery Walk, Bunhill Fields. 'And when afterwards I went to wait on him there ... he shewed me his second poem, called Paradise Regained, and in a pleasant tone said to me, "This is owing to you, for you put it into my head by the question you put to ...
— An English Garner - Critical Essays & Literary Fragments • Edited by Professor Arber and Thomas Seccombe

... then, until we reach a row of cottages not far from the railway station. 'Will you knock at one of these doors,' I asked. And he, 'I do not feel like chaffering and bargaining this morning.' 'Why then did you come out,' I urged. And he, in an air of nonchalance, 'Only for the walk.' And so, we pursued our way in the Bronx, until we reached one of our favourite spots, where a sycamore tree seemed to invite ...
— The Book of Khalid • Ameen Rihani

... animals, and cried out, "Nihil habeo cum porcis: I am a clergyman, sir, and am not come to buy hogs." Trulliber answered, "He was sorry for the mistake, but that he must blame his wife," adding, "she was a fool, and always committed blunders." He then desired him to walk in and clean himself, that he would only fasten up the stye and follow him. Adams desired leave to dry his greatcoat, wig, and hat by the fire, which Trulliber granted. Mrs Trulliber would have brought him a basin of water to wash his face, but her husband bid her be ...
— Joseph Andrews, Vol. 2 • Henry Fielding

... years past, how far are we from our object? what shall we do now? I am afraid that we shall lose there our ancient possession, and our market entirely, if we do not pave immediately some new way for its inhabitants to walk in, for they know all the old roads which lead hither too well. And, since yonder invincible fist shortens my chain, and prevents me from going myself to the earth, counsel me, I pray you, as to whom I shall ...
— The Sleeping Bard - or, Visions of the World, Death, and Hell • Ellis Wynne

... deske to lye there books on. And the carrells was no greater then from one stanchell of the wyndowe to another."[1] There were carrells at Evesham in the fourteenth century.[2] In 1485 Prior Selling constructed in the south walk at Christ Church, Canterbury, "the new framed contrivances called carrells" for the comfort of the monks at study.[3] Such recesses are to be found at Worcester and Gloucester; remains of some exist at the south end of the west ...
— Old English Libraries, The Making, Collection, and Use of Books • Ernest A. Savage

... Arthur, as they entered the Ranger place and began to ascend the stone walk through the lawns sloping down from the big, substantial-looking, creeper-clad house. "I stopped at Cleveland half a day, on the way West, and brought Adelaide along." He said this with elaborate carelessness; ...
— The Second Generation • David Graham Phillips

... of running on the gravel-walk outside and a sharp pull at the door-bell seemed to jerk ...
— Annie Kilburn - A Novel • W. D. Howells

... said in excellent English. "Come, gentlemen" (he turned to the others, who had risen to their feet as he rose), "we must be getting homewards. Monsignor!" (and he beckoned to the two English priests to walk with him.) ...
— Dawn of All • Robert Hugh Benson

... mules and donkeys. On the wooden packsaddles on their backs are the carefully weighed bales of hay or ammunition boxes or other war materials. Walking gingerly by the edges of the mountain ridges they avoid pitfalls and rocks and walk round the stiff, distended bodies of their comrades that have broken down on the way. At times there ambles along a long row of working animals a colt, curious and restlessly sniffing. In the midst ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume III (of VIII) - History of the European War from Official Sources • Various

... brain. At the headland they stood by the seat that looks into the dark mysteries of Blackapit, and then he sat down. Isbister had resumed his talk whenever the path had widened sufficiently for them to walk abreast. He was enlarging upon the complex difficulty of making Boscastle Harbour in bad weather, when suddenly and quite irrelevantly ...
— The Sleeper Awakes - A Revised Edition of When the Sleeper Wakes • H.G. Wells

... systems are only a kind of crutches, sometimes useful to people who cannot walk, but actual impediments to those having the use of their limbs, and who by proper exercise can maintain their ...
— A Book for All Readers • Ainsworth Rand Spofford

