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Go   /goʊ/   Listen
Go

verb
(past went; past part. gone; pres. part. going)
1.
Change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically.  Synonyms: locomote, move, travel.  "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus" , "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect" , "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell" , "News travelled fast"
2.
Follow a procedure or take a course.  Synonyms: move, proceed.  "She went through a lot of trouble" , "Go about the world in a certain manner" , "Messages must go through diplomatic channels"
3.
Move away from a place into another direction.  Synonyms: depart, go away.  "The train departs at noon"
4.
Enter or assume a certain state or condition.  Synonyms: become, get.  "It must be getting more serious" , "Her face went red with anger" , "She went into ecstasy" , "Get going!"
5.
Be awarded; be allotted.  "Her money went on clothes"
6.
Have a particular form.  Synonym: run.  "As the saying goes..."
7.
Stretch out over a distance, space, time, or scope; run or extend between two points or beyond a certain point.  Synonyms: extend, lead, pass, run.  "His knowledge doesn't go very far" , "My memory extends back to my fourth year of life" , "The facts extend beyond a consideration of her personal assets"
8.
Follow a certain course.  Synonym: proceed.  "How did your interview go?"
9.
Be abolished or discarded.  "These luxuries all had to go under the Khmer Rouge"
10.
Be or continue to be in a certain condition.
11.
Make a certain noise or sound.  Synonym: sound.  "The gun went 'bang'"
12.
Perform as expected when applied.  Synonyms: function, operate, run, work.  "Does this old car still run well?" , "This old radio doesn't work anymore"
13.
To be spent or finished.  Synonyms: run low, run short.  "Gas is running low at the gas stations in the Midwest"
14.
Progress by being changed.  Synonyms: move, run.  "Run through your presentation before the meeting"
15.
Continue to live through hardship or adversity.  Synonyms: endure, hold out, hold up, last, live, live on, survive.  "These superstitions survive in the backwaters of America" , "The race car driver lived through several very serious accidents" , "How long can a person last without food and water?"
16.
Pass, fare, or elapse; of a certain state of affairs or action.  "The day went well until I got your call"
17.
Pass from physical life and lose all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life.  Synonyms: buy the farm, cash in one's chips, choke, conk, croak, decease, die, drop dead, exit, expire, give-up the ghost, kick the bucket, pass, pass away, perish, pop off, snuff it.  "The children perished in the fire" , "The patient went peacefully" , "The old guy kicked the bucket at the age of 102"
18.
Be in the right place or situation.  Synonym: belong.  "Let's put health care where it belongs--under the control of the government" , "Where do these books go?"
19.
Be ranked or compare.
20.
Begin or set in motion.  Synonyms: get going, start.  "Ready, set, go!"
21.
Have a turn; make one's move in a game.  Synonym: move.
22.
Be contained in.
23.
Be sounded, played, or expressed.
24.
Blend or harmonize.  Synonyms: blend, blend in.  "This sofa won't go with the chairs"
25.
Lead, extend, or afford access.  Synonym: lead.  "The road runs South"
26.
Be the right size or shape; fit correctly or as desired.  Synonym: fit.
27.
Go through in search of something; search through someone's belongings in an unauthorized way.  Synonym: rifle.
28.
Be spent.
29.
Give support (to) or make a choice (of) one out of a group or number.  Synonym: plump.
30.
Stop operating or functioning.  Synonyms: break, break down, conk out, die, fail, give out, give way, go bad.  "The car died on the road" , "The bus we travelled in broke down on the way to town" , "The coffee maker broke" , "The engine failed on the way to town" , "Her eyesight went after the accident"



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"Go" Quotes from Famous Books



... certainly," said Miss Tallowax, looking at the bed with all her eyes. "Does anybody ever go ...
— Is He Popenjoy? • Anthony Trollope

... the sheriff, the lord- lieutenant, and the coroner, was expected to perform his public services as part of his patriotic duty. It is true that certain statutes provided that part of the fines for any violation should go to the justices before whom the violators were prosecuted; two or three others gave small fees to the justice for affixing his seal or signing a document; but these were apparently casual efforts to secure enforcement, and can have brought no appreciable return to the justices. ...
— European Background Of American History - (Vol. I of The American Nation: A History) • Edward Potts Cheyney

... so much in it of interest that the temptation not to put it down until it is completed is strong within the mind of every person who begins to read it. As a historical record it is one of those volumes which will go further to straighten some disputed points than all of the arguments which could be advanced in good natured disputes ...
— Spalding's Official Baseball Guide - 1913 • John B. Foster

... lively; till Mr. Masters rose and bade them good night. And then Mrs. Starling still went on musing. Why had she not interfered at the right moment, to put a stop to this affair? She had let the moment go, and the thought vexed her; and her mood was not at all sweetened by the lurking doubt whether she could have stopped it if she had tried. Mrs. Starling could not abide to meet with her match, ...
— Diana • Susan Warner

... go there to-morrow. Oh, please say yes. If not, you cannot imagine how worried I ...
— Maupassant Original Short Stories (180), Complete • Guy de Maupassant

... you, Sir Cuthbert," the girl said frankly, "better than any one else next to my father, and gladly submit myself to his will. My own inclinations indeed, so far as is maidenly, go with his. These are troubled times," she said anxiously, "and our holy mother tells me that you fear some danger ...
— Winning His Spurs - A Tale of the Crusades • George Alfred Henty

... Lemoine, "you will throw your chances away. You are too careless, Dupre; you do not study enough. This kind of thing is all very well in Chili, but it will wreck your chances when you go to Paris. If you studied more deeply, Dupre, you ...
— Revenge! • by Robert Barr

... replied, half turning round. "Perhaps we had better go back to the drawing-room. My ...
— The Inner Shrine • Basil King

... than blue blazes in here," Old Heck said when all had finished; "we'd better go out into the big room. Maybe Carolyn June will play some on ...
— The Ramblin' Kid • Earl Wayland Bowman

... Pizarro's toils, Almagro, lur'd by hope of golden spoils, To distant Chili's ever-verdant meads, Thro' paths untrod, a band of warriors leads; O'er the high Andes' frozen steeps they go, 5 And wander mid' eternal hills of snow: In vain the vivifying orb of day Darts on th' impervious ice his fervent ray; Cold, keen as chains the oceans of the Pole, Numbs the shrunk frame, and chills the vig'rous ...
— Poems (1786), Volume I. • Helen Maria Williams

... for years to come, had been named "Prince Patrick's Land," in honor of the baby prince who was the youngest when they left home. Will he not be tempted, when he is a man, to take a crew, like another Madoc, and, as younger sons of queens should, go and settle upon this tempting god-child? They had heard from Sir Edward Belcher's part of the squadron; they had heard from England; had heard of everything but Sir John Franklin. They had even found an ale-bottle ...
— If, Yes and Perhaps - Four Possibilities and Six Exaggerations with Some Bits of Fact • Edward Everett Hale

