Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Writer   Listen
noun
Writer  n.  
1.
One who writes, or has written; a scribe; a clerk. "They (came) that handle the pen of the writer." "My tongue is the pen of a ready writer."
2.
One who is engaged in literary composition as a profession; an author; as, a writer of novels. "This pitch, as ancient writers do report, doth defile."
3.
A clerk of a certain rank in the service of the late East India Company, who, after serving a certain number of years, became a factor.
Writer of the tallies (Eng. Law), an officer of the exchequer of England, who acted as clerk to the auditor of the receipt, and wrote the accounts upon the tallies from the tellers' bills. The use of tallies in the exchequer has been abolished.
Writer's cramp, Writer's palsy or Writer's spasm (Med.), a painful spasmodic affection of the muscles of the fingers, brought on by excessive use, as in writing, violin playing, telegraphing, etc. Called also scrivener's palsy.
Writer to the signet. See under Signet.






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Writer" Quotes from Famous Books



... was a strong, glowing, whole-souled human being, who enjoyed life more intensely than any Englishman since Walter Scott. He was born among books; and circumstances enabled him to follow his inclinations and become a writer,—a poet by profession. He was, from early youth to venerable age, a centre of bounding vitality, the very embodiment of spontaneous life; and the forms of poetry in which he so fully and so accurately expressed himself enable us to know him ...
— Emerson and Other Essays • John Jay Chapman

... and things which animated the men of the Revolution is one of these affective phenomena which are the more striking the more one studies their psychology. They detested, not only their enemies, but the members of their own party. "If one were to accept unreservedly,'' said a recent writer, "the judgments which they expressed of one another, we should have to conclude that they were all traitors and boasters, all incapable and corrupt, all assassins or tyrants.'' We know with what hatred, scarcely appeased by ...
— The Psychology of Revolution • Gustave le Bon

... names of the Isle of Wight and the peninsula of Jutland, since we have seen that in both cases, there was a similar confusion between the syllables Jut- and Vit-. This is an error into which even a careful writer might fall. That Beda had no authentic historical accounts of the conquest of Britain, we know from his own statements in the Preface to his Ecclesiastical History,[14] and that he partially tried to make ...
— A Handbook of the English Language • Robert Gordon Latham

... remember that, in "The Pursuits of Literature,"—a satirical poem once universally famous,—the lines about Mnemosyne and her daughters, the Pierides, are cited as exhibiting matchless sublimity. Perhaps, therefore, if carefully searched, this writer may contain ...
— Autobiographic Sketches • Thomas de Quincey

... runaway horse with the farcical realism of the authors of Some Experiences of an Irish R.M., can parody a judge, can paint a portrait, and can steep a landscape in vision. Two recent critics have described him as "the best English prose writer since Dryden," but that only means that Mr. Belloc's rush of genius has quite naturally swept ...
— Old and New Masters • Robert Lynd

... of the writers who always wrote. She expressed herself in verse from early school days and it was then predicted that Lilian Mack would one day become a writer. Justifying this sentiment, while still at high school, she took charge of the woman's page for a city paper and her work there attracted such favorable attention that she left school to take entire charge of woman's work for the largest daily in an ...
— The Outdoor Girls in a Winter Camp - Glorious Days on Skates and Ice Boats • Laura Lee Hope

... way that writer talked. He talked so steadily nobody could slide a word in edgeways. Yet he said he wanted information. We wondered. If the ability to deliver an unending monologue, consisting chiefly of the ninth letter in the alphabet, is any sign of lung power, that chap didn't need any cod-liver oil or sea air. ...
— The Blood Ship • Norman Springer

... looking as though he had eaten a hatful of crab-apples; the impious remarks about the Thirty-nine Articles; the suggestion that Godfrey, instead of going to bed as he had ordered him to do that evening, was wandering about London at midnight; the boldly announced intention of the writer of not going to church—indeed, every word of ...
— Love Eternal • H. Rider Haggard

... a pantomime of tearing his hair. "Is there no escape?" he groaned. "It's bad enough to be a lion in town, but I positively refuse to roar in the country. I won't do it. I have writer's cramp—I can't use my right hand. Rayner, my boy, I'll turn them ...
— Sisters Three • Mrs. George de Horne Vaizey

... the newspaper writer sometimes, in the passion of the hour, goes far afield. It is equally true that no statement of importance can thus be made that is not immediately challenged, answered and reanswered until, through the fierce fires of controversy the dross is burned ...
— Woodrow Wilson's Administration and Achievements • Frank B. Lord and James William Bryan

... and he was tied down to his bed—which was a common Hospital Pallet—by an immense number of Leathern Straps, secured by Iron Rings to the Floor of his Dungeon. But what Dr. Goldsmith, the Poetry-writer, means by "Damiens' Bed of Steel," I'm sure I don't know. At the head and foot of his Bed an Exempt kept watch Night and Day, and every three-quarters of an hour the Guard was relieved; so that the Miserable Creature had little chance of Sleeping. He would have sunk under all this Cruelty, ...
— The Strange Adventures of Captain Dangerous, Vol. 3 of 3 • George Augustus Sala

... much encumbered with diacritical signs, and not too startlingly different from the spellings of earlier times, especially from that of Lhuyd, whose system was constructed from living Cornish speakers. The writer has arrived at his conclusions by a comparison of the various existing spellings with one another, with the traditional fragments collected and recorded by himself in 1875, with the modern pronunciation of Cornish ...
— A Handbook of the Cornish Language - chiefly in its latest stages with some account of its history and literature • Henry Jenner

... on this subject will be found in a notice of the "Seven Lamps" in the British Quarterly for August, 1849. I think, however, the writer attaches too great importance to one out ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume I (of 3) • John Ruskin

... simplest; and in every case they provide the exact musical counterpart to the thought. Mrs. Jacob has an austere conscience. She eschews facile rhymes and worn epithets, and escapes the easy cadences of hymnology which are apt to be a snare to the writer of folk-songs. She has many moods, from the stalwart humour of "The Beadle o' Drumlee," and "Jeemsie Miller," to the haunting lilt of "The Gean-Trees," and the pathos of "Craigo Woods" and "The Lang Road." But in them all are the same clarity and sincerity ...
— Songs of Angus and More Songs of Angus • Violet Jacob

