Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Greek mythology   /grik məθˈɑlədʒi/   Listen
Greek mythology

noun
1.
The mythology of the ancient Greeks.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Greek mythology" Quotes from Famous Books



... disconnected stories were told but when we found how much the stories influenced the children's reading, we began to follow a regular program, which has proved more effective than haphazard story telling. Last year we told stories from Greek mythology and Homer and had an attendance of over 5,000 children. The books placed on special story hour shelves ...
— Library Work with Children • Alice I. Hazeltine

... three lines if one has no knowledge beyond the literal meaning of the phrases! "The hollow round of Cynthia's seat" has beauty for that person only who knows something of the Ptolemaic system of astronomy and of the huntress-queen of Greek mythology. ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 10 - The Guide • Charles Herbert Sylvester

... broken in upon by the beatific vision, are ranged the great personages of. Christian history, with the Sacrament in the midst. Another fresco of Raffaelle in the same apartment presents a very different company, Dante alone appearing in both. Surrounded by the muses of Greek mythology, under a thicket of myrtles, sits Apollo, with the sources of Castalia at his feet. On either side are grouped those on whom the spirit of Apollo descended, the classical and Renaissance poets, to whom the waters of ...
— The Renaissance - Studies in Art and Poetry • Walter Pater

... the air has been the dream of mankind for uncounted centuries. As far back as we have historic records we find stories of the attempts of men to fly. The earliest Greek mythology is full of aeronautical legends, and the disaster which befell Icarus and his wings of wax when exposed to the glare of the midsummer sun in Greece, is part of the schoolboy's task in Ovid. We find like traditions in the ...
— Aircraft and Submarines - The Story of the Invention, Development, and Present-Day - Uses of War's Newest Weapons • Willis J. Abbot

... the very period on which we are now engaged. I said that he seems to be justified in concluding that there was a popular idea of such a kind, which the State religion did not recognise; but that it can very easily be explained as the natural effect of a degenerate Greek mythology, popularised by Greek dramas adapted to the Roman stage, upon certain peculiarities of the Roman theology, and especially the functional combination of male and female divine names in Italian invocations of the deities. Nothing could be more natural than that playwrights should ...
— The Religious Experience of the Roman People - From the Earliest Times to the Age of Augustus • W. Warde Fowler

... as man's companion and helper from the earliest times. In Greek mythology horses play a very important part, as every one knows who has read the stories of Arion and the winged horse Pegasus. The most famous horse in history probably was Bucephalus (Bull Head), who belonged to Alexander the Great. Alexander was the son of ...
— Friends and Helpers • Sarah J. Eddy

... alike in Assyria, Egypt, among the Jews, Phoenicians, and ancient Britons, kings' names were formed out of the names of the gods, is fully explained. The genesis of Polytheism out of Fetishism, by the successive migrations of the race of god-kings to the other world—a genesis illustrated in the Greek mythology, alike by the precise genealogy of the deities, and by the specifically asserted apotheosis of the later ones—tends further to bear it out. It explains the fact that in the old creeds, as in the still ...
— Essays on Education and Kindred Subjects - Everyman's Library • Herbert Spencer

... battle-field. Even the sacred writings introduce us to Nimrod, the first mighty hunter before the Lord, and tell us that Ishmael, in the solitudes of Arabia, became a skilful bow-man; and that David, when yet young, was not afraid to join in combat with the lion or the bear. The Greek mythology teems with hunting exploits. Hercules overthrows the Nemaean lion, the Erymanthean boar, and the hydra of Lerna; Diana descends to the earth, and pursues the stag; whilst Aesculapius, Nestor, Theseus, Ulysses, and Achilles ...
— The Book of Household Management • Mrs. Isabella Beeton

... furniture with conveniences for writing, as an opening top or falling front panel, places for inkstand, pens, and stationery, etc."—Century Dictionary. PROCRUSTEAN BED: In Greek mythology, Procrustes (derivatively "the stretcher") was a giant who tied those whom he caught on a bed, making them fit by stretching them out if too short, and by cutting off their limbs ...
— The Short-story • William Patterson Atkinson

... and fancy which men call legend reached its fullest and richest expression in the golden age of Greece, and thus it is to Greek mythology that one must turn for the best form of any legend which foreshadows history. Yet the prevalence of legends regarding flight, existing in the records of practically every race, shows that this form of transit was a dream of many peoples—man always wanted ...
— A History of Aeronautics • E. Charles Vivian

... Science of Language, vol. ii. p. 468, he tells us that "Zeus, the most sacred name in Greek mythology, is the same word as Dyaus in Sanscrit, Jovis or Ju in Jupiter in Latin, Tiw in Anglo-Saxon, preserved in Tiwsdaeg, Tuesday, the day of the Eddic god ...
— History of Religion - A Sketch of Primitive Religious Beliefs and Practices, and of the Origin and Character of the Great Systems • Allan Menzies