... them when I go past," said the other, elevating her scornful little nose; it was ...
— Daisy • Elizabeth Wetherell

... dark night. Fully convinced that the time for action was at hand, Somers called together the handful of brave fellows who were to follow him, and briefly addressed them. He told them he wished no man to go with him who did not prefer being blown up to being captured. For his part, he would much prefer such a fate, and he wished his followers to agree with him. For answer the brave fellows gave three cheers, and crowded round him, each asking to be ...
— The Naval History of the United States - Volume 1 (of 2) • Willis J. Abbot

... addressing an unphilosophical audience; something too was to be directed to the bystanders in court; at present, we must proceed more precisely. In what way can all offences be called equal? Because nothing is more honourable than what is honourable; nothing more base than what is base. Go on a little further, for there is a great dispute as to this point; let us examine those arguments, which are especially your own, why all offences are equal. As, says he, in many lyres, if not one of them is so well in tune as to be able to preserve the harmony, all ...
— The Academic Questions • M. T. Cicero

... may be quite sure our friends do too, whether they talk about it or not, and our duty, as a friend, is to see their best self and help them to be it. Very often the mere fact of knowing that our friend sees our nobler nature, and believes in it, heartens us to keep faith in it and to go on striving after it. "Edward Irving unconsciously elevated every man he talked with into the ideal man he ought to have been; and went about the world making men noble by believing ...
— Stray Thoughts for Girls • Lucy H. M. Soulsby

... to the remainder? For, as the German commentator, De Wette, well says, "The only means of acquaintance with a history is the narrative we possess concerning it, and beyond that narrative the interpreter can not go. In these Bible records, the narrative reports to us only a supernatural course of events, which we must either receive or reject. If we reject the narrative, we know nothing at all about the event, and we are not justified in allowing ourselves ...
— Fables of Infidelity and Facts of Faith - Being an Examination of the Evidences of Infidelity • Robert Patterson

... rich children do. Just think how faithfully she works in that little garden, so as to have flowers to give away! I do not believe there is a house anywhere near us into which sickness or poverty comes where her simple flowers will not go." ...
— Happy Days for Boys and Girls • Various

... "Let 'em all go," suggested Samantha; "there's Jabe dawdlin' along the road, and they might as well be ...
— Timothy's Quest - A Story for Anybody, Young or Old, Who Cares to Read It • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... constitution, but I had never developed it or my body through exercise. My muscles were small and soft, like a woman's, or so the doctors had said time and again in the course of their attempts to persuade me to go in for physical-culture fads. But I had preferred to use my head rather than my body; and here I was, in no fit condition for the ...
— The Sea-Wolf • Jack London

... go I have ever known," said the explosive man profoundly. "You don't think he expects us to call in the morning and ...
— Bones in London • Edgar Wallace

... I am glad that I went to war and that I fought for my country. The experience was of untold value to me, as it gave me a broader and more serious view of life. Notwithstanding all the horrors of war, if called upon again, I would willingly go. I am ready to serve my country any time it calls. We have a wonderful country and a wonderful people. I realize that now more than I did before we went to war. My rather limited observations lead me to believe that we are far ahead of any European country. ...
— In the Flash Ranging Service - Observations of an American Soldier During His Service - With the A.E.F. in France • Edward Alva Trueblood

... especially rare and that no Tournebouche should flatter himself that he is one, granting that he be a Tournebouche. Thirdly, never to spend more than one quarter of one's income, conceal one's wealth, hide one's goods and chattels, to undertake no office, to go to church like other people, and always keep one's thoughts to oneself, seeing that they belong to you and not to others, who twist them about, turn them after their own fashion, and make calumnies therefrom. Fourthly, always to remain in the condition ...
— Droll Stories, Volume 2 • Honore de Balzac

... of Christ. Before our Lord left the world He said to His apostles, "Go ye into all the world, and preach the Gospel to every creature." Good news was thus to be proclaimed to every human being. If the commission meant anything it meant this, that God was honestly and earnestly desirous of saving every one. And this is in beautiful harmony with the exhortation ...
— The Doctrines of Predestination, Reprobation, and Election • Robert Wallace

... shoes lock the door to the garden behind me, and pass through the long series of echoing south rooms full of shadows and ladders and ghostly pails of painters' mess, and humming a tune to make myself believe I liked it, go rather slowly across the brick-floored hall, up the creaking stairs, down the long whitewashed passage, and with a final rush of panic whisk into my room and double lock and bolt ...
— Elizabeth and her German Garden • "Elizabeth", AKA Marie Annette Beauchamp

... ye couldn't do botther," replied Mick, caressing Jocko with much satisfaction, evidently proud to be his real owner. "Sure, an' if Oi've got to go to say ag'in an' can't look afther the baiste mesilf, it's some 'un ilse Oi'll be afther givin' him to thet'll say to ...
— Young Tom Bowling - The Boys of the British Navy • J.C. Hutcheson

... fens, and bitter were the comments of the farmers on it, while I sympathised with the other side. One typical case, which happened some months later, may stand as example of all. There was a young man, married, with two young children, who was wicked enough to go into a neighboring county to a "Union Meeting", and who was, further, wicked enough to talk about it when he returned. He became a marked man; no farmer would employ him. He tramped about vainly, looking for work, grew reckless, and took to ...
— Autobiographical Sketches • Annie Besant

... surrounded with a brilliant light, outshining the sun at noonday. He was then informed by these glorious personages that all religious denominations were in error, and were not acknowledged of God as His church and kingdom, and that he, Joseph, was expressly commanded not to go after them. At the same time, he received a promise that the fulness of the Gospel should at some future ...
— Something of Men I Have Known - With Some Papers of a General Nature, Political, Historical, and Retrospective • Adlai E. Stevenson

... same without prostituting his master in the eyes of all France, and of all Europe, by compelling him to be guilty of a measure to which it would be seen he had been urged by force. I conjured him not to go; and to show him on what terms I was with the Abbe Dubois, I explained to him I was the sole man of rank he had not invited to his consecration; but that, notwithstanding this circumstance, if he would give me his word that ...
— The Memoirs of Louis XIV., His Court and The Regency, Complete • Duc de Saint-Simon

... cause them to show as dark against the same globe. Professor Seeliger, however, replied[1106] that the darkening is due to the never-ending swarms of their separate shadows transiting the planet's disc. Sunlight is not, indeed, wholly excluded. Many rays come and go between the open ranks of the meteorites. For the dusky ring is transparent. The planet it encloses shows through it, as if veiled with a strip of crape. A beautiful illustration of its quality in this respect was derived by Professor Barnard from an eclipse of Japetus, November 1, 1889.[1107] ...
— A Popular History of Astronomy During the Nineteenth Century - Fourth Edition • Agnes M. (Agnes Mary) Clerke

