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Anthropologist   /ˌænθrəpˈɑlədʒəst/  /ˌænθrəpˈɑlədʒɪst/   Listen
Anthropologist

noun
1.
A social scientist who specializes in anthropology.



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"Anthropologist" Quotes from Famous Books



... pleasure to his pages. Though he lacked the large grasp, the fertile suggestiveness, of great scientific travellers like Humboldt, Darwin, and Alfred Russel Wallace, he was curious, well informed, industrious, and sympathetic; and as he was the first trained anthropologist to enter into personal relations with the Tasmanian blacks—a race now become extinct under the shrivelling touch of European civilisation—his writings concerning them have great value, quite apart from the pleasure with which they may be ...
— Terre Napoleon - A history of French explorations and projects in Australia • Ernest Scott

... once for all, that racial inferiority is not the cause of anti-Negro prejudice. Boaz, the anthropologist, says, "An unbiased estimate of the anthropological evidence so far brought forward does not permit us to countenance the belief in a racial inferiority which would unfit an individual of the Negro race to take his part in modern civilization. We do not know of any demand made ...
— The Negro • W.E.B. Du Bois

... the matter differently, psychology has shown what happens in the brain when a man falls in love, and anthropology has traced marriage to a care for property rights, are we to suspect the idyllic in literature wherever we find it? Life is full of the idyllic; and no anthropologist will ever persuade the reasonably romantic youth that the sweet and chivalrous passion which leads him to mingle reverence with desire for the object of his affections, is nothing but an idealized property sense. Origins explain very little, after all. The bilious ...
— Definitions • Henry Seidel Canby

... Virchow established what Lord Lister describes as "the true and fertile doctrine that every morbid structure consists of cells which have been derived from pre-existing cells as a progeny." Virchow was not only distinguished as a pathologist, he also gained considerable fame as an archaeologist and anthropologist. During the wars of 1866 and 1870-71, he equipped and drilled hospital corps and ambulance squads, and superintended hospital trains and the Berlin military hospital. War over, he directed his attention to sanitation and the sewage problems of Berlin. Virchow was ...
— The World's Greatest Books - Volume 15 - Science • Various

... published by the Anthropologist Daniel G. Brinton in 1883, is a work that is particularly appropriate for our own times. The native American movement has stressed the need for history written from the Indian point of view. Interest in native American ...
— Aboriginal American Authors • Daniel G. Brinton

... question for fuller treatment elsewhere. Here is in brief my thought as a socialist and as a criminal anthropologist. ...
— Socialism and Modern Science (Darwin, Spencer, Marx) • Enrico Ferri

... obviously slumming here in the Old Quarter, made his way over to the table. His body scales were a glossy dark green and he wore glittering, be-jeweled straps across his chest and an equally glittering, be-jeweled weapons belt. Aside from these, in the approved Irwadian fashion, he was quite naked. An anthropologist friend had once told Ramsey that once the Irwadians had worn clothing, but since the coming in great number of the outworlders they had stripped down, as though to prove how tough they were in being ...
— Equation of Doom • Gerald Vance

... made by the unscholarly anthropologist alone. Curtius has especially remarked the difficulties which beset the 'etymological operation' in the case of proper names. 'Peculiarly dubious and perilous is mythological etymology. Are we to seek the sources of the divine names in aspects of nature, or in moral conceptions; ...
— Custom and Myth • Andrew Lang

... received the Mid[-e]wiwin from Kitshi Manid[-o], but it is believed that the word is a synonym or a substitute based upon some reason to them inexplicable. These figures were obtained in 1887, and a brief explanation of them given in the American Anthropologist.[14] At that time I could obtain but little direct information from the owners of the records, but it has since been ascertained that both are mnemonic songs pertaining to Minab[-o]zho, or rather Eshgib[-o]ga, and do not form a part of the sacred records ...
— Seventh Annual Report • Various

... comparative mythology has shown a close and suggestive relationship between creeds and symbols that were once believed to have nothing in common. But beyond these fields of research there is at least one other that has hitherto been denied the attention it richly deserves. When the anthropologist has described those conditions of primitive culture amid which he believes religious ideas took their origin, and the comparative mythologist has shown us the similarities and inter-relations of widely separated creeds, religious beliefs have yet to submit to the test of a scientific ...
— Religion & Sex - Studies in the Pathology of Religious Development • Chapman Cohen

... thought that I have been allowed to see what no other foreigner has been privileged to see—the interior of Japan's most ancient shrine, and those sacred utensils and quaint rites of primitive worship so well worthy the study of the anthropologist and the evolutionist. ...
— Glimpses of an Unfamiliar Japan - First Series • Lafcadio Hearn

... to be baffled by the natives lying and misleading us wherever they can. They fear us very, greatly, and with a terror that would gratify an anthropologist's heart. Their unfriendliness is made more trying by our being totally unable to observe for our position. It is either densely clouded, or continually raining day and night. The country is covered with brackens, and rivulets occur at least one every ...
— The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume II (of 2), 1869-1873 • David Livingstone

