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Guess   /gɛs/   Listen
Guess

noun
1.
A message expressing an opinion based on incomplete evidence.  Synonyms: conjecture, hypothesis, speculation, supposition, surmisal, surmise.
2.
An estimate based on little or no information.  Synonyms: dead reckoning, guessing, guesswork, shot.



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"Guess" Quotes from Famous Books



... "I guess she can," quoth he. "She will skim like a bird over the snow; so get into the sleigh, and we will go straight ...
— Life in the Clearings versus the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... and half the rest, that there was an end of this terrible strenuosity, this taking of the Gods (good harmless useful fictions—probably fictions) so fearfully in earnest: I wonder how many there were to guess how near the end of the world had come? The cataclysm was much more sudden and over-whelming than we commonly think; and to have prophesied, in Roman society, in the year 363, that in a century's time the empire and all its culture would be things ...
— The Crest-Wave of Evolution • Kenneth Morris

... sheer laziness, nothing else or her garments were only constructed for sitting down in. I stayed for a quarter of an hour trying to penetrate the gloom, to guess what her surroundings were like, while she stuck out ...
— Under the Deodars • Rudyard Kipling

... simply; and this was the only description of the interview between father and son which was vouchsafed to any one. But Lieutenant Sutch knew the father and knew the son. He could guess at all which that one adjective implied. Harry Feversham told the results of ...
— The Four Feathers • A. E. W. Mason

... answer. Though he could discuss Alice Rokeby, one of those vague, sweet women who seem designed by Nature to develop the sentiment of chivalry in the breast of man, he felt that it would be disloyal to speak lightly of his hero, John Benham. "You could never guess where I've been," he said with relief because he had got rid of the subject. "I might as well tell you in the beginning that I have just left ...
— One Man in His Time • Ellen Glasgow

... ... the last evening. It must all end. I have played like a child about a thing I did not guess.... I have played a-dream about the snares of fate.... Who has awakened me all at once? I shall flee, crying out for joy and woe like a blind man fleeing from his burning house.... I am going to tell her I shall flee.... My father is out of danger; ...
— Pelleas and Melisande • Maurice Maeterlinck

... you did,' said Gashford, smiling, and folding up the document again. 'Your friend, I might have guessed—indeed I did guess—was sure to ...
— Barnaby Rudge • Charles Dickens

... "Ha, lung, I guess," said the doctor, examining a small clean wound high up in the left breast. "Better send for an ambulance, Sergeant, and hurry them up. The sooner we get him to the hospital, the better. And here is another ...
— The Foreigner • Ralph Connor

... said Glaucon, laughing, that the word 'every one' hardly includes me, for I cannot at the moment say what they should be; though I may guess. ...
— The Republic • Plato

... "That's true. That's what made me so easy about it. I knew I could leave it off ANY time. Well, I will not disturb you any longer, Miss Galbraith." He throws his overcoat across his arm, and takes up his travelling-bag. "I have failed to guess your fatal- -conundrum; and I have no longer any excuse for remaining. I am going into the smoking-car. Shall I send the porter to ...
— The Parlor-Car • William D. Howells

... and he encountered darkness like a bride, and greeted the unseen death not with a cheer as a peril to be boldly faced, but as a great consummation, the supreme safety. How his poetry would have reacted to the actual experience of war we can only guess. But in others, his friends and comrades, the fierce immersion in the welter of ruin and pain and filth and horror and death brought only a more superb faith in the power of man's soul to rise above the hideous obsession of his own ...
— Recent Developments in European Thought • Various

... his brain was clearing he felt sure that his capture was the work of Moran, doubtless planned as a revenge for the events of their last meeting, although what shape this revenge was to take the cattleman could not guess. He feared that he would either be shot or left to starve in this cul-de-sac in the hills. The thought of all that he and his friends had suffered through Moran lashed the ranchman temporarily to fury; but that he soon controlled as well as he could, for he found its only result ...
— Hidden Gold • Wilder Anthony