... entitled Select Trials at the Old Bailey is an account of the trial and execution of Robert Hallam, for murder, in the year 1731. Narrating the execution of the criminal, and mentioning some papers which he had prepared, the writer says: "We will not tire the reader's patience with transcribing these prayers, in which we can see nothing more than commonplace phrases and unmeaning Guthryisms." What {621} is the meaning of this last word, and to ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 191, June 25, 1853 • Various

... earnestness with which he invests the part intensifies the drollery of the complications. And to think that the adapter of this gay and festive piece should be none other than the sentimental troubadour, song-writer and composer, author of a Lyceum Tragedy and other similar trifles, Mr. HAMILTON AIDE!! "Sir," in future will HAMILTON AIDE say, when being interviewed by a Manager, "I will now read you my Five Act Tragedy entitled——" "Hang your tragedies!" will the Manager ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 98, April 5, 1890 • Various

... his "Age of Louis XIV.," was the first to call special attention to this mystery, and since then numerous conjectures have been made as to who the Iron Mask really was. One writer has suggested that he was an illegitimate son of Anne of Austria, the queen-mother. Another identifies him with a supposed twin brother of Louis XIV., whose birth Richelieu had concealed. Others ...
— Historical Tales, Vol. 6 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality. French. • Charles Morris

... newspaper writer," he made his familiar statement. "My name is Lester Terabon. I'm from New York. I came down here from St. ...
— The River Prophet • Raymond S. Spears

... comes across specimens having a black-and-tan colour, which, although not mentioned in the recognised standard as being debarred, do not as a rule figure in the prize list. Some of the best specimens which the writer has seen have been black-and-tans, and a few years ago on the award of a first prize to a bitch of this colour, a long but non-conclusive argument was held in the canine press. Granted that the colour is objectionable, a dog which scores in all other ...
— Dogs and All About Them • Robert Leighton

... The writer of this Narrative was hired by his master to a "soul-driver," and has witnessed all the horrors of the traffic, from the buying up of human cattle in the slave-breeding States, which produced a constant scene of separating the victims ...
— The Narrative of William W. Brown, a Fugitive Slave • William Wells Brown

... That of Jonas Ramus, which is perhaps the most circumstantial of any, cannot impart the faintest conception either of the magnificence, or of the horror of the scene—or of the wild bewildering sense of the novel which confounds the beholder. I am not sure from what point of view the writer in question surveyed it, nor at what time; but it could neither have been from the summit of Helseggen, nor during a storm. There are some passages of his description, nevertheless, which may be quoted for their details, although their effect is exceedingly feeble in conveying ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 2 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... pleasant comradeship at the table whose polished surface was littered with letters, books of household accounts, and all those dainty metal and crystal trinkets the jeweller conceives necessary to the writer. Evidently they had found refreshment desirable, for a diminutive tea-table still stood near Flavia, while a pushed-back chair beneath which a young Great Dane hound lay asleep indicated that Corrie had been ...
— From the Car Behind • Eleanor M. Ingram

... to note that the Catholic immigrant, finding in his Church the one homelike thing, is often a better Catholic in America than he was at home. A Protestant writer without accurate information would not dare to generalize on the religious dislocation of the second Catholic generation. But there must be a very great loss. The large non-churched elements in our population must be in part due to Catholic disintegration as they ...
— Modern Religious Cults and Movements • Gaius Glenn Atkins

... have values which I think I am now acquainted with; and for the help of the reader I will here repeat certain of those words and phrases, and follow them with numerals which shall represent those values—then we shall see the difference between a writer's ciphering and a ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... excite a deeper hostility than ever against the savage foe. Nor was the subsequent conduct of the Indians themselves calculated to soften this bitter feeling against them; for, to use the words of a modern writer, "The woods again teemed with savages, and no one was safe from attack beyond the walls of a station. The influence of the British, and the constant pressure of the Long Knives, upon the red-men, had produced a union of the ...
— Ella Barnwell - A Historical Romance of Border Life • Emerson Bennett

... Opus Epistolarum he seeks, not always with entire success, to do justice to the great regent. Through his laborious efforts to be fair to the statesman, there pierces his personal dislike of the man. Trivial jibes and small criticisms at the Cardinal's expense are not wanting. The writer shared the feeling of the Spanish Grandees, that it was "odious to be governed by a friar." He also derided the Cardinal's military spirit. One of the regent's earliest measures suppressed all pensions, but though he excepted Martyr by name, pending the King's decision, no ...
— De Orbe Novo, Volume 1 (of 2) - The Eight Decades of Peter Martyr D'Anghera • Trans. by Francis Augustus MacNutt

... Congress may have exclusive jurisdiction whenever it may choose to exercise the authority. There is a line of reasoning which would lead to that conclusion. It may be that many will not care to follow the lead of the writer as to the measure of aggregate net revenue which railway companies are entitled to collect in tolls, but it is evident that before the tolls can be intelligently determined some measure of such aggregate revenue must ...
— The Railroad Question - A historical and practical treatise on railroads, and - remedies for their abuses • William Larrabee

... can plainly see that our authoress fully understood the true vocation of a romance writer, and has successfully realized the ...
— Japanese Literature - Including Selections from Genji Monogatari and Classical - Poetry and Drama of Japan • Various

... part, I have such faith in truth that I take it mere concealment is in most cases a mischief. And I should say, for instance, that a wise man would be sorry that his fellows should think better of him than he deserves. By the way, that is a reason why I should not like to be a writer of moral essays, Milverton—one should be supposed to ...
— Friends in Council (First Series) • Sir Arthur Helps

... was composed of the top of a flat trunk, and to find its way there the invitation went up three pairs of stairs. Mr. Pillet was a writer, and his income was by no means as great as his ability. He had often to point out a similar disparity in the lives of other writers, because this was his one way of accounting for his want of success. ...
— In the Yule-Log Glow, Book II - Christmas Tales from 'Round the World • Various

... is, discovering why the northern nations fell a prey more readily to the disorganizing doctrines of Protestantism than the southern. The general fickleness of the human mind, which is so well brought out by the great Spanish writer, does not strike us as a sufficient cause; for the mind of southern peoples is certainly not less fickle, on many points at least, than ...
— Irish Race in the Past and the Present • Aug. J. Thebaud

... that the knights are often represented with the legs crossed. Many speculations have been made with regard to the meaning of this fashion of cross-legged effigy. It is a popular superstition, in which for some years the writer shared, that such effigies represented Crusaders. We were told in our young days that when the knight had his legs crossed at the feet he had gone to the Crusades once; when at the knees, that he had been to two Crusades; and when crossed at the thighs, he had been thrice to rescue ...
— English Villages • P. H. Ditchfield

