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Gi

noun
1.
A unit of magnetomotive force equal to 0.7958 ampere-turns.  Synonyms: Gb, gilbert.



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"Gi" Quotes from Famous Books



... ask me, dear William, whether I had a money-box. I'd ha' told you so at once, had ye but asked me. And had you said, 'Gi' me your money-box,' it was yours, only for your asking. You do see, you can't get any of it out. So, when you asked for money I was right ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... ae word about reform, Nor petition Parliament; A wiser scheme I 'll now propose, I 'm sure ye 'll gi'e consent: Send up a chiel or twa like me, As a sample o' the flock, Whose hollow cheeks will be sure proof O' a hinging, toom meal pock. And ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... breeks and the iron garters—ay, and the hemp cravat, for a' that, neighbour,' replied the bailie. 'Nae man in a civilised country ever played the pliskies ye hae done; but e'en pickle in your ain pock-neuk—I hae gi'en ye warning.'"—Rob Roy. ...
— The Proverbs of Scotland • Alexander Hislop

... pleasure, and then, with an arch smile, turning suddenly about to me, exclaimed, "Ah! faith and troth, you mun ha' some mair! if you can make 'em so pratty as this, you mun ha' some mair! sweet bairn! I gi' you my benediction! be a comfort to your papa and mamma! Ah, madam!" (with one of her deep sighs) "I must gi' my consent to your having some mair ! if you can make 'em so pratty as this, faith and troth, I mun let you have ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 3 • Madame D'Arblay

... car. He had a new sense of loneliness as he stood on the roofless platform, half a foot deep in gathering snow, which driven by a pitiless gale from the north blew his cloak about as he looked to see that his trunk had been delivered. A man shifted a switch and coming back said, "Gi'me your check." John decided that this was not safe, and to the man's amusement said that he would wait until the carriage of Captain Penhallow arrived. The man went away. John remained angrily expectant ...
— Westways • S. Weir Mitchell

... tenants on the estate started to his feet, and led the rest with him in an instant. I see the man now, with his honest brown face and his iron-grey hair, mounted on the window-seat, waving his heavy riding-whip over his head, and leading the cheers. "There she is, alive and hearty—God bless her! Gi' it tongue, lads! Gi' it tongue!" The shout that answered him, reiterated again and again, was the sweetest music I ever heard. The labourers in the village and the boys from the school, assembled on the lawn, caught up the cheering ...
— The Woman in White • Wilkie Collins

... first year of Freedom's second dawn[502] Died George the Third; although no tyrant, one Who shielded tyrants, till each sense withdrawn[gi] Left him nor mental nor external sun:[503] A better farmer ne'er brushed dew from lawn,[gj] A worse king never left a realm undone! He died—but left his subjects still behind, One half as ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 4 • Lord Byron

... green manteel, fair maid, Give me your maidenhead; Gif ye winna gie me your green manteel, Gi me ...
— A Collection of Ballads • Andrew Lang

... hastened to assure her. "Hy-guy, that coffee smells some kind o' good, don't it? Between the smell o' the stuff an' the looks o' my cup, it'll be so temptin' that I'll wish I had the neck of a gi-raffe, an' could taste it all the way deown. Angy, I be afraid we'll git the gout a-livin' so high. Look at ...
— Old Lady Number 31 • Louise Forsslund

... was naw mercy asked nor gi'en. And those wha escaped knockin on t' yead were aw sold as ...
— The History of David Grieve • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... own name," she continued, presently. "Say he marster'll know him when he come—ain' know de folks is free; say he marster gwi buy him back in de summer an' kyar him home, an' 'bout de money he gwine gi' him. Ef he got any money, I wonder he live down dyah in dat evil-sperit hole." And the woman glanced around with great complacency on the picture-pasted walls of her own by no means sumptuously furnished house. "Money!" she repeated aloud, as she began to rake in the ashes, ...
— Short Story Classics (American) Vol. 2 • Various

... "this sort o' thing is too many for me. I gi'en it up. It's very interestin', I s'pose, but my head begins to spin, an' it seems to me it's gettin' out of order. Do ye see my har, Doctor?" said he, exposing the heavy shock ...
— Sevenoaks • J. G. Holland

... and coal eno' burning in the greenhouses to ripen a few bunches of grapes out of God's own season, as would keep many of us warm. Who puts our coal down a dollar in the ton, or takes it off of house-rent when wages come down? I'll work as cheap as the next one if ye'll gi' me a cheap house to live in and cheap beef and bread. I doant care for money in the savin's bank, or a house that they tax all out o' sight. When I'm old I'll go to the poorhouse, I will; but I'm danged if I like starvin' before then, and they a-ridin' ...
— Hope Mills - or Between Friend and Sweetheart • Amanda M. Douglas