... about the middle of dinner, just in fact as the saddle of mutton had been brought in by Smither, that Mrs. MacAnder, looking airily round, said: "Oh! and whom do you think I passed to-day in Richmond Park? You'll never guess—Mrs. Soames and—Mr. Bosinney. They must have been down ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... dignities play strongly on the fancy. As a madman is apt to think himself grown suddenly great, so he that grows suddenly great is apt to borrow a little from the madman. To co-operate with their resentment would be to promote their phrenzy; nor is it possible to guess to what they might proceed, if to the new title of Solicitor, should be added the elation of victory ...
— Life Of Johnson, Volume 4 (of 6) • Boswell

... know but she's took care of, but I guess she don't get much coddlin'. Lucretia an' Maria ain't that kind—never was. I heerd the other day they was goin' to have a Christmas-tree down to the school-house. Now I'd be will-in' to ventur' consider'ble that child don't have a ...
— Young Lucretia and Other Stories • Mary E. Wilkins

... accelerated pace of their lives balanced it out. In the beginning, something like four of our days was a lifetime. So they lived, grew, developed, evolved. They learned to communicate. They became civilized—far more so than we have, according to them. And I guess that was true. They were even able to extend their life span to ...
— Inside John Barth • William W. Stuart

... possibilities of a precipice. But I did not ask Mr. Powell anxiously what had happened to Mrs. Anthony in the end. I let him go on in his own way feeling that no matter what strange facts he would have to disclose, I was certain to know much more of them than he ever did know or could possibly guess . . . " ...
— Chance • Joseph Conrad

... of many: Erskine Branch of Company D, Seventy-seventh New York, when his leg was torn to shreds by a shell, hobbled off on the sound one and his gun, singing "The Star Spangled Banner." Corporal Henry West was shot through the thigh, and he was brought to the rear. "I guess," said he "that old Joe West's son has lost a leg." The corporal died soon after. While in the hospital, suffering from extreme anguish, a wounded man at his side lamented that he had come to the war. "I am not sorry that I came," ...
— Three Years in the Sixth Corps • George T. Stevens

... brands of silk which we've brought in. Some one to whom we've offered them has notified the Stewart company. At this moment and as we sit here, the detectives belonging to Stewart, and for all I may guess, the whole Central Office as well, are on our track. They want to discover who has these silks; and how they came in, since the customs records show no such importations. And there's a dark characteristic to these silks. Each bolt has its ...
— The Onlooker, Volume 1, Part 2 • Various

... you like, at the bold reply, Answer disdainfully, flouting my words: How should the listener at simple sixteen Guess what a foolish old rhymer could mean Calmly predicting, "You will surely fly"— Fish one might vie with, but ...
— Ionica • William Cory (AKA William Johnson)

... "I guess you'll catch 'em all right!" put in Ned, who was at his chum's side as they walked along a quiet Shopton street in the darkness. "There's not an aeroplane going that can ...
— Tom Swift and his Great Searchlight • Victor Appleton

... wonder how I could draw such a doctrine from these spinners of hypothesis. I will tell you. I had heard them severally maintain—Try to guess what!—Not in seven years, though you were to do nothing else.—You I suppose like me have heard that liberty, security, and property are the three main pillars of political happiness?—Well then, these professors maintain that individual property is a general evil!—What ...
— Anna St. Ives • Thomas Holcroft

... trail and that was the general topic of conversation the balance of the day. If they had been on foot we could easily have told what tribe they belonged to by their moccasin tracks, but they all being on horseback left us to guess. ...
— Thirty-One Years on the Plains and In the Mountains • William F. Drannan

... said Mrs. Belloc after a reflective silence. "I guess a girl who goes and gets a good job, first crack out of the box, must have a ...
— The Price She Paid • David Graham Phillips

... —se come to an end. acacia f. acacia. acariciar cherish, soothe, caress. acaso adv. perchance, perhaps. accin f. action, feat. acento m. accent, voice, words, tone. acercar approach, bring near; —se approach. acero m. steel. acertar guess aright, tell certainly, ascertain, divine. acompaar accompany, follow. acudir assist, hasten to assistance, come, appear. achacar blame, impute, attribute. adelantar(se) advance, proceed, hasten. adelante adv. onward, on, farther, forward. ademn m. gesture, ...
— El Estudiante de Salamanca and Other Selections • George Tyler Northup

