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Hie

verb
(past & past part. hied; pres. part. hieing or hying)
1.
Move fast.  Synonyms: belt along, bucket along, cannonball along, hasten, hotfoot, pelt along, race, rush, rush along, speed, step on it.  "The cars raced down the street"






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Hie" Quotes from Famous Books



... wildcat flourished in a gold camp or gambling joint, and that wildcat did not hie to Canada when the real estate boom broke loose, the wildcat species not in evidence was too rare to be classified. Property in small cities sold at New York and Chicago values. Suburban lots were staked out round small towns in areas for a London or a Paris, and the lots were sold on instalment ...
— The Canadian Commonwealth • Agnes C. Laut

... ho, officers, gentlemen! Hie to the presence to attend the Emperor.— Good Frederick, see the rooms be voided straight: His majesty is coming to the hall; Go back, and see the ...
— Dr. Faustus • Christopher Marlowe

... heart, my hand, My vow and all I render, A Highland lay has won the day, And I will hie ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume VI - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... Cinth. Hie thee then, And charge the wind flie from his Rockie Den. Let loose thy subjects, only Boreas Too foul for our intention as he was; Still keep him fast chain'd; we must have none here But vernal blasts, and gentle winds appear, Such as ...
— The Maids Tragedy • Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher

... sordid man!' exclaimed the poet. 'Dost thou desire nothing brighter than gold that thou wouldst transmute all this ethereal lustre into such dross as thou wallowest in already? For myself, hiding the jewel under my cloak, I shall hie me back to my attic chamber, in one of the darksome alleys of London. There, night and day, will I gaze upon it; my soul shall drink its radiance; it shall be diffused throughout my intellectual powers, and gleam brightly in every line of poesy that ...
— The Great Stone Face - And Other Tales Of The White Mountains • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... dearth. Red phantom figures of the furious fire, For kindly greeting change your usual ire. Grey, grizzly googies from the woods and dells, To gentle whisperings change your harrowing yells. Flagae, Devas, Mara Rupas,[19] hie to the Plane, the Astral Plane, And to these three poor fools, explain, explain The secrets that they wish ...
— The Sorcery Club • Elliott O'Donnell

... that you can not live at court with a jaundiced countenance. Heigh-ho! Alackaday! You should hie yourself back to the woods and barren wastes of Friedwald, ...
— Under the Rose • Frederic Stewart Isham

... the whole country, To the war with him each tenth man should hie. "My dearest Lady, worthy thou art In the field of honour to bear a part." Woe befall ...
— Queen Berngerd, The Bard and the Dreams - and other ballads • Thomas J. Wise

... just the same," he continued. "I warn you that, from now on, I am going to pester you a lot. You'll find me sitting on your front door-step every morning, ready to take orders. To-morrow I must hie me to New York, to explain to some venerable directors why the net earnings have fallen below forty per cent. But when I return, O fair maiden, ...
— The Slim Princess • George Ade

... latter accompanied Fujiwara Kuzunomaro, two years later. Saicho was specially sent to China by his sovereign to study Buddhism, in order that, on his return, he might become lord-abbot of a monastery which his Majesty had caused to be built on Hie-no-yama—subsequently known as Hiei-zan—a hill on the northeast of the new palace in Kyoto. A Japanese superstition regarded the northeast as the "Demon's Gate," where a barrier must be erected against the ingress of evil influences. Saicho ...
— A History of the Japanese People - From the Earliest Times to the End of the Meiji Era • Frank Brinkley and Dairoku Kikuchi

... you have given up, in these six hours, a tithe of your heart to this man—if, in fact, his screed be not arrant bosh—then will I hie me to London for good and all, and write political leaders all the days of ...
— The Delectable Duchy • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... began his lecture, and, you may depend upon it, by this time the lion was in him, and he went careering on. Hie views were extreme; he made them extravagant. I remember at one point—for he was a man without bluster, serene, self-poised, never disturbed in the least—he made an affirmation that was very bitter, and the cry arose over the whole congregation. ...
— Brave Men and Women - Their Struggles, Failures, And Triumphs • O.E. Fuller

... late at night And folks to bed should hie, Then because the Abbot sat too long He ...
— The Serpent Knight - and other ballads - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... Bellay) 'gins Barras hie to raise His Heavenly muse, th' Almighty to adore. Live, happy spirits! th' honor of your name, And fill the ...
— Anne Bradstreet and Her Time • Helen Campbell

... may say, I think, that such a report would be in substantial agreement with the report that is here offered; but, if one's virtue will not endure the love-making of Arcadia, let him banish the myth from his imagination and hie to ...
— Unwritten Literature of Hawaii - The Sacred Songs of the Hula • Nathaniel Bright Emerson

... the enemy, and gave them another great overthrow, taking seven of their foists laden with various kinds of merchandise, and sank ten others by the shot of his artillery, one of which was laden with elephants. Hie enemy, seeing the ocean almost covered with the bodies of their slain, their principal ships taken, sunk, or much injured, and having lost all hope of victory, endeavoured to save themselves by flight. But the Portuguese determined to follow up their ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume VII • Robert Kerr

... provide marching-money, hand-money [shillings for earnest]; Colignon's recruits travelled mostly of will and at their own charge. In Franken, in Schwaben, in the Rhine Countries, a dissolute son would rob his father,—as shopmen their masters' tills, and managers their cash-boxes,—and hie off to those magnanimous Prussian Officials, who gave away companies like kreutzers, and had a value for young fellows of spirit. They hastened to Magdeburg with their Commissions; where they were received ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XIX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... fie hie sly cry shy vie sty pry why lied fried sky tied vied tried pried ally rely defy deny reply spry skies flies cried supply spied ...
— The Beacon Second Reader • James H. Fassett

... of purest golde Upon a brazen pillour standing hie, 660 Which th'ashes seem'd of some great prince to hold, Enclosde therein for endles memorie Of him whom all the world did glorifie: Seemed the heavens with the earth did disagree, Whether should of ...
— The Poetical Works of Edmund Spenser, Volume 5 • Edmund Spenser

... shall be left to men. Only if Ares or Phoebus Apollo fall to fighting, or put constraint upon Achilles and hinder him from fight, then straightway among us too shall go up the battle-cry of strife; right soon, methinks, shall they hie them from the issue of the fray back to Olympus to the company of the gods, overcome by the ...
— The Iliad of Homer • Homer (Lang, Leaf, Myers trans.)