... used simply as a thread to connect these things together. Consequently, the action is intermittent, being checked by irrelevant episodes, and by long tirades on agriculture, sociology, and on other theories set forth by the writer with much zeal but also with much acrimony. Catholicism is asserted to be the only Church which has shown humanity its way of safety; Tascheron's sister, who returns from America, is made to relate that in a certain place ...
— Balzac • Frederick Lawton

... The writer of this report passed the winter of 1861 at Merida, the capital of the Province of Yucatan, as the guest of Don David Casares, his classmate, and was received into his father's family with a kindness and an attentive hospitality which only those who know the warmth and sincerity ...
— The Mayas, the Sources of Their History / Dr. Le Plongeon in Yucatan, His Account of Discoveries • Stephen Salisbury, Jr.

... be supposed, it is an object of much importance that all books, which found any part of their interest upon their novelty, should be brought out at this time: and something or other is generally looked for from the pen of every popular writer as a means of giving zest and seasoning to the heavy Mess-Catalog. If it happens therefore upon any account that an author fails to meet these expectations of the Leipsic fair,—obliging persons are often at hand who step forward as his proxy by forging something ...
— Walladmor: - And Now Freely Translated from the German into English. - In Two Volumes. Vol. I. • Thomas De Quincey

... laughing, "I take that remark as a compliment, Sir; I have always appreciated that writer's pieces; I enjoy them ...
— Queechy, Volume II • Elizabeth Wetherell

... or turning around; as a versatile spindle; turning with ease from one thing to another; many sided; as, a versatile writer. ...
— Orthography - As Outlined in the State Course of Study for Illinois • Elmer W. Cavins

... beginning with a vowel is coupled with one beginning with a consonant, the indefinite article must be repeated; thus, 'Sir Matthew Hale was a noble and an impartial judge;' 'Pope was an elegant and a nervous writer.'"—Maunder's Gram., p. 11. "W and y are consonants, when they begin a word or syllable; but in every other situation they are vowels."—Murray's Gram., p. 7: Bacon, Comly, Cooper, Fish, Ingersoll, Kirkham, Smith, et ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... them was a dingy bill, bearing the sinister imprimatur of an auctioneer, and offering (in capitals of various sizes) Bedroom Suites (Walnut and Mahogany), Turkey, Indian and Wilton Pile Carpets, Two Full-sized Billiard-Tables, a Remington Type-writer, a Double Door (Fire-Proof), and other objects not less useful and delightful. The club, then, had gone to smash. The members had been disbanded, driven out of this Eden by the fiery sword of the Law, driven back to ...
— Yet Again • Max Beerbohm

... would some day become a writer had given him a place of distinction in Winesburg, and to Seth Richmond he talked continually of the matter, "It's the easiest of all lives to live," he declared, becoming excited and boastful. "Here and there you go and there is no one ...
— Winesburg, Ohio • Sherwood Anderson

... education at Queen's and Magdalen colleges, Oxford. He entered the diplomatic service and rose steadily, becoming one of the two principal secretaries of state two years before his death. He attained a higher political position than any other writer has ever achieved through his literary ability. With Steele he published The Tatler, and later The Spectator, at first a daily paper and afterward a tri-weekly one. He was a master of English prose, and his poems are elevated and serious in style. He ...
— Graded Poetry: Seventh Year • Various

... a little significance, however, in another of M. Polti's suggestions—that perhaps a portion of the beauty and power we discern in the great plays of the Greeks was directly due to the accepted limitation of the themes which a tragic writer held himself authorized to treat. The restriction of the number of available legends forced the successive dramatists of Athens to handle again, each in his turn, the dark stories already dealt with by his predecessors. The fateful lives of OEdipus, ...
— Inquiries and Opinions • Brander Matthews

... beings. But, having already spoken of that in another chapter, I will content myself with repeating here that these memoirs were all the more precious, as their principal object was to make known the truth; that the impression they left on the mind was a perfect conviction of the writer's sincerity; that Lord Byron possessed the most generous of souls, and that the separation had no other cause but incompatibility of disposition between the two parties. Had he not given irrefragable proof of the truth of these memoirs, by sending them to be read and commented ...
— My Recollections of Lord Byron • Teresa Guiccioli

... Fanshawe's moving account of her leave-taking from Charles I. at Hampton Court, which has been quoted hundreds of times. They will be thrilled by at least three stories of the supernatural told with the elan and consummate simplicity that exceeds art, and they will be charmed with the ingenuousness of the writer when she writes about herself, and her masterly little sketches by the way of such characters of the time as Sir Kenelm Digby and Lord Goring, son of the Earl of Norwich. Indeed, we venture to think they cannot ...
— Memoirs of Lady Fanshawe • Lady Fanshawe

... Russell, of the London Times, is what I always thought him to be—a graphic, imaginative writer, with power of description of all he sees, but not the slightest insight in events, in men, in institutions. Russell is not able to find out the epidermis under a shirt. And they make so much fuss about him; Seward brings him to the first cabinet dinner given by the President; ...
— Diary from March 4, 1861, to November 12, 1862 • Adam Gurowski

... for the press, the editor has toned down nothing, has added nothing, and has suppressed nothing. The only alterations she has made have been such as were essential to conceal the identity of the writer and of other persons mentioned in the document. Consequently, surnames, Christian names, and names of places, have been changed. These modifications have enabled the original author of the diary to allow me to place it at the free disposal of ...
— A Young Girl's Diary • An Anonymous Young Girl

... The writer and my son, M. P. Reed, have top worked quite a number of large black walnuts, ranging from 3 to 9 inches in diameter. They were cut back last spring and budded in the new growth this summer, setting from 20 to 40 buds in some of the trees. Buds of ...
— Northern Nut Growers Association, Report of the Proceedings at the Fourth Annual Meeting - Washington D.C. November 18 and 19, 1913 • Various

... highest excellencies were the virtuous and religious principles which governed his whole life; his purse was ever open to relieve the distress of an unfortunate friend, or the wants of the deserving poor. Many were the alms which he bestowed in secret; which can be testified by the writer of this paragraph, who knew him well, ...
— The King's Post • R. C. Tombs