... said I, 'that man was gi'en "dominion ower the beasts o' the earth an' the fowls o' the air," but I canna do as I'd wush wi' ...
— Adrift in the Ice-Fields • Charles W. Hall

... Aunt Polly and said, protestingly, "Don't gi' me but jest a teasp'nful o' that ice cream. I'm so full now 't I can't hardly reach the table." He took a taste of the cream and resumed: "I can't give it jest as Dick did," he went on, "but this is about the gist on't. Him, an' ...
— David Harum - A Story of American Life • Edward Noyes Westcott

... this new institution of Japan possess permanency? Constitutional government has shown in many cases the lack of stability. In France and Spain especially it has been established and overthrown again and again.[20] Can Tei Koku Gi Kai[21] prove itself above such frailty and stand for ages a majestic monument of the people capable of self-government? Or must it pass away in ignominy and gloom through its own weakness, or of the ...
— The Arena - Volume 4, No. 22, September, 1891 • Various

... Ammanto E' ricoperto il Cielo, e ogn' un' riposa Prencipe andiamo, oue l'honor c'Invita; Abbandoniam' queste incantate Soglie, Che gi troppo contrarie Furo' alla gloria mia, ed' al' ...
— Amadigi di Gaula - Amadis of Gaul • Nicola Francesco Haym

... had they been queens A' plump an' strapping, in their teens; Their sarks, instead o' creeshie flannen, Been snaw-white seventeen hunder linen! Thir breeks o' mine, my only pair, That ance were plush o' guid blue hair, I wad hae gi'en them aff my hurdies, For ae blink o' the ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... "Yo' gi' me my money back," he said, holding out a shaking hand. "Yer can't 'ave spent it all—'tain't possible—an' yer ain't chucked it out o' winder. Yer've got it somewhere 'idden, an' I'll get it out o' you if I ...
— Bessie Costrell • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... "Gi-ive it," Ryabov says in his growling bass; they can hear him breathing hard, and it seems that he would like to say a great deal, but cannot find ...
— Love and Other Stories • Anton Chekhov

... sort!" said the man. "But if there had been a God, as people say, he would ha' made me fit to gi'e you a job, i'stead o' stan'in' here as you see me, with ne'er a turn o' work to ...
— A Rough Shaking • George MacDonald

... io che avevo in uggia questa serenit! Debbo chiamarlo ed ospitalit debbo offrir? Ma che! Dorme di gi. (guardando ...
— Zanetto and Cavalleria Rusticana • Giovanni Targioni-Tozzetti, Guido Menasci, and Pietro Mascagni

... I dunno, Miss Maud; whatsomeveh come, and whensomeveh, and howsomeveh de Lawd sen' it, ef us feels his ahm und' us, us ought to be 'shame' not to be happy, oughtn't us?" All at once she sprang half up: "I tell you de Lawd neveh gi'n no niggeh de rights to snuggle down anywhuz an' ...
— The Flower of the Chapdelaines • George W. Cable

... lairds o' Pettybaw, sax placed meenisters, an' seeven doctors. I was a mason an' a stoot mon i' thae days, but it's a meeserable life now. Wife deid, bairns deid! I sit by my lane, an' smoke my pipe, wi' naebody to gi'e me a sup o' water. Achty-sax is ower auld for a ...
— Penelope's Progress - Being Such Extracts from the Commonplace Book of Penelope Hamilton As Relate to Her Experiences in Scotland • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... "Gi'me a chance now, skipper," says Gillis, and orders a little something, and when the waiter was gone: "Sam's not far away. I left him up to Antone's rolling dice for turkeys. We came over, him and me, on a little ...
— Wide Courses • James Brendan Connolly

... "highest administrative authority"; SPA reelected KIM Yong Nam president of its Presidium also with responsibility of representing state and receiving diplomatic credentials; SPA appointed PAK Pong Ju premier head of government: Premier PAK Pong Ju (since 3 September 2003); Vice Premiers KWAK Pom Gi (since 5 September 1998), JON Sung Hun (since 3 September 2003), RO Tu Chol (since 3 September 2003) cabinet: Naegak (cabinet) members, except for Minister of People's Armed Forces, are appointed by ...
— The 2007 CIA World Factbook • United States

... just gi'e one wonderin' sooart o' chuck, an then, after a long stare reawnd th' hen-coyt, it woked eawt, as mad a hen as aw've ever sin. Aw fun' eawt after, what th' long stare meant. It were tekkin' farewell! For if yo'll ...
— The Diary of a Goose Girl • Kate Douglas Smith Wiggin

... Crittenden," said Mrs. Powers with a respectful admiration for the suitability of this appearance. "And there ain't nothing surprising that you should. Did you ever see anybody go off more sudden than Miss Hetty? Such a good woman she was, too. It must ha' gi'n you an awful turn." She poured the doughnuts into the jar and, folding the checked cloth, went on, "But I look at it this way. 'Twas a quick end, and a peaceful end without no pain. And if you'd seen as many old people drag along for years, as I have, stranglin' and chokin' and ...
— The Brimming Cup • Dorothy Canfield Fisher