... receive the heat of charity, which gives light to the beautiful body of the faith; and seeing that that rational fuel of Mindoro would not allow themselves to be burned for their good, with the quickness that was desired: they thought it advisable to abandon the little for the much, and to go first to Ilocos and secondly to Camarines where they hoped for more abundant fruits in return for their ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume 41 of 55, 1691-1700 • Various

... Hill ('History of Animals,' vol. iii, p. 170), in 1752, but as this was before the discovery of the binomial system, by the Rules it is absolutely excluded as of any authority. In my opinion, under all these circumstances, it would be mere pedantry to go back to Oken's 'Lehrbuch der Naturgeschichte' for the name Mitella,—a work little known, and displaying entire ...
— A Monograph on the Sub-class Cirripedia (Volume 1 of 2) - The Lepadidae; or, Pedunculated Cirripedes • Charles Darwin

... others were engaged about the sufferer, for what seemed a very long time before she heard Mrs. Aylward say, "His arm is broke, sir. We must send for Dr. Hunter. The maids are all in their beds, but I will go and wake one, and send her to the ...
— Love and Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... "Go 'long with you, Buck Thornton!" she cried, making a monumental failure of the frown with which she tried to draw her placid brows. "Here I thought all the time you was goin' to ...
— Six Feet Four • Jackson Gregory

... house at Banner Cross, another suburb of Sheffield, and on October 29 moved into their new home. One of the first persons Mrs. Dyson saw on arriving at Banner Cross was Peace himself. "You see," he said, "I am here to annoy you, and I'll annoy you wherever you go." Later, Peace and a friend passed Mr. Dyson in the street. Peace took out his revolver. "If he offers to come near me," said he, "I will make him stand back." But Mr. Dyson took no notice of Peace and passed on. He had another month ...
— A Book of Remarkable Criminals • H. B. Irving

... throne, or to enslave a nation of freemen, neither are your exertions required to redress a fancied wrong, or to revenge a supposed insult; but you are called upon to preserve your own dwellings from the flames—your families from destruction. Neither are you requested to go unprotected nor unprovided;—everything that the patriot soldier could possibly wish will be furnished you by the government—food complete and sufficient for the necessities or conveniences of life—compensation for your clothing,—arms of the best quality ...
— Recollections of Forty Years in the House, Senate and Cabinet - An Autobiography. • John Sherman

... through the ranks; then suddenly the vanguard stopped, and declared that it would go no farther. In vain Foedor, who commanded a company, begged and entreated his own men to set an example by continuing the march: they threw down their arms, and lay down beside them. Just as they had given this proof of insubordination, fresh murmurs, sounding like an approaching ...
— CELEBRATED CRIMES, COMPLETE - VANINKA • ALEXANDRE DUMAS, PERE

... very "heavy" failures. This difficulty, however, was soon overcome and, after the first few months, the cooking standard was high and well maintained. Our stove was very small and only two loaves of bread could be cooked at once. It frequently happened, therefore, that the others, which would go on rising in the tins, overflowed; a matter which could only be set right ...
— The Home of the Blizzard • Douglas Mawson

... others, less considerate, forced matters until the talk threatened to become too furious, he would interrupt with an anecdote or a story that cleared the air and ended the discussion in a general laugh. Sometimes for exercise he would go into a bowling-alley close by, entering into the game with great zest, and accepting defeat and victory with equal good-nature. By the time he had finished a little circle would be gathered around him, enjoying his enjoyment, and laughing at his ...
— The Boys' Life of Abraham Lincoln • Helen Nicolay

... rude of your maid to go to bed with her mistress without first shaving herself," said the Princess, and ...
— The Memoirs of Napoleon Bonaparte • Bourrienne, Constant, and Stewarton

... (1967); note - day of the national referendum to decide whether to remain with the UK or go with Spain ...
— The 2005 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... Kennedy and Elaine had approached the fork, their driver had slowed up, as if in doubt which way to go. Craig had stuck his head out of the window, as I had done, and, seeing the crossroads, had told the chauffeur to stop. There ...
— The Exploits of Elaine • Arthur B. Reeve

... manifestations of it. That is why his stories are short; often mere allusions stand in place of actual development. And whatever domains or corners of Russian life the reader, under the guiding hand of this perspicacious cicerone, may visit, he will almost always go away with one predominating impression: the lamentable isolation ...
— Contemporary Russian Novelists • Serge Persky

... parted she put one arm caressingly about his neck and whispered: "Give me all the hours you can, Charlie, before you must go; they may be all we shall ever ...
— Pocket Island - A Story of Country Life in New England • Charles Clark Munn

... "You had best go on foot, my son. Doubtless men have been set to see that none from the Saxon homesteads carry the warning to the woods. The distance is not beyond your reach, for you have often wandered there, and ...
— Winning His Spurs - A Tale of the Crusades • George Alfred Henty

... every event in life—who cut cards to decide whether they shall go into the City by cab or by underground train, and toss up to see whether they had better dine at home or at the Club, may be interested to know of a new game of chance which can be played at dinnertime, and in which ladies ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 98, February 1, 1890 • Various

... thought of intellectual pursuits, even if Londoners themselves had any conception of an intellectual life. For any trace of such unthought-of, and perhaps, indeed, unheard-of, articles as books, we must go to localities far remote from London—to spots where, happily, the strife and din of savage warfare scarcely made themselves heard. The monasteries were the sole repositories of literature; to the monk alone had the written book any ...
— The Book-Hunter in London - Historical and Other Studies of Collectors and Collecting • William Roberts

... and leap to the inland cities and the frontier villages. And next spring, when the roads were open, would come the men, the regiments of men, on foot, mounted, in long caravans, hastening to California for the gold that was there for anyone who had the strength and hardihood to go. ...
— The Emigrant Trail • Geraldine Bonner

... you are right, dearest," responds Mrs. Talbot sweetly. She is a little afraid of her cousin, but still maintains her position bravely. "It is always a mark of folly to defy public opinion. Do not wait for him to ask you again to go through your play with him alone, but tell him yourself to-morrow that you will meet him for that purpose in the north gallery some time ...
— The Haunted Chamber - A Novel • "The Duchess"

... I was arrested was at Romigny, by General Asebert. I had on me a three-thousand-word story, written that morning in Rheims, telling of the wanton destruction of the cathedral. I asked the General Staff, for their own good, to let the story go through. It stated only facts which I believed were they known to civilized people would cause them to protest against a repetition of such outrages. To get the story on the wire I made to Lieutenant Lucien Frechet and Major Klotz, of ...
— With the Allies • Richard Harding Davis