... situation is portrayed with much spirit and humor, as well as with the most perfect good-humor. Thoroughly Southern as the novel is, it is not narrowly so: its pictures of Southern society are drawn from within, and show its writer's sympathy with Southern feeling, yet its tone, even in touching on the most tender spots, is entirely dispassionate, and at the same time free from any apparent ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, December 1878 • Various

... my heart to him I am sure. He touched my emotions, and I admired his skill as a writer. I have thought at times that I cared a good deal for him. I think perhaps if he had spoken to me at any other time than the one he chose, I could easily have persuaded myself that I loved him. But ...
— In His Steps • Charles M. Sheldon

... Reflections, are sprinkled up and down the Writings of all Ages, by Authors, who leave behind them Memorials of their Resentment against the Scorn of particular Women, in Invectives against the whole Sex. Such a Writer, I doubt not, was the celebrated Petronius, who invented the pleasant Aggravations of the Frailty of the Ephesian Lady; but when we consider this Question between the Sexes, which has been either a Point of Dispute or Raillery ...
— The Spectator, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 - With Translations and Index for the Series • Joseph Addison and Richard Steele

... claimed these bits of business as having originated with them. For that matter, she was a favourite with playwrights, as well she might be, considering the vitality which she injected into their hackneyed situations. Every little while some young writer, fired by an inflection in her voice or a nuance in her comedy, would rush back stage to tell her that she never had had a part worthy of her, and that he would now come to her rescue. Sometimes ...
— Gigolo • Edna Ferber

... (Lord), which means a giver of bread, because the Gesiths ate his bread. They not only ate his bread, but they shared in the booty which he brought home. They slept in his hall, and were clothed in the garments woven by his wife and her maidens. A continental writer tells how a body of Gesiths once approached their lord with a petition that he should take a wife, because as long as he remained unmarried there was no one to make new clothes for them or to mend their ...
— A Student's History of England, v. 1 (of 3) - From the earliest times to the Death of King Edward VII • Samuel Rawson Gardiner

... regard to the practical man's means of salvation; but it is at one with itself in its fundamental thesis, that all things are each a part of One Lord, that men and gods are but manifestations of the One Divine Spirit, which, or rather whom, the Vishnuite re-writer identifies with ...
— The Religions of India - Handbooks On The History Of Religions, Volume 1, Edited By Morris Jastrow • Edward Washburn Hopkins

... with dry descriptions and measures, are often uninteresting, unless with figures and explanations to illustrate their nature and designs. The writer having himself surveyed many American sites of ancient cities, may hereafter describe and explain some of them, with or without figures. He has also collected accounts of similar monuments all over the earth, and will be able to elucidate ...
— The Ancient Monuments of North and South America, 2nd ed. • C. S. Rafinesque

... Women Writers", that Mrs. Wiggin was "a popular writer who expressed what her contemporaries themselves thought of as 'real life'" (p. 413). "The Village Watch-Tower" I think is a perfect example of that observation; it captures vividly a few frozen moments of rural America, right at the twilight of the ...
— The Village Watch-Tower • (AKA Kate Douglas Riggs) Kate Douglas Wiggin

... parents or guardians, and that any other correspondence directed to them was opened and perused by the head mistress. Letters from brothers, sisters, cousins, or friends were of course allowed if forwarded under cover by a parent, but must not be sent separately to the school by the writer. ...
— A Patriotic Schoolgirl • Angela Brazil

... an excellent writer. His descriptions of his travels from Chicago to the South would make a good-sized and a very interesting book. His last composition is given below. It is an appropriate ending to this brief outline of the history of one who should be regarded ...
— History of the Donner Party • C.F. McGlashan

... motives and ideas by which the various religions are inspired, and the movements of thought which they present. And the attempt is made to exhibit the great manifestations of human piety in their genealogical connection. The writer has ventured to deal with the religions of the Bible, each in its proper historical place, and trusts that he has not by doing so rendered any disservice either to Christian faith or to the science of religion. ...
— History of Religion - A Sketch of Primitive Religious Beliefs and Practices, and of the Origin and Character of the Great Systems • Allan Menzies

... writer, was affected that way by this picture," said Cortes; "he was shocked at its ...
— Caesar or Nothing • Pio Baroja Baroja

... between the public and an author already established, who has lost the charm of novelty, but gained the weight of acknowledged reputation; and who, either upon politics or criticism, seeks for frequent and continuous occasions to enforce his peculiar theses and doctrines. But, upon the young writer, this mode of communication, if too long continued, operates most injuriously both as to his future prospects and his own present taste and style. With respect to the first, it familiarises the public to his mannerism (and all writers worth reading have mannerism) in ...
— Ernest Maltravers, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... the natural surroundings are the same. According to Ramon de la Sagra, the death-rate is smaller among the creoles, and greater among the natives, than it is in Spain; the mortality among the garrison, however, is considerable. The same writer states that the real acclimatization of the Spanish race takes place by selection; the unfit die, and the ...
— The Former Philippines thru Foreign Eyes • Fedor Jagor; Tomas de Comyn; Chas. Wilkes; Rudolf Virchow.

... long been famous in the North Riding, and their history goes back to the earliest days of fox-hunting in these parts. The Bilsdale being the only pack that claims an earlier origin. William Marshall, the agricultural writer (mentioned a few pages further on), hunted with the Sinnington pack for many years, and Jack Parker, huntsman of last century, was a very notable character whose witty anecdotes are still remembered. The silver-mounted horn illustrated ...
— The Evolution Of An English Town • Gordon Home

... responded Richard, with a laugh." (There was nothing to laugh about; there never is. The writer puts it in from habit—automatically; he is paying no attention to his work; or he would see that there is nothing to laugh at; often, when a remark is unusually and poignantly flat and silly, he tries to deceive the reader ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... in a most efficient manner. The villagers presented me with an address of welcome, and altogether my reception at Fort McLeod was such as to satisfy the most fastidious lover of display, and more than enough to satisfy the writer. ...
— The Treaties of Canada with The Indians of Manitoba - and the North-West Territories • Alexander Morris

... all his bravery and his self-sacrifice this heroic priest was not without his traducers. A short time after his death a certain missionary named Dr. Hyde made scurrilous charges against him which were answered by that great writer, Robert Louis Stevenson, in a letter that has become one of the classics of English literature, and in which it was predicted that Father Damien would be made a saint by the Church of Rome, as he is indeed a saint in the bravery and purity of ...
— A Treasury of Heroes and Heroines - A Record of High Endeavour and Strange Adventure from 500 B.C. to 1920 A.D. • Clayton Edwards

