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Do   /du/   Listen
Do

verb
(past did; past part. done; pres. part. doing)
1.
Engage in.  Synonym: make.  "Make an effort" , "Do research" , "Do nothing" , "Make revolution"
2.
Carry out or perform an action.  Synonyms: execute, perform.  "The skater executed a triple pirouette" , "She did a little dance"
3.
Get (something) done.  Synonym: perform.
4.
Proceed or get along.  Synonyms: come, fare, get along, make out.  "How are you making out in graduate school?" , "He's come a long way"
5.
Give rise to; cause to happen or occur, not always intentionally.  Synonyms: cause, make.  "Make a stir" , "Cause an accident"
6.
Carry out or practice; as of jobs and professions.  Synonyms: exercise, practice, practise.
7.
Be sufficient; be adequate, either in quality or quantity.  Synonyms: answer, serve, suffice.  "This car suits my purpose well" , "Will $100 do?" , "A 'B' grade doesn't suffice to get me into medical school" , "Nothing else will serve"
8.
Create or design, often in a certain way.  Synonym: make.  "I did this piece in wood to express my love for the forest"
9.
Behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself.  Synonyms: act, behave.  "Don't behave like a fool" , "What makes her do this way?" , "The dog acts ferocious, but he is really afraid of people"
10.
Spend time in prison or in a labor camp.  Synonym: serve.
11.
Carry on or function.  Synonym: manage.
12.
Arrange attractively.  Synonyms: arrange, coif, coiffe, coiffure, dress, set.
13.
Travel or traverse (a distance).  "We did 6 miles on our hike every day"



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"Do" Quotes from Famous Books



... cranky notions about a platform scare you," he mumbled in the Senator's ear. "You know Vard Waymouth as well as I do. He's safe and all right. Give him his head. You don't ...
— The Ramrodders - A Novel • Holman Day

... fruits is a matter of considerable importance, for on it the food value of the fruits depends. To a certain extent, the composition of all fruits is the same, but the varieties of this food differ in their food values almost as greatly as do vegetables. Many of them are extremely low in this respect, while a few of them are rather high. In order to determine the place that fruit should have in a meal, it is necessary to obtain a definite idea of the composition as well ...
— Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 5 • Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences

... "Do you know," said Mrs. Trent to her husband, "I have found out that she always carries that letter in her breast? I see her put her hand to it in the strangest way ...
— "Le Monsieur De La Petite Dame" • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... descent upon it, and a ready conveyance for those gross commodities, which {xiii} are the chief staple of North America, from the most remote places of the continent above mentioned: and as for lighter European goods, they are more easily carried by land, as our Indian traders do, over great part of the continent, on their horses, of which this country ...
— History of Louisisana • Le Page Du Pratz

... 11,357 What price do you pay for fish to the neutral man who brings them to you in that way?-It is not always the same; sometimes it is more and ...
— Second Shetland Truck System Report • William Guthrie

... aroused that the Japanese Government promised to institute an enquiry and place the guilty on trial. Ito was then Prime Minister and declared that every unworthy son of Japan connected with the crime would be placed on trial. "Not to do so would be to condemn Japan in the eyes of all the world," he declared. "If she does not repudiate this usurpation on the part of the Tai Won Run, she must lose the respect of every civilized government on earth." Miura and his associates were, in due course, brought before a court ...
— Korea's Fight for Freedom • F.A. McKenzie

... evident advantage to be derived from coasting the southern part of that portion of land called in the chart “North Somerset,” as far as it might lead to the westward; which, from our former knowledge, we had reason to suppose it would do as far at least as the longitude of 95°, in the parallel of about 72°. After sailing about eight miles, we were stopped by a body of close ice lying between us and a space of open water beyond. By way of occupying the time in further examination of the state of the ice, we ...
— Journal of the Third Voyage for the Discovery of a North-West Passage • William Edward Parry

... who took me for a spirit up aloft there in the moonlight and spread the alarm. The first white man they brought me was a wretched drunkard known to the boys as 'Old Fusil,' or 'Fusel Oil,' who went into delirium tremens at the sight of me. Well, who do you suppose he turned out to be? Flint! Flint played out and ruined! Cast off and discarded by his relations in New York—the foundation of whose fortunes he had laid by the villainy they had accepted and condoned. For Flint, as the carpenter of the old homestead, had discovered the existence ...
— Sally Dows and Other Stories • Bret Harte

... unemployment and underemployment; more than two-thirds of the labor force do not ...
— The 2001 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... you what I'll do," said Harry, stopping the horse: "If each of you gives me a kiss, of her own good will, I'll promise not to tell. Are you on? Say the word, for I'll only give you one ...
— Such is Life • Joseph Furphy

