Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Let   /lɛt/   Listen
Let

verb
(past let; past part. let; pres. part. letting)
1.
Make it possible through a specific action or lack of action for something to happen.  Synonyms: allow, permit.  "This sealed door won't allow the water come into the basement" , "This will permit the rain to run off"
2.
Actively cause something to happen.
3.
Consent to, give permission.  Synonyms: allow, countenance, permit.  "I won't let the police search her basement" , "I cannot allow you to see your exam"
4.
Cause to move; cause to be in a certain position or condition.  Synonyms: get, have.  "This let me in for a big surprise" , "He got a girl into trouble"
5.
Leave unchanged.
6.
Grant use or occupation of under a term of contract.  Synonyms: lease, rent.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Let" Quotes from Famous Books



... me the sun and the sky, The wide sky. Let it blaze with light, Let it burn with heat—I care not. The sun is the blood of my heart, The wind of the plain my breath. No woodsman am I. My eyes are set For the wide low lines. The level rim Of the prairie land is mine. The semi-gloom of the pointed firs, The sleeping darks of the mountain ...
— The Trail of the Goldseekers - A Record of Travel in Prose and Verse • Hamlin Garland

... the audacious falsehood which disfigures the story in Pope's way of telling it. Without the personal interest, the incidents were nothing; and with that interest, at starting, Pope's romance must have defeated itself by its fabulous coloring. Let me recall to the reader the principal lines in ...
— Theological Essays and Other Papers v2 • Thomas de Quincey

... life which might have ended fatally was to come to them sooner than they expected. Seeing that they were now on Sidcotinga Station country, and that they had not been molested for six days, Mick decided to let the horses go without being watched that night, taking the precaution of tying up his own saddle-horse ...
— In the Musgrave Ranges • Jim Bushman

... Let us now suppose that the original agent or cause, instead of being instantaneous, is permanent. Whatever effect has been produced up to a given time, would (unless prevented by the intervention of some new cause) subsist ...
— A System Of Logic, Ratiocinative And Inductive • John Stuart Mill

... let me drive," Pauline suggested. "I drove a great deal when I was staying with the Warehams. ...
— Miss Merivale's Mistake • Mrs. Henry Clarke

... of the attack, ordered his chariots to charge, and the main line to follow, calculating on disorder. But the horses of the chariots were terrified and wounded by the Grecian archers and darters in front, and most turned round, or were stopped. Those that pressed on were let through the Macedonian lines without mischief. As at Issus, Alexander did not attack the centre, where Darius was surrounded with the choicest troops of the army, but advanced impetuously upon the left wing, ...
— Ancient States and Empires • John Lord

... him to order all hands on deck and get the chain hooks. This order surprised Paul as it was very unusual for any work to be done on Sunday except to stand watch, steer and trim sail. He made no remark, however, but proceeded to the deck and ordered all hands out. The men let their washing, sewing, and other domestic duties to which they generally devoted their attention on Sunday, and came on deck more astonished than Paul was. He then told the boatswain to get out the chain hooks. The captain now appeared and gave the order to "hoist away ...
— The Story of Paul Boyton - Voyages on All the Great Rivers of the World • Paul Boyton

... said Hester, rising up indignant; 'now that is a sin. Eh! if thou only knew the lot o' some folk. But let's talk no more on that, that cannot be helped; go, take him his tea, for it's a sad thing to think on ...
— Sylvia's Lovers — Complete • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... willing to let Bud take the lead, as the search for the rustlers was distinctly an affair ...
— The Boy Ranchers on the Trail • Willard F. Baker

... be no man to pity him, nor to have compassion upon his fatherless children.... Let his children be vagabonds, and beg their bread; let them seek it also out of desolate places." Psalm cix. ...
— Aylwin • Theodore Watts-Dunton

... much of this particular symptom, let us consider a few other tendencies. The Bromide has no surprises for you. When you see one enter a room, you must reconcile yourself to the inevitable. No hope for flashes of original thought, no illuminating, newer ...
— Are You A Bromide? • Gelett Burgess

... temple-roof the glories Of Italy,—now thy sole heritage, Since the ill-guarded Alps and the inconstant Omnipotence of human destinies Have rent from thee thy substance and thy arms, Thy altars, country,—save thy memories, all. Ah! here, where yet a ray of glory lingers, Let a light shine unto all generous souls, And be Italia's hope! Unto these stones Oft came Vittorio[8] for inspiration, Wroth to his country's gods. Dumbly he roved Where Arno is most lonely, anxiously Brooding upon the heavens and the fields; Then when no living aspect could console, Here rested ...
— Modern Italian Poets • W. D. Howells

... strike me as curious," I remarked. "That fellow closest to the center, just about to let his arrow fly, seems to have no head to ...
— The City of Domes • John D. Barry

... strength, until, at a village near Jalapa, we fell in with the well-known chief Antonio Perez and his famous plateados, two hundred strong, who had won their name and a somewhat doubtful distinction by their successful raids upon convoys of silver. Our escort fraternized with all, and they let ...
— Maximilian in Mexico - A Woman's Reminiscences of the French Intervention 1862-1867 • Sara Yorke Stevenson