... girls, Cady Stanton contrasted the buoyant spirit of young males with the dejected sickliness of immature women. This, she says, is because the latter are keenly sensitive to the fact that they have no aim in life. This is a sad, sad truth! No longer ago than last year the writer's youngest girl-Gloriana, a skin-milk blonde concern of fourteen-came pensively up to her father with big tears in her little eyes, and a forgotten morsel of buttered bread lying ...
— The Fiend's Delight • Dod Grile

... pen aside with a sigh. "It is abominable work to write letters," he said; "I cannot comprehend why you, Gneisenau, who are so good a soldier, at the same time know so well how to wield the pen. It is not my forte, although I had a notion once to be a savant, and really become a sort of writer. In those calamitous days, subsequent to 1807, despair and ennui sought for some relief to my mind, and made me write a book, and ...
— NAPOLEON AND BLUCHER • L. Muhlbach

... which has been universally accepted since it was first proposed in 1513. The kingdom of Cottius was made into a Roman province by Nero (cf. Suetonius, Nero, 18), and it is inconceivable that any Roman writer subsequently referred to ...
— Ten Books on Architecture • Vitruvius

... incidents which had accompanied Colonel Lopez's betrayal had not remained wholly unobserved. It has been stated* that at 1:30 A.M. Colonel Tinajero, on watch at the convent heights, had come to headquarters and reported an unusual stir in the enemy's camp. The same writer adds that, later on, another officer had come to report that the Juarists seemed to be entering La Cruz.* He was laughed at for his pains. How could such a thing take place without a single ...
— Maximilian in Mexico - A Woman's Reminiscences of the French Intervention 1862-1867 • Sara Yorke Stevenson

... they must carry them alone, children in America would rather not be born. A little girl who lives in my neighborhood came home from school in tears one day not long ago. Her father is a celebrated writer. The school-teacher, happening to select one of his stories to read aloud to the class, mentioned the fact that the author of the story was the father of my ...
— The American Child • Elizabeth McCracken

... under nature." In the "Life and Letters," II., page 246, Darwin, speaking of Naudin's work, says: "Decaisne seems to think he gives my whole theory."), but it does not seem to me to anticipate me, as he does not show how selection could be applied under nature; but an obscure writer (126/2. The obscure writer is Patrick Matthew (see the "Historical Sketch" in the "Origin.") on forest trees, in 1830, in Scotland, most expressly and clearly anticipated my views—though he put the case so briefly that no single person ever noticed ...
— More Letters of Charles Darwin - Volume I (of II) • Charles Darwin

... antecedent to the history, have any weight, when we consider that, though the HISTORY OF TOM THUMB, printed by and for Edward M——r, at the Looking-glass on London-bridge, be of a later date, still must we suppose this history to have been transcribed from some other, unless we suppose the writer thereof to be inspired: a gift very faintly contended for by the writers of our age. As to this history's not bearing the stamp of second, third, or fourth edition, I see but little in that objection; editions being very uncertain lights to judge of books by; and perhaps Mr ...
— Miscellanies, Volume 2 (from Works, Volume 12) • Henry Fielding

... very deliberately—lying upon his back and healing that traitor lung of his—to be a writer. He didn't so decide entirely because that was what he had always wanted to be, but for many reasons. First place, he could say things to her through prose and verse that could not be expressed in sculpture, ...
— IT and Other Stories • Gouverneur Morris

... generally observed that no species of writing is so difficult as the dramatic. It must, indeed, appear so, were we to consider it upon one side only. It is a dialogue, or species of composition which in itself requires all the mastery of a complete writer with grace and spirit to support. We may add, that it must have a fable, too, which necessarily requires invention, one of the rarest qualities of the human mind. It would surprise us, if we were to examine the thing critically, ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VII. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... anecdote, another, still more recent, may be here added. The author was lately honoured with a letter from a gentleman deeply skilled in these mysteries, who kindly undertook to calculate the nativity of the writer of Guy Mannering, who might be supposed to be friendly to the divine art which he professed. But it was impossible to supply data for the construction of a horoscope, had the native been otherwise desirous of it, since all those who could supply ...
— Guy Mannering • Sir Walter Scott

... drawing-room stopped, and, wanting to know the time, she went into the study and looked at the clock, trying to keep her eyes from the bookcase. But in spite of herself she looked. The books were there: they had been thrust so far back that she could not read the name of the writer. Well, it did not matter, she did not care to know the name of the writer—Ned's room interested her more than the books. There was his table covered with his papers; and the thought passed through her mind that he might be writing the book he had promised her not to write. What he was writing ...
— The Untilled Field • George Moore

... It is doubtful, however, whether van Drebbel's boat was ever entirely submerged, and the voyage with which he was credited, from Westminster to Greenwich, is supposed to have been made in an awash condition, with the head of the inventor above the surface. More than one writer at the time referred to van Drebbel's boat and endeavored to explain the apparatus by which his rowers were enabled to ...
— New York Times Current History: The European War, Vol 2, No. 1, April, 1915 - April-September, 1915 • Various

... require great penetration for Herbert to be instantly convinced that the writer of this vulgar epistle and the owner of the unknown voice were two very different individuals. The note was evidently a trick. A suspicion of ...
— The Heritage of Dedlow Marsh and Other Tales • Bret Harte

... This writer is celebrated for his Sea Stories. They are bound to please and entertain their readers and we urgently ask that boys obtain the complete set of six books. No library ...
— The Lost Trail - I • Edward S. Ellis

... style, diction, phraseology, wording; manner, strain; composition; mode of expression, choice of words; mode of speech, literary power, ready pen, pen of a ready writer; command of language &c. (eloquence) 582; authorship; la morgue litteraire[Fr].. V. express by words &c. 566; write. Phr. le style c'est de l'homme [Fr][Buffon]; "style is the dress ...
— Roget's Thesaurus • Peter Mark Roget

... removing boxing that the portion adjacent to the wood was frequently friable and of poor quality, owing to the fact just stated. It is usual to face or plaster concrete work after removing the boxing. On breakwater work, where the writer was engaged, the wall was faced with cement and flint grit, and this was found to form a particularly hard and lasting protection to the face of ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 643, April 28, 1888 • Various

