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Herb   /ərb/  /hərb/   Listen
Herb

noun
1.
A plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests.  Synonym: herbaceous plant.
2.
Aromatic potherb used in cookery for its savory qualities.



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"Herb" Quotes from Famous Books



... and promises to return soon. I am invited to the feast wherewith he will be welcomed. Old Abdul Jemaalee thinks it will divert my mind, and prove to me that Allah will take me home safe to my children, about whom he and his wife asked many questions. Moreover, he compelled me to drink herb tea, compounded by a Malay doctor for my cough. I declined at first, and the poor old man looked hurt, gravely assured me that it was not true that Malays always poisoned Christians, and drank some himself. Thereupon I was obliged, of course, to drink ...
— Letters from the Cape • Lady Duff Gordon

... jasmine buds that keep Their odor to themselves all day But when the sunlight dies away Let the delicious secret out To every breeze that roams about;— When thus NAMOUNA:—"'Tis the hour "That scatters spells on herb and flower, "And garlands might be gathered now, "That twined around the sleeper's brow "Would make him dream of such delights, "Such miracles and dazzling sights "As Genii of the Sun behold "At evening from their tents of gold ...
— The Complete Poems of Sir Thomas Moore • Thomas Moore et al

... painful vividness, is apparent from a letter which I shall translate almost in extenso; as, together with those few words which I have quoted about Gori's death, it shows the passionate tenderness that was hidden, like some aromatic herb beneath the Alpine snow, under ...
— The Countess of Albany • Violet Paget (AKA Vernon Lee)

... decree that they should take with them flint stones of their own and vervain of their own; that the Roman praetor should command them to strike the league, and that they should demand of him herbs. The description of herb usually given to the heralds is taken from the Capitol. Thus the Carthaginians being allowed to depart from Rome, when they had gone into Africa to Scipio concluded the peace on the terms before mentioned. They delivered up their men-of-war, their elephants, deserters, fugitives, ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Vol. 2 • Various

... he is "quite right:" that "people would call this Premier 'Bill' in Australia") the new world differs from the old. I cannot so much as contemplate the thought of Mr. Asquith being addressed by the Minister Of Munitions as "Herb," ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol 150, February 9, 1916 • Various

... University, and to whom I had given a little book and spoken some friendly words. My bread came back to me—a whole loaf for a crumb. All day long, she and her mother, who left her wash tub to attend to me, worked over my miserable head. A mile and more she ran in the burning sun for ice, and no herb that grew on "Petit Anse" from which a decoction could be made, was left untried, until ice, herbs, and a tough constitution prevailed, and I was able to ride home. I offered pay, but it was almost indignantly refused. I wish space would allow me to tell a hundred stories to illustrate their ...
— American Missionary, Volume 43, No. 10, October, 1889 • Various

... Fair, is better known to our readers than the precise contents of the said tankard. In olden times the "cool tankard" was, or nearly coincided with, the wine mixed with Burrage, (so the translators call the herb) of Plutarch, and the Herbosum Vinum of Du Cange. In all probability, the "cool tankard" of our times implies a well-appointed dejeune ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction. - Volume 20, No. 567, Saturday, September 22, 1832. • Various

... every plant of the field before it was in the earth and every herb of the field before it grew; for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man ...
— Fireside Stories for Girls in Their Teens • Margaret White Eggleston

... were old hand-woven, herb-dyed, knitted quilts, they are worth fifty dollars apiece in New York to-day. I paid that for one not five months ago," I said, staring haughtily into the calmly doubting faces of the mountaineers in the jury ...
— The Heart's Kingdom • Maria Thompson Daviess

... from the town: the Syrian woman going by in the gray town road, with her bright-coloured head-dress, and her oil-cloth pack; and the Old-ironman with his dusty wagon, jangling his little bells, and the cheerful weazened Herb-doctor in his faded hat, and the Signman with his mouth full of nails—how they are all marked upon by the town, all dusted with the rosy bloom of human experience. How often in fancy I have pursued them down the valley ...
— Adventures In Friendship • David Grayson

... unable to procure more. In this dilemma milk would have been an excellent substitute, or coffee, if we had possessed it; but we had neither the one nor the other, so we agreed to try the Yankee tea—hemlock sprigs boiled. This proved, to my taste, a vile decoction; though I recognized some herb in the tea that was sold in London at five shillings a pound, which I am certain was nothing better than dried hemlock leaves ...
— The Backwoods of Canada • Catharine Parr Traill

... other wild beasts upon her; upon which they made a very mournful outcry; and some of them scattered spikenard, others cassia, others amomus (a sort of spikenard, or the herb of Jerusalem, or ladies rose), others ointment; so that the quantity of ointment was large, in proportion to the number of people; and upon this all the beasts lay as though they had been fast asleep, and did ...
— The Forbidden Gospels and Epistles, Complete • Archbishop Wake

... this moment as I pen these lines, a certain ditch-bordered path leading to a narrow foot-bridge across a river in Norfolk. I can recall the indescribable sensations which the purple spikes of loosestrife and the tall willow-herb, growing with green rushes, produced in my mind on a certain misty morning when the veiled future bowed toward me like a vision of promise and the dead past flew away over the fens like a flight ...
— Suspended Judgments - Essays on Books and Sensations • John Cowper Powys

... "There groweth also a certain kind of herb whereof in summer they make a great provision for all the year, making great account of it, and only men use it; and first they cause it to be dried in the sun, then wear it about their necks wrapped in a little beast's skin made like a bag, together with a hollow piece of stone or wood like ...
— Pioneers in Canada • Sir Harry Johnston

... of this knowledge is still preserved amongst their descendants, and considered efficacious. For every illness there is an herb, for every accident a remedy. Baths are in constant use, although these temezcallis are confined to the Indians. In every family there is some knowledge of simple medicine, very necessary, in haciendas especially, where no physician ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon De La Barca

... strove, the battle came nearer, and the sky was hidden by clouds of dust, and javelins fell thick into the camp. But when Venus saw how grievously her son was troubled, she brought from Ida, which is a mountain of Crete, the herb dittany. A hairy stalk it hath and a purple flower. The wild goats know it well if so be that they have been wounded by arrows. This, then, Venus, having hidden her face, brought and dipped into the water, and sprinkled there with ambrosia ...
— The Children's Hour, Volume 3 (of 10) • Various

... she untied the silk 'kerchief from her friend's neck, then stooping down, she gathered, with the quickness of thought, a handful of a certain herb, broke a young palma christi across her knee, and took out the delicate, fleshy substance found under the bark of that tree. Returning to the stranger, she filled the wound with the pith, overlaid it with herbs, and bound it with the handkerchief. The whole was ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 59, No. 367, May 1846 • Various

... in his sleep. No man becomes a vigorous Christian by any other course than 'giving all diligence.' It is a very lowly virtue. It is like some of the old wives' recipes for curing diseases with some familiar herb that grows at every cottage door. People will not have that, but if you bring them some medicine from far away, very rare and costly, and suggest to them some course out of the beaten rut of ordinary, honest living, they will jump at that. Quackery always deals ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture - Ephesians; Epistles of St. Peter and St. John • Alexander Maclaren

... deep emotions, cried out: "Bless the Lord, O my soul: and all that is within me, bless his holy name. He watereth the hills from his chambers; the earth is satisfied with the fruit of thy works. He causeth the grass to grow for the cattle, and herb for the ...
— The Kentucky Ranger • Edward T. Curnick