... And sink in misery. All they wish'd on earth, Possessing here, whom have they to accuse, But their own folly, for the lot they chose? Yet, for that these injured themselves alone, They to the house of PENITENCE may hie, And, by a long and painful regimen, To wearied Nature her exhausted powers Restore, till they shall learn to form the wish Of wisdom, and ALMIGHTY GOODNESS grants That prize to him who seeks it." Whilst he spake, The board is spread. With bloated paunch, and eye Fat swoln, and ...
— Poems, 1799 • Robert Southey

... trusty page,' said he, 'that I have reared thee in my household, and cherished thee above all thy companions. If thou hast loyalty and affection for thy lord, now is the time to serve him. Hie thee to the Christian camp, and find thy way to the tent of the Bishop Oppas. If any one ask thee who thou art, tell them thou art of the household of the bishop, and bearer of missives from Cordova. When thou art admitted ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, May 1844 - Volume 23, Number 5 • Various

... were left to me," said Sir Dagonet, "I would hie me to Ireland. A likely spot to find him, say I. For there are none who have said that they know of ...
— In the Court of King Arthur • Samuel Lowe

... will answere it; If great mens eares be ope to inocency, If greatnesse be not partial with greatenesse, Even to the greatest I will answere it. Perhaps, some shallow censurer will say, The Orator was proud, he would climbe too hie; But heaven and truth will say the contrarie. My greatest grief is, I have my friend betraide; The treasons done, I, and the Traitor's free, Yet innocent Treason needes not to flee. His loyaltie bids me abide his frowne, And he hath power to ...
— A Collection Of Old English Plays, Vol. IV. • Editor: A.H. Bullen

... differently from many poor fellows whom it makes my blood run chill to think of, confined to the plantation, with not enough of food and that little of the coarsest kind, to satisfy the gnawings of hunger,—compelled oftentimes, to hie away in the night-time, when worn down with work, and steal, (if it be stealing,) and privately devour such things as they can lay their hands upon,—made to feel the rigors of bondage with no cessation,—torn away sometimes ...
— The Narrative of Lunsford Lane, Formerly of Raleigh, N.C. • Lunsford Lane

... cool and pleasant" So you hie yourself away To the wild-wood sweet and shady For a joyous, happy day; Then the rain comes down in torrents Till it drowns the very snakes, And you have a high example Of the weather ...
— Oklahoma Sunshine • Freeman E. (Freeman Edwin) Miller

... yea, in such sort that if nature had not been so favourable unto them as to have sprinkled their forehead with a little tincture of bashfulness and modesty, you should see them in a so frantic mood run mad after lechery, and hie apace up and down with haste and lust, in quest of and to fix some chamber-standard in their Paphian ground, that never did the Proetides, Mimallonides, nor Lyaean Thyades deport themselves in the time of their bacchanalian festivals more shamelessly, ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... Suppose him, by some strange chance, to stumble upon that incomparable specimen of modern sculpture which stands on high at King's-Cross, lifted up, in order, we presume, to enable the good citizens duly to feast their eyes upon its manifold perfections, as they daily hie them to and fro between their western or suburban retreats and the purlieus of King Street or Cheapside. What estimate would the stranger form of the taste or skill of those who placed on its pedestal ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, No. 327 - Vol. 53, January, 1843 • Various

... between the puffs of his pipe, as he sat on the wash bench by the door, and Mother MacAllister had told them the story, as she and Elizabeth washed up the dishes, the story of the lady of high degree who had cast aside wealth and noble lovers to hie ...
— 'Lizbeth of the Dale • Marian Keith

... who wish to make the acquaintance of the bird must either resort to some fancier's shop, or hie themselves to the cool heights of Mussoorie, or, better still, of Darjeeling, where the liothrix is exceptionally abundant. But even at Darjeeling the Pekin-robin will have to be looked for carefully, for it is of shy and retiring habits, and a small bird of such a disposition ...
— Birds of the Indian Hills • Douglas Dewar

... slave, the ugly monster, Death, Shaking and quivering, pale and wan for fear, Stands aiming at me with his murdering dart, Who flies away at every glance I give, And, when I look away, comes stealing on. Villain, away, and hie thee to the field! I and mine army come to load thy back With souls of thousand mangled carcasses. Look, where he goes; but see, he comes again, Because I stay: Techelles, let us march And weary Death with bearing souls to hell. Part II, ...
— The Principles of English Versification • Paull Franklin Baum

... Charioteer, I seek thy protection. Do my behest. My mind misgiveth me. The king may come to grief. Yoking Nala's favourite horses endued with the fleetness of the mind, do thou take these twins (my son and daughter) on the car and hie thou to Kundina. Leaving the children there with my kindred as also the car and the horses, either stay thou there, or go to any other place as it listeth thee." Varshneya, the charioteer of Nala, then reported ...
— Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa Bk. 3 Pt. 1 • Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa

... lot of the fender-fisherman be happier? No colds, quinsies or asthmas follow his incursions into the realms of fancy where in cool streams and peaceful lakes a legion of chubs and trouts and sawmon await him; in fancy he can hie away to the far-off Yalrow and once more share the benefits of the companionship of Kit North, the Shepherd, and that noble Edinburgh band; in fancy he can trudge the banks of the Blackwater with the sage of Watergrasshill; in fancy he can hear the music of the Tyne ...
— The Love Affairs of a Bibliomaniac • Eugene Field

... fowth o' awfu' stories reengin' the country, like ghaists 'at naebody cud get a grip o'—as to hoo he had gotten the said siller, an' sic like—the siller 'at naebody ever saw; for upo' that siller, as I tell ye, naebody ever cuist an e'e. Some said he had been a pirate upo' the hie seas, an' had ta'en the siller in lumps o' gowd frae puir ships 'at hadna men eneuch to hand the grip o' 't; some said he had been a privateer; an' ither some said there was sma' differ atween the twa. An' some wad hae't he was ane o' them 'at tuik an' ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... surprised, Jane," said he, in a tone not without affection in it. "You did not expect, I suppose, ever to see me again. It was a mere chance brought me to America. I shall stay here a moment, and then hie me back again. I could not pass through the city without a 'How d'ye' to the little girl for whom I ...
— Jane Talbot • Charles Brockden Brown

... Suthern winds gar spindrift flee Abune the clachan, faddumes hie, Whan for the cluds I canna see The bonny lift, I'd fain indite an odd to thee ...
— Robert Louis Stevenson • Margaret Moyes Black

... well that Sir Dinadan, a knight of the Table Round, made this song, and made me to sing it afore you. Thou sayest well, said King Mark, and because thou art a minstrel thou shalt go quit, but I charge thee hie thee fast out of my sight. So the harper departed and went to Sir Tristram, and told him how he had sped. Then Sir Tristram let make letters as goodly as he could to Launcelot and to Sir Dinadan. And so he let conduct the harper out of the country. But to say that King Mark was wonderly ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume II (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... best. It must combine the excellences of your invention with the excellences of his. Meanwhile a coolness should be made to arise between her and him: and as there would be no artistic reason for his presence here after the verdict is pronounced, he would perforce hie back to town. Do ...
— A Laodicean • Thomas Hardy

... we are to rear only four children per marriage, and if we are to give the medical man liberty to weed out the weaklings, it behoves us to see that the children whom we produce are of the best quality. Let us, therefore, hie to the stud-farm, observe its methods and proceed to apply them to the human race. We must definitely prevent feeble-minded persons from propagating their species. Within limits, that is a proposition with which all instructed persons ...
— Science and Morals and Other Essays • Bertram Coghill Alan Windle

... divided the lands among his people; but he was dead and gone to the house of Hades, and King Alcinous, whose counsels were inspired of heaven, was now reigning. To his house, then, did Minerva hie in furtherance of ...
— The Odyssey • Homer

... this custom at sea; and every night, in the dog-watch, sing the songs of Zion to the roll of the great ocean-organ: a pious custom of a devout race, who thus send over their hallelujahs before them, as they hie to the ...
— Redburn. His First Voyage • Herman Melville