... "I do not know when that will be," replied Mad. de Coulanges, in a sick voice: "I was never so ill in my life—and so the physician says. But I am revived by seeing Lady Littleton—she is, and ever has been, all goodness and politeness ...
— Tales and Novels, Vol. 6 • Maria Edgeworth

... Peace. Be careful what you say. Let me tell you, wife, that you do not know of whom you are speaking when you speak of him! He is a man of more importance than you can imagine, a nobleman who is held in great honour at court, and who speaks to the king just as I speak to you. Is it not a thing which does me great ...
— The Shopkeeper Turned Gentleman - (Le Bourgeois Gentilhomme) • Moliere (Poquelin)

... holiness commanded, not perhaps as it was worthy to be done, yet as well as was possible considering the time in which we live. So great evil everywhere struts about among us that it was scarcely possible to do the little that has been done. We have sent only a few grains of seed,[951] as you see, to sow at least a small part of that field into which the true Isaac once went out to meditate, when Rebekah was first brought to him by Abraham's servant, ...
— St. Bernard of Clairvaux's Life of St. Malachy of Armagh • H. J. Lawlor

... what do you quench your thirst?" ejaculated the disappointed priest. "Lake water?" Then he added ...
— Carmen Ariza • Charles Francis Stocking

... better. But it must also be considered that if the enemy enjoy Maluco in quiet, their profits and gains would be very great; and I think they could consequently succeed in whatever plan they wished, and whatever they did would result well. But because they do not possess it, there is war—in which he will prevail and succeed better who has more tenacity and force, especially on the sea. He who will remain lord of them will be lord of many profits and riches, which can be taken from these districts. Inasmuch as this is a matter that demands ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 • Emma Helen Blair

... judge in formal speech, "would tend to incriminate you, then you are acting within your constitutional rights in refusing to answer. If not, then you can be lodged in jail for contempt of court, and held there until you answer the question which the prosecuting attorney has asked you. Do you understand this?" ...
— The Bondboy • George W. (George Washington) Ogden

... exclaimed; "I never supposed for a single instant that you could equal Alice, or do, in all your life, the good that she does in one day; but if you showed her confidence and kindness,—if you treated her as ...
— Ellen Middleton—A Tale • Georgiana Fullerton

... them endued with life, sensation, and a capacity of moving; but he has joined to these powers of living existence uncomeliness, want of strength, want of distinction, the characteristics of a dead carcass. This is what the mind is apt to do: it is very apt to confound the ideas of the surviving soul and the dead body. The vulgar have always and still do confound these very irreconcilable ideas. They lay the scene of apparitions in churchyards; they habit the ghost in ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. VII. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... mustard do not appear to be aware that mustard seed alone cannot produce, when ground, a powder of so intense and brilliant a colour as that of the common mustard of commerce. Nor would the powder of real mustard, when mixed with ...
— A Treatise on Adulterations of Food, and Culinary Poisons • Fredrick Accum

... then became the property of "Marse Henry" (Henry James), owning large estates and about thirty slaves near Charleston. On account of having raised "Marse Henry," Jim was a special favorite with his master, and was allowed to do as he chose. His second master, Henry, died in 1815, about 55 years of age, and Jim, now at 63 years of age, became the property of James James, Henry's second son. In 1833 the railroad from Charleston to Savannah was completed, then the longest ...
— Buchanan's Journal of Man, September 1887 - Volume 1, Number 8 • Various

... for Italy Goethe had provided him with a letter of introduction to Lord Byron, who was then staying at Venice, but Schopenhauer never made use of the letter; he said that he hadn't the courage to present himself. "Do you know," he says in a letter, "three great pessimists were in Italy at the same time—Byron, Leopardi, and myself! And yet not one of us has made the acquaintance of the other." He remained in Italy until June 1819, when he proceeded to Milan, where he ...
— Essays of Schopenhauer • Arthur Schopenhauer

... cross bedding" has been given. Thus in the section (Figure 3) we see seven or eight large beds of loose sand, yellow and brown, and the lines a, b, c mark some of the principal planes of stratification, which are nearly horizontal. But the greater part of the subordinate laminae do not conform to these planes, but have often a steep slope, the inclination being sometimes towards opposite points of the compass. When the sand is loose and incoherent, as in the case here represented, the deviation from parallelism ...
— The Student's Elements of Geology • Sir Charles Lyell