... hospitality. At the conclusion of the meal Lukabela produced a bag of deerskin, from which he extracted some dry leaves of a rich brown colour, out of which he deftly manufactured three cigarros, and for the first time in his life George had an opportunity to sample the delights of the curious herb now called tobacco. Truth to tell, he did not altogether like the experience; the smoke had a tendency to get into his throat and nostrils, choking him and making him sneeze violently; but Dyer, who had sampled the weed on his ...
— The Cruise of the Nonsuch Buccaneer • Harry Collingwood

... arrival of the procession at the Abbey, the Herb-woman and her Maids, and the Serjeant-Porter, remained at the entrance within the great ...
— Coronation Anecdotes • Giles Gossip

... vive occult to mortal eyes, Dorm on the herb with none to supervise, Carp the suave berries from the crescent vine, And bibe the flow from ...
— The Poetical Works of Oliver Wendell Holmes, Complete • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... Trade of the East India Company.—In 1668, the East India Company ordered "one hundred pounds weight of goode tey" to be sent home on speculation. A taste for the Chinese herb was created and carefully fostered; the invoice was increased from year to year, until it now amounts to 30,000,000 pounds weight (notwithstanding the excessive duty of 100 per cent, and the onerous restrictions of the commutation ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. XIX. No. 541, Saturday, April 7, 1832 • Various

... water is then poured on it, and it is covered immediately with another cup fitting closely: as soon as the flavour of the tea is slightly extracted, it is sipped hot, as it is, great strength being avoided; the cup is then filled again with boiling water, until all the flavour of the herb is exhausted. Mechanics and labourers, who cannot afford to drink it in this manner, draw it in a large block-tin tea-pot, cased with wood, and having cotton wool put between the wood and the vessel to preserve the warmth longer. The extreme ...
— The American Quarterly Review, No. 17, March 1831 • Various

... a great deal since then," pleaded Mrs. Witton "and if you do not want any new doctors, isn't there something I can do for you? If you will tell me how you feel, it may be that some sort of herb tea—or a mustard plaster—" ...
— The Girl at Cobhurst • Frank Richard Stockton

... going to fight. You must overhang the night with drooping fog, and lead them so astray, that one will never find the other. When they are tired out, they will fall asleep. Then drop this other herb on Lysander's eyes. That will give him his old sight and his old love. Then each man will have the lady who loves him, and they will all think that this has been only a Midsummer Night's Dream. Then when this is done, all will be ...
— Beautiful Stories from Shakespeare • E. Nesbit

... our common English weeds, each little nut is covered with many small hooks, which make it catch on firmly by several points of attachment to passing animals. These are the kinds we human beings of either sex oftenest find clinging to our skirts or trousers after a walk in a rabbit-warren. But in herb-bennet and avens each nut has a single long awn, crooked near the middle with a very peculiar S-shaped joint, which effectually catches on to the wool or hair, but drops at the elbow after a short period of withering. ...
— Science in Arcady • Grant Allen

... nobody! They call me a witch—the saints know why, save that I am old and poor. I never did hurt to any, and I've given good herb medicines to the women about; and if I do mutter a few outlandish words over them, what harm does it do? They mean nothing; and they make the foolish girls fancy I know something more than they do, and so I get a silver penny here, or a handful of eggs there, and we ...
— One Snowy Night - Long ago at Oxford • Emily Sarah Holt

... forest, river? Man nor brute, Nor dint of hoof, nor print of foot, Lay in the wild luxuriant soil; No sign of travel, none of toil; The very air was mute; And not an insect's shrill small horn. Nor matin bird's new voice was borne From herb nor thicket. Many a werst, Panting as if his heart would burst. The weary brute still stagger'd on: And still we were—or seem'd—alone. At length, while reeling on our way. Methought I heard a courser neigh, ...
— MacMillan's Reading Books - Book V • Anonymous

... forms, dark snares and dogs, And more unpitying men, the garden seeks, Urg'd on by fearless want. The bleating kind [sic] Eye the bleak heav'n, and next, the glist'ning earth, With looks of dumb despair; then, sad dispers'd, Dig for the wither'd herb through heaps of snow." ...
— Lectures on the English Poets - Delivered at the Surrey Institution • William Hazlitt

... in a chest or drawer, should have some pleasant, cleanly herb like lavender or sweet-grass, or the old- fashioned clover, or bags of Oriental orris-root, put between them, that they may come to the table smelling of ...
— Manners and Social Usages • Mrs. John M. E. W. Sherwood

... and sea bear England witness if he lied who said it; he Whom the winds that ward her, waves that clasp, and herb and flower and tree Fed with English dews and sunbeams, hail as more than ...
— Astrophel and Other Poems - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne, Vol. VI • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... lay there prostrate, even as one that is adoring the shrine; and it was on the sands of the desert she was lying. It chanced that the Chieftain of a desert tribe passed at midday by the spot, and seeing the figure of a damsel unshaded' by any shade of tree or herb or tent-covering, and prostrate on the sands, he reined his steed and leaned forward to her, and called to her. Then as she answered nothing he dismounted, and thrust his arm softly beneath her and lifted her gently; and her swoon had the whiteness of death, so that he thought ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... unsound? What then am I to say to you? "Help me in this matter!" you cry. Ah, for that I have no rule! And neither did you, if that was your object, come to me as a philosopher, but as you might have gone to a herb-seller or a cobbler.—"What do philosophers have rules for, then?"—Why, that whatever may betide, our ruling faculty may be as Nature would have it, and so remain. Think you this a small matter? Not so! but the greatest thing ...
— The Golden Sayings of Epictetus • Epictetus

... And this delightful Herb whose tender Green Fledges the River's Lip on which we lean— Ah, lean upon it lightly! for who knows From what once lovely Lip it ...
— Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam and Salaman and Absal • Omar Khayyam and Ralph Waldo Emerson

... Talleyrand type? How many distinguished men have been fat. Napoleon, Renan, Gibbon, Dr. Johnson—" she turned her sheet as she mildly brought out the desultory list. "And all seem to end in n, do they not? I am glad that I asked Mr. Drew. He flavours the dish like an aromatic herb; and what a success he has been; hein? But he is the type of personal success. He is ...
— Tante • Anne Douglas Sedgwick

... of this herb is a sign that you will shortly have occasion to exert all your prudence to ...
— Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds • Charles Mackay

... the towing-path; it is shady with willows, aspens, alders, elders, oaks and other trees. On the banks are flowers—yarrow, meadow-sweet, willow herb, loosestrife, and lady's bed-straw. Oswald learned the names of all these trees and plants on the day of the picnic. The others didn't remember them, but Oswald did. He is a boy of ...
— The Wouldbegoods • E. Nesbit

... quickened veins; The wedding song of sun and rains He is, the dance of children, thanks Of sowers, shout of primrose-banks, And eye of violets while they breathe; All these the circling song will wreathe, And you shall hear the herb and tree, The better heart of men shall see, Shall feel celestially, as long As you crave nothing ...
— Poems of To-Day: an Anthology • Various

... suspected how much feeling he had for people's comforts, who came to see him. Sometimes he would say to me, "Hester, you know we have got such a one coming down. I believe his wound is hardly well yet, and I heard him say that he felt much relieved by fomentations of such an herb; perhaps you will see that he finds in his chamber all that he wants." Of another he would say, "I think he drinks asses' milk; I should like him to have his morning draught." And I, who was born with such sensibility that ...
— Little Memoirs of the Nineteenth Century • George Paston