... Squire's Yeoman, who formed one of his party of pilgrims, "A forester was he truly as I guess," and tells us that "His arrows drooped not with feathers low, And in his hand he bare a mighty bow." When a halt was made one day at a wayside inn, bearing the old sign of the "Chequers," this yeoman consented to give the company an exhibition of his skill. Selecting ...
— The Canterbury Puzzles - And Other Curious Problems • Henry Ernest Dudeney

... "I guess that on the time appointed for the opening of this paper we, i.e. Charlotte, Anne, and I, shall be all merrily seated in our own sitting-room in some pleasant and flourishing seminary, having just ...
— The Three Brontes • May Sinclair

... ef I went over thar I'd gain me some enemies," he said. "Hit 'pears like ye made a right shrewd guess ... read thet.... I found hit nailed ter my door when I come home ...
— The Roof Tree • Charles Neville Buck

... and many chapters entirely rewritten, as the consequence not so much of any material change in Godwin's views, as of the profit he had derived from private controversies. Condorcet (though he is never mentioned) is, if one may make a guess, the chief of the new influences apparent in the second edition. It is more cautious, more visibly the product of a varied experience than the first draft, but it abandons none of his leading ideas. A third edition appeared in 1799, toned down still ...
— Shelley, Godwin and Their Circle • H. N. Brailsford

... the Chisholm crossing on Red River, I felt certain that I would find a letter, but I didn't. I wrote her from there, but when we reached Caldwell, nary a letter either. The same luck at Abilene. Try as I might, I couldn't make it out. Something was wrong, but what it was, was anybody's guess. ...
— A Texas Matchmaker • Andy Adams

... believe me when I tell you that I bought a brace of ptarmigans, bought them myself at the market for—guess!" ...
— Married • August Strindberg

... Sapsucks gittin' down to biz, Weedin' out the lonesomeness; Mr. Bluejay, full o' sass, In them base-ball clothes o' his, Sportin' 'round the orchard jes' Like he owned the premises! Sun out in the fields kin sizz, But flat on yer back, I guess, In the shade's where glory is! That's jes' what I'd like to do Stiddy fer a ...
— Standard Selections • Various

... always easy for the strong and crafty to twist him into new shapes for all kinds of unnatural purposes. The popular instinct sees in such developments the possibility of backs bowed and hunch-backed for their burden, or limbs twisted for their task. It has a very well-grounded guess that whatever is done swiftly and systematically will mostly be done by a successful class and almost solely in their interests. It has therefore a vision of inhuman hybrids and half-human experiments much in the style of Mr. Wells's "Island of Dr. Moreau." The rich man may ...
— What's Wrong With The World • G.K. Chesterton

... the explanation!" He climbed in and took his seat beside her. "That's another thing that disguised you. How was I to guess that you'd wangle a Staff car to ...
— The Kingdom Round the Corner - A Novel • Coningsby Dawson

... over a crevice or fissure between both, appears to be eight or ten feet wide, having on either side smooth precipices like walls, but some parts broken between them. The river finding this chasm pours all its water into it headlong from a height, according to guess, of about eighty feet; and all this pouring water must break upon the undermost piece of stone lying in the crevice, which causes a great roaring and foaming, so that persons standing there, side ...
— Journal of Jasper Danckaerts, 1679-1680 • Jasper Danckaerts

... The sentinel accompanying me, pointed out the bush. I did not like to fire into it, lest I should give a false alarm. I watched it about ten minutes, and there was not the least movement. "I guess," I said, "it is nothing but a bush." But at that moment, I perceived a very slight agitation of the branches. It proved that ...
— Christopher Carson • John S. C. Abbott

... other person was it would not have required a very keen observer to guess, from a certain eagerness in Mr. Gilfil's glance as that little figure in white tripped along the lawn with the cushions. Captain Wybrow, too, was looking in the same direction, but his handsome face remained ...
— Scenes of Clerical Life • George Eliot

... don't want to go with Strasoldo, and I thought you would protect me. Nobody will be able to guess where I am, and Strasoldo will be obliged to go by himself. You will not be so cruel as ...
— The Memoires of Casanova, Complete • Jacques Casanova de Seingalt

... aware than myself of its fearful resources, whether in England or Spain, in Italy or in any other part. I should not be now in this situation had I been permitted to act alone. How much more would have been accomplished, it does not become me to guess. ...
— The Life of George Borrow • Herbert Jenkins