... and half an ear. Thus was the hare pursued, though free from guilt; Thus, Bob, shall thou be maul'd, fly where thou wilt. Then, honest Robin, of thy corpse beware; Thou art not half so nimble as a hare: Too ponderous is thy bulk to mount the sky; Nor can you go to Hell before you die. So keen thy hunters, and thy scent so strong, Thy turns and doublings cannot save ...
— Poems (Volume II.) • Jonathan Swift

... said Walter, "that the noble Duke has a neighbor of the same stripe to go a hunting with him, the grandeur of this great palace without a friendly neighbor to come in and take a hand at cards or crack a joke with ...
— In Chteau Land • Anne Hollingsworth Wharton

... treatment. He found the females much more vicious than the males. A dog-fox which his party captured lived several months with them, and became so tame in a short time that he regularly attended the dinner-table like a dog, and was always allowed to go at large about the cabin. When newly caught their rage is quite ungovernable, and yet when two are put together they very seldom quarrel. They soon get reconciled to confinement. Captain Lyon[120] notices that their ...
— Heads and Tales • Various

... 'I cannot let you go from us, Charley,' began Mrs. Woodward, 'without telling you how deep a sorrow it has been to me to be so long without seeing you. I know you have thought me ...
— The Three Clerks • Anthony Trollope

... face the world. A woman does not lead the life she had led for years without at least knowing herself well and understanding exactly how far she can rely upon her face and voice. She knew when she rose from the sofa that she could go through the remainder of the day well enough; and though her eyes gleamed hungrily, there was a cynical smile on her lips as she turned over the red cushion, on which there were marks where she had bitten it, and softly unlocked ...
— Taquisara • F. Marion Crawford

... Aurelian was sorely vexed, ran swiftly home and sent his servants in all directions in search of the mendicant who had stolen his wallet. He was found and brought to Aurelian, who, after drubbing him soundly for three days, let him go his way. He afterwards told Clovis all that had passed and what Clotilde suggested. Clovis, pleased with his success and with Clotilde's notion, at once sent a deputation to Gondebaud to demand his niece in ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume I. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... in mount Ephraim, and dwelt therein; and went out from thence, and built Penuel. 26. And Jeroboam said in his heart, Now shall the kingdom return to the house of David: 27. If this people go up to do sacrifice in the house of the Lord at Jerusalem, then shall the heart of this people turn again unto their lord, even unto Rehoboam king of Judah, and they shall kill me, and go again to Rehoboam king of Judah. ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... you have lied, it will go hard with you, understand that. No, I can hear nothing now; tomorrow, perhaps, or next day. Monsieur Villon, place him in safety for to-night, he must not be allowed ...
— The Justice of the King • Hamilton Drummond

... walk, gamble, and carouse, when you are doing nothing worse. I thought you had left Vienna. You had better go upon your estates and attend to the welfare of your vassals. Idleness is the parent of crime, and I fear that if you remain another day in Vienna, you will bring disgrace upon your father's name. Go at once." [Footnote: The emperor's own words to Podstadsky.—"Anecdotes, etc., of the Emperor ...
— Joseph II. and His Court • L. Muhlbach

... my father was greatly attracted by her," Dulcie said, "and I am not surprised. I think she is quite lovely, though in such a curious, irregular way; but besides that there is something awfully 'taking' about her. She doesn't, however, seem to 'go down' very well with the people about here; but then you know what county society is. She seems to have hardly any friends, and to ...
— The Four Faces - A Mystery • William le Queux

... of Zack, came across the river from Virginia into Ohio. He had lain in the woods by day, and traveled by the North Star at night, when it was clear, but in rainy or cloudy weather he found he was as liable to go South as North. There had been much rain to impede his progress, and he suffered much from hunger. He had advanced only a few miles from the river, when he found a family of true friends, who replenished his clothing, and was preparing ...
— A Woman's Life-Work - Labors and Experiences • Laura S. Haviland

... must be connected with child sacrifice. The latter is logically anterior. Their historical relation we do not know. To dedicate a girl to the goddess would be an alternative to the sacrifice of her. All forms of child sacrifice and sacral suicide go back to the pangs and terrors of men under loss and calamity. Something must be found which would wring pity and concession from the awful superior powers who afflict mankind. Every one born under ...
— Folkways - A Study of the Sociological Importance of Usages, Manners, Customs, Mores, and Morals • William Graham Sumner

... Ribsam seemed to take in the whole far-reaching truth. "You must do everything you possibly can," he said, many a time; "you must use your teeth, your hands, and your feet to hang on; you must never let go; you must hammer away; you must always keep your powder dry; you must fight to the last breath, and all the time ask God to help you pull ...
— Through Forest and Fire - Wild-Woods Series No. 1 • Edward Ellis

... and everyone else absolutely in the wrong. Had he owned a more full-blooded life, he would probably have lost his temper, and "spoken his mind," as the saying is, to poor Miss Marlett She certainly should never have let Margaret go with a stranger, on the authority even of a telegram from ...
— The Mark Of Cain • Andrew Lang

... does when he pauses, as occasionally he has to for the purpose of taking breath, is to come to his assistance with short encouraging remarks, such, for instance, as: "Well." "You think that." "And if I did?" Her object seems to be to help him on. "Go on," she says from time to time, bitterly. And he goes on. Towards the end, when he shows signs of easing up, she puts it to him as one sportsman to another: Is he quite finished? Is that all? Sometimes it isn't. As often as not he has been saving the pick ...
— They and I • Jerome K. Jerome

... in various tender ways, but none of them sufficed this time, "You'll marry her as soon as you're a man," she insisted, and she would not let this tragic picture go. It was a case for his biggest efforts, and he opened his mouth to threaten instant self-destruction unless she became happy at once. But he had threatened this too frequently of late, even shown himself drawing the knife ...
— Sentimental Tommy - The Story of His Boyhood • J. M. Barrie

... ruffled up his gray moustache with thumb and forefinger, leaving his mouth open beneath, like a dark cave under a tangled wintry thicket. "Why, that's the doggonedest thing I ever heard!" he said. "I already am the oldest inhabitant down there, but if you go, there won't be anybody else of the old generation at all. What on earth you thinkin' ...
— Alice Adams • Booth Tarkington

... introduce the enemies of Prospero. Do we know at the time of such a person as Prospero? Do we know why the persons are on the ship, where they intended to go or where they are now? When do we find out these things? What idea do you get of Gonzalo in the first scene? Why is his conversation with the boatswain ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8 • Charles H. Sylvester

... name," he insisted. "She should have a name. Soon in another year she goes to school. People will want to know who she is. It can't go on forever like this." ...
— Jennie Gerhardt - A Novel • Theodore Dreiser

... street—omniscient being!—discussed it threadbare on the pavement. A man who knew the Boers was the man in the street. He knew the British army, too, though; and was sanguine of its ability to go one better—the shrewdness of which view was loudly applauded. And he really did much to make morbid people easy, and to lighten the burden of weak minds. The man in the street was respected. It was deemed a privilege to chat on the situation ...
— The Siege of Kimberley • T. Phelan