... white or black, fell sick on the place, it was Patty herself who tended them. She knew the virtue of every herb in the big chest in the storeroom. And at table she presided over her father's guests with a womanliness that won her more admiration than mine. Now that the barrister was become a man of weight, the house was as crowded as ever ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... sit and rightly spell Of every star that heaven doth shew, And every herb that sips the dew; Till old experience do attain ...
— A Dish Of Orts • George MacDonald

... out of the eyes; let it suffice to inform our readers that she was well stocked with them; and, that in addition to this, she, together with her husband, drank a potion made up and administered by an herb-doctor, for preventing for ever the slightest misunderstanding or quarrel between man and wife. Whether it produced this desirable object or not, our readers may conjecture, when we add, that the herb-doctor, after having taken a very liberal advantage ...
— The Haunters & The Haunted - Ghost Stories And Tales Of The Supernatural • Various

... education is one of my spavined hobbies, and a brief canter for your improvement in classic lore would be charitable, so I proceed: Agatho the Samian says that in the Scythian Brixaba grows the herb phryxa (hating the wicked), which especially protects step children; and whenever they are in danger from a stepmother (observe the antiquity of Stepmotherly characteristics!) the phryxa gives them warning by emitting a bright flame. You ...
— Infelice • Augusta Jane Evans Wilson

... could have told her what she wist not, for I was then but new come out of the discovering that what women commonly reckon the flower of a woman's life was not for me, and that I must be content to crown mine head with the common herb of the field. But I held my peace, and none wist it but Aunt Joyce: for in her presence had I not been a day when I found that her eyes had read me through. As we sat by the fire at even, our two selves, quoth she all suddenly, without an other ...
— Joyce Morrell's Harvest - The Annals of Selwick Hall • Emily Sarah Holt

... as they looked at the Child, and every one of them saw itself reflected in his clear eyes, they rejoiced exceedingly, and called all their fellows together, and alighted on the bushes all around; and soon it was so light in the cave, that herb and grass began to grow as if it had been broad day. Now, indeed, was the joy and triumph of the Dragon-fly complete. The Child was delighted with the merry and silvery tones of the bells, and with the many little bright-eyed companions around him, and with the deep ...
— Peter Schlemihl etc. • Chamisso et. al.

... packed in pine, suggesting the well-saged dressing of a turkey. A round mouthful of luscious mellowness, with a bouquet—a snapping reminder to the nose. And there's just a soupcon of new-mown hay above the green freckles of herb to delight the eye and set the fancy free. So this is the veritable vert, green cheese—the moon is made of it! Vert veritable. A general favorite with everybody who ever tasted it, for ...
— The Complete Book of Cheese • Robert Carlton Brown

... done on each side, and a great many champions came to their death. But for those that were alive at evening, the physicians on each side used to make a bath of healing, with every sort of healing plant or herb in it, the way they would be strong and sound ...
— Gods and Fighting Men • Lady I. A. Gregory

... have been a winner once, but it was a long spell back. Just then he was some out of repair. He had a head big enough for a college professor, and a crop of hair like an herb doctor, but his eyes were puffy underneath, and you could see by the cafe au lait tint to his face that his liver'd been on a long strike. He was fairly thick through the middle, but his legs didn't match the rest of him. They were too thin and ...
— Shorty McCabe • Sewell Ford

... deeper yet in herb and fern, Look further thro' the chace, Spread upward till thy boughs discern ...
— The Early Poems of Alfred Lord Tennyson • Tennyson

... whose supports had become curved from much riding on an elephant's neck; but there was no mistaking the private's action as he took out the roll of tobacco, opened one end so as to expose the finely shredded aromatic herb, held it to his nose, and then passed it on to the mahout, whose big, dull, brown eyes began to glisten, and he hesitated as if in doubt, till the private pressed it into his hands and made a sign as if of filling a pipe and puffing out the smoke. The little fellow nodded his satisfaction, while ...
— Trapped by Malays - A Tale of Bayonet and Kris • George Manville Fenn

... begun in paradise, whose interest never flags, whose beauty never fades, whose end can never come till Love lies dead. With womanly skill she divined the secret, with motherly discretion she counselled patience, and her son accepted her advice, feeling that, like many a healthful herb, its worth lay in ...
— A Modern Cinderella - or The Little Old Show and Other Stories • Louisa May Alcott

... been taken down from the door, and the blessed herb, moly, was incautiously thrown aside; neither had Goody Dickisson offered up the usual petition that evening, to be defended from the snares of the devil. Her discontent was too great, and she was in a fitter mood ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 1 (of 2) • John Roby

... examination showed that Ike had only a mouth of the ordinary dimensions, the appearance of size being caused by two marks of caked tobacco-juice, a piece of that herb being always ...
— Brownsmith's Boy - A Romance in a Garden • George Manville Fenn

... replied Ravonino with something of a humorous twinkle in his eyes. "But we don't smoke. We only snuff. In making our snuff we first dry the tobacco leaves and grind them to powder. Then to this we add the ashes of the leaves of a sweet-smelling herb, the mixture being twice as much tobacco as ashes; a small quantity of potash or salt is added, and then it is considered fit ...
— The Fugitives - The Tyrant Queen of Madagascar • R.M. Ballantyne

... consented, and when she left the room, two very contrite little girls cuddled up close to each other, and took without a murmur the hot herb tea which Mrs. Dallas brought to them. And the next morning when they woke, lo! the sun was shining, and not an ache nor a pain did either little girl feel to remind her of ...
— A Sweet Little Maid • Amy E. Blanchard

... are rich they are benevolent and charitable, and show mercy unto the wretched and the poor. So that, in their case, the words of the Wise Man are naught, when he says that the earth is barren of good things where she hoardeth treasure; and that where gold is in her bowels no herb groweth. Pray, Mr. Chalker, pray earnestly for gold in order that ...
— In Luck at Last • Walter Besant

... auspicious King, that "Affan had found in certain books that none, mortal or spirit, could pluck the seal ring from the lord Solomon's finger; and that no navigator could sail his ship upon the Seven Seas over which the coffin had been carried. Moreover, he had found out by reading that there was a herb of herbs and that if one express its juice and anoint therewith his feet, he should walk upon the surface of any sea that Allah Almighty had created without wetting his soles, but none could obtain this herb, without he had with him the Serpent-queen. When Bulukiya arrived ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... little place where a tiny stream flowed into the lake, with reeds and flowery marsh of pink willow herb, and a gravelly bank to the side. Here they ran delicately ashore, with their frail boat, the two girls took off their shoes and stockings and went through the water's edge to the grass. The tiny ripples of the lake were warm and ...
— Women in Love • D. H. Lawrence

... one feareth not the other; If thou believe not, think upon the grain, For by its seed each herb is recognized. ...
— Dante's Purgatory • Dante

... flowers, and round his wrist a spotted snake; he came with downcast eyes to Cheiron, and whispered how he had watched the snake cast his old skin, and grow young again before his eyes, and how he had gone down into a village in the vale, and cured a dying man with a herb which he had seen ...
— Myths That Every Child Should Know - A Selection Of The Classic Myths Of All Times For Young People • Various

... be a disputed question, even on the river, as to the effect of the Darling pea on horses, some asserting that they become cranky simply from eating that herb, and others that it is starvation that makes them mad. I could get no satisfactory information even as to the symptoms, which seem to vary considerably; but this I had from a reliable source, that horses will eat the pea in large quantities without being injuriously affected, provided they can obtain ...
— Successful Exploration Through the Interior of Australia • William John Wills