... now," Hattie Sterling pursued, throwing a brightly stockinged foot upon a chair, "your voice is too good for the chorus. Gi' me a cigarette, Joe. Have one, Kitty?—I 'm goin' to call you Kitty. It 's nice and homelike, and then we 've got to ...
— The Sport of the Gods • Paul Laurence Dunbar

... siller wand An' gi'en strokes three, An' chang'd my sister Masery To a mack'rel of the sea. And every Saturday at noon The mack'rel comes to me, An' she takes my laily head An' lays it on her knee, An' kames it wi' a kame o' pearl, An' ...
— Sir John Constantine • Prosper Paleologus Constantine

... world what yourn is," he said, breaking off to bestow a smacking kiss on Joan. "So look sharp, like a good little maid as you be, and gi'e us sommat to sit down for;" and he drew a chair to the table and began flourishing the knife which had been set there for him. Then, catching sight of Eve, whose face, in her desire to spare him, betrayed an irrepressible look of consciousness, he exclaimed, "Why, they've bin ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 26, July 1880. • Various

... very decent for you to be kissing, It does not look weel wi' the black coat ava, 'Twould hae set you far better tae hae gi'en us your blessing, Than thus by such tricks to be breaking the law. Dear Watty, quo Robin, it's just an auld custom, And the thing that is common should ne'er be ill taen, For where ye are wrong, ...
— Folk Lore - Superstitious Beliefs in the West of Scotland within This Century • James Napier

... maitter, Cosmo, are na we a' brithers an' sisters? A' body's brithers an' sisters wi' a' body. It's but a kin' o' a some mean pride 'at wadna be obleeged to yer ain fowk, efter ye hae dune yer best. Cosmo! ilka han'fu' o' meal gi'en i' this or ony hoose by them 'at wadna in like need accep' the same, is an affront frae brither to brither. Them 'at wadna tak, I say, has no richt ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... spoke out one motherly dame, "they two do look clean-like. Children, too—who'd gi' them stones when they beg for bread? I'll do for them this night myself; and thou, the good man, and Kit can sleep in the hutch. So there, dears; now let's see the Lord ...
— Master Skylark • John Bennett

... for refusing to enlist him. To make standards for black applicants substantially higher than those for whites, he alleged, violated the Preamble and Fifth Amendment of the Constitution, while the inducements offered for enlistment, for example the GI Bill of Rights, constituted a valuable property right denied him because of race. The suit asked that all further enlistments in the Army be stopped until Negroes were accepted on equal terms with whites and all ...
— Integration of the Armed Forces, 1940-1965 • Morris J. MacGregor Jr.

... after swallowing about a gallon of the rain-water, "didn't I say that He 'as sent us meat, in such good time too, could also gi' us som'at to drink? Look there! water enow to ...
— The Ocean Waifs - A Story of Adventure on Land and Sea • Mayne Reid

... polish off Japan? Would I greet this famous man, Prince or Prelate, Sheik or Shah?— Figaro gi and Figaro la! ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... as she caught sight of the empty bottle lying on a chair. "You been er-putting' suthin' on my chile's head! I knows yer, I's er-gwine ter make yo' mammy gi' ye de worses' whippin' yer eber got an' I's gwine ter take dis here William right ober ter Miss Minerva. Ain't y' all 'shame' er yerselves? Er tamperin' wid de ha'r what de good Lord put on er colored pusson's ...
— Miss Minerva and William Green Hill • Frances Boyd Calhoun

... be pronounced Ngam, Ngin, and Ngienchau, all of which are sufficiently near Polo's Gengiu. The next city reached is Lan Ki Hien or Lan Chi Hsien, famous for its hams, dates, and all the good things of this life, according to the Chinese. In this city I recognise Polo's Zen Gi An of Ramusio. Does its description justify me in my identification? 'The city of "Zen gi an",' says Ramusio, 'is built upon a hill that stands isolated in the river, which latter, by dividing itself into two branches, appears to embrace it. These streams take opposite directions: one of them pursuing ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo, Volume 2 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... the girl apologetically, "an naw 'ees savit th' munny. Abbut e'd bean tickled 'ad 'ee knowed it! Dear! dear! 'ee niver thowt et 'ud be gi'en by stranger an' ...
— Stories in Light and Shadow • Bret Harte

... breakfast. Slept well last night, sir?" he continued, as I entered the little parlour; "the bed is rayther hard, I know; but, ye see, it does well enow for my son George when he's up here, which isna often. Ye look tired like, this morning; didna get much rest p'raps? Ah! now then, Bess, gi' us another plate here, ole gal." I ate my breakfast in comparative silence, wondering to myself whether it would be well to say anything to my host of my recent experiences, since he had clearly no suspicions on the subject; and, anon, ...
— Dreams and Dream Stories • Anna (Bonus) Kingsford