... are repeated, not in stucco, but in purest marble, while the entrance to the "holy of holies" is probably the most glorious piece of mosaic in the world. The pavement of the interior is deeply worn by the knees of the Moslem pilgrims, who compassed it seven times, kneeling, as they now do in the Kaaba, at Mecca. The sides are embroidered with sentences from the Koran, in Cufic characters, and the roof is in the form of a fluted shell, of a single piece of pure white marble, fifteen ...
— The Lands of the Saracen - Pictures of Palestine, Asia Minor, Sicily, and Spain • Bayard Taylor

... the steamboat wharf. My Bucksport dory has just been pulled up on the ledges and painted. You'll need another boat besides, so I've arranged with Sammy Stinson to let you have his pea-pod. She'll do to lobster in. Now as to gear. You'll find over a hundred lobster-traps piled up on the sea-wall near my cabin, and there's six tubs of trawl in the fish-shed. Keep an account of whatever stuff you have to buy for repairs, and we can settle at ...
— Jim Spurling, Fisherman - or Making Good • Albert Walter Tolman

... fellow who brings you your breeches and rides your second horse." Mr. Pepper never had a second horse, or a man of his own to bring him his breeches, but the allusion did not on that account vex him. "And then you can do what you like a great deal more than you can in ...
— Ralph the Heir • Anthony Trollope

... a nice little anecdote connected with the sign of the Queen's Head at Epsom,[9] which the editor of this volume would do well to insert in his next impression. The above sign, (the original; for we fear the board has been repainted,) was executed by Harlow, the artist of the celebrated picture of the Trial of Queen Katherine, or the Kemble Family. The painter, it will be remembered, was a pupil of the late ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 19, Issue 550, June 2, 1832 • Various

... their ultimate purpose, the best that might even then have been devised, for Moses had to work, as all great constructive statesmen have to work, with the tools that came to his hand, and upon materials as he found them. Still less do I mean to say that forms suitable for that time and people are suitable for every time and people. I ask, not veneration of the form, but recognition of ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 3 of 8 • Various

... to do," began Raissa: "the doctor has prescribed something for father, and I must go to the apothecary's'; and our serf" (Latkin had still one serf left) "has brought us some wood from the village, and also a goose. But the landlord has taken it away. 'You are ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Vol. XVII. No. 101. May, 1876. • Various

... celestials having heard of the prowess of Skanda, all said to Vasava, "O Sakra, do thou kill Skanda without delay for his prowess is unbearable. And if thou dost not exterminate him, he will conquer the three worlds with ourselves, and overpowering thee, will himself become the mighty lord of the ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 2 • Translated by Kisari Mohan Ganguli

... termed old-fashioned) in his character and conduct, and that, without presenting anything in either which distinctly calls for reprobation, he is often very unlike other young gentlemen of his age and social position." Now, Dombey,' said Miss Blimber, laying down the paper, 'do you understand that?' ...
— Dombey and Son • Charles Dickens

... so he came. From prairie cabin up to Capitol, One fair ideal led our chieftain on. Forevermore he burned to do his deed With the fine stroke and gesture of a king. He built the rail pile as he built the State, Pouring his splendid strength through every blow, The conscience of him testing every stroke, To make his deed ...
— The Poets' Lincoln - Tributes in Verse to the Martyred President • Various

... produced or attended by painful or pleasurable sensation. The secondary links of the first ten species are attended with increased motions without inflammation, those of the remainder are attended with inflammation. All inflammations, which do not arise in the part which was previously torpid, belong to this genus; as the gout, rheumatism, erysipelas. It is probable many other inflammations may, by future observation, require to be transplanted into ...
— Zoonomia, Vol. II - Or, the Laws of Organic Life • Erasmus Darwin

... good many hours before long, at this rate. Silly fellow! That's not the way to do well at an exam! I must counsel him for his soul's good, I must, indeed. Will he dine ...
— The Crown of Life • George Gissing

... the table, sparkling, too joyous even to attempt her soup, had sung out, "I'm proud of you, rascal! You're a wonder, you are! Listen, people, little sister here is going to do something splendid one of these ...
— The Fifth Wheel - A Novel • Olive Higgins Prouty

... Teuton with the Slav; and in German military circles there was undoubtedly a conviction that the epic conflict had best come sooner and not later. How long this idea has influenced German policy we do not pretend to say. But it has certainly contributed to her unenviable prominence in the 'race of armaments' which all thinking men have condemned as an insupportable, tax upon Western civilization, ...
— Why We Are At War (2nd Edition, revised) • Members of the Oxford Faculty of Modern History

... this afternoon. That statue can never be replaced, and you have destroyed one of my most valuable possessions. Let it be a warning for the future. If ever you break anything again, I shall punish you most severely. Do you understand?" ...
— Probable Sons • Amy Le Feuvre