... the laws of health and abuse what they know, but in the matter of herbs they can be trusted. The herb drink which they gave me had virtue, for I woke with my head clear. A gourd of water stood beside my pallet, and I drained it and called lustily for another. A man pushed aside the skins and came in. It was Pierre. Pierre, ...
— Montlivet • Alice Prescott Smith

... the number of their dependent towns, or places baussenques, to seventy-nine, because these numbers in combination were thought to be of good omen to their house. Beral des Baux, Seigneur of Marseilles, was one day starting on a journey with his whole force to Avignon. He met an old woman herb-gathering at daybreak, and said, 'Mother, hast thou seen a crow or other bird?' 'Yea,' answered the crone, 'on the trunk of a dead willow.' Beral counted upon his fingers the day of the year, and turned bridle. With troubadours of name and ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece, Complete - Series I, II, and III • John Symonds

... blustery days, then chill damp ones, but steadily life grew, here, there, everywhere, and the ever-new miracle of the awakening earth took place once again. Sap mounted in the trees, blood coursed in the children's veins, mothers began giving herb tea and sulphur and molasses, young human nature was restless; the whole creation throbbed and sighed, and was tremulous, ...
— Mother Carey's Chickens • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... Ahab;—the keynote of his character is the weakness of wickedness, and the wickedness of weakness. Think of him. Weakly longing—as idle and weak minds in lofty places always do—after something that belongs to somebody else; with all his gardens, coveting the one little herb-plot of the poor Naboth; weak and worse than womanly, turning his face to the wall and weeping when he cannot get it; weakly desiring to have it, and yet not knowing how to set about accomplishing his ...
— Expositions Of Holy Scripture - Volume I: St. Luke, Chaps. I to XII • Alexander Maclaren

... the fire, till they brew a kind of hell-broth, which they imbibe at odd moments all day long! Oddly enough, this is the way in which they prepare tea in Cashmere and other parts of India, with this essential difference, though, that the Orientals mitigate the astringency of the herb with milk and almonds and divers ingredients, tending to make a sort of "compote" of it. Taken as it is taken here, it must have a tremendous effect on the nerves. Mr. Olphert thinks it has had much to do with the increase of lunacy in Ireland of late years. From his ...
— Ireland Under Coercion (2nd ed.) (1 of 2) (1888) • William Henry Hurlbert

... particular disease or danger, are as follows: Achatius (Acacius), Aegidius, Barbara (cf. St. Barbara's cress), Blasius (the "defender" of those afflicted with throat diseases), Catharine (cf. St. Catharine's flower), Christopher (cf. St. Christopher's herb), Cyriacus, Dionysius, Erasmus (Italian: San Elmo; cf. St. Elmo's fire), Eustachius, George the Martyr (cf. St. George's herb), Margaret, Pantaleon, and Vitus (cf. St. Vitus's dance). Luther's Sermons on the First Commandment ...
— Works of Martin Luther - With Introductions and Notes (Volume I) • Martin Luther

... fungus called Coleosporium Senecionis. In other words, the fungus growing in the cortex of the pine, and that parasitic on the leaves of the groundsel and its allies, are one and the same: it spends part of its life on the tree and the other part on the herb. ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 664, September 22,1888 • Various

... in having discovered what it is pleased to call an order of development on earth—tender grass, herb, tree; moving creatures that have life in the waters; bird, reptile, beast, cattle, man. The Bible gives the same order ages before, and calls it ...
— Recreations in Astronomy - With Directions for Practical Experiments and Telescopic Work • Henry Warren

... quite at the end of the garden, through and beyond the pot-herb part, and upon a little bank which overhung a little lane. Here in this corner a good woman had contrived what women nearly always understand the best, a little nook of pleasure and of perfume, after the rank ranks of the kitchen-stuff. ...
— Mary Anerley • R. D. Blackmore

... shrubs, and sweet waters bubbling from scented hillsides, overhung with blue skies which never brewed storms. A land of bud and bloom and blossom, scented and sweet, with every desirable weed and tasty herb—a land of life full and beautiful, of warm suns, calling up dreams from a blossoming mist of bluebells, creating the freshness and the happiness of youthfulness in every living thing. A land where far vistas and wide horizons, bounded by green hills, brought visions from the inner self, with joyous ...
— The Underworld - The Story of Robert Sinclair, Miner • James C. Welsh

... (ornament) 847; work of art. flower, flow'ret gay[obs3], wildflower; rose[flowers: list], lily, anemone, asphodel, buttercup, crane's bill, daffodil, tulip, tiger lily, day lily, begonia, marigold, geranium, lily of the valley, ranunculus[ISA:herb@flowering], rhododendron, windflower. pleasurableness &c 829. beautifying; landscaping, landscape gardening; decoration &c. 847; calisthenics|!. [person who is beautiful] beauty; hunk [of men]. V. be beautiful &c. adj.; shine, beam, bloom; become one &c. (accord) 23; set off, ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... "Are there women in our days so weak as to love where they can never be loved again, I wonder? It is foolish enough in a man; but he cures himself as quickly as the mungoose that gets bitten by a snake, and runs away to find the herb which is an antidote to the venom, and comes back ready to ...
— Vixen, Volume II. • M. E. Braddon

... et in dem days to clean a feller out. Hit cum up tender every spring and when it cut deep down in sand it looked white. It's an herb. Cut it; wash it and par boil; pour off water and ball up in balls in your hand; put in frying pan of hot grease (grease from ham or strip meat) and fry. Season with black pepper and salt and eat with new spring ...
— Slave Narratives Vol. XIV. South Carolina, Part 2 • Works Projects Administration

... streets and town lots was in 1839 The principal trade was in exporting hides and that was small. In 1846 an American man of war entered the harbor and took possession in the name of the United States. The town was known as Yerba Buena (good herb) until 1847 when it was changed to its present name. About that time it had a population of four hundred and fifty nine. The discovery of gold in 1848 gave the city its first start toward its present ...
— A Brief History of the United States • Barnes & Co.

... gardens and pools of water. No, the longer I live, the more sure I am that these things are meant for our solace and minor help through the trials of life. I assure you, Phoebe, that the crimson leaf of a Herb-Robert in the hedge has broken a strain of fretful repining, and it is one great blessing in these pleasures that one ...
— Hopes and Fears - scenes from the life of a spinster • Charlotte M. Yonge

... of learning, they left modern GALLANTRY and the POINT OF HONOUR, which still maintain their influence, and are the genuine offspring of those ancient affectations. [FN [f] In all legal single combats, it was part of the champion's oath, that he carried not about him any herb, spell, or enchantment, by which he might procure victory. Dugd. ...
— The History of England, Volume I • David Hume

... come in to that fireside very much as the Parson does to ours. The Parson, to be sure, never prophesies, but he grumbles, and is the chorus in the play that sings the everlasting ai ai of "I told you so!" Yet we like the Parson. He is the sprig of bitter herb that makes the pottage wholesome. I should rather, ten times over, dispense with the flatterers and the smooth-sayers than the grumblers. But the grumblers are of two sorts,—the healthful-toned and the whiners. There are makers of beer who substitute for the clean bitter of the hops some ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... summer-time really approach something of that Arcadian beauty which is supposed to prevail in the country. Everything, of course, depends upon the character of the inmates. The dull tint of the thatch is relieved here and there by great patches of sillgreen, which is religiously preserved as a good herb, though the exact ailments for which it is "good" are often forgotten. One end of the cottage is often completely hidden with ivy, and woodbine grows in thickest profusion over the porch. Near the door there are almost always a few cabbage-rose trees, and under ...
— The Toilers of the Field • Richard Jefferies