... the ultimate putt was holed out in each notable duel How grandly they took it, remarking "I think (or I guess) That the right man has conquered," not shouting that Fortune was cruel, Not murmuring, "Bless!" What a glory illumined their features when snapped ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, June 3, 1914 • Various

... inquired at Mr B. if he could recommend me to any cheap and respectable lodging. After applying some thought to the subject, he began to recollect that he did know of one or two. With regard to one the address was rather imperfect, as he knew neither the name nor the number, but had a guess of the street. The other I discovered, and now occupy, although he gave me both a ...
— The Book-Hunter - A New Edition, with a Memoir of the Author • John Hill Burton

... feminine wear she put on, one after the other, till her neck and arms were loaded—and literally blazed with the myriad scintillations of different-colored gems. I marveled at her strange conduct, but did not as yet guess its meaning. I moved away from the staircase and drew imperceptibly nearer to her—Hark! what was that? A strange, low rumbling like a distant earthquake, followed by a sharp cracking sound; I stopped ...
— Vendetta - A Story of One Forgotten • Marie Corelli

... Porter—is she married? I stole a kiss the day I left. And so the coachman is dead? and you have given the reins to Jenkins, and have taken my little fellow on your own establishment? And Ponto? and Ranger? and my friend Guess?" ...
— A Love Story • A Bushman

... that Joe Miles cannot guess the quality and errand of his guests, but this time he is floored. Has that young spark run away from home? I hardly think so, for he speaks gravely, and without haste; lads who have run away may generally be known by their speaking in a hurry, and as if anxious. They are ...
— The Cornet of Horse - A Tale of Marlborough's Wars • G. A. Henty

... did," said Angela reassuringly. "That's why she left I guess. She may be in bad in some way, and so she went off not to get you mixed ...
— Eve to the Rescue • Ethel Hueston

... said excitedly, "we're going to get our three days' cut, and oh, guess what's happened! Patty Paine's mother's here—we just left her down in the reception-room, and she's invited us all—the Lambs—down to her summer home in Maine at a place called Sargentville. They have a cottage there, and she's going ...
— Blue Bonnet in Boston - or, Boarding-School Days at Miss North's • Caroline E. Jacobs

... not the weather—not because we forgot to wind it up—not because things did not go right in the room. Now, your mind is something like a clock. If it is kept in order, it will run pretty well, I guess—no matter whether it rains or shines—whether it is winter or summer. Milton says, very beautifully, in his poem called ...
— Wreaths of Friendship - A Gift for the Young • T. S. Arthur and F. C. Woodworth

... spoken the truth. The corner of the raft had impinged against some ice that was piled on the beach. The gloom was too deep for any one to see more than a few rods, so that Tim, who had traversed the sheet of water before, was unable to guess where ...
— Klondike Nuggets - and How Two Boys Secured Them • E. S. Ellis

... didn't. I just felt that something was going to happen and then we struck the boat. I guess it's all right and we'd better get the Fortuna with her nose into it or we'll roll the engines off their beds. This is ...
— Boy Scouts in Southern Waters • G. Harvey Ralphson

... dinner. It was a dinner that had every appurtenance that a good dinner should have, including the best things to drink that could be obtained, and lashings of them. I proceeded at that dinner just as I had proceeded at scores of similar dinners in my time—hundreds of them, I guess—and took a drink every time anybody else did. I was a seasoned drinker. I knew how to do it. I went home that night pleasantly jingled, but no more. I slept well, ate a good breakfast and went down to business. On the way down ...
— Cutting It out - How to get on the waterwagon and stay there • Samuel G. Blythe

... cakes are so like real macaroons that no one who had not seen the recipe would guess how ...
— A Little Cook Book for a Little Girl • Caroline French Benton

... of anything that might be painful to you," said Schrotter, with kindly forethought. "I can guess the drift of it, and now understand your last letter. I thought you would probably be in a frame of mind to need a friend near you, and so I ...
— The Malady of the Century • Max Nordau

... mistress of this little house in the woods. Great-grandmother Avery lived with them later. She had a petulant disposition. One day when reproved for something, she went off and hid herself in the bushes and sulked—a family trait; I'm a little that way, I guess. ...
— Our Friend John Burroughs • Clara Barrus