... has!" cried Mrs. Peerybingle, instantly becoming very active. "Here, take the precious darling, Tilly, while I make myself of some use. Bless it, I could smother it with kissing it, I could! Hie then, good dog! Hie, Boxer, boy! Only let me make the tea first, John; and then I'll help you with the parcels, like a busy bee. 'How doth the little'—and all the rest of it, you know, John. Did you ever learn 'How doth the little,' when you ...
— The Cricket on the Hearth • Charles Dickens

... of losing De Wet. Now, young feller, just you hie back to your general, Charles Knox, I suppose, and tell him that the New Cavalry Brigade is coming right in here, but will not worry him long, as it has orders to be off to-night. (The youth salutes and goes to the right-about, while ...
— On the Heels of De Wet • The Intelligence Officer

... speak not to me, get thee gone! Death and destruction dog thee at thy heels; Thy mother's name is ominous to children. If thou wilt outstrip death, go cross the seas, And live with Richmond, from the reach of hell: Go, hie thee, hie thee from this slaughter-house, Lest thou increase the number of the dead; And make me die the thrall of Margaret's curse, Nor mother, wife, nor ...
— The Life and Death of King Richard III • William Shakespeare [Collins edition]

... Then hie thee to some bonny brake Another mate to woo and take, And as thy soul to love. Rise with the dew, stay not the noon, What's good cannot be found too soon, The wind will not be always south, Nor like a rose is every mouth, Time's ...
— Path Flower and Other Verses • Olive T. Dargan

... out my sight, Nor dare attempt such joy to blight, Thou evil wicked-doing doit, Then hie away, Seek not the morning, but the ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, No. 388 - Vol. 14, No. 388, Saturday, September 5, 1829. • Various

... her kirtle green A little aboon her knee, The lady snooded her yellow hair A little aboon her bree, And she's gane to the good greenwood As fast as she could hie. ...
— Folk-Lore and Legends - Scotland • Anonymous

... appeared at a distance, invested with that purple bloom so inexpressibly beautiful, and peculiar to this fortunate climate. I hailed the prospect and blessed the transparent air that gave me life and vigour to run down the rocks, and hie as fast as my savage across the plain to Puzzoli. There we took bark and rowed out into the blue ocean, by the remains of a sturdy mole: many such, I imagine, adorned the bay in Roman ages crowned by vast lengths of slender pillars; ...
— Dreams, Waking Thoughts, and Incidents • William Beckford

... to catch Chandler's fast crystallizing gaze, he pointed to the sleeping lady's door with a gesture so stern and significant that the prostrate man half-lifted his head, with his remaining strength, to see. He saw nothing; but he caught the cold words of the doctor—the last sounds hie was to hear: ...
— Rolling Stones • O. Henry

... there came this sense: "Her heart has answered unto thine; She comes, to-night. Go, hie thee hence! Meet ...
— Rose and Roof-Tree - Poems • George Parsons Lathrop

... wars, are all wing-shots, and there is friendly rivalry among them regarding the season's scores. The ducks are shot at dusk. After office hours we watch each little group, equipped with the latest capers in London and Dublin sporting-irons, hie off to the vantage-points in the marshes. On the walls of the office each resultant bag is verified and recorded, the figures being kept from year to year. To make good at Lesser Slave, if you are a man you must ride well, shoot straight, honour The Company, and otherwise play ...
— The New North • Agnes Deans Cameron

... Hie locus est, partes ubi se via findit in ambas. Dextera, quae Ditis magni sub moenia tendit Hac iter Elysium nobis; at laeva malorum Exercet poenas et ad ...
— Recollections Of My Childhood And Youth • George Brandes

... brogue-shod Scot, that begins thy care, Then boastful barley-bag-man, thy dwelling is all bare. False wretch and forsworn, whither wilt thou fare? Hie thee unto Bruges, seek a better biding there! There, wretch, shalt thou stay and wait a weary while; Thy dwelling in Dundee is lost for ever ...
— An Outline of the Relations between England and Scotland (500-1707) • Robert S. Rait

... Love! The golden morning wastes While the sun from his sphere His fiery arrows casts: Making all the shadows fly, Playing, staying in the grove To entertain the stealth of love. Thither, sweet Love, let us hie, Flying, dying in desire, Wing'd with ...
— Lyrics from the Song-Books of the Elizabethan Age • Various

... gape and swallow him that Heauens hate, Consume me Fire with thy deuouring flames, Or Water drowne, who else would melt in teares. But liue, liue happy still, in safety liue, Who safety onely to my life can giue. Exit. Cor. O he is gon, go hie thee after him, My vow forbids, yet still my care is with thee, My cryes shall wake the siluer Moone by night, And with my teares I will salute the Morne. No day shall passe with out my dayly plaints, 460 No houre without my prayers for thy returne. My minde misgiues mee Pompey ...
— The Tragedy Of Caesar's Revenge • Anonymous

... my rifle into them as fast as I could pull the trigger, but it only checked them momentarily. A few snaps, and of their wounded brethren there was nothing left but a pile of glistening bones. Then, hie away, and they were once again in red-hot pursuit. At last our pace slackened, and still I could see no signs of the lake. A great grey shape, followed by others, then rushed by us and tried to reach the horses' flanks with their sharp, gleaming teeth. A few more seconds, and I knew we should be ...
— Animal Ghosts - Or, Animal Hauntings and the Hereafter • Elliott O'Donnell

... hill to hill, through the dark wood they hie, And warrior to warrior is calling; Behind the thick bushes in ambush they lie, The rifle is heard, and the loud war-cry, In rows the Frank minions are falling: And if the black troopers' name you'd know, 'Tis Luetzow's wild ...
— ZigZag Journeys in Northern Lands; - The Rhine to the Arctic • Hezekiah Butterworth

... have kept silent about your misdeeds?' she asked. 'Hie hence when I bid you, or you shall not see the new ...
— The Red Romance Book • Various

... to shop and ship and factory, Mine and mill and foundry where the iron yokes are made; Ye have trod a distant track With a queen on camel-back, Now hie and hew a broadway ...
— Guns of the Gods • Talbot Mundy

... to light the ground, While the beetle goes his round: Follow now the beetle's hum; Little wanderer, hie ...
— Poems of William Blake • William Blake

... dingle was occupied; men and horses were everywhere in the lane; and the hounds were closing in above the gorse. The far side of the covert offered the only chance of escape, and thither he must hie, else the hounds, now pouring down the slope, would cut off his retreat. Quickly he threaded his way through the gorse, by paths familiar only to himself and the rabbits, till he reached the bank by the willows; but, even while he ...
— Creatures of the Night - A Book of Wild Life in Western Britain • Alfred W. Rees

... Hie est Guilfridus, belli dum vixit avidus. Cum gladeo et lancea Normannia et quoque Francia Verbera dura dabat. Per Turcos multum equitabat. Guilbertum occidit;—atque Hyerosolyma vidit. Heu! nunc sub fossa sunt tanti militis ...
— Thackeray • Anthony Trollope