... call them, give us a mean idea of the thing; but the sound of the Latin is so much more pleasing, by the just mixture of the vowels with the consonants, that it raises our fancies to conceive somewhat more noble than a common herb, and to spread roses under him, and strew lilies over him—a bed not unworthy the grandson ...
— Discourses on Satire and Epic Poetry • John Dryden

... herb-gatherer had brought her infant with her on her quest, and had laid it down on a bed of soft grass while she worked. And it was this infant, wrapped as Tom afterward saw in a piece of deer-skin, at ...
— Tom Swift and his Big Tunnel - or, The Hidden City of the Andes • Victor Appleton

... the fragrant herb filled the room with its aroma; the brown toast was odoriferous; and everything pleasant and charming. After a temporary warming, I was shown to a room, where I changed my wet dress, an returning to the table, found that the interval had been we improved by my hostess; a meal for a traveler was ...
— Redburn. His First Voyage • Herman Melville

... Agreeing that plants and animals were produced by Omnipotent fiat does not exclude the idea of natural order and what we call secondary causes. The record of the fiat—"Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed," etc., "and it was so"; "let the earth bring forth the living creature after his kind, cattle and creeping thing and beast of the earth after his kind, and it was so"—seems even to imply them. Agreeing that they were formed of "the dust of the ground" and of ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. VI.,October, 1860.—No. XXXVI. - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... appetising and nutritious food while the banana grows as it does in North Queensland, and common as it is, the banana is one of the curiosities of the vegetable world. One writer says: "It is not a tree, a palm, a bush, a vegetable, nor a herb; it is simply a herbaceous plant with the stature of tree, and is perennial." He adds that the fruit contains no seed, though he qualifies the latter statement by remarking that he has heard of fully developed seeds occasionally appearing in the cultivated fruit "when left ...
— The Confessions of a Beachcomber • E J Banfield

... triumph o'er mortality." The keeper to the Princess Ishtar said: "Withhold thy speech! or Allat's fury dread! To her I go to bid thee welcome here." To Allat then the keeper doth appear: "Thy sister Ishtar the dark waters seeks— The Queen of Heaven," thus Allat's fury breaks. "So like an herb uprooted comes this Queen, To sting me as an asp doth Ishtar mean? What can her presence bring to me but hate? Doth Heaven's Queen thus come infuriate?" And Ishtar thus replies: "The fount I seek, Where I with Tammuz, my first love, may speak; And drink ...
— Babylonian and Assyrian Literature • Anonymous

... make two profits. Do you grow barley? Malt it, and infuse it, and sell the liquor for two small profits, one on the grain, and one on the infusion. Do you grow grass? Turn it into flesh, and sell for two small profits, one on the herb, ...
— A Perilous Secret • Charles Reade

... is a deceiver, and hath the knowledge of the virtue of herbs, so he did show the virtue of this herb, that by the means thereof they might see their imaginations and visions that he hath represented ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Volume XII. F, No. 325, August 2, 1828. • Various

... garden. To her foster-child it was a labour of love. In the early morning hours before milking time at the farm, or in the grey of the twilight, Morva was free to work in her own garden, while Sara only tended her herb bed. There at the further end was the potato bed in purple flower, here were rows of broad beans, in which the bees were humming, attracted by their sweet aroma that filled the evening air; there was the leek bed ...
— Garthowen - A Story of a Welsh Homestead • Allen Raine

... herb Of earth or potion dire Drawn from the flowing ocean, hadst thou drunk, That on thee thou hast brought the public curse? Thou hast cast off, cut off; Thyself will be cast out, A thing ...
— Specimens of Greek Tragedy - Aeschylus and Sophocles • Goldwin Smith

... were grazing in various portions of the uncultivated plain. At first sight they appeared to be only searching for food among the stones and dust, but upon close examination I found a peculiar fleshy herb something like the stone-crop which grows upon the old walls and rocks of England. This plant was exceedingly salt, and the sheep devoured it with avidity, and were in fair condition. The wool was long, but of a coarse wiry texture, and much ...
— Cyprus, as I Saw it in 1879 • Sir Samuel W. Baker

... allowed, "for the hardness of their hearts," as he maintained, to eat meat. But in the beginning it was not so; only herbs were given to man, at first, for food. He quoted the Psalmist (Psalm civ. 14) to show that man's food came from the earth, and was the green herb; and contended that the reason why Daniel and his friends were fairer and fatter than the children who ate their portion of meat was that they ate only pulse (Daniel i. 12-15). These are all of his Scriptural arguments which ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Volume 8, No. 47, September, 1861 • Various

... tapering towards the top, much resembling the long horns of Lobsters, each of whose stems or quills, DD, were brisled or brushed with multitudes of small stiff hairs, issuing out every way from the several joints, like the strings or sproutings of the herb Horse-tail, which is oft observ'd to grow among Corn, and for the whole shape, it does very much resemble those brushy Vegetables; besides these, there are two other jointed and brisled horns, or feelers, EE, in the forepart of the head, and a proboscis, ...
— Micrographia • Robert Hooke

... to be turned and made over in Deephaven, and she went to the Carews' and Lorimers' at house-cleaning time or in seasons of great festivity. She had no equal in sickness, and knew how to brew every old-fashioned dose and to make every variety of herb-tea, and when her nursing was put to an end by her patient's death, she was commander-in-chief at the funeral, and stood near the doorway to direct the mourning friends to their seats; and I have no reason to doubt that ...
— Deephaven and Selected Stories & Sketches • Sarah Orne Jewett

... through this last word, and another word written above it; but the ink was so faded, the page so woolly and thin with use, that it was impossible to decipher the correction; perhaps it was "mother-wort," an herb Philly did not know; or it might be "mandrake"? It looked as much like one as the other, the writing was so blurred and dim. "It is best to take what the book says," Philly said, simply; "besides, I haven't those other things in the garden, and I have monk's-hood ...
— The Voice • Margaret Deland

... troubling you—really? The heat is excessive, and I find that the mint, simple herb though it ...
— The Boss of Little Arcady • Harry Leon Wilson

... much fish, and kils and spoils much more: And I can tell you, that he can smel a fish in the water one hundred yards from him (Gesner sayes, much farther) and that his stones are good against the Falling-sickness: and that there is an herb Benione, which being hung in a linen cloth near a Fish Pond, or any haunt that he uses, makes him to avoid the place, which proves he can smell both by water and land. And thus much for my knowledg of the Otter, which you may now see above water at vent, and the dogs close with ...
— The Complete Angler 1653 • Isaak Walton

... fix'd on the eternal wheels, Beatrice stood unmov'd; and I with ken Fix'd upon her, from upward gaze remov'd At her aspect, such inwardly became As Glaucus, when he tasted of the herb, That made him peer among the ocean gods; Words may not tell of that transhuman change: And therefore let the example serve, though weak, For those whom grace hath better ...
— The Divine Comedy, Complete - The Vision of Paradise, Purgatory and Hell • Dante Alighieri

... but we are not the physician. Here we shrink in our proportion, sink in our dignity, in respect of very mean creatures, who are physicians to themselves. The hart that is pursued and wounded, they say, knows an herb, which being eaten throws off the arrow: a strange kind of vomit. The dog that pursues it, though he be subject to sickness, even proverbially, knows his grass that recovers him. And it may be true, ...
— Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions - Together with Death's Duel • John Donne

... the New Zealand scurvy grass. But it seemed to acquire a rank flavour by being boiled; which, however, some of our people did not perceive, and esteemed it good. If it could be introduced into our kitchen gardens, it would, in all probability, improve so far by cultivation as to be an excellent pot-herb. At this time none of its seeds were ripe enough to be preserved, and brought ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 15 (of 18) • Robert Kerr