... must fight, my lord, if you must ruin Monsieur de la Foret and a poor Huguenot girl, do it by greater means than this. You have power, you say. Use it then; destroy us, if you will. Send us to the Medici: bring us to the block, murder us—that were no new thing to Lord Leicester. But do not stoop ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... of my own to support these hard times, I'd do it for nothing," he assured me, over and over; "but I'll do it for half price. My time, you know, is all the money I have, and one must look out ...
— Medoline Selwyn's Work • Mrs. J. J. Colter

... Christian also— In this do Patrick and myself agree, And differ, being Christians both, And yet as opposite as good from evil. But for the faith which I sincerely hold (So greatly do I estimate its worth), I would lay down a hundred thousand lives— Bear witness, ...
— Purgatory • Mary Anne Madden Sadlier

... to despise a comic song, but there are instances where a good specimen has helped to make history, or has added a popular phrase to our language. An instance of the latter is MacDermott's 'Jingo' song 'We don't want to fight but by Jingo if we do.' An illustration of the former comes from the coal strike of March, 1912, during which period the price of that commodity only once passed the figure it reached in 1875, as we gather from the old song 'Look at ...
— Charles Dickens and Music • James T. Lightwood

... earning their daily bread. There was a tired hopelessness about them, such as was never seen among the early mill-girls. Yet they have more leisure, and earn more money than the operatives of fifty years ago, but they do not know how to improve the one or use the other. These American-born children of foreign parentage are, indeed, under the control neither of their church nor their parents, and they, consequently, adopt the vices and follies instead ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 481, March 21, 1885 • Various

... "Do not grieve for her! Who knows, but she may have found the joy she sought? Love and patience are all that make for happiness in this world; or in the world of the past or of the future; of the living or the dead. She dreamed ...
— The Jewel of Seven Stars • Bram Stoker

... it as the first indication that a woman is really interested; when you want to get rid of a man, treat him systematically as you treat everybody, and he will be wounded at your indifference and go away." But Giovanni did not go, and Corona began to wonder whether she ought not to do something to break the interest she felt ...
— Saracinesca • F. Marion Crawford

... requested, after thanking him. He hoped that she was not going to interrogate the Italian in his presence. Surely she would be incapable of such clumsiness! Still, women without imagination—and the majority of women were without imagination—did do the most astounding things. ...
— The Pretty Lady • Arnold E. Bennett

... the centre of the stage, so that now important business is often done far from the footlights. This tendency has led to further innovations. Actors now frequently turn their backs to the audience,—a thing unheard of before the advent of the Drama of Illusion; and frequently, also, they do their most effective work at moments when they have no ...
— The Theory of the Theatre • Clayton Hamilton

... friend, If my rhymes did offend, Your pardon, a thousand times o'er; From friendship I strove, Your pangs to remove, But, I swear, I will do ...
— Byron's Poetical Works, Vol. 1 • Byron

... "I have charge of the buying for the school and our tenants this year and I naturally want to do the best possible. I thought I'd come over and see about getting ...
— The Quest of the Silver Fleece - A Novel • W. E. B. Du Bois

... defect above alluded to, it is advisable to add glycerine to the washing water after the image is cleared. Some operators recommend a coating of flexible collodion, that is, prepared with castor oil, for the purpose in question. We do not think that necessary when the transparencies are not exposed to sunshine. If anything should be applied ...
— Photographic Reproduction Processes • P.C. Duchochois

... alighted from his elephant and kissing the earth before him, sought of him leave to challenge the foe to combat singular. Then he mounted his elephant and driving into mid-field, cried out, 'Who is for duello, who is for derring do, who is for knightly devoir?' When King Teghmus heard this, he said to his troops, 'Which of you will do single battle with this sworder?' And behold, a cavalier came out from the ranks, mounted on a charger, mighty of make, and driving up to the King kissed ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... Semitic control is another matter. The time has come for every Briton to ask himself whether he seriously desires to see the traditions of his country, those great traditions of honour, integrity, and justice which have made the name of England great, replaced by Oriental standards. I do not say that there are no honourable and upright Jews, but I do maintain that the spirit of fair play which is the essence of the British character is not the characteristic of the Jewish race in general. The complete absence of this spirit shown in the attempts of agitators to suppress free ...
— Secret Societies And Subversive Movements • Nesta H. Webster

... your brother? Why do you judge your brother? Why do you set at nought your brother? Inasmuch as you do it unto the least of these, you do it ...
— What Necessity Knows • Lily Dougall

... didn't know of anybody to go but just you and me, and I noticed that you hadn't any flowers started for decorations the way you always do." ...
— Hillsboro People • Dorothy Canfield