... heaven's gate sings,' or poetise with Mr. Patmore of 'the heavenly-minded thrush.' And what awful voices some of those great red roses would have! Yes, Nature is so sympathetic because she is so silent; because, when she does talk, she talks in a language which we cannot understand, but only guess at; and her silence allows us to hear her eternal meanings, which her gossiping ...
— Prose Fancies • Richard Le Gallienne

... has dyspepsia. I guess he don't feel any too well, and nothing pleases him. He took a notion that a sea voyage would cure him, and it didn't. He snarled and snapped all the way, and oh, I was so sick—ugh! and I had to drag myself around after him. Then next he tried the German baths. He's tried everything, ...
— The Gentle Art of Cooking Wives • Elizabeth Strong Worthington

... pure gold, and took it out. It would have weighed about one grain. The whole of the washing, from the first putting in of the sand till she shewed me the gold, did not exceed the space of two minutes. I now desired her to take a larger portion. She put in, as nearly as I could guess, about two pounds; and having washed it in the same manner, and nearly in the same time, found no fewer than twenty-three particles; some of them were very small. In both cases I observed that the ...
— The Journal Of A Mission To The Interior Of Africa, In The Year 1805 • Mungo Park

... are incorporated West End Whispers and Mayfair Mysteries). Prizes will be awarded to the three readers who are first, second, and third in guessing the identities of the greatest number of Society Personages indicated in the Guess Who It ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, February 18, 1914 • Various

... joke which you can't guess. Said a little four-year-old boy, 'My father and mother have a daughter who is not my sister.' Now what relation ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 16, July 16, 1870 • Various

... Bathgate road the same carriage would be charged L.1, 7s. 1d.; while a coach drawn by four horses would pay five shillings. On the Ashburnham and Totness road, steam would pay L.2; and a four-horse coach three shillings. And how did these sages settle the rates of payment? The reader would never guess, so we will tell him at once-they charged for each horse power as if the boiler contained a whole stud, all trampling the road to atoms with iron shoes; whereas they ought have let the broad-wheeled carriage ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Volume 54, No. 335, September 1843 • Various

... blankly, and Pederson gave a snort and a gesture. "All right! I guess I'm wrong. For a while there I actually thought you had it." Pederson surveyed him shrewdly. "Just the same, that bit you exploded—about the person who killed Carmack didn't hate him at ...
— We're Friends, Now • Henry Hasse

... I can well imagine Broadly speaking An admirable idea In a literal sense By sheer force of genius You can imagine his chagrin I hazard a guess It challenges belief He has an inscrutable face Very fertile in resource I am loath to believe It is essentially undignified Example is so contagious I am not in her confidence Taken in the aggregate It is a reproof to shallowness There is a misconception ...
— Talks on Talking • Grenville Kleiser

... up, eh?" he remarked. "Better chuck it and go back! I guess I was wrong when I told ...
— The Confessions of Artemas Quibble • Arthur Train

... the frown fell so dark over his eyes that the last seemed only visible by two sparks of fire. "I guess, my proud Vavasours are mutinous. Retire, thou and thy comrade. Await me in my chamber. The feast shall not flag in London because the wind blows ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... the earth, and must have cooled at its surface millions of years before the earth did. Hence, if a story of life began on Mars at all, it began long before the story of life on the earth. We cannot guess what sort of life-forms would be evolved in a different world, but we can confidently say that they would tend toward increasing intelligence; and thus we are disposed to look for ...
— The Outline of Science, Vol. 1 (of 4) - A Plain Story Simply Told • J. Arthur Thomson

... say about it—it's all right, I guess. You can tell 'em that those prayin' "fellers" have broken all my cane chairs, and I've had to get wooden ones—guess they can't break them. Broke my glass there, too, smashed it in, and they smash everything they touch. Somebody stole my coat, too—I'd like to catch ...
— The Secrets Of The Great City • Edward Winslow Martin

... answered. 'I guess it's a fool thing to have done, but I thought that I could have some fun with the Bishop's head. Mother is going to round up all the Delances at Christmas for a big dinner—uncles, aunts, and cousins, you know—a celebration of our genealogical discoveries with a great family tree in the center ...
— 'Charge It' - Keeping Up With Harry • Irving Bacheller