... of both Jew and Gentile agree in ascribing to woman a primary agency in the introduction of human evils. In the Greek Mythology, she is indeed not the first offender; but she is the bearer of the box that contained all the crimes and diseases which have punished our world for the abuse of liberty. It is worthy of remark that Pandora, who is the ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... strengthen us for our attempts, and to bear us up when our own weak wings fail. The Psalmist sang that angels' hands should bear up God's servant. That is little compared with this promise of being carried heavenwards on Jehovah's own pinions. A vile piece of Greek mythology tells how Jove once, in the guise of an eagle, bore away a boy between his great wings. It is foul where it stands, but it is blessedly true about Christian experience. If only we lay ourselves on God's ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... Rome, nor himself, but a view into the enchanted gardens of the Greek mythology. This path I followed, have been following ever since; and now, life half over, it seems to me, as in my childhood, that every thought of which man is susceptible, is intimated there. In those young years, indeed, ...
— Memoirs of Margaret Fuller Ossoli, Vol. I • Margaret Fuller Ossoli

... of broken gods, headless divinities. I tried to believe in Greek mythology; to fancy that the world had gone backwards, and that there were spirits of the earth and air, that took part in the life of man. But these were poetic visions that shifted and waved with every fleeting fancy. But now this would be a pleasant faith. What if I could ...
— Words of Cheer for the Tempted, the Toiling, and the Sorrowing • T. S. Arthur

... selection of a player for the leading role, that of Pallas Athene, the beautiful goddess of Greek mythology, was successfully accomplished when Miss Genevieve Clark, the pretty and vivacious daughter of Speaker Clark, consented to take the part. Those who know Miss Clark and Greek mythology will realise at once that there will be a natural affinity between ...
— Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, July 8, 1914 • Various

... strong and so tremendously vivid! I think those nice girls you read of in the Greek mythology must have been like that," ...
— A Hoosier Chronicle • Meredith Nicholson

... little need be said here. As represented in the creation story, he was freer in his movements than any of the planets. He passed across the heavens daily as an overseer to see that everything was maintained in good order. As in Greek mythology, the sun was represented as riding in a chariot drawn by horses.[825] Scientific speculation advanced but little upon these popular fancies. The course that the sun took on the ecliptic was determined, and the ecliptic itself served as the guide for determining ...
— The Religion of Babylonia and Assyria • Morris Jastrow

... ritual. These factors rarely if ever occur in complete separation; they are blended in very varying proportions. Religion we have seen was in the last century regarded mainly in its theoretical aspect as a doctrine. Greek religion for example meant to most educated persons Greek mythology. Yet even a cursory examination shows that neither Greek nor Roman had any creed or dogma, any hard and fast formulation of belief. In the Greek Mysteries (See my "Prolegomena to the Study of Greek Religion", page 155, Cambridge, ...
— Darwin and Modern Science • A.C. Seward and Others

... puzzle which men have so long found it. For, observe, Greek myth does not represent merely a humorous play of fancy, dealing with things religiously sacred as if by way of relief from the strained reverential contemplation of the majesty of Zeus. Many stories of Greek mythology are such as could not cross, for the first time, the mind of a civilised Xenophanes or Theagenes, even in a dream. THIS was the ...
— Myth, Ritual, and Religion, Vol. 1 • Andrew Lang

... of Cypselus. The stratagem by which the town of Gabii is brought under the power of the Tarquins is, again, obviously copied from Herodotus. The embassy of the young Tarquins to the oracle at Delphi is just such a story as would be told by a poet whose head was full of the Greek mythology; and the ambiguous answer returned by Apollo is in the exact style of the prophecies which, according to Herodotus, lured Croesus to destruction. Then the character of the narrative changes. From the first mention ...
— Lays of Ancient Rome • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... protection of the raven, first cause of all things.[4] Strange to say, this bird also plays an important part amongst the Kadiaks, who are Esquimaux. According to Lutke, the Kaloches have a tradition of a deluge and some fables which recall those of the Greek mythology. ...
— Celebrated Travels and Travellers - Part III. The Great Explorers of the Nineteenth Century • Jules Verne

... According to Greek mythology, Hermes made a lyre, which is a kind of harp, out of the shell of a tortoise, and on a vase in the Museum at Munich is a figure of Polyhymnia playing a harp with thirteen strings, of the form which was used ...
— Chatterbox, 1906 • Various

... able, among other things, to enter into a view about the gods which is as far removed from what we should describe as religious sentiment, as it is from the frigid ingenuity of those later poets who regarded the deities of Greek mythology as so many wheels in the supernatural machinery with which it pleased them to carry on the action of their pieces. If we are to accept Mr. Herbert Spencer's views as to the progress of our species, changes of sentiment are likely to occur ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol 3 • Various