... Abbey, determined to speak to Miss Fountain, and find out whether he had given her offense; for this was still his uppermost idea. Having failed in this attempt at an interview with her, he was now meditating a more resolute course, and he paced the little gravel-walk at home debating in himself the pros and cons. Raising his head suddenly, he saw his sister walking slowly at the other end of the path. She was coming toward him, but her eyes were bent thoughtfully on the ...
— Love Me Little, Love Me Long • Charles Reade

... school-divinity a catechism. His fashion and demure habit gets him in with some town-precisian, and makes him a guest on Friday nights. You shall know him by his narrow velvet cape, and serge facing; and his ruff, next his hair the shortest thing about him. The companion of his walk is some zealous tradesman, whom he astonishes with strange points, which they both understand alike. His friends and much painfulness may prefer him to thirty pounds a year, and this means to a chambermaid; with whom we leave him now in the bonds of wedlock:—next Sunday ...
— Character Writings of the 17th Century • Various

... There is so much exhilaration in the shrill bugle-notes which order the movements of the drill, and so much life in its swift evolutions, that the men and horses seem to dance rather than walk on their way to the drill grounds, and both are readily learning the certain sounds of the trumpet, and becoming masters of motions and dispositions required of them. Like all other apprentices, of course, we occasionally indulge ...
— Three Years in the Federal Cavalry • Willard Glazier

... outrages, calumnies, robberies, and acts of violence; here, there, and almost daily, bloody thunderbolts fall haphazard on the most inoffensive heads, on an old man asleep, on a Knight of Saint-Louis taking a walk, on a family at prayers in a church. But, in this aristocracy, crushed down in some places and attacked everywhere, the thunderbolt finds one predestined group which attracts it and on which it constantly falls, and that is ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 2 (of 6) - The French Revolution, Volume 1 (of 3) • Hippolyte A. Taine

... violence of his tone fell on her like a blow. She seemed to shrink together; while Ashe resumed his walk to and fro. ...
— The Marriage of William Ashe • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... internal pains, and he returned home with the fever on him. The next day he rose and dressed, but he was unable to eat or work, and fell into a long drowse; the next day after that he again tried to take a walk, but returned with frightful pains. He refused to go to bed except at night, and tore off the mustard plaisters which the doctors had placed on his feet, lest the blisters should prevent his walking; dying, he ...
— The Countess of Albany • Violet Paget (AKA Vernon Lee)

... know anything of me. But I need not have used all that caution, for the old gentleman was grown dim-sighted by some distemper which had fallen upon his eyes, and could but just see well enough to walk about, and not run against a tree or into a ditch. The woman that was with me had told me that by a mere accident, knowing nothing of what importance it was to me. As they drew near to us, I said, 'Does he know you, Mrs. Owen?' (so they called ...
— The Fortunes and Misfortunes of the Famous Moll Flanders &c. • Daniel Defoe

... a good one, he got in two before Jimmy was out of reach, and he then changed the handkerchief to his left hand in readiness for the return journey. Arrived at the end of the lines, Jimmy turned on his heel and began to walk even ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, January 5, 1916 • Various

... written prayers, or even a whole library. Those who turn the barrel acquire all the merit arising from repeating the prayers or reading the books. In Tibet this form of devotion is a national mania. People carry small prayer wheels in their hands as they walk and place large ones in rivers to be turned by the current. In China, Japan and Korea we find revolving libraries and occasional praying machines, though not of quite the same form as in Tibet,[1050] but, so far as I know, there is nothing to show that these were not introduced ...
— Hinduism and Buddhism, An Historical Sketch, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Charles Eliot

... Bowerton saw a tall, handsome stranger, with downcast eyes, walk rapidly through the principal street and ...
— Romance of California Life • John Habberton

... names even in Sardis which have not defiled their garments; and they shall walk with me in white: for they ...
— Notes On The Apocalypse • David Steele

... I took a closer survey of the farm-house. It was, as I have said, a low, unpainted wooden building, located in the middle of a ten acre lot. It was approached by a straight walk, paved with a mixture of sand and tar, similar to that which the reader may have seen in the Champs Elysees. I do not know whether my back-woods friend, or the Parisian pavior, was the first inventor of this composition, but I am satisfied ...
— Among the Pines - or, South in Secession Time • James R. Gilmore