... to whom the crown was offered, reigned for ten years as Frederic I. Though his coronation oath bound him to do nothing against the church, he had only been king for three years before he came out openly for the Reformation. In this again we must see primarily a policy, rather than a conviction. He was supported, however, by the common people, ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith

... bundle of bombazine—this precious friend of yours—well and sound? Will you, I say, be satisfied with seeing him in perfect safety without attempting to speak to or converse with him?' Darsie signified his assent. 'Take hold of my arm, then,' said Redgauntlet; 'and do you, niece Lilias, take the other; and beware; Sir Arthur, ...
— Redgauntlet • Sir Walter Scott

... the haunted chamber out of my head, until, when I recalled it in all its vividness, I simply could not speak of it? It was all like a swift, bad dream, the telling of which might revive the unpleasant sensation it created in passing. I do not pretend to explain a child's reserve on subjects which have gone very far into the deeps of a consciousness that never lets them go. Perhaps the solution is partly in the poverty of a vocabulary which lags ...
— When Grandmamma Was New - The Story of a Virginia Childhood • Marion Harland

... rate of 6 per cent. in half-yearly instalments, the extra 1 per cent. being by way of gradual repayment of the principal. Mortgagees must in this way repay the principal in 73 half-yearly instalments, provided they care to remain indebted so long. If able to wipe off their debts sooner, they can do so. The Act came into force in October, 1894. Machinery for carrying it out was quickly set up; applications for loans came in freely, and about a million has been lent, though the State Board, in its anxiety to avoid bad security, has shown ...
— The Long White Cloud • William Pember Reeves

... Mary's reading had been rather limited to such works as she needed to know for the sake of examinations; and her time for reading in London was very little. For some reason, no one likes to be told that they do not read enough poetry, but her resentment was only visible in the way she changed the position of her hands, and in the fixed look in her eyes. And then she thought to herself, "I'm behaving exactly as I said I wouldn't behave," whereupon she relaxed all her muscles and said, ...
— Night and Day • Virginia Woolf

... order her to be searched! The horror of the indignity made her shudder, but she would have submitted to that, if thereby she could have saved Droulde. But of this she could not be sure until after she had looked through the papers, and this she had not the time to do. ...
— I Will Repay • Baroness Emmuska Orczy

... me anywhere. And he kind of resented it. He had enough money not to need me for work—a sister of his did the housework better than I could—and yet he was poor enough to hate having to feed me and pay for my clothes. I was always feeling in the way, and a burden. There was nothing I could do. ...
— Snow-Blind • Katharine Newlin Burt

... if you like. But I don't suppose it will do one atom of good. It never does, you know. Where does ...
— The Helpmate • May Sinclair

... in mind to do primarily was to draw the West to the side of the South, in common opposition to the East. He therefore vigorously attacked the Foote resolution, agreeing with Benton that it was an expression of Eastern ...
— The Reign of Andrew Jackson • Frederic Austin Ogg

... 'You do hope that you will not officiate? Oh, Evan the eternal contemplation of gentlemen's legs! think of that! Think of yourself sculptured in that attitude!' Innumerable little prickles and stings shot ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... one, but a larger than this. We're not going to play the do-nothing gentlefolk; but all the same our life won't and can't be what it has been. There's no choice. You've worked hard all your life, mother, and it's only fair you should come in for a bit of rest. We'll find ...
— Demos • George Gissing

... must say that I think, with the information we had then, we took the most probable route for finding Burke's party. In all our expeditions we followed the watercourses and went over more ground than I thought it should have been possible to do with our ...
— Journal of Landsborough's Expedition from Carpentaria - In search of Burke and Wills • William Landsborough

... lion roars, And the wolf behowls the moon; Whilst the heavy ploughman snores, All with weary task foredone. Now the wasted brands do glow, Whilst the scritch owl, scritching loud, Puts the wretch that lies in woe, In remembrance of a shroud. Now it is the time of night That the graves, all gaping wide, Every one lets forth his sprite, In the churchway paths to glide: And we ...
— The Children's Garland from the Best Poets • Various

... of no interest to posterity, excepting in so far as it shows anew how the magnates were able to use intermediaries to do their underground work for them, and to put those intermediaries into the highest official positions in the country. This fact alone was responsible for their elevation to such bodies as the United States Senate, the President's Cabinet and the courts. Their long service as lobbyists ...
— Great Fortunes from Railroads • Gustavus Myers