... it? There's naething so good for a man as lettin' him be kind to ye, even if he is an Elder in the kirk. I'm thinkin' Peter's ain o' them that such as that is good for—Hester! What ails ye! Are oot of ye're mind? Gi'e her a drap of whuskey, ...
— The Eye of Dread • Payne Erskine

... stranger, "I was not aware that the crown lands were so extensive in the Wight. Have you much game?" "Ees, ees." "And who is the lord of the manor?" "King George." "And these new roads I see forming, are they also done by King George?" "Ees, ees, he ought to gi' us a few new ones, I think; bekase Ize zure he's stopped up enou of our old ones." "What, by some new inclosure act, I suppose?" "Naye, naye, by some old foreclosure acts, I expect." "Why, you do not mean to say that our gracious sovereign ...
— The English Spy • Bernard Blackmantle

... mixed the drinks an' chalked 'em up, tote roun' An' see ef ther' 's a feather-bed (thet's borryable) in town. We'll try ye fair, ole Grafted-Leg, an' ef the tar wun't stick, Th' ain't not a juror here but wut'll 'quit ye double-quick,' To cut it short, I wun't say sweet, they gi' me a good dip, (They ain't perfessin' Bahptists here,) then give the bed a rip,— The jury'd sot, an' quicker 'n a flash they hetched me out, a livin' Extemp'ry mammoth turkey-chick fer a Fejee Thanksgivin'. ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... make tracks!" called Tom. "We'll have to push on to the next village before we can ask where the gi—" he caught himself just in time, for San Pedro was looking curiously ...
— Tom Swift in Captivity • Victor Appleton

... over them vi'lets. Here Tode, gi' me some o' them bright ones. Gi' me a rose!" cried one of the young women, and Theo handed each of them a rose and went away in silence. He glanced back as he left the room. The old woman was still holding the violets to her cheek and it was plain, even to the boy, ...
— The Bishop's Shadow • I. T. Thurston

... a "Hurra for Dundas," the other met them from the opposite side of the street, with a counter cry of "Anderson forever." Immediately after clearing the houses, I was accosted by a man from the country. "Ye'll be seeking beasts," he said: "what price are cattle gi'en the noo?" "Yes, seeking beasts," I replied, "but very old ones: I have come to hammer your rocks for petrified fish." "I see, I see," said the man; "I took ye by ye'er gray plaid for a drover; but I ken something about the stane fish too; there's lots o' them ...
— The Cruise of the Betsey • Hugh Miller

... and she added, for the truth was ever more to her than her father's wrath, "he gi'ed me saxpence for ...
— Nonsense Novels • Stephen Leacock

... to gi'e it to. There's not, to my knowledge, one living that ever belonged to me. I may be dead before ye come back again. And I like ye, Allison Bain. And the ring may keep evil from ye, if ye wear ...
— Allison Bain - By a Way she knew not • Margaret Murray Robertson

... to the Judge, I gin my brother Tim a hundred dollars for his bargain; but then theres a new house ont, that cost me sixty more, and I paid Moses a hundred dollars for choppin, and loggin, and sowin, so that the whole stood to me in about two hundred and sixty dollars. But then I had a great crop ...
— The Pioneers • James Fenimore Cooper

... "Say, Alice, gi' me a couple O' them two for five cigars, Will yer?" "Where's your nickel?" "My! Ain't you close! Can't trust a feller, can yer." "Trust you! Why What you owe this store Would set you up in business. I can't think why Father 'lows it." "Yer Father's a sight more neighbourly Than you be. That's ...
— Men, Women and Ghosts • Amy Lowell

... jointure I will gi'e her A good two hundred pounds a year Accruing from my landed rents, Whereof see t'other paper, telling Lands, copses, and grown woods for felling, Capons, ...
— Citation and Examination of William Shakspeare • Walter Savage Landor

... his right eye shut up tight for the purpose, that he underwent a convulsion of shuddering and choking. But even in the midst of that paroxysm, he still essayed to repeat his favourite introduction of himself, 'Pa-ancks the gi-ipsy, fortune-telling.' ...
— Little Dorrit • Charles Dickens

... witts so limber to believe I could compell it from thee. Twas a trick, A meere conceipt of mirth; thou sha't ha mine. Dost thinke I stand upon a sword? Ile gi' thee A case of Pistolls when we come to London; And shoot me when I love thee not. Pox ont, Thou apprehende'st ...
— A Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. II • Various