... are apt to confuse Milton's descriptions with those in the book of Genesis. Milton fills his Paradise with flowers; but no flowers are spoken of in Genesis. We may indeed conclude that in speaking of every herb of the field, flowers are included. But they {61} are not named. The things that are named in the Garden ...
— Proserpina, Volume 1 - Studies Of Wayside Flowers • John Ruskin

... a wind from out the darkness, With scent of flower and fern and herb and tree, And in its breath there came a sound of ...
— Eyes of Youth - A Book of Verse by Padraic Colum, Shane Leslie, A.O. • Various

... clouds might give abundant rain; The nightly dews might fall, And the herb that keepeth life in man Might ...
— The Universal Reciter - 81 Choice Pieces of Rare Poetical Gems • Various

... Majesty in danger by such a method? Is not the monarchy in danger? Is not the nation's peace and tranquillity in danger? Will a change of parties make the nation more happy? No, my lord, the seed is sown that is like to afford us a perpetual increase; it is not an annual herb, it takes deep root; it seeds and breeds; and, if not timely prevented by her Majesty's royal endeavors, will split ...
— The World's Best Orations, Vol. 1 (of 10) • Various

... secretary, meets the witch at night in quest of a remedy for her passion for Richard, who of course has also been fascinated by her. They arrive about the same time, and he overhears the witch telling her to go to a lonely spot, where she will find an herb potent enough to cure her of her evil desires. The Governor follows her, and during their interview the Secretary hurriedly rushes upon the scene to notify him that conspirators are on his track. He throws a veil over Amelia's face and orders Reinhart, the Secretary, ...
— The Standard Operas (12th edition) • George P. Upton

... not the only herb prized as a means of casting the soul into the condition of hypostatic union with divinity. We have abundant evidence that long after the conquest the seeds of the plant called in Nahuatl the ololiuhqui ...
— Nagualism - A Study in Native American Folk-lore and History • Daniel G. Brinton

... opened Chinese ports to Russian ships, was a severe blow to Kiachta and Maimaichin. Up to that time only a single cargo of tea was carried annually into Russia by water; all the rest of the herb used in the empire came by land. Unfortunately the treaty was made just after the Russian and Chinese merchants had concluded contracts in the tea districts; these contracts caused great losses when the treaty went into effect, ...
— Overland through Asia; Pictures of Siberian, Chinese, and Tartar - Life • Thomas Wallace Knox

... Smell, which got so little exercise and attention that it went to sleep altogether, so that millions get no warning and no joy through it. We met the need for its education in the Baby Camp by having a Herb Garden. Back from the shelters and open ground, in a shady place, we have planted fennel, mint, lavender, sage, marjoram, thyme, rosemary, herb gerrard and rue. And over and above these pungently smelling things there are little fields of mignonette. We have balm, indeed, everywhere ...
— The Child Under Eight • E.R. Murray and Henrietta Brown Smith

... garden are an herb bed, a few rhubarb plants, and an asparagus bed. The latter, because it takes time to become established, seems difficult but laying out a proper bed is not so hard. Also, in two to three years the plants will have reached the stage where the larger stalks may be cut for consumption. ...
— If You're Going to Live in the Country • Thomas H. Ormsbee and Richmond Huntley

... whether that world be spiritual or natural. The poet, in singing of the heavenly land, fails not to mention its fields of 'living green,' and 'rivers of delight.' And what are fields without grass, and flowers, and tender herb? If, then, there be flowers in the spiritual world, they ...
— The Good Time Coming • T. S. Arthur

... be," I objected, "when the pea is a weak, clinging, straggling herb, and the locust a big, ...
— The Story of My Boyhood and Youth • John Muir

... conscience struck him in his proudest hour—the humblest things of earth, brought deathly terror to his soul. 'Twas evident the appearance of the mullen plant, which drew us to the spot, had been the cause of his death. The words of the old sailor seemed true. The lowly herb had brought the crime to light, and in the hand of heaven ...
— Sketches And Tales Illustrative Of Life In The Backwoods Of New Brunswick • Mrs. F. Beavan

... Bournemouth shopkeeper named Richard Oliver. It seems that Oliver is troubled with pimples on his face, and that Emma Barney—not an inappropriate name, by the way—said she could cure these by means of a certain herb, the name of which she would divulge 'for a consideration.' Before doing so, however, she required Richard's coat and waistcoat, and some silver to 'steam in hot water,' after which the name of the herb would be given—on the following day. It is needless to say that the coat, waistcoat, ...
— Gipsy Life - being an account of our Gipsies and their children • George Smith

... victuals brought into the city by country butchers and farmers, viz., Leadenhall and the Greenyard for the east end of the city, Honey Lane for the centre, and a market near Warwick Lane, which was to take the place of Newgate Market, for the west end. Two places were to be assigned for herb and fruit markets, viz., the site of the king's wardrobe (if the king would give his consent) and the ground whereon recently had stood the church of St. Laurence Pulteney. The markets formerly held in Aldersgate Street and Gracechurch Street were to be ...
— London and the Kingdom - Volume II • Reginald R. Sharpe

... That third Herb Robert one is just the drawing that nobody but me (never mind grammar) could have made. Nobody! because it means ever so much careful watching of the ways of the leaf, and a lot of work in cramp perspective besides. It is not quite right yet, but it ...
— Hortus Inclusus - Messages from the Wood to the Garden, Sent in Happy Days - to the Sister Ladies of the Thwaite, Coniston • John Ruskin

... of all the zephyrs. No sooner is the lion there Than of some sickness he complains. Says he, 'You on your mission fare. A fever, with its thirst and pains, Dries up my blood, and bakes my brains; And I must search some herb, Its fatal power to curb. For you, there is no time to waste; Pay me my money, and make haste.' The treasures were unbound, And placed upon the ground. Then, with a look which testified His royal joy, the lion cried, 'My coins, good heavens, ...
— The Fables of La Fontaine - A New Edition, With Notes • Jean de La Fontaine

... the cooling earth caused the elevation of the land, and the draining of the waters into the seas. The geologist Lyell says, "All land has been under water." Hitchcock says, "The surface of the globe has been a shoreless ocean." "And the earth brought forth grass, herb yielding seed after its kind, and tree bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after its kind." Though the sun was not yet visible on account of dense clouds and vapors, the warm, humid atmosphere ...
— The Evolution Of Man Scientifically Disproved • William A. Williams

... man. To quote two instances only which justify doubt—and to take birds this time, by way of a change—a pigeon will swallow opium enough to kill a man, and will not be in the least affected by it; and parsley, which is an innocent herb in the stomach of a human being, is deadly poison ...
— Heart and Science - A Story of the Present Time • Wilkie Collins

... willing to give him $1.37-1/2 in gold. Gold was now 2.69-3/4, so Mr. Peterkin found in the newspaper. This gave Agamemnon a pretty little sum. He sat himself down to do it. But there was the coffee! All sat and thought awhile, till Elizabeth Eliza said, "Why don't we go to the herb-woman?" Elizabeth Eliza was the only daughter. She was named after her two aunts,—Elizabeth, from the sister of her father; Eliza, from her mother's sister. Now, the herb-woman was an old woman who came ...
— The Peterkin Papers • Lucretia P Hale