... damsels of his; some in carriages, some on horseback, whilst no man was permitted to enter. Sometimes the King would set the girls a-coursing after the game with dogs, and when they were tired they would hie to the groves that overhung the lakes, and leaving their clothes there they would come forth naked and enter the water and swim about hither and thither, whilst it was the King's delight to watch them; ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo, Volume 2 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... down, light down from your horse o' pride, I trow ye talk too loud and hie, And I will make you a triple word, And syne, if ye ...
— The Seven Seas • Rudyard Kipling

... these lights do seem so rudely thrown And scattered throughout the spacious skie, Yet each most seemly sits in his own Throne In distance due and comely Majesty; And round their lordly seats their servants hie Keeping a well-proportionated space One from another, doing chearfully Their dayly task. No blemmish may deface The worlds in severall deckt ...
— Democritus Platonissans • Henry More

... playmates of the rose and daffodil, Be careful, ere ye enter in, to fill Your baskets high With fennel green, and balm, and golden pines, Savory, latter-mint, and columbines, Cool parsley, basil sweet, and sunny thyme; Yea, every flower and leaf of every clime, All gather'd in the dewy morn: hie Away! ...
— Culinary Herbs: Their Cultivation Harvesting Curing and Uses • M. G. Kains

... Mayor, you hear your charge.— Come, good Sir Thomas More, to court let's hie; You are ...
— Sir Thomas More • William Shakespeare [Apocrypha]

... Margaret and his brother. This unwelcome intelligence reached Edward at the very moment he was sallying from his palace gates to his pleasant pastime. He took aside Lord Hastings, and communicated the news to his able favourite. "Put spurs to thy horse, Hastings, and hie thee fast to Baynard's Castle. Bring back Gloucester. In these difficult matters that boy's head is ...
— The Last Of The Barons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... the surprised Du Guay-Trouin. "It is a big man-of-warsman and a Britisher too. We must give up our prizes, I fear. Clap on all canvas and we'll hie ...
— Famous Privateersmen and Adventurers of the Sea • Charles H. L. Johnston

... which one of the handsomest girls and her swain made a striking silhouette. Then she remembered that the next name on the programme was Warner's; he was to read for half an hour from his own work; after which all would hie themselves to the music ...
— The Gorgeous Isle - A Romance; Scene: Nevis, B.W.I. 1842 • Gertrude Atherton

... fired, the vessel must fly To the town from the green wood shady. Come, friends, now we to the table will hie, A gentleman and a ...
— O. T. - A Danish Romance • Hans Christian Andersen

... six, I lie and wait Until the papers come at eight. I skim them with an anxious eye Ere duly to my bath I hie, Postponing till I'm fully dressed My study of the daily pest. Then, seated at my frugal board, My rasher served, my tea outpoured, I disentangle news official From reams of comment unjudicial, Until at half-past ...
— Punch or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, December 9, 1914 • Various

... chiefly, in respect of the most happy and gladsome tidings of the most glorious Gospel of our Sauiour Iesus Christ, whereby they may be brought from falshood to trueth, from darknesse to light, from the hie way of death to the path of life, from superstitious idolatrie to sincere Christianity, from the deuill to Christ, from hell to heauen. And if in respect of all the commodities they can yeelde vs (were they many moe) that they should but receiue this onely benefit ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries of - the English Nation. Vol. XIII. America. Part II. • Richard Hakluyt

... Go, hie thee soon, and grope behind the old brass pan, Which thing when thou hast done, There shalt thou find an old shoe, wherein, if thou look well, Thou shalt find lying an inch of white tallow candle: Light it, and ...
— The Growth of English Drama • Arnold Wynne

... the river," Betty called to them, stopping once more to listen to the rhythmic sound of splashing water. "Come on, girls. It can't be more than a few hundred feet away, even though we can't see it for the bushes. Lead on, Mollie Billette, I wouldst hie me hence." ...
— The Outdoor Girls at Wild Rose Lodge - or, The Hermit of Moonlight Falls • Laura Lee Hope

... repeated a longer or shorter time, until the dog, finding that no harm is meant, quietly submits. He is then permitted to rise; he is patted and caressed, and some food is given to him. The command to rise is also introduced by the terms 'Hie up!' A little afterwards the same process is repeated, and he struggles less, or perhaps ...
— The Dog - A nineteenth-century dog-lovers' manual, - a combination of the essential and the esoteric. • William Youatt

... short. And he was curious about it all—the meaning and purpose of life. He loved the world and life, into which he had been fortunately born, both as to constitution and to place, which latter, for him, had been the high place over hie priests and people. He was not afraid to die, but he wondered if he might live again. He discounted the silly views of the tricky priests, and he was very much alone in the chaos of ...
— Jerry of the Islands • Jack London

... waves that lapped the sleek sides of a yacht lying at anchor under the hill. A yacht that Paul had watched many a day and dreamed of many a night; for he often longed with a great longing to slip cable and hie away, ...
— In the Footprints of the Padres • Charles Warren Stoddard

... souls come to our planet in this way, it seems, and hasten to incarnate themselves in as promising unborn though just begotten men and women as they find, that they may the sooner be free to hie them sunwards with ...
— The Martian • George Du Maurier

... Asia, constructed during his stay in Siberia, and published in Das Nord- und Ostliche Theil von Europa und Asia, Stockholm, 1730. On this map there is the following inscription in the sea north of the Kolyma—"Hie Rutheni ab initio per Moles glaciales, quae flante Borea ad Littora, flanteque Anstro versus Mare iterum pulsantur, magno Labore et Vitae Discrimine transvecti sunt ...
— The Voyage of the Vega round Asia and Europe, Volume I and Volume II • A.E. Nordenskieold

... his soft young strength would collapse. A howl of terror would apprise the world at large that he was about to drown. Whereat some passing boatman would pick him up and hold him for ransom, or else some one from The Place must jump into skiff or canoe and hie with all speed to the rescue. The same thing would be repeated day ...
— Bruce • Albert Payson Terhune

... many things to talk over in those last hours. I promise you I will go up to-night and explain. Tell Weston about that fox on Gander Knob—of course I shall. School starts tomorrow, else I'd be after him myself; but on Saturday we'll hie to the mountain, Weston and Captain and I. You, Tim, shall have the skin, a memento of the valley. I'll say good-by to Captain again, and I'll keep the guns oiled, and Piney Carter shall have the rifle ...
— The Soldier of the Valley • Nelson Lloyd

... had I nevere in bene, The grounde was grene, y poudred with dayse, The floures and the gras ilike al hie, Al grene and white, ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Vol. II. • William Wordsworth

... one's a funny fellow; every one's a little mellow; Follow, follow, follow, follow, o'er the hill and in the hollow! Merrily, merrily, there they hie; now they rise and now they fly; They cross and turn, and in and out, and down in the middle, and wheel about,— With a "Phew, shew, Wadolincon! listen to me, Bobolincon!— Happy's the wooing that's speedily doing, that's speedily doing, That's ...
— Birds and Poets • John Burroughs

... ever saw a dog come out of the water and not shake himself? Carlo, hie, Carlo!" and George threw a stone along the ground, after which Carlo trotted; but his limbs seemed to work stiffly; the stone spun round a sharp corner in the road, ...
— It Is Never Too Late to Mend • Charles Reade

... "I must hie me back to St. Blane's, for our good Abbot Godfrey bade me be with him ere nightfall. Where is your brother Allan? Say, was he of those who went with my father and Alpin to the punting ...
— The Thirsty Sword • Robert Leighton