... an' James are frien's o' my father. Gi' me some bread. The want o' men is occasioned by the want o' money. We seldom fine' men o' principle to ac' thus. Beas' an' creepin' things were ...
— McGuffey's Sixth Eclectic Reader • William Holmes McGuffey

... find voice at once, but presently he chuckled, nervously: "Humh! humh! No, boy, I ain't gwine die yit—not till my time comes, please Gord. But dis heah's Christmas, honey, an' I thought I'd gi'e you de ole banjo whiles I was living so's I could—so's you could—so's we could have pleasure out'n 'er bofe together, yer know, honey. Dat is, f'om dis time on she's yo' banjo, an' when I wants ter play on 'er, you ...
— Solomon Crow's Christmas Pockets and Other Tales • Ruth McEnery Stuart

... oberseer dem times," said Cudjo. "Him gi' me de lickins; him got my gal—me owe him for dat!" And, with a ferocious grimace, clinching his hands together as if he felt his enemy's throat, he gave a yell of rage which resounded through ...
— Cudjo's Cave • J. T. Trowbridge

... agin nater and agin God," added Tryan. "God never intended gold in the rocks to be made into heathen candlesticks and crucifixens. That's why he sent 'Merrikans here. Nater never intended such a climate for lazy lopers. She never gi'n six months' sunshine to be slept and ...
— The Luck of Roaring Camp and Other Tales • Bret Harte

... her arms twa, And gi'en him kisses thorough; She sought to bind his mony wounds, But ...
— The Book of Old English Ballads • George Wharton Edwards

... owd brid," I said, "tha cornd. It's noan brass this time, it's mi lad." And th' owd flute seemed to say, "Try me." So I tuk it up, and put it to mi lips and blew—yi, aat of a sad heart, Mr. Penrose—but it wor reet. Th' owd flute gi' me back mi prayer—grace for grace, as yo' parsons say, whatever yo' mean by't. And as I sat on th' bench i' th' garden—same bench as yo' saw me sittin' on this afternoon—my missis coome to th' dur, and hoo said, "Enoch, what doesto think?" "Nay, lass," I said, "I ...
— Lancashire Idylls (1898) • Marshall Mather

... Lord'll gi' us a lot more water in the river," the woods- boss McTavish complained, "I dinna see how I'm to keep the mill runnin'." He was taking John Cardigan up the riverbank and explaining the situation. "The heavy butt-logs ...
— The Valley of the Giants • Peter B. Kyne

... all, from me come memory and knowledge, as well as their loss'; 'He who free from delusion knows me to be the highest Person'; 'The Lord, O Arjuna, is seated in the heart of all Beings, driving round by his mysterious power all beings as if mounted on a machine; to him fly for refuge' (Bha. Gi. XV, 15, 19; XVIII, 61). These Smriti-texts show the embodied soul to be the meditating subject, and the highest Self the object ...
— The Vedanta-Sutras with the Commentary by Ramanuja - Sacred Books of the East, Volume 48 • Trans. George Thibaut

... standing above a grave, we were on the verge of tears—but with vexation, the strain, the fatigue; with the great longing to be done with it, to get away, and lie down to rest somewhere where we could see our danger and breathe. Archie shouted:—"Gi'e me room!" We crouched behind him, guarding our heads, and he struck time after time in the joint of planks. They cracked. Suddenly the crowbar went halfway in through a splintered oblong hole. It must have missed Jimmy's head by less than an inch. Archie withdrew it quickly, and that ...
— The Nigger Of The "Narcissus" - A Tale Of The Forecastle • Joseph Conrad

... beneath me as a steed That knows his rider.[278] Welcome to their roar! Swift be their guidance, wheresoe'er it lead! Though the strained mast should quiver as a reed, And the rent canvass fluttering strew the gale,[gi] Still must I on; for I am as a weed, Flung from the rock, on Ocean's foam, to sail Where'er the surge may sweep, the tempest's ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... francuzhenki i ital'janki javljajutsja samymi luchshimi nositel'nicami rasputstva nravov s mesta na mesto. Eti zhenshhiny sluzhat dlja teh, kotorye, blagodarja im, vsegda nuzhdajutsja v den'gah, a potomu ohotno torgujut sovest'ju, chtoby dobyt' deneg vo chto by to ni stalo. Den'gi zhe tol'ko ssuzhajutsja takim torgovcam sovesti, chto bystro vozvrashhajutsja v ruki, ssuzhavshija ih, potomu chto s pomoshh'ju teh zhe zhenshhin rastrachivajutsja skoro posle ih poluchenija. Sionskija seti razstavleny na vseh putjah "goev" i cikl zmija podvigaetsja v XX stoletii bystrotoj ...
— The History of a Lie - 'The Protocols of the Wise Men of Zion' • Herman Bernstein