... Augustus himself summon the poor man of Fiesole who has a family of eight children, thirty-six grandchildren and eighteen great grandchildren, and organize in his honour a fete in the Capitol, accompanied by a great deal of publicity? Does not Tacitus, half-anthropologist and half-Rousseau, describing the noble savage with his eye on fellow citizens, remark that among the Germans it is accounted a shameful thing to limit the number of your children? The long duration of Augustus's legislation ...
— Medieval People • Eileen Edna Power

... All-Around-this-Pretty-Little-Maid. These are merely the ones that have seemed favorites and by no means exhaust the list of love games that I have seen used. Out of eighty-three games of Washington (D. C.) children reported in the American Anthropologist, by W. H. Babcock,[9] as many as thirty are love games. In this, as in the previous stage, the embrace is the most important love expression and stimulus. But in this stage it takes on disguised forms or is excused by the ...
— A Preliminary Study of the Emotion of Love between the Sexes • Sanford Bell

... Race had a 'Sound Language,' to wit, chant-like sounds composed of vowels alone." From this developed "monosyllabic speech which was the vowel parent, so to speak, of the monosyllabic languages mixed with hard consonants still in use among the yellow races which are known to the anthropologist. The linguistic characteristics developed into the agglutinative languages.... The inflectional speech, the root of the Sanskrit, was the first language (now the mystery tongue of the Initiates) ...
— AE in the Irish Theosophist • George William Russell

... ("Science Progress", New Series, Vol. I. 1897. "A Remarkable Anticipation of Modern Views on Evolution". See also Chap. VI. in "Essays on Evolution", Oxford, 1908.) has shown that the anthropologist James Cowles Prichard (1786-1848) must be included, even in spite of himself, among the precursors of Darwin. In some passages of the second edition of his "Researches into the Physical History of Mankind" (1826), he certainly ...
— Darwin and Modern Science • A.C. Seward and Others

... infinite variety that it is impossible ever to classify types. Therefore, they mourn, the vocational expert cannot judge of aptitudes except by trial in various kinds of work until, finally, real native talents appear in actual accomplishment. The anthropologist, however, easily divides mankind by means of several broad classifications, A few distinct variations, easily recognizable by the anthropological expert, put every one of the billion and one-half people on the face of the earth ...
— Analyzing Character • Katherine M. H. Blackford and Arthur Newcomb

... are susceptible, in various degrees, of feeling such influences without any previous somnolizing. Nearly all the inhabitants of the torrid zone are subject to such influences in their habitual condition, and actually require no medicine, because their treatment by the hand of an enlightened anthropologist familiar with therapeutic sarcognomy will control all their diseases. The greatest triumphs of sarcognomy are yet to be realized in ...
— Buchanan's Journal of Man, June 1887 - Volume 1, Number 5 • Various

... His trained anthropologist's mind speculated avidly over the little they had gotten from the younger of the two men found nearly a week before, nearly frozen and half-starved. The older man had succumbed almost at once; the other, in the most primitive sign language, had indicated ...
— The Last Supper • T. D. Hamm

... The anthropologist and historian of to-day realize much more clearly than their predecessors of a couple of generations back how artificial most great nationalities are, and how loose is the terminology usually employed to describe them. There is an element of unconscious ...
— African and European Addresses • Theodore Roosevelt

... anthropologist was questioning a Bakairi Indian of Brazil as to the language of his tribe, he gave the sentence, "Every man must die" to be translated into the Bakairi language. To his astonishment, the Indian remained long silent. ...
— The Belief in Immortality and the Worship of the Dead, Volume I (of 3) • Sir James George Frazer

... you would moralise on my discontent, but I know I have seen a little of men and things from behind this ambuscade—only a truly artistic man would fall into the sympathetic attitude that attracted me. My life has had even too much of observation in it, and to the systematic anthropologist, nothing tells a man's character more than his pose after dark, when nobody seems watching. As you sit, the black outline of you is clear against the sky. Ah! now you are sitting stiffer. But you are no Calvinist. My friend, the best of life is its delights, and the best ...
— Select Conversations with an Uncle • H. G. Wells



Words linked to "Anthropologist" :   Ashley Montagu, Sir James George Frazer, Margaret Mead, ethnologist, benedict, Alfred Kroeber, Richard Erskine Leakey, Kroeber, mead, Ruth Benedict, Daniel Garrison Brinton, Levi-Strauss, Broca, archaeologist, Louis Leakey, Pierre-Paul Broca, Mary Douglas Leakey, Frazer, Mary Leakey, Heyerdahl, Alfred Louis Kroeber, Edward Sapir, Brinton, Lewis Henry Morgan, Morgan, archeologist, Malinowski, James George Frazer, Bronislaw Malinowski, Louis Seymour Bazett Leakey, Bronislaw Kasper Malinowski, Ruth Fulton, Leakey, social scientist, ethnographer, Richard Leakey, anthropology, Claude Levi-Strauss, Sapir, Thor Hyerdahl, Montagu



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