... sensation which will bring the weak tears in your eyes for the simple reason that you are so happy. Yes, it is a pleasant thing to have been very ill, if only for the sake of the thankful sensation that comes the first time you go out once more in the ...
— To The West • George Manville Fenn

... as the bees would exhaust the honey within their circle or cluster. But on the contrary, when the sun can strike the hive, it warms up the bees, and melts the frost more frequently. The bees may then go among their stores and obtain a supply, generally, as often as needed. We seldom have a winter without sunny days enough for this purpose; but should such an one occur, stocks of this class should be brought ...
— Mysteries of Bee-keeping Explained • M. Quinby

... does not take her away in spite of him. Then the other says: "It would not be right for me to let you take her away; I would sooner fight with you. But if we should wish to fight, we could not possibly do it in this narrow road. Let us go to some level place—a meadow or an open field." And he replies that that will suit him perfectly: "Certainly, I agree to that: you are quite right, this road is too narrow. My horse is so much hampered here that I am afraid he will crush his flank before ...
— Four Arthurian Romances - "Erec et Enide", "Cliges", "Yvain", and "Lancelot" • Chretien de Troyes

... Arabic-English Lexicon, s.v. The Old Testament title "Rock" given to Yahweh (Deut. xxxii, 18, "the Rock that begat thee") is figurative, but may go back to a ...
— Introduction to the History of Religions - Handbooks on the History of Religions, Volume IV • Crawford Howell Toy

... was a war in progress. Some of them realized that events out of the ordinary were transpiring through the suddenly increased demand for their labor and the higher wages offered them. But that Uncle Sam would ever call them to serve in his army and even to go far across seas to a shadowy—to them, far off land, among a strange people; speaking a strange language, had never occurred to most of them even ...
— History of the American Negro in the Great World War • W. Allison Sweeney

... dead, to resist fiercer demons than any that had power to attack him from without. And it is related, that, when St. Charles Borromeo, his friend, the narrow, but pure-minded reformer of the Church, came to Rome, from time to time, he, too, used to go at night to this cemetery, and watch through the long hours in penitence and prayer. Such associations as these give interest to the cemetery of St. ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 7, May, 1858 • Various

... We will go to any length to help you in the cause of Better Food. We realize that women must study this product as they would any other altogether new article of cookery, and that the study and care used will be amply repaid by the palatability ...
— The Story of Crisco • Marion Harris Neil

... was ever marked by devotion to the best interests of his beloved land, and by able and conscientious effort to uphold its dignity and honor. His countrymen will long revere his memory and see in him a type of the patriotism, the uprightness and the zeal that go to molding and strengthening ...
— Messages and Papers of William McKinley V.2. • William McKinley

... all, if you ask me," she added. "I say, Drusie, don't you think we might go up to the Greys' gate, and see if we can get a look at Hal and his precious ...
— A Tale of the Summer Holidays • G. Mockler

... Mrs. Price deserted them at dinner. She was going to sit, she said, with Mrs. Bangster, and Dr. Shaughnessey, and the judge. Mrs. Bangster had made a promise to old Mr. Price in England to look after her; and, therefore, she thought it better to go back to Mrs. Bangster before they reached Southampton. They were now past Gibraltar. So on that day, Mrs. Price's usual chair at dinner was vacant, and Wilkinson, looking down the tables, saw that room had been made for her next to Dr. Shaughnessey. ...
— The Bertrams • Anthony Trollope

... Fleet," replied Morton, staring ahead between the twin funnels of his boat. "I suppose it's the usual weary stunt; go out and steam about trailing the tail of our coat for a couple of days, and then come back again." The speaker gripped the spokes of the wheel almost savagely. "Lord!" he added, "if only they'd ...
— The Long Trick • Lewis Anselm da Costa Ritchie

... thought at first I wouldn't play. But I suppose it's better to go on doing one's ordinary things. You're ...
— The Prelude to Adventure • Hugh Walpole

... wife, was powerless to hold him back! powerless to keep him beside her, when that mad fit of passion seized him to go on one of those wild quests, wherefrom she always feared he could not return alive: and this, although she might use every noble artifice, every tender wile of which a loving and ...
— The Elusive Pimpernel • Baroness Emmuska Orczy

... she said, "and forget it—and all that has gone before. Believe me," she added, with a faint sigh, "it is best. Our paths diverge from this moment. I go to the summer-house, and you go to the Hall, where my father is expecting you." He would have detained her a moment longer, but she glided away ...
— Under the Redwoods • Bret Harte

... not give Bismarck up. In this regard, William was as cold as ice. He saw that should Bismarck be asked to go, at that time, the Liberals would be irresistibly strengthened. The recoil of the mighty wave against kingcraft might even end by forcing abdication for ...
— Blood and Iron - Origin of German Empire As Revealed by Character of Its - Founder, Bismarck • John Hubert Greusel

... the king, "can wrest from me the free authority of disposal which God and the laws give me over my family." "You are king; you weep; and yet I am going away!" said the young girl to her royal lover, who let her go. Mary de Mancini was mistaken; he was not ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume V. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... need fer you ter go an' see things," Rube Carter insisted. "Jus' you have a good rest until you're quite well. Everything's goin' on famous. We've gotten the roof on, an' we're now fixin' up your bedroom, so's you kin occupy it while the rest of the ...
— Kiddie the Scout • Robert Leighton

... solemn because of the tragedy that had doubtless taken place upstairs. He was on the point of sending out a "feeler" about the matter, when he remembered Zoie's solemn injunction to "say nothing to anybody." Perhaps it was even worse than suicide. He dared let his imagination go no further. By the time he had put out his hand to touch the electric button at Zoie's front door, his finger was trembling so that he wondered whether he could hit the mark. The result was a very faint note from the bell, but not so faint that it escaped the ear of the anxious young ...
— Baby Mine • Margaret Mayo

... Plim. They'll go careful until they find there's no one firing back at them, then it won't take 'em long to figure out the way in. You can't tell how much Wyatt told 'em on the way up. They've got me. I can't ride. My lungs are filling up. Butch is paralyzed—if he ain't dead. A hell of a wind-up! ...
— Rimrock Trail • J. Allan Dunn

... hand on it, Drennie," he said. "We start back to New York to-morrow, don't we? Well, when I get there, I put on overalls, and go to work. When I propose next, I'll have ...
— The Call of the Cumberlands • Charles Neville Buck

... passing the cup to her, and pressing each other to drink, we kept feasting until quite far into the night, when at her suggestion another room was sought and a little repose taken. But soon day began to break, and I said I would go home. Then ...
— Japanese Literature - Including Selections from Genji Monogatari and Classical - Poetry and Drama of Japan • Various