... opposite theory interpreted myths by an Euhemeristic process, or allegorized them by regarding them as originally descriptions of the physical processes of nature. In the present century Creuzer (Symbolik, 1810) applied the method of comparison, and, studying Greek mythology in correlation with that of other countries, taught in a Neo-Platonic sense that myths are a second language, the echo of nature in the consciousness. Creuzers system was opposed by Lobeck about 1824, Voss, and ...
— History of Free Thought in Reference to The Christian Religion • Adam Storey Farrar

... from Tantalus, a Phyrgian king who, according to Greek mythology, was punished in the lower world by being placed in a lake of pure water up to his chin, while there hung over him luscious fruit, the fruit and the water receding whenever he sought to satisfy his hunger or thirst. Hence tantalize means to tease or torment by presenting something desirable ...
— Orthography - As Outlined in the State Course of Study for Illinois • Elmer W. Cavins

... Circe, according to Greek mythology, was an enchantress, who dwelt in the island of AEaea, and who possessed the power to transform men into beasts. (See any mythological text on Ulysses' wanderings.) In Arnold's fantastic, visionary poem, the magic potion, by which this transformation is accomplished, ...
— Matthew Arnold's Sohrab and Rustum and Other Poems • Matthew Arnold

... but whose love is fatal, for after a few months the sun's power begins to wane. Gilgamesh, who in incantation hymns is invoked in terms which show that he was conceived as a sun-god, [117] recalls to the goddess how she changed her lovers into animals, like Circe of Greek mythology, and brought them to grief. Enraged at Gilgamesh's insult to her vanity, she flies to her father Anu and cries for revenge. At this point the episode of the creation of the bull is introduced, ...
— An Old Babylonian Version of the Gilgamesh Epic • Anonymous

... "apple-island." It was like the Hesperides of Greek mythology, the western islands where grew the golden ...
— The Book of Hallowe'en • Ruth Edna Kelley

... the giant. Longfellow's poem "Enceladus" emphasizes this reference. For the story of the giants and the punishment of Enceladus see any good Greek mythology. ...
— Selections From American Poetry • Various

... importance of Ovid in literature and his gift to posterity lay in the new and vivid life which he imparted to the fables of Greek mythology. 'No other classical poet has furnished more ideas than Ovid to the Italian poets and painters of the Renaissance, and to our own poets—from Chaucer to Pope, ...
— Helps to Latin Translation at Sight • Edmund Luce

... In Greek mythology perhaps the best-known statement was made by Hesiod: to him it was revealed, regarding the men of the most ancient times, that they were at first "a golden race," that "as gods they were wont to live, ...
— History of the Warfare of Science with Theology in Christendom • Andrew Dickson White

... GREEK MYTHOLOGY. No spectacle can be presented to the thoughtful mind more solemn, more mournful, than that of the dying of an ancient religion, which in its day has given consolation to ...
— History of the Conflict Between Religion and Science • John William Draper

... supremely shapely and graceful; gentle, almost, in spite of his holding out with his light nervous arm the snaky head of the slaughtered Gorgon. His name is Perseus, and you may read his story, not in the Greek mythology, but in the memoirs of Benvenuto Cellini. Glancing from one of these fine fellows to the other, I probably uttered some irrepressible commonplace of praise, for, as if provoked by my voice, a man rose from the ...
— The Madonna of the Future • Henry James

... then, had their native or aboriginal deities (differing in number and in attributes with each different tribe), and with them rests the foundation of the Greek mythology. They required no Egyptian wisdom to lead them to believe in superior powers. Nature was their primeval teacher. But as intercourse was opened with the East from the opposite Asia—with the North ...
— Athens: Its Rise and Fall, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... the Brave—our St. George—possesses many of the attributes of Perun. He is, however, a purely mythical character, and the extremely ancient religious poems relating to him present the most amusing mixture of Christianity and Greek mythology, ...
— A Survey of Russian Literature, with Selections • Isabel Florence Hapgood

... where it would seem they first met with genuine Greek wine, that is, wine mixed with resin and lime—a more odious draught at the first taste than any drug the apothecary mixes. Considering how much of allegory entered into the composition of the Greek mythology, it is probable that in representing the infant Bacchus holding a pine, the ancient sculptors intended an impersonation of the circumstance of resin being employed to ...
— The Life of Lord Byron • John Galt

... Phosphorus, the bearer of the dawn, translated into Latin as Lucifer, the Light-bearer. The son of Eos, or Aurora, and the Titan Astraeus, he was of the same parentage as the other multitude of the starry host, to whom a similar origin was ascribed, and from whom in Greek mythology he was evidently believed to differ only in the superior order of his brightness. Homer, who mentions the planet ...
— Young Folks' Library, Volume XI (of 20) - Wonders of Earth, Sea and Sky • Various