... this Subject; in the mean time I shall do all in the Power of a weak old Fellow in my own Defence: for as Diogenes, being in quest of an honest Man, sought for him when it was broad Day-light with a Lanthorn and Candle, so I intend for the future to walk the Streets with a dark Lanthorn, which has a convex Chrystal in it; and if any Man stares at me, I give fair Warning that Ill direct the Light full into his Eyes. Thus despairing to find Men Modest, I hope by this Means to ...
— The Spectator, Volume 2. • Addison and Steele

... would have been cadaverous but for their hue, a sanguine brown, well tanned by out-of-door living. His eyes, of an iron-grey colour, were fierce or gentle as you took him, but as a rule extraordinarily gentle. He would walk you thirty miles any day without fatigue, and shoot you a woodcock against any man; but as an angler ...
— Sir John Constantine • Prosper Paleologus Constantine

... no obligation whatever. I'd just love to," cried Peggy eagerly. "Why it would be perfectly lovely to have her come out here every day. Please walk back to the house and let us talk it ...
— Peggy Stewart: Navy Girl at Home • Gabrielle E. Jackson

... arms around S.'s neck, and pull'd his face down and kiss'd him. S. said he knew then the end was near. (S. stuck to him day and night to the last.) When I was home in August, Charlie was cradling on the hill, and it was a picture to see him walk through the grain. All work seem'd play to him. He had no vices, any more than Nature has, and was belov'd by ...
— Complete Prose Works - Specimen Days and Collect, November Boughs and Goodbye My Fancy • Walt Whitman

... high-flown compliments, with a bitter enjoyment of turning him into ridicule. Instead of running into the house as before, she sauntered carelessly by her companion's side, humming little snatches of song, and kicking the loose pebbles right and left on the garden-walk. Captain Wragge hailed the change in her as the best of good omens. He thought he saw plain signs that the family spirit was ...
— No Name • Wilkie Collins

... of the terrace, or parade walk, covered with my fellow-creatures, appals my imagination much more. My sympathies have never been half human enough, and in the proximity of one of nature's most impressive objects I shrink still more from contact with the outward forms of unknown humanity. However, this is merely an ...
— Records of Later Life • Frances Anne Kemble

... (!) weather he could neither hawk nor hunt, and was now tyred with cards, dice, &c., and such other domestical sports, or to see ladies dance, with some of his courtiers, he would in the evening walk disguised all about the town. It so fortuned as he was walking late one night, he found a country fellow dead drunk, snorting on a bulk; he caused his followers to bring him to his palace, and there stripping ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 2 • Richard F. Burton

... business they call politics—I had seen it from behind, when it is all bones and blackness; and I was cured for life of any temptations to take part in it again. A plain, quiet, private path was that which I was ambitious to walk in, where I might keep my head out of the way of dangers and my conscience out of the road of temptation. For, upon a retrospect, it appeared I had not done so grandly, after all; but, with the greatest possible amount of big speech and ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 11 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... frail Alan judged she did not weigh, here on earth, much over a hundred pounds. But even that he could see was too much for her. She could not fly, and it was only by the aid of her wings that she was able to walk with anything like his own ...
— The Fire People • Ray Cummings

... I can do," she told herself. "Oh, suppose Peter should die, or be a helpless cripple for life, or have to walk with crutches, or wear a boot with a sole ...
— The Railway Children • E. Nesbit

... enough, Tom. I am here with Wilcox and will soon get these things off you." Drawing his jack-knife he cut the bonds. "Do you think that you can walk, Tom?" ...
— With Cochrane the Dauntless • George Alfred Henty

... mean it," says Margaret quickly, the more so that she thinks he is going to walk the room again. "Of course you could not have ...
— The Hoyden • Mrs. Hungerford

... glad, therefore, when evening came, to find that she was going out for a lesson on the stars. I knew the open air was what she needed, and I thought the walk would do her good, whether she made any ...
— The Poet at the Breakfast Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... men. If it was a deeply conscious want of the human heart which led the heathen of distant India to grope their way from the cheerless service of remorseless deities to one who could be touched with a feeling of their infirmities, and could walk these earthly paths as a counsellor by their side, how striking is the analogy to essential ...
— Oriental Religions and Christianity • Frank F. Ellinwood