... they to the vineyards rushing, Where the grape's rich blood is gushing? Or hurrying to the bridal rite Of warrior brave and beauty bright? Ah no! those heads in mockery crowned, Those pennons gay with roses bound, Hie not to a scene of gladness— Theirs is mirth that ends in madness! All recklessly they rush to hear The dark words of that gifted seer, Who amid a guilty race Favour found and saving grace; Rescued from the doom that hurled To chaos ...
— Enthusiasm and Other Poems • Susanna Moodie

... I ken her horn, That's blinkin' in the lift sae hie; She shines sae bright, to wyle us hame, But by my sooth ...
— Reminiscences of Scottish Life and Character • Edward Bannerman Ramsay

... be glad to see a quiet room in a hotel and hie me back to simple living, free from the responsibilities of a temporary parent. I am not promising myself any gay thrills in the meantime. What 's the use, with Jack on the borderland of a sulphurous country and you in the Garden of Eden? His letters and yours will ...
— The Lady and Sada San - A Sequel to The Lady of the Decoration • Frances Little

... from my sight! thou traitor, hie away; By all my stars I thou enviest Tom Thumb. Go, sirrah! go, [1]hie away! hie!——thou art A setting ...
— Miscellanies, Volume 2 (from Works, Volume 12) • Henry Fielding

... time I first saw him. He was then a fiery youth, for all he can look so grave at times now. He hath some credit, for it was by his intercession with the Governor that my imprisonment was shortened. I will hie me to him, and hear what he advises, more especially as he hath sent for me. And I bethink me, Prudence, it were no bad thing, if he can do so much, to get him to speak a word ...
— The Knight of the Golden Melice - A Historical Romance • John Turvill Adams

... get tired of rolling around in your Lady Lizzie or listening to the blah-blah of your radio, hie yourself to the nearest news dealer, grab off a copy of a good detective, adventure or love story, ...
— A Woman at Bay - A Fiend in Skirts • Nicholas Carter

... take the air of Omi," was a very common saying in the glen. And the speaker would hie with his comrade toward the grotto; and flinging himself on the turf, pass his hand through his locks, and recline; making a joy and a business of breathing; for truly the breezes of Omi were ...
— Mardi: and A Voyage Thither, Vol. I (of 2) • Herman Melville

... Lord of learen, he was a lord of hie degree; he had noe more children but one sonne, he sett him ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... merry men who Your coursers’ backs have prest; We’ll hie us to our Lady’s church, And set our hearts ...
— Little Engel - a ballad with a series of epigrams from the Persian - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... said Sir Raynald, "see you not that he has neither breath nor voice to speak? If you wish to do him a service, hie to our tents—down yonder, to the east, where you see ...
— The Prince and the Page • Charlotte M. Yonge

... Now hie we on, to silent shades, To glist'ning streams, and sunlit glades, Where all that woodland life can give, Renders it bliss indeed, to live. Come, ye who love the shadowy wood, Whate'er your days, whate'er your mood. And ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction, Vol. 10, Issue 264, July 14, 1827 • Various

... degree, with the rest of the house. It was the rural custom to retire early to bed and to anticipate the rising of the sun. When the moonlight was strong enough to permit me to read, it was my custom to escape from bed, and hie with my book to some neighbouring eminence, where I would remain stretched on the mossy rock, till the sinking or beclouded moon, forbade me to continue my employment. I was indebted for books to a friendly ...
— Memoirs of Carwin the Biloquist - (A Fragment) • Charles Brockden Brown

... write, that from the bloody course of war, My dearest master, your dear son, may hie; Bless him at home in peace, whilst I from far, His name with zealous ...
— Writings in the United Amateur, 1915-1922 • Howard Phillips Lovecraft

... wait for the traitor foe By the walls of merry Carlisle; Else he would hie to his lady's help, ...
— Traditions of Lancashire, Volume 2 (of 2) • John Roby

... I'll hie me to the bower That thou wi' roses tied, And where wi' mony a blushing bud I strove myself to hide. I'll doat on ilka spot Where I ha'e been wi' thee; And ca' to mind some kindly word By ilka ...
— The World's Best Poetry, Volume 3 - Sorrow and Consolation • Various

... however, O Zarathustra, did I fly and hie longest; and though I hid myself from thee, I was nevertheless thy best shadow: wherever thou hast sat, ...
— Thus Spake Zarathustra - A Book for All and None • Friedrich Nietzsche

... Napoleon breathes his last— More woes must come—if now the worst be past. Napoleon's star, declining on his eye, Tells France shall yield him not a place to die. That he must hie him to an alien shore, And see his France, and blue-eyed boy no more. The noble Lion must be chained at length, By Fate's strong force, though not by man's weak strength. But, harmless now, that meaner things shall prey On whom they fled from, in his Glory's day. Oh! ...
— Lays of Ancient Virginia, and Other Poems • James Avis Bartley

... polluted lot, Hie thee, Maiden, hie thee hence! Seek thy weeping Mother's cot, 15 ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Vol I and II • Samuel Taylor Coleridge

... the sweetness of his language and delivery, And readily inferring what this prelude betokened, We hasted to open the door, and received him with welcome, Saying to the servant, "Hie! Hie! Bring whatever is ready!" But the stranger said, "By Him who brought me to your abode, I will not taste of your hospitality, unless you pledge to me That you will not permit me to be an incumbrance to you, Nor impose on yourselves necessity of ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 2 • Charles Dudley Warner

... lot toward unravelling the mystery, Dollops, my lad," he said. "A regular right-hand man you are, eh, Mr. Narkom? This evening we'll hie us to the Saltfleet Road and see what further the 'Pig and Whistle' can reveal to us. It'll be like the old times of the 'Twisted-Arm' days, boy, where every second held its own unknown and certain danger. Give us an appetite for our ...
— The Riddle of the Frozen Flame • Mary E. Hanshew

... dawn drew nigh and his eyelids closed for a little while. Then an old and venerable Shaykh appeared to him in a vision[FN16] and said to him, "O Zayn al-Asnam, sorrow not; for after sorrow however sore cometh naught but joyance; and, would'st thou win free of this woe, up and hie thee to Egypt where thou shalt find hoards of wealth which shall replace whatso thou hast wasted and will double it more than twofold." Now when the Prince was aroused from his sleep he recounted ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... to hold the arena? Its hazards were thrown to Sir George Grey. At the moment, he would, perhaps, rather have returned to New Zealand, but he was told that somebody with the necessary qualifications must hie to the Cape, and that the Government had selected him. He packed his baggage and sailed from Bristol, Sir James Stephen going down there to see him embark. Bristol, as he explained, was then endeavouring to establish relations with the Cape ...
— The Romance of a Pro-Consul - Being The Personal Life And Memoirs Of The Right Hon. Sir - George Grey, K.C.B. • James Milne

... liked me as Juliet. After the first night, or was it the dress rehearsal—I am not quite clear which—he wrote to me that "beautiful as Portia was, Juliet leaves her far, far behind. Never anybody acted more exquisitely the part of the performance which I saw from the front. 'Hie to high fortune,' and 'Where spirits resort' were simply incomparable.... Your mother looked very radiant last night. I told her how proud she should be, and she was.... The play will be, I believe, a mighty 'go,' for the beauty ...
— The Story of My Life - Recollections and Reflections • Ellen Terry