... The writer, who has humbly undertaken to re-tell an old tale, is neither a De Foe nor an Alcott. She finds she can borrow neither of their pens. Her own, conscious of its inexperience, finds its only relief in the fact that the ...
— A Story of One Short Life, 1783 to 1818 - [Samuel John Mills] • Elisabeth G. Stryker

... Linn—by Jove! you fellows will be in tremendous request. What else? Oh, nothing. There's been a plucky thing done by a servant-girl in rescuing two children from a fire—if there's a little testimonial to her, I'm in with my humble guinea. But there's nothing in the papers—I'm glad I'm not a leader-writer." ...
— Prince Fortunatus • William Black

... knew the Macdonalds," he said—"of them. The uncle was a damn rebellious, canting, planting Scotchman. Horton Pen was the centre of the Separation Movement. We could have hung him if we'd wanted to. The nephew was the writer of an odious blackmailing print. He calumniated all the decent, loyal inhabitants. He was an agent of you pirates, too. We arrested him—got his papers; know all about your relations ...
— Romance • Joseph Conrad and F.M. Hueffer

... with that whale as providential. Was not Saul of Tarsus converted from unbelief by a similar fright? I tell you, the sperm whale will stand no nonsense. I will now refer you to Langsdorff's Voyages for a little circumstance in point, peculiarly interesting to the writer hereof. Langsdorff, you must know by the way, was attached to the Russian Admiral Krusenstern's famous Discovery Expedition in the beginning of the present century. Captain Langsdorff thus begins his seventeenth chapter. By the thirteenth of May our ship ...
— Moby-Dick • Melville

... far as the writer of this book was concerned, Ypres and all that its name implies was now but a memory: I was safely back on the right side of the water once again. My feelings on leaving "Wipers" behind me can best be expressed in the words which a poet of the 55th Division ...
— At Ypres with Best-Dunkley • Thomas Hope Floyd

... them, any feelings, rather than those of respect and honor, for parents thus degraded? Some of these nameless indignities are alluded to in a letter written to me from a slave state, in March, 1833. "In this place," says the writer, "I find a regular and a much frequented slave market, where thousands are yearly sold like cattle to the highest bidder. It is the opinion of gentlemen here, that not far from five hundred thousand ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... regiment had been foremost in the attack, and that the Trocadero, the last resource of the Constitutionalists, had been carried with the loss of but few killed; but, alas! among that few, was Henri! He was shot through the body while leading his men to the assault. He fell instantly dead, and the writer expressed his desire that the sad intelligence should be conveyed as gently as ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, Issue 267, August 4, 1827 • Various

... there came upon him, not suddenly, but very gently and sweetly, as the morning sunlight breaks into a western valley, the broad assurance that he was Robert Burnham's son. Here was the declaration of that fact over the man's own signature. That was enough; there was no need for him to question the writer's sources of knowledge. Robert Burnham had been his ideal of truth and honor; he would have believed his lightest word against the solemn asseveration ...
— Burnham Breaker • Homer Greene

... these two romances form a pair, like twins of opposite sexes. This is a literary vagary to which a writer may for once give way, especially as part of a work in which I am endeavoring to depict every form that can serve as a garb ...
— Poor Relations • Honore de Balzac

... letters. I think I have a better plan. Since you refuse to tell me who wrote it, open it yourself, take this chalk, and copy the contents on the blackboard that we may all enjoy them. And sign the writer's name at the bottom." ...
— The Golden Road • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... writer visited M. D'Arrest, the astronomer, at Copenhagen, in 1872, he was presented by D'Arrest with one of several bricks collected from the ruins of Uraniborg. This was one of his most cherished possessions until, on returning home after a prolonged absence on astronomical work, he found ...
— History of Astronomy • George Forbes

... enemies in line; and then causing his dragoons to wheel round his flanks, the Indians were driven from their covers before they had time to load. One of the most conspicuous of the chiefs who fought in the battle of Miami assured the writer, that the red men could not fight the warriors with "long knives and leather stockings"; meaning the dragoons with their ...
— The Last of the Mohicans • James Fenimore Cooper

... the community; for that would be giving them an importance which they do not deserve. When I hear that the freedom of the will, the hope of a future life, and the existence of God have been overthrown by the arguments of some able writer, I feel a strong desire to read his book; for I expect that he will add to my knowledge and impart greater clearness and distinctness to my views by the argumentative power shown in his writings. But ...
— The Critique of Pure Reason • Immanuel Kant

... kept, apparently for the use of the master. These animals were not reared on the estate, but were purchased; oxen and horses at least were generally castrated. Cato assigns to an estate of 100 -jugera- one, to one of 240 -jugera- three, yoke of oxen; a later writer on agriculture, Saserna, assigns two yoke to the 200 -jugera-. Three asses were, according to Cato's estimate, required for the smaller, and four ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... you were officially canonized. Solon, Pisistratus, or one of the Pisistratidae, determined that you should be, not a vague tradition and wandering songs any longer, but the Bible of the Hellenes. From an obscure writer of the Alexandrian period we get a tale of Pisistratus sending to all the cities of Greece for copies of Homeric poems, paying for them well; collating them, editing them out of a vast confusion; and producing at ...
— The Crest-Wave of Evolution • Kenneth Morris

... "But I have read it all the same, on the piece of blotting-paper that you used to dry what you had written—the sheet of blotting-paper that was put ready on my desk so that if it were found it might seem that I was the writer." ...
— Glyn Severn's Schooldays • George Manville Fenn

... a thorough education," was the answer, "whether or not you ultimately become a writer. This education is indispensable for whatever career you select, and it must not be slipshod or sketchy. You ...
— Martin Eden • Jack London

... have recognised the writer of this, had you seen him on the boulevard this morning. I was a superb dandy, with the poses of a Sybarite and the smiles of a young sultan. I trod as one in the clouds, and looked so benevolently on my fellow ...
— The Cross of Berny • Emile de Girardin

... puzzle over the letter, hoping to discover some hidden meaning; twist the words as he would, they proved nothing for or against the writer. ...
— File No. 113 • Emile Gaboriau

... is left unconditionally to the admiral; and in the same breath he is told that he may do what he likes with it! The phrase points clearly to one of two conclusions. It has either dropped from the writer's pen in pure ignorance, or it has been carefully set where it appears to serve the purpose of a snare. I am firmly persuaded that the latter explanation is the right one. The words are expressly intended to mislead some person—yourself in all probability—and ...
— No Name • Wilkie Collins