... violation of that good faith which was implied in the cession." &c. The sole argument is not that exclusive sovereignty has no power to abolish slavery within its jurisdiction, nor that the powers of even ordinary legislation cannot do it,—nor that the clause granting Congress "exclusive legislation in all cases whatsoever over such District," gives no power to do it; but that the unexpressed expectation of one of the parties that the other would not "in all cases" use the power which ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... Dispatch immediate; though the inviting gales Ill brook the lingering mariners' delay: Soon as they reach thy soundings, down at once Drop the slack sails, and all the naval gear. The ship is moor'd: nor do the crew presume To quit thy sacred limits, 'till they have pass'd A painful penance; with the galling whip Lash'd thrice around ...
— A New System; or, an Analysis of Antient Mythology. Volume I. • Jacob Bryant

... commonness makes it all the more shocking. We may not be so much shocked at seeing the old die. We say, 'They have done their work, why should they not go?' That is not true. They have not done their work. There is more work in plenty for them to do, if they could but live; and it seems shocking and sad, at least to him who loves his country and his kind, that, just as men have grown old enough to be of use, when they have learnt to conquer their passions, when their characters are formed, when they have gained sound experience of this ...
— The Water of Life and Other Sermons • Charles Kingsley

... his face. Its worn and harrowed features, its look of graven patience, smote her like a cry. She was about to speak to him eagerly and with sympathy, but he was gone. His errand was finished,—the last thing he could do for Mercy. She watched his feeble steps as he walked away, and her pity revealed to her the history of ...
— Mercy Philbrick's Choice • Helen Hunt Jackson

... much, citizens," the little woman would cry. "Do them up in packages, and take the packages ...
— Parisian Points of View • Ludovic Halevy

... his age," his grace reflected astutely, "has always just fallen out of love, is falling into it, or desires vaguely to do so. Ten years later there would perhaps be blank spaces, lean years during which he was not in love at all; but at his particular period there must be a young woman somewhere. I wonder if she is employed in one of the department stores he spoke of, and how soon he hopes to present her to ...
— T. Tembarom • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... he sought causes to breake with him, and to maligne him: and therefore he forged (sayd he) these lies vpon him, and all because he by that meanes would auoid to marry with Alise his sister, according as he had promised. Adding moreouer that if he would so do, and would not marry the said Alise his sister according to his oth, he would be an enemy to him, and ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, v5 - Central and Southern Europe • Richard Hakluyt

... set up a human god and worship him as you do your Master. You are the maddest of all ...
— The Beloved Vagabond • William J. Locke

... any ship, aircraft, or helicopter) of the Coast Guard may be diverted to the principal and continuing use of any other organization, unit, or entity of the Department, except for details or assignments that do not reduce the Coast Guard's capability to perform its missions. (e) Changes to Missions.— (1) Prohibition.—The Secretary may not substantially or significantly reduce the missions of the Coast Guard or the Coast Guard's capability to perform those missions, except ...
— Homeland Security Act of 2002 - Updated Through October 14, 2008 • Committee on Homeland Security, U.S. House of Representatives

... Spanish commander that the English were very weak. He suggested to him to offer to pilot up their boats and galleys, and to bring them under the woods where he knew the hidden batteries were. If he succeeded in this, his pay would be doubled. If he could not do this, he was to use all his influence to keep them three days more at Fort St. Simon's. By that time the English would be reinforced by two thousand infantry and six men-of-war which had already sailed from Charleston. In a postscript he was cautioned on no account to mention that Admiral ...
— Historical Tales, Vol. 2 (of 15) - The Romance of Reality • Charles Morris

... air of content to flow from a certain triumph upon some advantage obtained. She no sooner sat down by me but I perceived she was one of those ladies who begin to be managers within the time of their being brides. Without letting her speak, which I saw she had a mighty inclination to do, I said, "Here has been your husband, who tells me he has a mind to go home this very morning, and I have consented to it."—"It is well," said she, "for you must know—" "Nay, Jenny," said I, "I beg your pardon, for it is you must know. You are to understand, that ...
— Isaac Bickerstaff • Richard Steele

... I fall into a fury. 'Oh, Liberty! I would cry, like the woman who did not love liberty more than I do—'Oh, Liberty, what deeds are done in thy name!' and (looking round ...
— The Letters of Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Volume II • Elizabeth Barrett Browning

... the dogs would remain seated in a circle round the man; that so long as he remained seated they would do the same; but that, if he attempted to rise, they would renew the attack. That vindicates me, and ...
— Corporal Sam and Other Stories • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... on the thirty-first of October, the day preceding All Saints' or Allhallows' Day. These dates coincide with none of the four great hinges on which the solar year revolves, to wit, the solstices and the equinoxes. Nor do they agree with the principal seasons of the agricultural year, the sowing in spring and the reaping in autumn. For when May Day comes, the seed has long been committed to the earth; and when November opens, ...
— The Golden Bough - A study of magic and religion • Sir James George Frazer