... spare for his tender age, Nor yet for his hie kin; But soon as ever he born is, He shall mount the gallow's ...
— The Chaplet of Pearls • Charlotte M. Yonge

... occasion was offered: Land he allowed me, life-joy at homestead, Manor to live on. Little he needed From Gepids or Danes or in Sweden to look for 35 Trooper less true, with treasure to buy him; 'Mong foot-soldiers ever in front I would hie me, Alone in the vanguard, and evermore gladly Warfare shall wage, while this weapon endureth That late and early often did ...
— Beowulf - An Anglo-Saxon Epic Poem • The Heyne-Socin

... ills," said Anne; then, wishful to divert her mistress's sad thoughts, she directed her attention to a commotion which was going on in the courtyard below. "Some stranger hath arrived. If I mistake not, 'tis a huckster come to spread out his wares. An it be your pleasure, I will hie me down and bring you tidings ...
— The Manor House School • Angela Brazil

... while speeding Londonwards by that delightful combination of a liberal railway management, a fast and yet cheap train. He had beguiled himself with a delicious certainty. Early the next morning—or at any rate as early as civilization permitted—he would hie him to Bayswater, and present himself at the neat iron gate of Philip Sheldon's gothic villa. She would be there, in the garden most likely, his divine Charlotte, so bright and radiant a creature that the dull October morning would be made glorious ...
— Birds of Prey • M. E. Braddon

... warning letter is sent to my Lord Monteagle, and whereto it may grow—Hie you to White Webbs when morning breaketh, with all the speed you may, and tell Mr Catesby of this. I fear—I very much ...
— It Might Have Been - The Story of the Gunpowder Plot • Emily Sarah Holt

... spreads his kind supporting arms To every child of grief; Hie secret bounty largely ...
— The Otterbein Hymnal - For Use in Public and Social Worship • Edmund S. Lorenz

... Such a treasure is my friend. Who hath sent thee?-Flora knows, For with care she reared the rose. Lo! here's a name!-it is the key That will unlock the mystery; This will tell from whom and why Thou didst to my presence hie. Wait-the hand's disguised!-it will Remain to me a mystery still. But I'm a "Yankee," and can "guess" Who wove this flowery, fairy tress. Yea, more than this, I almost know Who tied this pretty silken bow, Whose hand arranged them, and whose taste Each ...
— Town and Country, or, Life at Home and Abroad • John S. Adams

... exploring the syringa. A new generation of doves has grown up since the lilacs were in bloom, and nothing is easier than to distinguish the old and young of the two or three separate families till all leave the grass and the gravel together and hie to the stubble-fields beyond our ken. Of the one mocking bird who made night hideous by his masterly imitations of the screaking of a wheel-barrow (regreased at an early period in self-defence) and the wheezy ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, October, 1877, Vol. XX. No. 118 • Various

... going to slip out to Johnstown to spend Sunday with her mother. How I wish I could slip out to Rochester to sit a few hours in my mother's delightful east chamber, but I must hie me back to New ...
— The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 1 of 2) • Ida Husted Harper

... the night, For the morning seems to dawn; Traveller, darkness takes its flight, Doubt and terror are withdrawn. Watchman, let thy wanderings cease; Hie thee, to thy quiet home; Traveller, lo, the Prince of Peace, Lo, the ...
— Among the Sioux - A Story of the Twin Cities and the Two Dakotas • R. J. Creswell

... hit iwiste Ne mai ich isien bifore me for smeche ne for miste. Ar[gh]e we be to don god to juel al to riste More eie stonde man of man an him do of criste. 20 e wel ne de e hwile he mai wel ofte hit sal him rewen. an alle men sulle ripen at hie ar sewen. Do al to gode at he mu[gh]e ech e hwile he be aliue. Ne lipne noman to muchel to childe ne to wiue. | e e him selfe for[gh]iet for wiue oer for childe [f. 1v He sal cumen on euel stede bute him god be ...
— Selections from early Middle English, 1130-1250 - Part I: Texts • Various

... If so minded, hie you to the nearest grove and, digging down through the mid-winter's snow, bring home a spadeful of leaf-mould. Examine it carefully with hand-lens and microscope, and then prophesy what warmth and light will bring forth. "Watch the unfolding life of plant ...
— The Log of the Sun - A Chronicle of Nature's Year • William Beebe

... too old for that, Mr. Gerardo. Long before a week, as measured by your chronology, has elapsed, I shall lie beneath the sod. I've been put off that way too often. (Bringing down his fist on the piano.) Hie Rhodus! Hie salta! It's five years ago now that I called on the manager of the Royal Theatre, Count Zedlitz: "What have you got for me, my dearest professor?" "An opera, your Excellency." "Indeed, you have written a new opera? Splendid!" "Your Excellency, ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... mansion, please?" Tattiana asks, and hurriedly Unto Anicia for the keys The family of children hie. Anicia soon appears, the door Opens unto her visitor. Into the lonely house she went, Wherein a space Oneguine spent. She gazed—a cue, forgotten long, Doth on the billiard table rest, Upon the tumbled sofa placed, A riding whip. ...
— Eugene Oneguine [Onegin] - A Romance of Russian Life in Verse • Aleksandr Sergeevich Pushkin

... a neighbouring boy to hie to the booth for the latest figures, and his emissary taught lightning ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... thou soundest merrily, When the bridal party To the church doth hie! Bell! thou soundest solemnly, When, on ...
— The Grateful Indian - And other Stories • W.H.G. Kingston

... boat, I will delay my voyage just long enough to put ye on board, but not a minute longer. And if so be we do not encounter another craft, you will e'en both have to join us, for we have here no room for idlers. And now, hie you both away into the cabin, and take off your wet clothes; Mr Bascomb, the master, will furnish you with dry clothing from the slop chest—though I misdoubt me," he continued, running his eye dubiously ...
— Two Gallant Sons of Devon - A Tale of the Days of Queen Bess • Harry Collingwood

... wish that Page enjoy'd his life So that he had some other to his wife; But never could I wish, of low or hie, A longer life, and see sweet ...
— Devon, Its Moorlands, Streams and Coasts • Rosalind Northcote

... empty glasses, and in not altogether unpleasant sadness—Give it up, Sub-Subs! For by how much the more pains ye take to please the world, by so much the more shall ye for ever go thankless! Would that I could clear out Hampton Court and the Tuileries for ye! But gulp down your tears and hie aloft to the royal-mast with your hearts; for your friends who have gone before are clearing out the seven-storied heavens, and making refugees of long-pampered Gabriel, Michael, and Raphael, against your coming. Here ye strike but splintered hearts ...
— Moby Dick; or The Whale • Herman Melville

... last red ray is gone; Now the twilight shadows hie; Still the bell-notes, one by one, Send their soft voice to the sky, Praying, as with human lip,— "Angels, hasten, night is nigh, Take us ...
— Verses • Susan Coolidge