... was made to feel what it is for a bishop to be in the hands of an emperor; to taste of the cup so often presented to prelates at Constantinople; to understand in what estimation his sovereign held the vicar of God upon earth. Compelled to go to that metropolis to embrace the theological views which Justinian had put forth, thrice he agreed to them, and thrice he recanted; he excommunicated the Patriarch of Constantinople, and was excommunicated ...
— History of the Intellectual Development of Europe, Volume I (of 2) - Revised Edition • John William Draper

... nor, on the other, of the necessity which there is for their being restrained in them; nor are they capable of understanding the use of many parts of discipline, which, nevertheless, they must be made to go through in order to qualify them for the business of mature age. Were we not able, then, to discover in what respects the present life could form us for a future one, yet nothing would be more supposable ...
— The Age of Pope - (1700-1744) • John Dennis

... handkerchief. P. C. J. Hester Craigmile embroidered those letters." Mary's eyes filled with tears. "Bertrand, we must go to her. She may hear ...
— The Eye of Dread • Payne Erskine

... for even when I went down to Leydenburg I heard that several Englishmen had been maltreated, and one or two shot by Boers they met. I tramped for four days, and as the attack on our troops had been made on the 20th of December, it was now Christmas-eve. I had not ventured to go near a Boer farm, for fortunately I had shot a springbok, and was therefore under no trouble as to food; but on the previous day I had not come across water, and the heat was terrible, so I felt that whatever came of it I must go and ask for a drink. I saw a farmhouse ...
— With Buller in Natal - A Born Leader • G. A. Henty

... member of the human family, "in a Christian state of mind." He held to Jesus, who condemned violence, forbade the entertainment by his disciples of retaliatory feelings and the use of retaliatory weapons. When Jesus said "Love your enemies," he did not mean, "Kill them if they go too far." ...
— William Lloyd Garrison - The Abolitionist • Archibald H. Grimke

... of a shell, drawn by negroes, as substitutes for Tritons. In the evening, the sailors represented, amidst general applause, a comedy of their own composition. These sports, while they serve to keep up the spirits of the men, and make them forget the difficulties they have to go through, produce also the most beneficial influence upon their health; a cheerful man being much more capable of resisting a fit of sickness than a melancholy one. It is the duty of commanders to use every innocent means of maintaining ...
— A New Voyage Round the World in the Years 1823, 24, 25, and 26. Vol. 1 • Otto von Kotzebue

... breaking and a flock of wild-geese trumpeted overhead. The boy heard them, and said, "Boston tilicum" (white man), "does the Great Father tell the geese where to go?" ...
— Myths And Legends Of Our Own Land, Complete • Charles M. Skinner

... affected by the staunch way Fred stood up for his chum; "does he have any idea who could have done it? Perhaps he thinks my old black Mammy did; or poor, but honest, Jake Stall. He was always a fanciful boy, and it might be he suspects I walk in my sleep, and go around secreting my ...
— Fred Fenton on the Crew - or, The Young Oarsmen of Riverport School • Allen Chapman

... commercial capital, is often under a necessity of keeping prices down in order to a more expeditious sale. The maxim that the consumer is the payer, is so much oftener true than the reverse of the proposition, that it is far more equitable that the duties on imports should go into a common stock, than that they should redound to the exclusive benefit of the importing States. But it is not so generally true as to render it equitable, that those duties should form the only national fund. When they are paid by the merchant they ...
— The Federalist Papers

... the morning that greeted Christian Vellacott, as he opened the door of his little Chelsea home and stepped forth a free man. When once he had made up his mind to go, every obstacle was thrown aside, and his determination was now as great as had been his previous reluctance. He had no presentiment that he was taking an important step in life—one of those steps which we hardly notice at the time, but upon which we ...
— The Slave Of The Lamp • Henry Seton Merriman

... match—about the only thing they'd agreed about for five years. And they fixed it up for a Sunday when the old lady and the girls and kids were going on a visit to some relations, about fifteen miles away—to stop all night. The guv'nor made me go with them on horseback; but I knew what was up, and so my pony went lame about a mile along the road, and I had to come back and turn him out in the top paddock, and hide the saddle and bridle in a hollow log, and sneak home ...
— On the Track • Henry Lawson

... a Westerner. 'A man,' he would sometimes say, 'may come by the mystery of childbirth into Omaha or Kansas City and be content, but he can't come by Boston, New York, or Philadelphia.' Then, a moment later, paraphrasing his remark, he would add, 'To go to Omaha or Kansas City by way of New York and Philadelphia is like being translated heavenward with such violence that one passes through—into a ...
— The Bibliotaph - and Other People • Leon H. Vincent

... fire. Look! The door to that room down there seems to be the center of attraction. Hold on! Don't go over there, Lorry. There may be something to unnerve you, and that must not happen now. Let us go down this stairway—it leads to a side entrance, I think. "They were half way down the stairs when the thunder of rushing feet in the hall above came to their ears, causing them to hesitate between ...
— Graustark • George Barr McCutcheon

... it. But wink an eye agin, an' y' git it!" said Burns coldly, advancing. "Now, git back there up agin the corner of the table, an' stand, so 'f anyone comes along you'll appear to be leanin' there, conversin'. Go on, quick!" ...
— The Young Railroaders - Tales of Adventure and Ingenuity • Francis Lovell Coombs

... but that the nerves of your hand have undergone a change. All you hear and see and touch and taste and smell are mere variations of your own condition, beyond which, even to the extent of a hair's-breadth, you cannot go. That anything answering to your impression exists outside of yourself is not a fact, but an inference, to which all validity would be denied by an idealist like Berkeley, or by a ...
— Was Man Created? • Henry A. Mott

... another of the opponents who troubled him, and thus postponed the day of reckoning. Rival plans of constitutional reform were brought forward. The simplest remedy was the repeal of the union, leaving each province to go its own way. But this solution was felt to be a backward step and one which would create more problems than it would solve. More support was given the double majority principle, a provision that no measure affecting one section should be passed unless a majority from that section favored ...
— The Canadian Dominion - A Chronicle of our Northern Neighbor • Oscar D. Skelton

... creetur, have I know'd Mrs. Harris five-and-thirty year, to be told at last that there ain't no sech a person livin'! Go ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, April 8, 1914 • Various

... but I said nothing, hoping he would go away before Kornel saw him; but he kept on, and ...
— Vrouw Grobelaar and Her Leading Cases - Seventeen Short Stories • Perceval Gibbon

... neither did his friend. On the second night the house ghost was seen by the officer; on the third night it showed itself again; and the next morning the officer packed his gripsack and took the first train to Boston. He was a New Yorker, but he said he'd sooner go to Boston than see that ghost again. Eliphalet wasn't scared at all, partly because he never saw either the domiciliary or the titular spook, and partly because he felt himself on friendly terms with the spirit ...
— Humorous Ghost Stories • Dorothy Scarborough