... seven long hours of agony were the royal family exposed to these insults, before the unwieldy mass had urged its slow way to Paris. The darkness of night was settling down around the city as the royal captives were led into the Hotel de Ville. No one seemed then to know what to do, or why the king and queen had been brought from Versailles. The mayor of the city received them there with the external mockery of respect and homage. He had them then conducted to the Tuileries, ...
— Maria Antoinette - Makers of History • John S. C. (John Stevens Cabot) Abbott

... I could to my chamber in search of a bouquet, but unfortunately they were every one gone; my mother had distributed them all among the guests. The gardener lives at a considerable distance from the castle, and I did not know what I should do, as I was most anxious Matthias should have his bouquet, apart from all consideration of his prophecy. Suddenly, an excellent idea occurred to me; I divided my own bouquet, tied up the half of it with a white ribbon, and fastened it to his buttonhole by a gold pin, keeping a common one for myself. ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No 3, September 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... cabman has its exact counterpart here. 'Oh gracious God, what aileth thee, oh Achmet my brother, and why is thy bosom contracted that thou hast not once said to me d———n thy father, or son of a dog or pig, as thou art used to do.' ...
— Letters from Egypt • Lucie Duff Gordon

... you really mustn't do that. I assure you that I enjoy work. An illness I had when I was a child hindered and threw me back very much, and you can't think how eager I am to make up ...
— St. Winifred's - The World of School • Frederic W. Farrar

... extremely lymphatic person, was still sleeping the sleep of the just. I gave her a good shake at last, finding knocks and calls of no avail; but she only turned over sleepily, murmuring: "Oh, it's all right! I don't suppose there is anything much the matter—do ...
— Seen and Unseen • E. Katharine Bates

... would have to overcome if you followed up the left bank of the White river to Kamrasi's; because, if found easy, it would be far nearer and better to reach Kamrasi that way than going through the desert jungles of Ukidi, as we went. This is the way I should certainly go myself, but if you do not like the look of it, preserve your information well; and after returning to Faloro, make Koki per Chougi in two marches, and tell old Chougi you wish to visit his M'Kamma Kamrasi, for Chougi was appointed Governor-general of that place by Kamrasi to watch the Wakidi who ...
— The Albert N'Yanza, Great Basin of the Nile • Sir Samuel White Baker

... the system of Circe, plotting a landing orbit around Warlock, broadcasting her recognition signal and a demand for a beam to ride her in. Only, this time the Throgs were out of luck. They had picked up one prisoner who could not help them, even if he wanted to do so. The mysteries of the highly technical installations in this dome were just that to Shann Lantee—complete mysteries. He had not the slightest idea of how to activate the machines, let alone ...
— Storm Over Warlock • Andre Norton

... disagreeable to him, that he could not put up with her company for a few moments without repining; and began in very tender terms to reproach him with his inhumanity and indifference. To this expostulation he replied, "Zounds! what would the woman have? Let the parson do his office when he wool: here I am ready to be reeved in the matrimonial block, d'ye see, and d— all nonsensical palaver." So saying, he retreated, leaving his mistress not at all disobliged at his plain dealing. That same evening the treaty of marriage was brought upon the carpet, ...
— The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, Volume I • Tobias Smollett

... complicated by the fact that things are experienced in different connections in perceptive experience. I do not always experience "horse" together with "bridle." I sometimes see horses in a pasture eating clover. So, as far as this last experience is concerned, when I think "horse" I should also think "clover." I sometimes see a horse ...
— The Science of Human Nature - A Psychology for Beginners • William Henry Pyle

... clothed with exquisite verdure and noble walnut woods, on the right bank of the Venon. Exactly opposite Venose are the green pastures leading to the Col de la Muselle, 8300 ft. As the tributary valleys do not join the principal valley at common level, but are considerably higher, a waterfall, often of great beauty, almost invariably accompanies the meeting of the streams. In ascending the valley of St. Christophe the gorge soon becomes ...
— The South of France—East Half • Charles Bertram Black

... of time after the bathing and mending and re-arranging were all done. The axle of the phaeton had been split, and must be temporarily patched up and banded. There was nothing for Sylvie to do but to sit quietly there in the old-fashioned, dimity-covered easy-chair which they gave her by the front window, and wait. Meanwhile, she observed and ...
— The Other Girls • Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney

... height and walk erect upon their hind feet. Like the green Martians, they have an intermediary set of arms midway between their upper and lower limbs. Their eyes are very close set, but do not protrude as do those of the green men of Mars; their ears are high set, but more laterally located than are the green men's, while their snouts and teeth are much like those of our African gorilla. Upon their heads grows an enormous shock ...
— The Gods of Mars • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... scriptures are commonly acknowledged by all to have been written by the dictates of the holy spirit, and that the errors, which may be supposed by the injury of time to have slipt in, are not such but there is a sufficient clear testimony left to all the essentials of the Christian faith, we do look upon them as the only fit outward judge of controversies among Christians, and that whatsoever doctrine is contrary to their testimony, may therefore justly ...
— A Portraiture of Quakerism, Volume II (of 3) • Thomas Clarkson

... for the removal of legal restrictions against marriage with a deceased wife's sister. He opposed the latter measure upon theological, social, and moral grounds, and begged the House to repeat the almost entire sentiment of the country respecting the bill. To do otherwise would be to inflict upon the Church the misfortune of having anarchy introduced among its ministers. He hoped they would do all that in them lay to maintain the strictness of the obligations of marriage, ...
— The Grand Old Man • Richard B. Cook

... universal freedom, that is to say, is a measure of universal restraint. Without such restraint some men may be free but others will be unfree. One man may be able to do all his will, but the rest will have no will except that which he sees fit to allow them. To put the same point from another side, the first condition of free government is government not by the arbitrary determination ...
— Liberalism • L. T. Hobhouse

... Fortunately I've sold that confounded property. Good price, too. Hobson, of Hobson & Davies. Going to build for residence. Takes it from the expiration of the lease, which is up in July. He'll clear out the whole gang then, so that by the time we come back they'll be gone. What do you think? Might do Devonshire and Cornwall—always wanted to take that trip—with a few weeks in Paris before we ...
— The Side Of The Angels - A Novel • Basil King

... 'You do not speak the language very correctly,' said I; 'it is not Sas you should call me—'tis Sassannach,' and forthwith I accompanied the word with a speech full of ...
— Lavengro - The Scholar, The Gypsy, The Priest • George Borrow

... Broyk said, a little wistfully. "I sometimes think it was a mistake for Center to do away with sex. It ...
— Field Trip • Gene Hunter

... de bon sort!" cried Tartarin, "if you blow up one tyrant there 'll come another... You will have it all to do over again... And the years will go by, ve! the days for happiness and love..." His way of saying love—amour—a la Tarasconese, with three r's in it and his eyes starting out of his head, amused the young girl; then, serious once more, she declared she would never ...
— Tartarin On The Alps • Alphonse Daudet

... in the most bitter terms. He remarked:—"The noble duke is extremely angry with me that I did not previously consult him on the bringing in of the present bill. I would ask the noble lord, does he consult me? or do I desire to be previously told of any motion he thinks fit to propose to this house? His grace seems to be much offended at the manner this bill has been hurried. I am certain he could not be serious, if he gave himself a minute to consider how the case ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.III. - From George III. to Victoria • E. Farr and E. H. Nolan

... it will be but short-lived. But a brief time will pass, and all the papers which I have published, and many more which are yet to come, will be fully proved and laid before the public. When Colonel ——'s health is restored, I do not doubt that I shall prevail upon him to place them in my hands, when I shall see Mr. John Spear Smith with them at Baltimore and have the Messrs. Reed ...
— Nuts for Future Historians to Crack • Various

... some other small islands, in one of which is to be found much brazil-wood. Although all the others have it, I mention this because the Anglis [S: Sangleyes] from the mainland of China come for it, in order to dye their silk. [62] In this island of Luzon are three settlements of Moros, who do not know the law of Mahoma in its entirety. They eat no pork, and pay reverence to the said Mahoma. [The rest of the inhabitants are the same and have the same customs as those above.] The southern portion of this is in about thirteen ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803 - Volume III, 1569-1576 • E.H. Blair

... not help noticing that, when afflicted with this mood, he would often glance at himself in a large looking glass which faced him as he sat. His demonstrations of regard never became more pronounced. It was as much as Mavis could do to stop herself from laughing outright when she paid him, it being a signal mark of his confidence that he did not exact payment from her "on delivery of goods in order to prevent regrettable mistakes," as printed cards, conspicuously placed in the shop, informed customers—or ...
— Sparrows - The Story of an Unprotected Girl • Horace W. C. Newte

... Miranda, you must be mistaken. Maybe it was some one else you saw. I do not think Mrs. Spafford would be likely to run over there that way, and what in the world would she have to be ...
— Marcia Schuyler • Grace Livingston Hill Lutz



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