... na knowledge o' the deed until after it was done, what did ye mean by saying that something wad happen, wad pit a' thoughts o' marriage and gi'eing in marriage out the heads o' a' concerned?—when ye spak till me under the balcony that ...
— The Lost Lady of Lone • E.D.E.N. Southworth

... till he've a-done. 'Tis like rain on blossom." The last notes fell. "Go you down, Doctor, and say my duty and will he please play it over once more, and Fugler'll gi'e 'em a run ...
— Wandering Heath • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... darn fool! yuh gi' me the creeps! W'at's the matter with everything to-day? Everywhere I go some one starts gabblin' about mines and French Pete an' this all-fired—Louisiana! It's a damn good thing there ain't any more like him ...
— Louisiana Lou • William West Winter

... one of the works of Muro Kyuso—who lived from 1658 to 1734. It was during his life that the famous forty-seven ronin performed their exploit, and Kyu-so gave them the name by which they are still remembered, Gi-shi, the "Righteous Samurai." The purpose of the work is the defense of the Confucian faith and practice, as interpreted by Tei-shu, the philosopher of China whom Japan delighted to honor. It discusses among other things the fundamental ...
— Evolution Of The Japanese, Social And Psychic • Sidney L. Gulick

... and bowls are soon filled.] Kyppe kowpes i{n} honde ky{n}ge[gh] to serue, I{n} bry[gh]t bolle[gh], ful bayn birlen ise o{er}, [Sidenote: [Fol. 78a.]] & vche mon for his mayst{er} machches alone. 1512 [Sidenote: Music of all kind is heard in the hall.] er wat[gh] ry{n}gi{n}g, on ry[gh]t, of ryche metalles, Quen renkkes i{n} at ryche rok re{n}nen hit to cache, Clat{er}i{n}g of conacle[gh] at kesten o burdes, As sonet out of sau[t]{er}ay songe als myry. 1516 en e dotel on dece drank at he my[gh]t, ...
— Early English Alliterative Poems - in the West-Midland Dialect of the Fourteenth Century • Various

... "'Gi'me my mail, quick!' he says to Windy, who had tinkered up a one-night stand post-office and dealt out letters, at five ...
— Pardners • Rex Beach

... maggots that maun be cannily guided; and then, Richie,' says he, in a very laigh tone, 'I would tell it to nane but a wise man like yoursell, but the king has them about him wad corrupt an angel from heaven; but I could have gi'en you avisement how to have guided him, but now it's like after meat mustard.'—'Aweel, aweel, Laurie,' said I, 'it may be as you say', but since I am clear of the tawse and the porter's lodge, sifflicate wha like, deil hae Richie Moniplies if he come sifflicating here again.'— And ...
— The Fortunes of Nigel • Sir Walter Scott

... off the conversation as soon as she perceived the preoccupation of her companion, and began humming, perhaps unconsciously, two or three lines of Burns, whose "Whistle and I'll come to thee, my love," and "Gi'e me a glance of thy bonny black ee," were never better exemplified than in the couple before her. Really it is curious to watch them, and to see how gradually the attraction of this tantalizing vicinity becomes irresistible, and the rustic lover rushes to his pretty mistress like ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, Issue 265, July 21, 1827 • Various

... the paper! Gi' me the paper!" yelled a voice, as Hiram climbed uppermost on his man and fought to free his ...
— The She Boss - A Western Story • Arthur Preston Hankins

... the Cleikum Inn, which our folk have kept for these twa generations, I canna pretend to say ye should have had such tea as ye have been used to in foreign parts where it grows, but the best I had I wad have gi'en it to a gentleman of your appearance, and I never charged mair than six-pence in all my time, ...
— St. Ronan's Well • Sir Walter Scott

... one o' them husseys as gossips and chatters, And is allers o' mindin' of other folk's matters, But one as 'ull work, and be gentle and kind, And as knows when to gi'e you ...
— Sagittulae, Random Verses • E. W. Bowling

... gi'me a cup o' coffee? It's been some little time since I had anything to eat, an' I been ...
— The Burial of the Guns • Thomas Nelson Page

... time, sir," said Caleb, pausing in his work, and leaning forward very mysteriously. "Ef you cares to hear, I don't mind tellin' 'ee; on'y you must gi' me your Davy you won't let ...
— The Astonishing History of Troy Town • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... at all. We was wonderful clever 'bout that. We shifted an' shifted an' gi'ed 'em ...
— North, South and Over the Sea • M.E. Francis (Mrs. Francis Blundell)

... his lips away, and she sank back gasping. "You've 'ad yer way wi' me;" and he heaved a sigh that was as loud as a groan. "Oh, Mav, my girl, gi' me yer kisses—kiss me all night and all day—if ...
— The Devil's Garden • W. B. Maxwell

... gi che 'I mio saper misura Certa fosse e infallibile di quanto Pu far l'alto Fattor della natura." Tasso, Gerus, ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Vol. II, No. 8, June 1858 • Various