... Progress was written while Bunyan was in the Bedford jail, and as the writer says, was written for his own amusement. Christian is Bunyan himself, and the trials and experiences of the former are but the reflections of the temptations and sufferings of the great preacher set forth in wonderfully dramatic and ...
— Journeys Through Bookland - Volume Four • Charles H. Sylvester

... in her choice of work. Daughters as assistants of their fathers. In law. In medicine. As scientific farmers. Preparation for speaking or writing. Steps in the career of a journalist. The editor. The Advertising writer. The illustrator. Designing ...
— Practical Suggestions for Mother and Housewife • Marion Mills Miller

... events, of which we know, for the mere pleasure of giving her pain. We must never forget that human motives are generally far more complicated than we are apt to suppose, and that we can very rarely accurately describe the motives of another. It is much better for the writer, as a rule, to content himself with the bare statement of events; and we shall take this line with regard to the catastrophe recorded above, and shall state the remaining events connected with the general's trouble shortly, because we feel that we have already given to this secondary character ...
— The Idiot • (AKA Feodor Dostoevsky) Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... attention to the error that has been made in this connection by studying the soft structures of the foot separated by ordinary putrefactive changes from the horny covering. "In this way," the writer points out, "a wholly erroneous idea has crept in as to the relation of the one to the other, and the two parts have been treated as two anatomical items, when, indeed, they are portions of one and the same thing. As an illustration, and one very much to the point ...
— Diseases of the Horse's Foot • Harry Caulton Reeks

... facts, and consequently in his reasoning, These he fills up by suppositions, which may be as reasonably denied as granted. A sceptical reader, therefore, like myself, is left in the lurch. I acknowledge, however, he makes more use of fact, than any other writer on a theory of the earth. But I give one answer to all these theorists. That is as follows. They all suppose the earth a created existence. They must suppose a creator then; and that he possessed power and wisdom to a great degree. As he intended the earth ...
— Memoir, Correspondence, And Miscellanies, From The Papers Of Thomas Jefferson - Volume I • Thomas Jefferson

... almost always appropriate and significant, and overlays them with names that are, commonly, neither the one nor the other. The learned societies of the world, the geographical societies, the ethnological societies, have set their faces against this practice these many years past, and to them the writer confidently appeals. ...
— The Ascent of Denali (Mount McKinley) - A Narrative of the First Complete Ascent of the Highest - Peak in North America • Hudson Stuck

... equipage of the famous dwarf of the day, a piece of impertinence I did not mind. A brown coupe, lined with garnet, followed the blue one, and was itself replaced by a dark-green coupe lined with dark blue, for I actually did sport a coach—I, poor newspaper writer holding no Government stock—for five or six years. And my ponies were none the less fat and in good condition though they were fed on literature, had substantives for oats, adjectives for hay, and adverbs for straw. But alas! there came, no one knows very well why, the Revolution ...
— My Private Menagerie - from The Works of Theophile Gautier Volume 19 • Theophile Gautier

... word being spoken, every one knew that it was the best piano-forte in the Exhibition. The jurors were true to their duties. It is possible that some of them had predilections in favor of other makers; it is certain that one of them had,—the writer of the present notice. But when the time for the award came, there was no argument, no discussion, no bare presentment of minor claims; nothing, in fact, but a hearty indorsement of the singular merits ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 20, No. 117, July, 1867. • Various

... invited from all on every subject but the wind. Anything from light doggerel to heavy blank verse was welcomed, and original articles, letters to the Editor, plays, reviews on books and serial stories were accepted within the limits of our supply of foolscap paper and type-writer ribbons. ...
— The Home of the Blizzard • Douglas Mawson

... was "Nymphlidae," which the writer of the article declared was the largest family of all; and included the commonest of the gaily colored butterflies one saw flying about every day. Arethusa took a deep personal interest in this family, because of its name. She was well acquainted with nymphs, and knew ...
— The Heart of Arethusa • Francis Barton Fox

... that I have shrunk from putting them into a more formal dress, believing that here, as in the best letters, the personal element is bound up with what is most fresh and living in the comment, most characteristic of the writer, and most delightful both to those who knew him and to those who will wish they had. I have, therefore, only altered a word here and there, and added a note or two of my own (always in square brackets), where it seemed necessary for the sake ...
— Cyropaedia - The Education Of Cyrus • Xenophon

... library is complete unless it contains all of the books by that charming, delightful writer of boys' stories ...
— Boy Scouts in the Philippines - Or, The Key to the Treaty Box • G. Harvey Ralphson

... legal enactments, the state of the insane in Scotland, at this time, outside the asylums was as bad as it could be, and even in some asylums it was deplorable. At this period a well-known American lady, Miss Dix, who devoted her life to the interests of the insane, visited Scotland, and the writer had the opportunity of hearing from her own lips, on her return from her philanthropic expedition, the narration of what she saw of the cruel neglect of the pauper lunatics in that country. She caused so much sensation by her visits and her remonstrances, accompanied ...
— Chapters in the History of the Insane in the British Isles • Daniel Hack Tuke

... book, addressed to mankind, without insulting their weakness, or flattering their passions! a book, whose great object was to benefit the world, without seeking from it any kind of reward! a book, in which the genuine modesty of the Writer is equal to his unexampled beneficence! The mind of Howard was singularly and sublimely free from the common and dangerous passion for applause: that passion which, though taken altogether, it is certainly beneficial to the interests ...
— The Eulogies of Howard • William Hayley

... (1620-1678). An eminent English patriot and satirist. As a writer he is chiefly known by his "Rehearsal Transposed," written in answer to a fanatical defender of absolute power. When a young man he was assistant to the poet Milton, who was then Latin secretary to Oliver Cromwell. Marvell's wit and distinguished abilities rendered ...
— Essays • Ralph Waldo Emerson