... wherewithal to set thee at liberty; but call to mind thy past misdeeds and the craft and perfidy thou didst imagine against me and bethink thee how near thou art to being stoned to death. For know that thy soul is about the world to quit and cease in it and depart from it; so shalt thou to destruction hie and ill is the abiding-place thou shalt aby!"[FN153] Rejoined the wolf, "O Father of the Fortlet, hasten to return to amity and persist not in this rancorous enmity. Know that whoso from ruin saveth a soul, is as if he had quickened it and ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... churl And the Rommany girl To-morrow shall hie To poison the sty, And bewitch on the mead The ...
— George Borrow - The Man and His Books • Edward Thomas

... hath found thee out at last; Snaps thy pride beneath his judgment, as the tree before the blast. Haste thee! haste thee! speed thy couriers—Persian couriers travel lightly— To declare thy stranded navy, that by cruel death unsightly Dimmed thy glory. Hie thee! hie thee! hence, even by what way thou camest, Dwarfed to whoso saw thee mightiest, and ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... to tame wood (for so he speaketh very improperly, whereas vnto wood neither life nor taming can be ascribed) that wooden pattens of eight elnes long being bound to the soles of their feet do cary them with so great celeritie euen vpon hie mountaines, that they cannot be outrun, either by the swiftnes of hounds and deere, or yet by the flying of birds. And that they will kill nine roes or more at one course & with one stroke ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques and Discoveries - of the English Nation, v. 1, Northern Europe • Richard Hakluyt

... you're not yet strong enough for travelling. The snow lies thickly on the ground, and the winter's wind whistles keenly through the forest and across the plain. Stay a while with your good friends here, and I'll come back for thee, and then we will hie away to lead the free life we have enjoyed so long." Old Michael spoke in a more subdued ...
— The Trapper's Son • W.H.G. Kingston

... glanced towards the horizon. 'He must be at his Olivettes field now,' he answered, pointing towards the left. 'But Voriau will show your reverence the way. He's sure to know where his master is.' And he clapped his hands and called: 'Hie! Voriau! hie!' ...
— Abbe Mouret's Transgression - La Faute De L'abbe Mouret • Emile Zola

... shadows slant for afternoon, When the midday meal is over, When the winds have sung themselves into a swoon, And the bees drone in the clover, Then hie to me, hie, for a lullaby— Come, my baby, do; Creep into my lap, and with a nap We'll break ...
— The Kingdom of Love - and Other Poems • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... It. We had a sword naked, when on the sound row'd we, Hard in hand, as we twain against the whale-fishes 540 Had mind to be warding us. No whit from me In the waves of the sea-flood afar might he float The hastier in holm, nor would I from him hie me. Then we two together, we were in the sea For a five nights, till us twain the flood drave asunder, The weltering of waves. Then the coldest of weathers In the dusking of night and the wind from ...
— The Tale of Beowulf - Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats • Anonymous

... He was a big Hie'land laddie, and he wore naught but his kilt and his semmet—his undershirt. He had on his steel helmet, and it shaded a face that had not been shaved or washed for days. His great, brawny arms were folded across his chest, and he was smoking ...
— A Minstrel In France • Harry Lauder

... with grief by all Met at Poseidon's festival; All Greece is conscious of the smart, He leaves a void in every heart; And to the Prytanis [33] swift hie The people, and they urge him on The dead man's manes to pacify And ...
— The Works of Frederich Schiller in English • Frederich Schiller

... Wo sie die Frau alleine fand, Und machte sie gleich vor der Hand Von Freude bleich und rot. Sie sprach: "Gebt mir das Botenbrot! Der Garon ist gekommen." 2205 "Hast schon etwas vernommen? Ist's gute Mre? Sprich doch! Wie? Also ist Herr Iwein hie? Wie ist es ihm so frh geglckt?" "Die Liebe hat ihn hergeschickt." 2210 "Ach Gott! Doch sprich! Wer weiss davon?" "Es weiss bisher kein Muttersohn Als Euer Knab' und wir." "Wann fhrst du ihn zu mir? Geh stracks zu ihm, ich bitte dich." 2215 Die flinke Magd entfernte sich Und machte ...
— An anthology of German literature • Calvin Thomas

... strode and thus he spoke, to that Archbishop meek: "I take the land thy king bestows from Eure to Michael-peak, I take the maid, or foul or fair, a bargain with the toast, And for thy creed, a sea-king's gods are those that give the most. So hie thee back, and tell thy chief to make his proffer true, And he shall find a docile son, and ye ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... may not be content to follow through ignorance and indolence and be led to the lowly paths of life. Make my Hie positive; and from my surroundings may I look out and struggle to mount to the highest ideals, that I may be qualified to select the best in ...
— Leaves of Life - For Daily Inspiration • Margaret Bird Steinmetz

... doth smell, I flee as from the pest; Your mother likes my sire too well; To hie me home ...
— The Zincali - An Account of the Gypsies of Spain • George Borrow

... hold not thy peace, Sit not thou still O God of strength We cry and do not cease. 2 For lo thy furious foes now *swell And *storm outrageously, *Jehemajun. And they that hate thee proud and fill Exalt their heads full hie. 3 Against thy people they *contrive *Jagnarimu. *Their Plots and Counsels deep, *Sod. 10 *Them to ensnare they chiefly strive *Jithjagnatsu gnal. *Whom thou dost hide and keep. *Tsephuneca. 4 Come let us cut them off say ...
— The Poetical Works of John Milton • John Milton

... Eirik Biodaskalli, whose name was Sigurd: long had he been remote from the land, sojourning in the realm of Garda (western Russia) with King Valdamar,Sec. by whom was he held in great honour. Now Astrid conceived the desire that she should hie unto this her brother Sigurd. Therefore Hakon the Old furnished her with trusty followers & handsome equipment after the best manner. And she journeyed in the company of certain merchants. It was for the space of two winters she had abode with Hakon the Old, and Olaf was now three winters ...
— The Sagas of Olaf Tryggvason and of Harald The Tyrant (Harald Haardraade) • Snorri Sturluson

... winds blow, When clear falls the moonlight, When spring tides are low; When sweet airs come seaward From heaths starr'd with broom, And high rocks throw mildly On the blanch'd sands a gloom; Up the still, glistening beaches, Up the creeks we will hie, Over banks of bright seaweed The ebb-tide leaves dry. We will gaze, from the sand-hills, At the white, sleeping town; At the church on the hill-side— And then come back down. Singing: "There dwells a loved one, But cruel is she! She left lonely for ever The kings ...
— Poetical Works of Matthew Arnold • Matthew Arnold

... dwelled in that solace 205 More than I you say, parde; Till on a day, so have I grace, My lovely lady said to me[53]; "Do busk thee, Thomas; thee buse[54] again; For thou may here no longer be; 210 Hie thee fast with might and main; I shall thee bring till Eildon tree." Thomas said then with heavy cheer[55], "Lovely lady, now let me be; For certes, lady, I have been here 215 Nought but the space of dayes three!" "For sooth, Thomas, as ...
— The Sources and Analogues of 'A Midsummer-night's Dream' • Compiled by Frank Sidgwick

... neither white nor equal to the task of protecting him from the penetrating rays of the summer sun. His occupation appears to be that of all-round utility man for whomsoever cares to order him about. Osman has to bring water and pour it on my hands whenever I want to wash, hie him away to the bazaar to search for dates or anything my epicurean taste demands in addition to what is provided, feed the horse, change the position of the pee-wit to keep it in the shade, sweep out my bungalow, ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle Volume II. - From Teheran To Yokohama • Thomas Stevens