... half-cracked dominie heard that he was to be employed as Colonel Mannering's librarian, his joy knew no bounds; and on seeing the large number of old books which were committed to his charge he became almost crazy with delight, and shouted his favourite word, "Pro-di-gi-ous!" till the roof rung ...
— The Junior Classics, V5 • Edited by William Patten

... the ould chap began to munseer me; but the devil a bit of a gridiron he'd gi' me; and so I began to think they wor all neygars, for all their fine manners; and throth my blood begun to rise, and says I, 'By my sowl, if it was you was in distriss,' says I, 'and if it was to ould Ireland you kem, it's not only the gridiron they'd give you, ...
— Stories of Comedy • Various

... spike, wi' a crust in 'is pockit. An' w'en 'e sees a nice ole gentleman comin' along the street 'e chucks the crust into the drain, an' borrows the old gent's stick to poke it out. An' then the ole gent gi'es ...
— The People of the Abyss • Jack London

... de road out o' sight, an' we wuz out in de field a-slidin' an' a-slidin', when up comes ole marster. We started to run; but he hed done see us, an' he called us to come back; an' sich a whoppin' ez he did gi' us! ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 9 • Various

... FC will be mov'd to H four spaces in the same time that F the other end of it is mov'd to G three spaces, therefore the whole refracted pulse GH shall be oblique to the refracted Rays CHK and GI; and the angle GHC shall be an acute, and so much the more acute by how much the greater the refraction be, then which nothing is more evident, for the sign of the inclination is to the sign of refraction ...
— Micrographia • Robert Hooke

... has been learning at the feet of some demon-worshipping Malayan. Now, the Ilongot appear to have religious ideas that have come from various sources. Those of Nueva Vizcaya, with whom I talked, professed belief in spirits and called them "be tung"; the spirits of the dead were "gi na va." The Ilongot of Patakgao, curiously, have been affected by Christian nomenclature. The ruling spirit or spirits is "apo sen diot" ("apo" meaning lord or sir and "diot" being a corruption of Dios). They had no word for heaven, but mentioned ...
— The Negrito and Allied Types in the Philippines and The Ilongot or Ibilao of Luzon • David P. Barrows

... th' right on't to be unaisy. It's well seen on THEE what it is niver to be unaisy. Thee't gi' away all thy earnin's, an' niver be unaisy as thee'st nothin' laid up again' a rainy day. If Adam had been as aisy as thee, he'd niver ha' had no money to pay for thee. Take no thought for the morrow—take no thought—that's what thee't ...
— Adam Bede • George Eliot

... cried the parson cheerily, "they didna run well in harness; golf and the meenistry, I hae followed your advice: I hae gi'en it oop." ...
— Idle Ideas in 1905 • Jerome K. Jerome

... him o'er the Estmere Crag, And he has gi'en that beast a kiss: In she swang, and again she cam', And aye her speech was a ...
— Ballad Book • Katherine Lee Bates (ed.)

... drap," answered Donal. "I'll gang i' the stren'th o' that ye hae gi'en me—maybe no jist forty days, gudewife, but mair nor forty minutes, an' that's a gude pairt o' a day. I thank ye hertily. Yon was the milk o' human kin'ness, gien ever ...
— Donal Grant • George MacDonald

... compound is to be divided according to An. Gi. and Go.; the Bha. proposes another ...
— The Vedanta-Sutras with the Commentary by Sankaracarya - Sacred Books of the East, Volume 1 • George Thibaut

... undiminished rotundity. With stupid amazement, hair all erect, and ears likewise, they pass through life as through a museum, ready to exclaim with Dominie Sampson at all they cannot understand, 'Pro—di—gi—ous!' ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. III, No IV, April 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... the Dancers were to be seen from the mountain-top over the sea, and I thought maybe I'd go up and gi'e them a look, ...
— The Wind Bloweth • Brian Oswald Donn-Byrne

... "Oh, he enjoyin' de 'leckshum. He 'uz on de picnic yas'day, to Smeltuh's ice-houses; an' 'count er Mist' Maxim's gittin' 'lected, dey gi'n him bottle er whiskey an' two dollahs. He up at de house now, entuhtainin' some ge'lemenfrien's ...
— In the Arena - Stories of Political Life • Booth Tarkington

... folks been well-to-do peoples. Dey ain' been no poor white trash. Dey hab 'stonishing blood in dey vein. I been b'long to Massa Sam Stevenson wha' lib right down dere 'cross Ole Smith Swamp. Dey ain' hab no chillun dey own, but dey is raise uh poor white girl dere, Betty. Dey gi'e (give) she eve'yt'ing she ha'e ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves • Works Projects Administration