... challenge me the race, And when't had left me far away 'Twould stay, and run again, and stay; For it was nimbler much than hinds, And trod as if on the four winds. I have a garden of my own, But so with roses overgrown, And lilies, that you would it guess To be a little wilderness; And all the spring-time of the year It only loved to be there. Among the beds of lilies I Have sought it oft where it should lie, Yet could not, till itself would rise, Find it, although before ...
— The Works of Edgar Allan Poe - Volume 5 (of 5) of the Raven Edition • Edgar Allan Poe

... a woman of reason! Never grave out of pride, never gay out of season! When so easy to guess who this angel should be, Who would think Mrs. Howard ...
— Henry Esmond; The English Humourists; The Four Georges • William Makepeace Thackeray

... "Oh, I guess we'll pull through all right, if we can keep the cows moving; but it is not going to be very comfortable for your aunt or you. We'll have to drive until the cattle refuse ...
— Ted Strong in Montana - With Lariat and Spur • Edward C. Taylor

... in your own country, you know, though it pleases you to make yourself out a—a kind of medical Rip Van Winkle. In June last year—when I did not guess that I should ever know you—I heard a woman say: 'If Owen had been here, the child wouldn't have died.' And the woman was your ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... arbitrary, because numbers only subordinate themselves with difficulty to one of those general ideas which are expressed in the Aryan roots. Besides these words are, even in their oldest attainable forms, already so weather-beaten, that in most cases it is impossible even to guess their etymology and original meaning. We see that the names for two and eight are dual, while those for three and four clearly have plural endings. But why eight in the primitive Aryan was a dual, and what were the two tetrads, which, combined in asht-au, oct-o, {GREEK SMALL LETTER ...
— The Silesian Horseherd - Questions of the Hour • Friedrich Max Mueller

... take me long to see I made an awful bungle of things," he confessed, half-shy and hesitant. "And it got worse and worse as I saw what I had done to you people. Yet I'd given my word. I guess you'll understand a lot more than I can say; as Allan will understand, now, why I couldn't help knocking down that tramp who wanted money because I belonged in prison and wasn't there. It was all too much for me to think out! But—isn't there ...
— From the Car Behind • Eleanor M. Ingram

... ask you to stand aside, I guess, and give that string of people a chance. You have no right to take up my time in this way. The rules of the bank are inflexible. We must know who you are, even ...
— Nye and Riley's Wit and Humor (Poems and Yarns) • Bill Nye

... knew the Spanish tongue on account of having sailed in brigs from Saint-Malo and Saint-Nazaire, going to the ports of the Argentine, Chili and Peru. Those who could not understand the old fellow's words, could guess at them from his gesticulations. They were all laughing, finding him bizarre and interesting. And this general gayety induced Caragol to bring forth liquid treasures that had been piling up in former voyages under Ferragut's ...
— Mare Nostrum (Our Sea) - A Novel • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... "I guess you set it for a goody-trap," he said. "Folks can't help reading sign-boards when they go by. And besides, it's like the man that went to Van Amburgh's. I shall catch you forgetting, some fine day, and then I'll whop the ...
— We Girls: A Home Story • Mrs. A. D. T. Whitney

... himself, he said not a word. Not even when, the letters dispatched, Mr. Ascott rose, and administering a short, sharp homily, tacitly dismissed his visitors: Whether this silence was sullenness, cowardice, or shame, Hilary could not guess. ...
— Mistress and Maid • Dinah Craik (aka: Miss Mulock)

... roared, "that's over! You're never going to wear those things again!" Maybe after six years in the Dry-towns, Juli was beginning to guess what those six years behind a desk ...
— The Door Through Space • Marion Zimmer Bradley

... thousand voted. Until some count of the number of people could be taken to secure a proportionate representation, the Constitution had set an arbitrary number of sixty-five, apportioning them among the States by a guess at the respective populations. Rhode Island and North Carolina not being in the Union deducted six from this total, making thirty necessary for a quorum. Day after day, the incomplete House adjourned. New members arrived at intervals until the first day of April, ...
— The United States of America Part I • Ediwn Erle Sparks