... is little of a migratory movement even up and down the mountains among these interesting birdlets. In the winter a few descend from the heights and dwell on the plains, where the weather is not so rigorous. On the approach of spring they again hie up into the mountains, spending the summer there and rearing their pretty bairns. However, the majority of them remain in the mountains all winter, braving the bitterest and fiercest storms, often at an altitude of 8,000 feet. Their breeding range is from ...
— Our Bird Comrades • Leander S. (Leander Sylvester) Keyser

... corvi act as if they had formed a league for the prevention of nest-building on the part of white-eyed buzzards, kites, shikras and other of the lesser birds of prey. The modus operandi of the league is for two or more of its members to hie themselves to the tree in which the victim is building its nest, take up positions near that structure and begin to caw derisively. This invariably provokes the owners of the nest to attack the black villains, who do not resist, but ...
— A Bird Calendar for Northern India • Douglas Dewar

... "Then let us hie thither," spoke my lord, and Francis hurried after him, confused and embarrassed, as she encountered the curious gaze of the courtiers and ladies. They passed through the lofty halls and ante-chambers of the palace until ...
— In Doublet and Hose - A Story for Girls • Lucy Foster Madison

... words; e. g. it was a remedy for gout, to think, while fasting, on some other person, and thrice nine times to utter the words, touching the earth at the same time and spitting:—"I think of thee, mend my feet. Let the earth receive the ill, let health with me dwell" (-terra pestem teneto, salus hie maneto-. Varro de R. R. ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... they go with him to his house which standeth without the towne, and there they leaue him. Euery one of them hath his house, which is very little, set vpon six or eight posts, and they go vp to them with a ladder of twelue or foureteene staues. Their houses be for the most part by the hie wayes side, and among the trees, and in the woods. And they go with a great pot made of wood or fine earth, and couered, tied with a broad girdle vpon their shoulder, which cometh vnder their arme, wherewith they go to begge ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, - and Discoveries of The English Nation, Volume 10 - Asia, Part III • Richard Hakluyt

... from heaven, from heaven so hie, Of angeles ther came a great companie, With mirthe, and joy, and great solemnitye, The sange, terly, terlow; So mereli the ...
— In The Yule-Log Glow—Book 3 - Christmas Poems from 'round the World • Various

... too— Let me be just—that friend so true; In danger both, and in our cause! Minstrel, the Douglas dare not pause. Why else that solemn warning given, 'If not on earth, we meet in heaven!' Why else, to Cambus-kenneth's fane, If eve return him not again, Am I to hie and make me known? Alas! he goes to Scotland's throne, Buys his friends' safety with his own; He goes to do—what I had done, Had Douglas' ...
— The Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... Off hie honour suld be hir hud, Upoun hir heid to weir, Garneist with governance so gud, Na ...
— Six Centuries of English Poetry - Tennyson to Chaucer • James Baldwin

... good, and hate of ill, He me perswaded forth with him to fare. Nought tooke I with me, but mine oaten quill: Small needments else need shepheard to prepare. So to the sea we came; the sea, that is A world of waters heaped up on hie, Rolling like mountaines in wide wildernesse, Horrible, hideous, ...
— Spenser - (English Men of Letters Series) • R. W. Church

... troops hie From the black woods outpouring; Under them fly Storms and waves roaring. Over them waken Mild stars, and beckon The troop to the ...
— Strife and Peace • Fredrika Bremer

... place and perfection of so much former speach as had bene vttered, and from whence they needed not to passe any further vnles it were to renew more matter to enlarge the tale. This cannot be better represented then by example of these common trauailers by the hie ways, where they seeme to allow themselues three maner of staies or easements: one a horsebacke calling perchaunce for a cup of beere or wine, and hauing dronken it vp rides away and neuer lights: about noone he commeth to his Inne, & there baites ...
— The Arte of English Poesie • George Puttenham

... heareth now That his lady bright of brow Dwelleth in his own countrie, Never man was glad as he. To her castle doth he hie With the lady speedily, Passeth to the chamber high, Findeth Nicolete thereby. Of her true love found again Never maid was half so fain. Straight she leaped upon her feet: When his love he saw at last, Arms about her did he cast, ...
— Aucassin and Nicolete • Andrew Lang

... first the nuptial torches bore, As brightly burning as the mid-day's sun: But after them doth Hymen hie as fast, Clothed in ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 34, June 22, 1850 • Various

...Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear; And chastise with the valour of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes - Volume V: Miscellaneous Pieces • Samuel Johnson

... on her face seemed to force the mad words from his lips, the magnetic gaze seemed to hold him spellbound. He bent over hie mother and laid his fresh, brave young face on the cold, white face ...
— Daisy Brooks - A Perilous Love • Laura Jean Libbey

... day, As on a cloud he lay, 'Observing all our crimes, Come, let us change the times, By leasing out anew A world whose wicked crew Have wearied out our grace, And cursed us to our face. Hie hellward, Mercury; A Fury bring to me, The direst of the three. Race nursed too tenderly, This day your doom shall be!' E'en while he spoke their fate, His wrath ...
— The Fables of La Fontaine - A New Edition, With Notes • Jean de La Fontaine

... youth—for Roderick too— 225 Let me be just—that friend so true; In danger both, and in our cause! Minstrel, the Douglas dare not pause. Why else that solemn warning given, 'If not on earth, we meet in heaven!' 230 Why else, to Cambus-kenneth's fane, If eve return him not again, Am I to hie, and make me known? Alas! he goes to Scotland's throne, Buys his friend's safety with his own; 235 He goes to do—what I had done, Had Douglas' ...
— Lady of the Lake • Sir Walter Scott

... hear the Roost blawin' at the far-end of Aros, there comes a back-spang of current straucht into Sandag Bay. Weel, there's the thing that got the grip on the Christ-Anna. She but to have come in ram-stam an' stern forrit; for the bows of her are aften under, and the back-side of her is clear at hie-water o' neaps. But, man! the dunt that she cam doon wi' when she struck! Lord save us a'! but it's an unco life to be a sailor—a cauld, wanchancy life. Mony's the gliff I got mysel' in the great deep; and why the Lord should hae made yon unco water is mair ...
— The Merry Men - and Other Tales and Fables • Robert Louis Stevenson

... Jack! hie thee hack! hie thee back! To thy damp, drear abode in the jungle; I'll be sober and staid, And drink lemonade, Try and catch me—you'll make a ...
— Rattlin the Reefer • Edward Howard

... way had already hit two of his men, instantly killing one of them. He suspected that something was betraying his position. Looking down the line, he was horrified to discover what was unmistakably a man smoking. Flushed with anger, he shouted louder than his instructions would have permitted, "Hie there, me man! put thet cigaroot out," but the light remained undisturbed. "I say there, ye insultin' divil of a rekroot, put out thet ...
— Bamboo Tales • Ira L. Reeves



Words linked to "Hie" :   shoot, charge, shoot down, tear, push forward, travel, move, linger, buck, barge, scoot, flash, scud, go, dash, locomote, thrust ahead, dart



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