... pictures of lovers sitting in shady groves, exchanging their tributes of love and of friendship, their hopes and fears of the future; no temples of knowledge where philosophers and learned matrons discussed great questions of human destiny, such as Greek mythology gives to us; Socrates and Plato, learning wisdom at the feet of the Diametias of their times, give to us a glimpse of a more exalted type of womanhood than any which the sacred fabulists have vouchsafed ...
— The Woman's Bible. • Elizabeth Cady Stanton

... was the old Aryan god of the shining sky. But the Greek conception, even of the chief deity, differed from the Roman. When the Romans came into intercourse with the Greeks, they identified the Greek divinities with their own, and more and more appropriated the tales of the Greek mythology, linking them to their own deities. Of the early worship peculiar to the Romans, we know but little. But certain traits always belonged to the Roman religion. Their mood was too prosaic to invent a theogony, to originate ...
— Outline of Universal History • George Park Fisher

... Sphinx Byronic ... Horatian ... Don Giovanni ... Beethoven. The Sirens were the famous women of Greek mythology, who lured mariners to destruction by the overpowering sweetness of their songs. How Ulysses outwitted them is well-known to all readers of the Odyssey. One of Tennyson's earlier poems, The Sea-Fairies, deals with the same theme, and indeed it ...
— Essays of Robert Louis Stevenson • Robert Louis Stevenson

... the names in the myths are very obscure, the myths themselves are clear enough. Similar myths abound in Greek mythology. The story about Bil and Hjuke is our old English rhyme about Jack and Gill, who went up the hill to fetch ...
— The Younger Edda - Also called Snorre's Edda, or The Prose Edda • Snorre



Words linked to "Greek mythology" :   Atlantides, Stheno, Antigone, Gaia, pythoness, Rhadamanthus, Hypnos, Urania, Ge, Leda, hellhound, calliope, Jason, Pontos, sphinx, Orion, triton, Hesperides, Trojan War, Thanatos, Cynthia, Odysseus, argonaut, Apollo, Pythia, Athene, harpy, Cora, Eurydice, Philemon, ichor, Ganymede, Nereid, Gaea, chimaera, Sterope, Pontus, phoebe, Styx, Themis, Aidoneus, Helen, Hebe, Colchis, classical mythology, water nymph, psyche, boreas, Laertes, Sarpedon, Pygmalion, Proteus, Laocoon, Galatea, chimera, hector, maenad, Demeter, Medea, calypso, Mnemosyne, Selene, Leander, Priam, Typhon, Cadmus, daphne, Oedipus, Polyhymnia, Laius, Titaness, Ares, oracle of Delphi, Creon, Io, Tethys, Perseus, myrmidon, Aegisthus, naiad, narcissus, Hermaphroditus, Penelope, Augeas, Melpomene, Oread, Hestia, Alcyone, Oceanus, Eris, Phaethon, Liakoura, Patroclus, Euryale, Eos, Aglaia, amazon, Minotaur, Artemis, Pallas, Pasiphae, Agamemnon, Nyx, titan, Hephaestus, Thetis, Oceanid, Atreus, River Styx, Parnassus, Hermes, bacchante, hymen, Aides, zephyr, Elysium, King Oedipus, Cerberus, Pallas Athene, sea nymph, cyclops, Iapetus, Charybdis, Damon and Pythias, grace, Hyades, Erato, Helen of Troy, Erebus, Dardanus, Cocus, Pallas Athena, Poseidon, Gorgon, python, Kore, goat god, Jocasta, Asterope, Euphrosyne, Nestor, nemesis, Helios, Hades, Scylla, Dionysian, medusa, Chiron, Orestes, argus, Clio, River Acheron, Geryon, stentor, Nemean lion, eros, Tyche, Charon, Circe, Menelaus, Niobe, adonis, Tantalus, Dionysus, Zeus, hydra, Nereus, Mount Parnassus, Phoebus, Uranus, Hyperion, Clytemnestra, Pandora's box, Hephaistos, Daedalus, Temple of Apollo, Iphigenia, Cassiopeia, Thalia, River Cocytus, Athena, Cronus, pan, Tiresias, Theseus, Cocytus, Elysian Fields, Theia, Oedipus Rex, River Lethe, terpsichore, daedal, bacchant, Procrustes, Doris, Bellerophon, Demogorgon, Acheron, Thea, atlas, Lethe, Icarus, andromeda, Epimetheus, Pleiades, Hyperborean, Pegasus, Hygeia, echo, Electra, Ouranos, Pandora, Orpheus, Phoebus Apollo, Euterpe, Paris, Hecate, hero, Oracle of Apollo, Nike, chaos, Cepheus, Typhoeus, Augean stables, Crius, Despoina, Cassandra, Delphic oracle, halcyon, Persephone, Prometheus, Pluto



Copyright © 2022 Diccionario ingles.com