... although the sky here is blue and cloudless, away to the north where London lies, there is a great, black shadow like the shadow of my dream, and God keep all shadows from you, Barnabas. So come to me—meet me to-morrow—there is a new moon. Come to Oakshott's Barn at 7:30, and we will walk back to the ...
— The Amateur Gentleman • Jeffery Farnol et al

... there poor Eliza hoped to get a little rest for herself and Harry, who was now fast asleep in her arms. She had just sat down by the fire, when, who should ride into the yard but the trader and his guides. The swift horses had brought them much quicker than she and Harry could walk, but the weary mother would not lose her child. She darted out with him that moment, and the verses will tell you ...
— Pictures and Stories from Uncle Tom's Cabin • Unknown

... Bicetre is a neat quadrangular building, enclosing many other structures and many courts, which have each a different name; there is the grande cour (great court) where the prisoners walk; the cour de cuisine (or kitchen court;) the cour des chiens (or dog's court;) the cour de correction (or court of punishment;) and the cour des fers (or iron court.) In this last is a new building five stories high; each story ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction. - Volume XII, No. 347, Saturday, December 20, 1828. • Various

... quartette sauntered out for a walk up Elizabeth street to the post-office. The boys were just congratulating themselves that their uncomfortable, though piquant, experience of the morning was a thing definitely of ...
— Baseball Joe Around the World - Pitching on a Grand Tour • Lester Chadwick

... Almighty God. Our faith teaches that there is no safer reliance than upon the God of our fathers, who has so singularly favored the American people in every national trial, and who will not forsake us so long as we obey His commandments and walk humbly in ...
— Messages and Papers of William McKinley V.2. • William McKinley

... Ages: elements which moderns, even when they are mediaevalists, find it hard to understand and harder to imitate. The first is the primary idea of Mummery itself. If you will observe a child just able to walk, you will see that his first idea is not to dress up as anybody—but to dress up. Afterwards, of course, the idea of being the King or Uncle William will leap to his lips. But it is generally suggested by the hat he has already let fall over his nose, from far deeper motives. Tommy ...
— A Miscellany of Men • G. K. Chesterton



Words linked to "Walk" :   walk through, base on balls, hitch, bumble, accompany, sleepwalk, take the air, cock, stroll, move, posture, walk-up, constitutionalize, travel, pace, get across, calling, creep, walk out, wading, tally, oblige, go, walk off, hoof it, bearing, perambulate, step, boardwalk, flagging, amble, flounce, paseo, walk out of, walk about, pad, careen, saunter, strut, path, stride, shuffling, vocation, stagger, traveling, shuffle, walkabout, stamp, ambulatory, moonwalk, shambling, coggle, pass, hoof, behave, trot, walking, locomote, walk-through, lumber, walk-up apartment, sashay, stumble, traverse, mouse, sneak, paddle, wade, walk-in, locomotion, hobble, achievement, widow's walk, gimp, tiptoe, perambulation, prance, angry walk, tip, random walk, clomp, track, tippytoe, turn, mall, catwalk, spacewalk, swag, walk around, career, ruffle, tread, somnambulism, footslog, keel, tread down, walk of life, compel, pussyfoot, cross, pass over, leg it, prowl, noctambulation, walk in, marching, hit, carriage, lurch, process, mince, shamble, gait, totter, ride, comport, pound, score, promenade, skulk, cut through, clump, swagger, mosey, plod, hike, ambulation, traipse, trample, waddle, sidewalk, somnambulation, walk over, travelling, slouch, sleepwalking, trudge, baseball, somnambulate, baseball game, street-walk, hiking, tap, skywalk, dodder, stomp, stalk, march, pavement, lollop, toddle, tittup, reel, limp, toe, noctambulism, play, falter, get over, last mile, walk-on, flounder, obligate, ambulate, exhibit, consociate, shlep, stump, walk on air, tramp down, associate, parade, scuffle, constitutional, walker, tramp, walk away, rack up, accomplishment, space walk, slog, walkway, manner of walking



Copyright © 2019 Diccionario ingles.com