... Basil.—Sweet basil an aromatic herb is classed among the sweet herbs. It is used as seasoning in soups, sauces, salads and in fish dressings. Basil vinegar takes the place in winter ...
— Vaughan's Vegetable Cook Book (4th edition) - How to Cook and Use Rarer Vegetables and Herbs • Anonymous

... actions lent colour to these wild reports. She had studied various theories of medicine—quaint, old, forgotten herb lore, absurd mediaeval magic. At first it had diverted her, then she grew credulous, and in the despair of knowing Eberhard Ludwig's love to be waning and his health broken, she resorted to the pitiful puerilities of love potions, life essences, and elixirs. Of course, for ...
— A German Pompadour - Being the Extraordinary History of Wilhelmine van Graevenitz, - Landhofmeisterin of Wirtemberg • Marie Hay

... aphorisms concerning divine and moral philosophy, but also to compile a natural history of all verdure, from the cedar upon the mountain to the moss upon the wall (which is but a rudiment between putrefaction and an herb), and also of all things that breathe or move. Nay, the same Solomon the king, although he excelled in the glory of treasure and magnificent buildings, of shipping and navigation, of service and attendance, of fame and renown, and the like, yet he maketh no claim to any of those glories, but ...
— The Advancement of Learning • Francis Bacon

... yet every one of these articles has its own individual and peculiar use, and the knowledge of these articles and how to use them is what makes the difference between American and Foreign cooking. Each herb has a peculiar quality as a stomachic and it must be as delicately measured as if it were a medicine. The use of garlic, so much decried as plebeian, is the secret of some of the finest dishes prepared by the highest chefs. It must not be forgotten that in the use of all flavors and ...
— Bohemian San Francisco - Its restaurants and their most famous recipes—The elegant art of dining. • Clarence E. Edwords

... Pilgrim's Progress" are decidedly superior to those in the First Part, and some are of high excellence. Who is ignorant of the charming little song of the Shepherd Boy in the Valley of Humiliation, "in very mean clothes, but with a very fresh and well-favoured countenance, and wearing more of the herb called Heartsease in his bosom than he that is clad ...
— The Life of John Bunyan • Edmund Venables

... cry! But it was of no use. He had better not have taken her away from Giles, for he did not know what to feed her with, and had given her among the greens he had gathered a herb called hemlock, which is poisonous and will kill whatever eats of it; and it had killed ...
— Young Folks Treasury, Volume 3 (of 12) - Classic Tales And Old-Fashioned Stories • Various

... not a root nor yet a herb on the face of the earth that could cure the sickness I have ...
— Six Plays • Florence Henrietta Darwin

... up on the cleared spots; the wide-spreading juniper, with its great prickly disks, covers the barer slopes; the willow herb, wild rose, clematis, violet, golden rod, aster, immortelle, arbutus, harebell, orchis, linnaea borealis, mitchella, dalibarda, wintergreen, ferns innumerable, and four species of running pine, all in due season, deck ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol 6, No 5, November 1864 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... and must of course be fertilised by pollen from a distinct plant in order to yield any seeds. The plants on which I experimented were hermaphrodites; they had been cultivated for a long period as a pot-herb in my kitchen garden, and were, like so many long-cultivated plants, extremely sterile. As I felt doubtful about the specific name I sent specimens to Kew, and was assured that the species was ...
— The Effects of Cross & Self-Fertilisation in the Vegetable Kingdom • Charles Darwin

... need have we of so prodigious a household? Two chaplains at ten livres a month each, and, a chapel clerk at one hundred sols! A valet-de-chambre at ninety livres a year. Four head cooks at six score livres a year each! A spit-cook, an herb-cook, a sauce-cook, a butler, two sumpter-horse lackeys, at ten livres a month each! Two scullions at eight livres! A groom of the stables and his two aids at four and twenty livres a month! A porter, ...
— Notre-Dame de Paris - The Hunchback of Notre Dame • Victor Hugo

... signs, moving his hand, turning and twisting his head and body, and ending with a great show of reverence and submission. He returned to shore. Again, and for a third time, he came out and went through the same ceremony; after which he brought a little basket of rushes, filled with an herb which is called there tambac, which he threw into the boat. Then he ...
— Under Drake's Flag - A Tale of the Spanish Main • G. A. Henty

... on braziers—a species of three-legged iron bucket in which the charcoal fire is kindled. On this the little kettle, filled from the well in the patio, is boiled for the inevitable mt. About this herb I picked up, from various sources, some interesting information. The mt plant grows chiefly In Paraguay, and is sent down the river in bags made of hides. From the village of Tacurti Pucu in that country comes a strange account of the origin of the yerba mt plant, which runs thus: ...
— Through Five Republics on Horseback • G. Whitfield Ray

... servile; And vice in misery affecting still A tattered splendour. What a state of being! In Tuscany, my own dear sunny land, Our nobles were but citizens and merchants,[170] Like Cosmo. We had evils, but not such As these; and our all-ripe and gushing valleys 710 Made poverty more cheerful, where each herb Was in itself a meal, and every vine Rained, as it were, the beverage which makes glad The heart of man; and the ne'er unfelt sun (But rarely clouded, and when clouded, leaving His warmth behind in memory of his beams) Makes the worn mantle, and the ...
— The Works of Lord Byron - Poetry, Volume V. • Lord Byron

... mushrooms, and in Levin's finally ordering the soup to be served without the accompaniment of little pies, with which the cook had particularly meant to impress their visitor. But though Stepan Arkadyevitch was accustomed to very different dinners, he thought everything excellent: the herb brandy, and the bread, and the butter, and above all the salt goose and the mushrooms, and the nettle soup, and the chicken in white sauce, and the white Crimean wine— everything was superb ...
— Anna Karenina • Leo Tolstoy

... increased to nearly twenty thousand. In 1852, according to the census, it was thirty-four thousand eight hundred and seventy. The first settlement made at San Francisco, was commenced in the year 1776. The place was then called Yerba Buena, or Good Herb, from the fact that an herb of that name, which was supposed to have great medicinal value, grew in rich luxuriance over the surrounding country. The houses were at first built of adobes, or sun dried bricks. It is now one of the most important ...
— The Life and Adventures of Kit Carson, the Nestor of the Rocky Mountains, from Facts Narrated by Himself • De Witt C. Peters

... regard with small favor the therapeutic application of plants by the Filipino "herb-doctors" (curanderos) as being entirely empirical. This disparagement is unjustified because in all the most rational and scientific remedies that we make use of, the first step towards the final development of their relative position among remedies is due to ...
— The Medicinal Plants of the Philippines • T. H. Pardo de Tavera

... discussion took place between Oberon and Titania as to which of them was to have the little changeling boy. They parted in rage, Oberon threatening to torment Titania. Oberon summoned Puck to attend him, and bring the herb he once showed him, the juice of which, laid on sleeping eyelids, made man or woman dote upon the next creature seen. Having this herb's juice, Oberon would watch Titania when she was asleep, and drop the liquor ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... netting in a dry shed or room where the air will get at them on all sides. Be sure they are dry and not moist when you cut or pick them, and free them from dirt and decayed leaves. After they are entirely dried out, put them in paper bags upon which you have written the name of the herb and the date of tying it up. Hang them where the air is dry and there is no chance ...
— Practical Suggestions for Mother and Housewife • Marion Mills Miller

... vast clouds of grasshoppers sailing northward from the great Utah desert in the United States, alighted late in the afternoon of one day and in the morning fields of grain, gardens with their promise, and every herb in the Settlement were gone, and a waste like a blasted hearth remained behind. The event was more than a loss of their crops, it seemed a heaven-struck blow upon their community, and it is said they lifted up their eyes to heaven, weeping and ...
— The Romantic Settlement of Lord Selkirk's Colonists - The Pioneers of Manitoba • George Bryce