... would not awake, for Dahnash had made her sleep heavy; so he shook her and moved her, saying, "O my beloved, awake and look on me; I am Kamar al-Zaman." But she awoke not, neither moved her head; where-upon he considered her case for a long hour and said to himself, "If I guess aright, this is the damsel to whom my father would have married me and these three years past I have refused her; but Inshallah!—God willing—as soon as it is dawn, I will say to him, 'Marry me to her, that I may enjoy her.'"—And Shahrazad perceived the ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... hours slowly crept along, the watcher trying hard to settle in his own mind which was the east, but failing dismally, for the windings of the valley had been such that he could only guess at the direction where the dawn ...
— !Tention - A Story of Boy-Life during the Peninsular War • George Manville Fenn

... not a painter also?" asked Varillo playfully, putting his arm round her waist,—"And can I not guess the effect in the morning light as well as if I saw it? Come, Angela mia! Unveil the great prodigy!" and he laughed,—"You began it before we were affianced;— think what patience I have had for nearly ...
— The Master-Christian • Marie Corelli

... kid sent in shuttler II to investigate, saying that the camp was deserted but everything looked fine, just fine; the unsuccessful attempts to recontact him; and then a blank except for my own voice. Apparently, the skipper had followed with the rest of the con crew. I could even guess why he had failed to make additional entries in the log, or not transmitted from the camp in lieu thereof. He figured it was something he could work out himself, and he didn't want anything on record to show that he ...
— Attrition • Jim Wannamaker

... impudence of a church that threatens to inflict eternal punishment upon those who honestly reject its claims and scorn its pretensions? In the presence of the unknown we have all an equal right to guess. ...
— Lectures of Col. R. G. Ingersoll, Volume I • Robert Green Ingersoll

... want of eyes; each night the wake teemed more bright with flame-atomies. One kind were little brilliant sparks, hurled helpless to and fro on the surface, probably Noctilucae; the others (what they may be we could not guess at first) showed patches of soft diffused light, paler than the sparks, yet of the same yellow-white hue, which floated quietly past, seeming a foot or two below the foam. And at the bottom, far beneath, deeper under our feet than the summit of the Peak of Teneriffe was above ...
— At Last • Charles Kingsley

... have something better to do than to die. Here's some one come to court you, and that's much better. This is mother-in-law," he said, turning to the others; "so you can guess ...
— Pelle the Conqueror, Complete • Martin Andersen Nexo

... in," Barry said. "Pack him up and send him along. If he doesn't like it, I guess his ...
— The Rich Mrs. Burgoyne • Kathleen Norris

... to guess such silly stories!" said the little girl, stopping her ears. "Those are too silly for me even to tell baby! My story is a nice story about a darling tame beaver. Major Pickford took me on his knee and told ...
— In The Forest • Catharine Parr Traill

... estimates I've been studying this winter show. Don't thank me. I did not know till yesterday they were entirely your plans. You can have every dollar you need; it will rest with you to produce the results. I guess that's all. No, stop. I want you to go East with us next week for a month or two as our guest. You can forward your work the faster when you get back, and I should like you to meet the men whose money you are to spend. Were ...
— The Daughter of a Magnate • Frank H. Spearman

... bat is what would appear to represent a loose strip of wood. This strip is nearly one-third of the width of the instrument, and extends up the middle about two-fifths of the length of the body of it. I can only guess that the bat was, at some time, primarily, an emblem of a sergeant's office, and, secondarily, used for the infliction of chastisement on clumsy or disorderly recruits; and perhaps it was equivalent to the Pruegel of German armies, with which sergeants drove lagging warriors into the fray. But ...
— The Social History of Smoking • G. L. Apperson

... dollars, say. And you need dozens of dresses in a season. I'll make a guess that it takes five thousand a year to clothe you. That is nearly twice as much as I'll earn altogether next year if I throw away ...
— The Highgrader • William MacLeod Raine

... relentlessly on face and clothes, while the great volume was nosily disappearing to unknown and terrifying depths. The sight-seer tries to look across, to strain his eyes and to see beyond that white mist which obscures everything; but it is an impossible task, and he can but guess the width of the Falls, slightly horseshoe in shape, from the green trees which seem so far away on the opposite bank, and are only caught sight of now and then as the wind causes the spray to lift. At the same time ...
— South African Memories - Social, Warlike & Sporting From Diaries Written At The Time • Lady Sarah Wilson