... that we are just beginning," said an American lad who was in the thick of the fight and severely wounded with shrapnel. "It was fine to see our men go at the Huns. All of us, who thought baseball was the great American game, have changed our minds. There is only one game to keep the American flag flying—that is, kill the Huns. I got several before ...
— Kelly Miller's History of the World War for Human Rights • Kelly Miller

... with me aboard the Rainbow. We will go back and see your father. I would not take you without his sanction; but if he approves, we shall have time to get such an outfit as you require, for I do not sail ...
— Roger Willoughby - A Story of the Times of Benbow • William H. G. Kingston

... of the English Church, and have taken Deacon's Orders, but did not think fit (for reasons I need not go into) to take Priest's Orders. My dear father was what is called a "High Churchman," and I naturally adopted those views, but have always felt repelled by the yet higher ...
— The Life and Letters of Lewis Carroll • Stuart Dodgson Collingwood

... woe, punishment, and all mournfulness to the people all the time. Where you find sin, go ahead and denounce it mercilessly; but do it crisply, cuttingly, not dully and innocuously. Speak to kill. Do not forget that the Master told the people of His day that they "were a ...
— The Young Man and the World • Albert J. Beveridge

... changed. When by maturity of age and good effects of penitentiary education, the child instead of being a burden can be a source of profit, we see those same parents, who had abandoned him in his infancy, and apparently had forgotten him altogether, go to him and win him back to them by their entreaties, and finally on his discharge regain him by virtue of parental authority. This indiscretion of evil parents ... is the way that the first-fruits of correctional or charitable ...
— A Plea for the Criminal • James Leslie Allan Kayll

... and looking very strange and startling, darting out so lifelike from the black water, throwing itself fully into the bright sunshine, and then lost to sight and to pursuit. I saw also a long, flat-bottomed boat go up the river, with a brisk wind, and against a strong stream. Its sails were of curious construction: a long mast, with two sails below, one on each side of the boat, and a broader one surmounting them. The sails were colored ...
— Passages From The American Notebooks, Volume 1 • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... made to carry off any water which might appear in the rock. Box drains, 2 ft. wide and 6 ft. from center to center, were placed against the rock, so that, there being but 4 ft. between the drains, and the wall having a minimum thickness of 2 ft., any water in the rock would not have to go more than 2 ft. to reach a drain, and would probably pass along the face of the rock to a drain rather than through 2 ft. of concrete. These drains were connected with pipes leading through ...
— Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, vol. LXVIII, Sept. 1910 • B.F. Cresson, Jr

... the Prince's festival: we have been summoned thither with unwonted circumstance of honour and of courtesy, such as the haughty Normans have rarely used to our race since the fatal day of Hastings. Thither will I go, were it only to show these proud Normans how little the fate of a son, who could defeat their bravest, can ...
— Ivanhoe - A Romance • Walter Scott

... they had worked together he had been patient and very human; he was trying to part now on a pleasant note. "Anything you like to send me . . ." It would certainly be read; for a time he would read it himself—the next three failures, say. And then . . . Eric wondered whether he would be able to go back to journalism. The two successful plays would keep him from starving, but he must make a livelihood again . . . and count every shilling before he spent it. The flat must go. . ...
— The Education of Eric Lane • Stephen McKenna

... come neere your L. L. but with a kind of religious addresse; it hath bin the height of our care, who are the Presenters, to make the present worthy of your H. H. by the perfection. But, there we must also craue our abilities to be considerd, my Lords. We cannot go beyond our owne powers. Country hands reach foorth milke, creame, fruites, or what they haue: and many Nations (we haue heard) that had not gummes & incense, obtained their requests with a leauened Cake. It was no fault to approch their Gods, by what ...
— The Facts About Shakespeare • William Allan Nielson

... decrees of the commonalty, senatorial decrees," and the like which he mentions (Etym. v, 9), all have the same force. Therefore they do not differ, except materially. But art takes no notice of such a distinction: since it may go on to infinity. Therefore this division of human ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I-II (Pars Prima Secundae) - From the Complete American Edition • Saint Thomas Aquinas

... go: perhaps, God knows, into danger, perhaps to some encounter such as might fill the world with awe—to meet those who read the thought in your mind before it comes to your lips. Well! there is no thought in Martin that is ...
— A Beleaguered City • Mrs. Oliphant

... splendid mausoleum at the Cathedral. It was said that miracles were worked at his tomb, that the sick were cured, and that the worldly affairs of those who knelt at his shrine prospered. It became the fashion for men of all classes to go on pilgrimages to his tomb. As robbers infested the highways, the pilgrims usually waited at some inn until there was a sufficient band to resist attack. In time the journey came to be looked on as a holiday, which relieved the monotony of everyday life. About 1385 Chaucer probably went ...
— Halleck's New English Literature • Reuben P. Halleck

... person asked him what he should do to avoid envying another, and Rodaja bade him go to sleep, for, said he, "While you sleep you will be the equal of ...
— The Exemplary Novels of Cervantes • Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra

... Is the sweet Alene gone? Was the dear one foully murdered while I slept? Great God of heaven, can all this be true? Must I go through life unsupported by the brave heart of Alene on which I was depending for ...
— The Hindered Hand - or, The Reign of the Repressionist • Sutton E. Griggs

... know where to go, she will stand gossipping with any fool who asks her a question, and in this time I would wager a piece of twenty sous the police or some other busy-body will have got on the track. What more likely? ...
— Tales from Many Sources - Vol. V • Various

... day Mrs. Mountjoy informed her daughter that they would go back to Cheltenham. She did not name an immediate day, because it would be well, she thought, to stave off the evil hour. Nor did she name a distant day, because, were she to do so, the terrible evil of Harry Annesley's ...
— Mr. Scarborough's Family • Anthony Trollope

... this morning, after taking medicine yesterday. First thing, returned the visit of the Governor. When I go out early, find few persons about the streets. People are up as late in winter as they are early in summer. The Touaricks of the suburban huts do not come to town till very late in the morning, when the Souk begins. His Excellency treated ...
— Travels in the Great Desert of Sahara, in the Years of 1845 and 1846 • James Richardson

... Merefleet. "Go to her and ask her if she will see me alone. If she says 'No,' I give you my word that I will leave this place and trouble neither of ...
— The Odds - And Other Stories • Ethel M. Dell

... she most suffered from was his too-prompt acceptance of the semi-estrangement between them. After nearly three years of marriage she had still to learn that it was Amherst's way to wrestle with the angel till dawn, and then to go about his other business. Her own mind could revolve in the same grievance as interminably as a squirrel in its wheel, and her husband's habit of casting off the accepted fact seemed to betoken poverty of feeling. ...
— The Fruit of the Tree • Edith Wharton