Words linked to "Herb" :   herb bennet, feabane mullet, elephant's-foot, false miterwort, bishop's cap, Galega officinalis, barrenwort, butterweed, drypis, bog hemp, coltsfoot, coolwart, Dalmatian pyrethrum, herb doctor, false saffron, cow parsnip, aubergine, basil thyme, golden ragwort, Ethiopian banana, Amsinckia intermedia, butterflower, carrion flower, gumweed, bird's foot trefoil, asparagus pea, beaked parsley, breakstone, hawkweed, Fumaria officinalis, black salsify, cat's foot, Daucus carota sativa, false bugbane, eggplant, chaenactis, aroid, gall of the earth, globeflower, Aureolaria virginica, forget-me-not, Darmera peltata, ground cherry, apple of Peru, Anthemis nobilis, bishop's hat, foamflower, Eryngium aquaticum, clammy chickweed, Aspidistra elatio, balsam herb, flannel leaf, astilbe, blue thistle, Emmanthe penduliflora, Anethum graveolens, Emilia sagitta, Australian sword lily, brinjal, Cephalotus follicularis, breadroot, tracheophyte, Coriandrum sativum, Cichorium intybus, cow parsley, common amsinckia, ginseng, belladonna, beetleweed, crotalaria, Amaranthus spinosus, Dicentra canadensis, Cynoglossum amabile, Diplotaxis muralis, garden forget-me-not, herb Christopher, cockscomb, anise, Glaux maritima, alumbloom, false rue anemone, Guinea pepper, Gerardia pedicularia, coral necklace, beebalm, butterbur, Eruca sativa, Eranthis hyemalis, Eruca vesicaria sativa, Galeopsis tetrahit, gum plant, herb robert, Collinsonia canadensis, globe thistle, agueweed, dock, flameflower, Alexander, galax, catnip, arugula, cushion calamint, blue skullcap, Cichorium endivia, catmint, American liquorice, Armoracia rusticana, elsholtzia, heal all, camphor dune tansy, balsamroot, willowherb, fringepod, dog's mercury, Ballota nigra, Apium graveolens rapaceum, bladderpod, coreopsis, fetid horehound, goldcup, goat's rue, columbo, Cassia marilandica, cardamon, camomile, Ageratina altissima, Cynoglossum virginaticum, halogeton, dandelion, flame-flower, globe flower, creeping zinnia, Amsinckia grandiflora, buckwheat, climbing onion, gas plant, flax, chickweed, amaranth, Greek clover, corn salad, devil's apples, cupflower, blowball, eggplant bush, Anthriscus sylvestris, dittany, herb roberts, baby blue-eyes, alpine coltsfoot, feverroot, false nettle, agrimony, dog mercury, blue devil, garden rocket, flame flower, Emilia coccinea, devil's claw, Celosia cristata, Cnidoscolus urens, Asarum shuttleworthii, cultivated carrot, garden balm, asparagus, Egyptian henbane, deadly nightshade, common devil's claw, argemone, Coptis trifolia groenlandica, astrantia, Abyssinian banana, California yellow bells, anchusa, bar-room plant, gesneria, gypsywort, Desmanthus ilinoensis, burning bush, corn mayweed, arnica, fenugreek, bedstraw, buttercup, Chinese forget-me-not, common unicorn plant, fiesta flower, anise plant, Crambe maritima, Glycyrrhiza lepidota, grains of paradise, Diplotaxis tenuifolia, Curcuma longa, bugleweed, coriander plant, common cockscomb, Ananas comosus, evening primrose, barilla, geranium, bible leaf, herb Paris, butter-flower, Diplotaxis erucoides, boys-and-girls, earthnut, cultivated celery, golden seal, Emilia javanica, fraxinella, herbal, cumin, dragon's head, German chamomile, devil nettle, clammyweed, Dicentra spectabilis, Guinea grains, Australian pitcher plant, Asparagus setaceous, gromwell, bloodwort, fines herbes, Carum carvi, cottonweed, Dalmatia pyrethrum, Chrysanthemum balsamita, Apium graveolens, andryala, clover, goosefoot, gumbo, fumeroot, banana tree, false rue, Dicentra cucullaria, Chamaemelum nobilis, Chrysanthemum parthenium, dagga, Anacyclus pyrethrum, feverfew, bush pea, Emilia flammea, crowfoot, carnivorous plant, bee balm, Anthyllis vulneraria, Apium graveolens dulce, alumroot, Antennaria dioica, Frasera speciosa, benni, black henbane, American ginseng, herbaceous plant, cumfrey, cruciferous plant, chicory, Bowiea volubilis, Aframomum melegueta, gipsywort, bleeding heart, edible asparagus, blueweed, American gentian, dead nettle, blue pimpernel, crucifer, bird of paradise, calamint, benny, black lovage, cat's feet, St. Barbara's herb, deer's-ears, giant hyssop, bloodroot, benne, campanula, bellflower, dragonhead, day lily, boneset, Dracocephalum parviflorum, cast-iron plant, Asparagus officinales, herb tea, fumewort, angelique, glasswort, cleome, caryophyllaceous plant, Atropa belladonna, Arnoseris minima, Ayapana triplinervis, false foxglove, canna, black archangel, goat rue, bells of Ireland, Eupatorium aya-pana, button snakeroot, Cacalia lutea, Alexanders, Cacalia javanica, bergenia, cardamom, Echium vulgare, herb of grace, golden thread, Gerardia virginica, Eupatorium purpureum, beefsteak plant, carrot, Carthamus tinctorius, alecost, herbage, celeriac, cayenne jasmine, American licorice, bugle, Eupatorium perfoliatum, Eupatorium cannabinum, dayflower, Cape periwinkle, Curcuma domestica, burnet bloodwort, celery, devil's fig, Cape dagga, foxglove, fleabane, flame nettle, chicory plant, Aureolaria pedicularia, Dictamnus alba, healing herb, Coptis groenlandica, Descurainia pinnata, golden groundsel, Berteroa incana, deer's-ear, Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium, Glycyrrhiza glabra, Eupatorium rugosum, Abelmoschus esculentus, asclepiad, Epimedium grandiflorum, Anemopsis californica, dwarf nipplewort, basil balm, banana, arum, vascular plant, endive, elephant-tusk, false gromwell, ginger, giant buttercup, aspidistra, American columbo, chamomile, achillea, fumitory, black horehound, celery root, dog fennel, Antennaria plantaginifolia, Galax urceolata, chamois cress, Conopodium denudatum, galaxy, celandine, gramineous plant, bog rhubarb, Dutchman's breeches, false mitrewort, goldenseal, agrimonia, Halogeton souda, blessed thistle, belladonna plant, Anthriscus cereifolium, garden egg, esparcet, coleus, Acinos arvensis, Anigozanthus manglesii, American pennyroyal, Celosia argentea, Celosia argentea cristata, Cuminum cyminum, green gentian, Halogeton glomeratus, Cakile maritima, Borago officinalis, Fagopyrum esculentum, Elettaria cardamomum, Ensete ventricosum, Catharanthus roseus, costusroot, digitalis, asparagus fern, Clinopodium vulgare, acanthus, Eupatorium maculatum, Eupatorium capillifolium, black saltwort, graminaceous plant, goldthread, Cynoglossum officinale, draba, Haastia pulvinaris, bur reed, ayapana, Asparagus plumosus



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