... equivocations, Huish the strongest of brag with nobody to send it to. In a burst of weakness Davis tells Herrick what a villain he has been, through rum, and how he can not let his daughter, "little Adar," know it. "Yes, there was a woman on board," he said, describing the ship he had scuttled. "Guess I sent her to hell, if there's such a place. I never dared go home again, and I don't know," he added, ...
— The Delicious Vice • Young E. Allison

... him. He was as polite and agreeable to all of us, as he used to be in the days of his probation at Limmeridge, and he was so amazingly attentive and kind to his wife, that even icy Madame Fosco was roused into looking at him with a grave surprise. What does this mean? I think I can guess—I am afraid Laura can guess—and I am sure Count Fosco knows. I caught Sir Percival looking at him for approval more than once in the course ...
— The Woman in White • Wilkie Collins

... is reserved to the geologist,—(Nature's High-priest!)—to guess at the condition of this Earth of ours throughout all the long period of unchronicled ages which immediately succeeded the birthday of Time. It is for him to guess at the successive changes which this ...
— Inspiration and Interpretation - Seven Sermons Preached Before the University of Oxford • John Burgon

... to say for people that are sitting on their sofas and riding in their carriages; but let 'em be where I am, I guess it would come some harder. I wish I could be good; but my heart burns, and can't be reconciled, anyhow. You couldn't in my place,—you can't now, if I tell you all I've got to say. You ...
— Uncle Tom's Cabin • Harriet Beecher Stowe

... you're the only thing that does make a difference. We've got a fine place and a mint of money I suppose—and I'm proud of it. But I don't know.... If they'd let me be and put us two—just you and me—back in the old house with the bare floors and the rawhide chairs and the shuck beds, I guess we'd manage. If you're happy, you're happy; that's about the size of it. And sometimes I think that we'd be happier—you and I—chumming along shoulder to shoulder, poor an' working hard, than making ...
— The Pit • Frank Norris

... am not very familiar with riddles," said Edna. "I have never found them particularly amusing myself. But I must try and remember one. It needn't be so very difficult, because he doesn't seem to me clever enough to guess ...
— In Brief Authority • F. Anstey

... in the shoulder, sir; has bled scandalous, but I guess it 's the very luck that's goin' to save him; seems now to ...
— Bob Hampton of Placer • Randall Parrish

... a quiet creature," he wrote, "and do not like to see myself in print at all. So leave it to be understood who found the old bones, and let them guess who can." ...
— Captains of Industry - or, Men of Business Who Did Something Besides Making Money • James Parton

... aloon,' he told me, when his wits grew clear, 'I'd held the belt for seventeen 'ear,' (I think he said seventeen, but 'Fistiana' is not at hand, and I can but make a guess at memory.) 'They mought ha' let me aloon. Turn's a good un. I've sin 'em all, an' I've niver sin a better. But he owed to ha' let me be. Theer was no credit to be got in hommerin' a man at my time o' life. All the same, ...
— The Making Of A Novelist - An Experiment In Autobiography • David Christie Murray

... something," he went on. "He's a little freak, but you can't blame him much. Don't be mad at him. He's never moved from that corner since he was born, I guess, and he's got nothing to do or to think of but just hearing what's happening outside. He's sort of crazy curious, and when he gets hold of a thing that suits him he just holds on to it till ...
— T. Tembarom • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... V. n. xxii. It is remarkable, however, that in the reign of Richard II. the parliament granted the king only a temporary power of dispensing with the statute of provisors. Rot. Parl. 15 Rich.[** 15 is a best guess] II. n. i.: a plain implication that he had not, of himself, such prerogative. So uncertain were many of these ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part F. - From Charles II. to James II. • David Hume

... it was my turn to shiver and become pale, as any may guess who may have chanced to read the history of Mameena, and the turn of Miss Holmes to watch me with ...
— The Ivory Child • H. Rider Haggard



Words linked to "Guess" :   forebode, work, predict, figure, suspect, expect, figure out, anticipate, approximation, calculate, speculate, underestimate, make, set, assess, tell, foretell, place, solve, quantise, give, view, divination, lick, imagine, idea, cipher, cypher, misgauge, prognosticate, truncate, promise, opinion, count, compute, puzzle out, put, call, lowball, estimation, work out, quantize



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