... monarch. It adjoined the state apartments at its northern angle, but had no direct communication with them. To enter it from them the visitor had either to cross the Temple Court and proceed by the passage above indicated, or else to go round by the great entrance (X in the plan ) and obtain admission by the grand portals on the south-west side of the outer court. These latter portals, it is to be observed, are so placed as to command no view into the Hareem Court, though it is opposite to them. The passages by which ...
— The Seven Great Monarchies Of The Ancient Eastern World, Vol 2. (of 7): Assyria • George Rawlinson

... You can't go walking around with any rotten outsider who forces himself into your company," was the most amiable reply he could frame on the spur ...
— The Strange Case of Mortimer Fenley • Louis Tracy

... called spontaneous combustion. When cotton or tow which has become soaked with oil is laid aside in heaps, the oxygen of the air begins to unite with it; but the heat developed causes the oxidation to go on faster and faster, until in some cases the mass bursts into a flame. The same thing sometimes takes place in moist hay, the moisture starting the process, as explained above, and the confined heat increasing until it is sufficient to ...
— Harper's Young People, September 14, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... "I'll go this nugget that the Yankee hits his man at the first fire," cried one fellow, holding up a lump of virgin gold as large as a ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... it so? And must I from my Rosa go? Oh Rosa, say "Good night!" once more, And I'll repeat it o'er and o'er, Till the first glance of dawning light Shall find ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... it does. The principal pleasure of your life is to remind your family of their misfortunes. And the next great pleasure of your existence is to keep low company. But, however, if you have no sense of decency, I have. You'll please to allow me to go on the other ...
— Little Dorrit • Charles Dickens

... their predecessors. Those houses are near sixty feet in length, built harbourwise after their building. This place they count so holey as that but the priests and Kings dare come into them; nor the savages dare not go up the river in boates by it, but that they solemnly cast some piece of copper, white beads or pocones into the river for feare their Okee should be offended and ...
— A Further Contribution to the Study of the Mortuary Customs of the North American Indians • H.C. Yarrow

... at Achin on the island of Sumatra. Dampier and two of his companions started for Nicobar with him, but rough weather forced them to abandon the voyage. He importuned Dampier to make a voyage with him to Persia, but the latter declined, preferring to go to ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898—Volume 39 of 55 • Various

... be lifted into the world of morals and religion; when the polling-booth shall be a beautiful temple, surrounded by fountains and flowers and triumphal arches, through which young men and maidens shall go up in joyful procession to ballot for justice and freedom; and when our election days shall be kept like the holy feasts of the Jews at Jerusalem. Through the trials of this second revolution shall not our nation rise up, with new virtue and strength, to fulfill her mission in leading all ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... William, 12d.; to his son Ralph, 12d.; to his daughter, Elizabeth King, L20 after his wife's death; to his son William's son William, 2s. 6d.; to his daughter Elizabeth, a feather bed; to his daughter Sara, 12d.; to his daughter Robina, 12d.; if John died without heirs, the tenements to go to his sons Ralph and William. His wife Elizabeth executrix; his friend, Mr. William Dance, and his son-in-law, Robert Parsons, overseers. Was it a stepmother's influence that made him cut off his two ...
— Shakespeare's Family • Mrs. C. C. Stopes

... more for its being made by a gentleman, and no blacksmith; and so will my governor, when I show it to him. I shan't let it remain where it is, but will keep it, as a remembrance of you, as long as I live.' He then again rubbed his hands with great glee, and said, 'I will now go and see after my horses, and then to breakfast, partner, if you please.' Suddenly, however, looking at his hands, he said, 'Before sitting down to breakfast, I am in the habit of washing my hands and face: I suppose you could not furnish me with a little soap ...
— The Romany Rye - A Sequel to 'Lavengro' • George Borrow

... for example, is there not in mere Washing! Perhaps one of the most moral things a man, in common cases, has it in his power to do. Strip thyself, go into the bath, or were it into the limpid pool and running brook, and there wash and be clean; thou wilt step out again a purer and a better man. This consciousness of perfect outer pureness, that to thy skin there now adheres no foreign speck of imperfection, how it ...
— Past and Present - Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII. • Thomas Carlyle

... must—go now: Go, with my blessing filling both your hands, And, mid the desert sands Which life drifts deep round every garden wall, Make your new festival Of bud and blossom—red rose and green leaf. No blight born of ...
— The Rainbow and the Rose • E. Nesbit

... the ecclesiastical authorities. After several years of close confinement at Arcetri, during which time he suffered much from rheumatism and continued ill-health, aggravated by grief and mental depression consequent upon the death of his favourite daughter, Galileo applied for permission to go to Florence in order to place himself under medical treatment. This request was granted by the Pope subject to certain conditions, which would be communicated to him when he presented himself at the office of the Inquisition at Florence. These were more severe than he anticipated. He was forbidden ...
— The Astronomy of Milton's 'Paradise Lost' • Thomas Orchard

... "We wouldn't go so far as that, but he did not tell us anything interesting, if that is what you mean," said Grace. "But do come and sit down, we don't dare follow ...
— The Girl Scouts at Sea Crest - The Wig Wag Rescue • Lillian Garis

... or other, I could release a man to go and fight, it would be the next best thing to giving myself. Not here, necessarily; I don't believe we will ever go in. But in ...
— Dangerous Days • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... a little to himself as he thought over the conversation. The general had been nearly bursting with rage, and would not have permitted such opposition from any one else to go unpunished. But Falkenhein was a recognised favourite of the old monarch; he had been the king's hunting-companion for days together, and was surer in his position than even the general in his. So he could not cut up ...
— 'Jena' or 'Sedan'? • Franz Beyerlein

... tedious to relate here her various negotiations, to go over her discourses, conversations, and numerous letters: it would involve a history of the Fronde, and that is not our subject. It will suffice to say that she obtained the esteem of all parties at a time when parties ...
— Political Women (Vol. 1 of 2) • Sutherland Menzies

... about Cornelia. Since that unfortunate morning at Richmond Hill they had never met. If she saw him go up or down Maiden Lane, she made no sign. Several times Arenta's face at her parlour window had given him a passing hope; but Arenta's own love affairs were just then at a very interesting point; and, besides, she regarded ...
— The Maid of Maiden Lane • Amelia E. Barr

... linked together in small tribes, the firm friends of each other, but the sworn enemies of all the world besides. While these dreadful tempests last, the Arabs carry devastation and destruction wherever they go, sparing neither age nor sex, and even ripping open the dead bodies of their victims, to discover whether they have not swallowed their riches for the purpose of concealment. Their barbarity towards Christians ought not to be tried ...
— Lander's Travels - The Travels of Richard Lander into the Interior of Africa • Robert Huish



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