Words linked to "Writer" :   Aleksey Maksimovich Peshkov, cyberpunk, Anthony Trollope, word-painter, abstracter, Dutch Leonard, Georges Simenon, Baronne Anne Louise Germaine Necker de Steal-Holstein, Alfred Damon Runyon, Edith Newbold Jones Wharton, film writer, Alan Stewart Paton, polemist, crane, Guy de Maupassant, Clarence Day, Franz Werfel, du Maurier, Andre Maurois, George Louis Palmella Busson du Maurier, Dostoyevsky, hall, Feodor Dostoevsky, forester, haggard, compiler, Burnett, Francis Richard Stockton, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Blixen, George Sand, Eleanor Roosevelt, Cather, Edgard Lawrence Doctorow, Churchill, Defoe, Aleksey Maximovich Peshkov, gagwriter, Benjamin Franklin Norris Jr., Conrad Potter Aiken, De Quincey, ghostwriter, D. H. Lawrence, Carson Smith McCullers, burgess, gagman, framer, joint author, Edward Estlin Cummings, tragedian, Christopher Isherwood, Anne Bronte, Charles Lutwidge Dodgson, Currer Bell, Grimm, Elizabeth Haldane, Andre Malraux, writer's cramp, Asch, lyrist, Alan Alexander Milne, Beckett, Clarence Shepard Day Jr., C. S. Forester, Alfred de Musset, Ambrose Bierce, biographer, chandler, librettist, Ezra Pound, Bronte, wordsmith, Gardner, Gothic romancer, Francois de La Rochefoucauld, Alice B. Toklas, Erle Stanley Gardner, communicator, Benet, Fourth Earl of Orford, E. B. White, litterateur, Elizabeth Sanderson Haldane, Baraka, journalist, Alex Haley, collins, Dumas, Baroness Dudevant, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Ehrenberg, poetizer, Ernst Theodor Wilhelm Hoffmann, Frank Harris, Ambrose Gwinett Bierce, Baroness Karen Blixen, Franz Kafka, paragrapher, Ernest Hemingway, Eudora Welty, Eliot, authoress, reviewer, Conrad Aiken, Eric Arthur Blair, Frank Stockton, Gunter Grass, Gore Vidal, Gombrowicz, coauthor, e. e. cummings, George du Maurier, Cervantes Saavedra, gagster, playwright, Amandine Aurore Lucie Dupin, Fyodor Dostoyevsky, Ferber, Francois Rene Chateaubriand, commentator, A.E., Hamsun, Gertrude Stein, George William Russell, DuBois Heyward, drafter, Aleksandr I. Solzhenitsyn, Feodor Dostoyevsky, Auchincloss, Donald Barthelme, Charlotte Bronte, Edward George Earle Bulwer-Lytton, hack writer, Elmore Leonard, pamphleteer, Ahmed Salman Rushdie, Anthony Burgess, Anderson, Andersen, Boswell, Eric Blair, Alexander Isayevich Solzhenitsyn, Dreiser, Emily Post, Ellen Price Wood, Camus, bellow, Frank Morrison Spillane, goldsmith, Dorothy Sayers, Emily Price Post, Calvino, Bret Harte, Dame Jean Iris Murdoch, Agatha Christie, Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald, Elwyn Brooks White, Golding, Capek, Elie Wiesel, Dashiell Hammett, Chopin, Clive Staples Lewis, Cervantes, Gibran, dickens, First Baron Lytton, Goncourt, Doctorow, Burroughs, George Bernard Shaw, Bulwer-Lytton, butler, Cicily Isabel Fairfield, buck, Gjellerup, Erskine Caldwell, Charles Dickens, versifier, scenarist, Beerbohm, Asimov, Gaskell, Edward Everett Hale, Abraham Stoker, A. A. Milne, G. K. Chesterton, Dr. Seuss, de Sade, David John Moore Cornwell, Graham Greene, Edith Wharton, Daphne du Maurier, Evelyn Arthur Saint John Waugh, Aiken, Beauvoir, Grahame, Gustave Flaubert, Ayn Rand, Borges, E. L. Doctorow, Artemus Ward, Gide, essayist, Emily Jane Bronte, Anna Eleanor Roosevelt, Frances Hodgson Burnett, Elizabeth Gaskell, cummings, Colette, ford, dramatist, Beatrice Webb, Benchley, Comte Donatien Alphonse Francois de Sade, Dame Daphne du Maurier, Elizabeth Cleghorn Stevenson Gaskell, Ben Hecht, Edwin DuBois Hayward, Christie, Aragon, letter writer, Boyle, ghost, Alexis Charles Henri Maurice de Tocqueville, C. S. Lewis, alliterator, Edmond de Goncourt, Carl Clinton Van Doren, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, Francois-Marie Arouet, Conrad, Bram Stoker, Gogol, George Orwell, Carlos Fuentes, George Eliot, Dos Passos, Graves, Benjamin Franklin, hale, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Charles John Huffam Dickens, Farrell, Alfred Edward Woodley Mason, writer's block, Gaius Plinius Secundus, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, Flannery O'Connor, Fyodor Dostoevsky, G. B. Shaw, Carl Sandburg, rhymester, Ford Hermann Hueffer, Clarence Malcolm Lowry, Browne, writer's name, Eugene Sue, Carroll, abstractor, Arthur Koestler, Charles Percy Snow, Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson, Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Eugene Luther Vidal, Doris Lessing, Cheever, Chloe Anthony Wofford, Aldous Leonard Huxley, H. H. Munro, Francois Mauriac, A. E. W. Mason, rhymer, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoyevsky, Dame Muriel Spark, Dostoevski, Edna Ferber, Count Lev Nikolayevitch Tolstoy, Erskine Preston Caldwell, lyricist, Chateaubriand, Andre Gide, wordmonger, Ernst Theodor Amadeus Hoffmann, day, space writer, folk writer, Baum, Austen, novelist, poetiser, sports writer, Emerson, polemic, Feodor Dostoevski, Baldwin, Georges Joseph Christian Simenon, franklin, Edna O'Brien, Galsworthy, Dorothy Parker, Albert Camus, Arna Wendell Bontemps, Alessandro Manzoni, Cecil Scott Forester, hack, Dame Rebecca West, E. T. A. Hoffmann, Gilbert Keith Chesterton, Elias Canetti, Hammett, Alexandre Dumas, Canetti, Dorothy Rothschild Parker, scriptwriter, Barth, Algren, Barthelme, Conan Doyle, cooper, Dinesen, Fuentes, Caldwell, Ezra Loomis Pound, Boell, Feodor Mikhailovich Dostoevski, grey, Greene, Fyodor Dostoevski, Dr. Johnson, Fitzgerald, Edmond Hoyle, Aldous Huxley, Haldane, Frank Norris, Damon Runyon, Ellison, Chesterton, Carson McCullers



Copyright © 2020 Diccionario ingles.com