... people in Mindano, for, besides occupying the regions above-mentioned, they are found on the main tributaries of the Rio Grande de Kotabto—the Batagan, the Biktsa, the Luan, the Narkanitan, etc., and especially on the River Pulagi—on nearly all the influents of the last-named stream, and on the Higoog River in the Province of Misamis. As we shall see later on, even in the Agsan Valley, the Manbos were gradually split on the west side of the river by the ingress, as of some huge wedge, ...
— The Manbos of Mindano - Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume XXIII, First Memoir • John M. Garvan

... splendid ball, She never blazed in courtly grandeur, But like her native lily's bloom, She cheerfu' gilds her humble home; The pert reply, the modish air, To soothe the soul were never granted, When modest sense and love are there, The guise o' art may well be wanted; O Fate! gi'e me to be my bride The ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume III - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... St. Kavin, "you must say more nor that—my horn's not so soft all out," says he, "as to repair your old goose for nothing; what'll you gi' me if I do the job for you?—that's the chat," says ...
— Celtic Fairy Tales • Joseph Jacobs (coll. & ed.)

... here we should distinguish; for howe'er Kisses, sweet words, embraces, and all that, May look like what it is—neither here nor there,[gi] They are put on as easily as a hat, Or rather bonnet, which the fair sex wear, Trimmed either heads or hearts to decorate, Which form an ornament, but no more part Of heads, than their caresses of ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 6 • Lord Byron

... was jawing nigh on half a' hour, he was, while I gi'en him a shine. But, bless you, them boots of his is pretty nigh 'andy wore out, and I tell him so. 'Never mind, Billy,' says he; 'I'll be getting a new pair soon when I've got the money saved,' says he. 'I mean to get a good strong pair,' says he, 'double-soled and ...
— My Friend Smith - A Story of School and City Life • Talbot Baines Reed

... content To eat my bannock on the bent, And kitchen't wi' fresh air; O' lang-kail I can make a feast And cantily haud up my crest, And laugh at dishes rare. Nought frae Apollo I demand, But through a lengthened life, My outer fabric firm may stand, And saul clear without strife. May he then, but gi'e then, Those blessings for my share; I'll fairly, and squarely, Quit a', and seek ...
— Royal Edinburgh - Her Saints, Kings, Prophets and Poets • Margaret Oliphant

... native informs us "Innuit pechuk," meaning that the people are away or not at home; "Allopar" is cold, and "allopar pechuk" is hot. Persons fond of tracing resemblances may find in "Ignik" (fire) a similarity to the Latin ignis or the English "ignite," and from "Un-gi doo-ruk" (big, huge) the transition down to "hunky-dory" is easy. Those who see a sort of complemental relation to each other of linguistic affinity and the conformity in physical characters may infer from "Mikey-doo-rook" (a term of endearment equivalent to "Mavourneen" and used in addressing ...
— The First Landing on Wrangel Island - With Some Remarks on the Northern Inhabitants • Irving C. Rosse

... well, here's God bless his jolly old glazed hat any way," cried the trooper, swallowing a horn of grog; "he's the boy what has come from the Peninsula just to gi' 'em a leaf out of his book. He was a dancing last night—riding like a devil all the morning—and I'll warrant he'll be fighting all the afternoon ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction. - Volume 13, No. 359, Saturday, March 7, 1829. • Various

... blaze; and if ever you see a blue-lookin' man, that man was McKellop; for as soon as old Peter see the blaze he recollected hearin' his father tell about the survey; he recollected it particular because the old man was a good judge of apple-jack, and he'd said that my father'd gi'n him some of the best, that day the survey was made, that he'd ever tasted. And Peter said he reckoned he could find something about it in his father's books and among some loose papers he had in a box. And, sure ...
— Lippincott's Magazine, August, 1885 • Various

... a' yer little interests in my hands; it's the wisest thing ye can do. Ask for Maister Bishopriggs (that's me) when ye want a decent 'sponsible man to gi' ye a word of advice. Set ye doon again—set ye doon. And don't tak' the arm-chair. Hech! hech! yer husband will be coming, ye know, and he's sure to want it!" With that seasonable pleasantry the venerable Bishopriggs winked, and ...
— Man and Wife • Wilkie Collins

... the woman, startled into a more natural tone. "Na, na, it's no sae bad as that. It's the mistress, my lord; she just fair flittit before my e'en. She just gi'ed a sab and was by wi' it. Eh, my bonny Miss Jeannie, that I mind sae weel!" And forth again upon that pouring tide of lamentation in which women of her class ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. XIX (of 25) - The Ebb-Tide; Weir of Hermiston • Robert Louis Stevenson

... tak this bonnie neb o' mine, That pecks amang the corn, An' gi'e't to the Duke o' Hamilton To be ...
— The Shadow of a Crime - A Cumbrian Romance • Hall Caine



Words linked to "Gi" :   clean house, houseclean, magnetomotive force unit, clean



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