... Let us kneel with the Hon. Lancelot at his greasy burgundy-stained shrine, what time the jingling hansom waits us with its rolling occupant and his sword-stick and his revolver and his pockets stacked with penny dreadfuls. ...
— Gilbert Keith Chesterton • Maisie Ward

... a little, and let us for a few moments turn our thoughts toward that Island of the sea, upon which it was the fate of our heroine, through the guidance of a divine providence, to find a home in the bosoms of those whose hearts' beatings were of love ...
— Natalie - A Gem Among the Sea-Weeds • Ferna Vale

... the world," which he must again unlearn and become a little child once more in the Kingdom of God.[35] The taint, however, is not in the native structure of the soul, it is not through a biological transmission, it is due to false training—it is from the parents' lives rather than their loins. Let parents, he says, who desire holy children learn to make them possessors of divine things betimes. It is "deadly barbarous and uncouth" to "put grubs and worms" into little children's minds, to teach them to say this house is mine, this bauble is a jewel, this gew-gaw is a ...
— Spiritual Reformers in the 16th & 17th Centuries • Rufus M. Jones

... planter of an apple orchard should use fillers is a question which he alone must decide. In the writer's opinion there are more advantages than disadvantages in so doing, but we must state both sides of the question and let the reader judge for himself. The term "filler" is one used to designate a tree planted in the orchard for the temporary purpose of profitably occupying the space between the permanent trees while these are growing and not yet in bearing. Fillers ...
— Apple Growing • M. C. Burritt

... he said, "if she wanted to let the gul come and see you about some sewing you had to have done, ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... bread to those children who are murdering each other on the road," he ordered his servant. "Let the weakest be crippled, be denied share in the prize, and be soundly thrashed into the bargain, as they will be when they return to their homes with torn trousers and bruised eyes. This will give them an idea of the ...
— Against The Grain • Joris-Karl Huysmans

... the stumps, which emit showers of sparks, they chase one another or dance with the girls round the burning pile. Shots, too, are fired, and shouts raised. The fire, the smoke, the shots, and the shouts are all intended to scare away the witches, who are let loose on this witching day, and who would certainly work harm to the crops and the cattle, if they were not deterred by these salutary measures. Mere contact with the fire brings all sorts of blessings. Hence when the bonfire is burning low, the lads ...
— Balder The Beautiful, Vol. I. • Sir James George Frazer

... the adjacent bounds, in their presbyterial assembly, try and judge who are fit for the ministry; thereafter let a certain number of those who are by them approven as fit, be offered and propounded to the vacant church, that a free election may be made of some one of that number, providing always that if the church or congregation ...
— The Works of Mr. George Gillespie (Vol. 1 of 2) • George Gillespie

... find that whatever we do for the immigrant will be, in the end, so much accomplished for the good of all. Let us lessen this unfair pressure upon him, as far as we can, and we shall surely find that in helping him to help himself, we have, at the same time, ...
— The Trade Union Woman • Alice Henry

... for the sea. The mailman, to whom he expressed these sentiments, told him to cheer up. It was loneliness, he said, that made him feel like that, and he for his part 'didn't like to see no man feelin' lonely in the bloomin' bush.' Therefore he would keep him company for a few days, and let the sanguinary mail ...
— Ridan The Devil And Other Stories - 1899 • Louis Becke

... secret look of one who is stealing to certain happiness. Both these pictures were very unpleasant, and even more so was a third picture, of husband and wife and friend; and the married people glancing at each other as though they were content to let something pass unquestioned, being themselves possessed of the deeper truth. Other pictures—he was walking very fast in his irritation, and they came before him without any conscious effort, like pictures on a sheet—succeeded these. Here were the worn ...
— The Voyage Out • Virginia Woolf

... clean cold water, and put them in a rack to drain. When dry, polish them outside and inside, as far as possible, with a fine cloth. To remove the crust of port or other wines, add a little muriatic acid to the water, and let ...
— The Book of Household Management • Mrs. Isabella Beeton

... Christabel Pankhurst has been turned down as a barrister. They won't let her qualify for the Bar, because she's a woman, so they certainly won't let me with my pedigree; just as, merely because we are women, they won't let us become Chartered Actuaries or Incorporated Accountants. After we had that long talk ...
— Mrs. Warren's Daughter - A Story of the Woman's Movement • Sir Harry Johnston

... fear; and they have many games in which such pleasure forms the chief attraction. Among these is 0-bake-goto, or Ghost-play. Some nurse-girl or elder sister loosens her hair in front, so as to let it fall over her face, and pursues the little folk with moans and weird gestures, miming all the attitudes of ...
— Glimpses of an Unfamiliar Japan • Lafcadio Hearn

... asked marster my name, and informed me I was free, and asked me whether or not I wanted to keep living with Moore. I did not know what to do, so I told him yes. A fixed price of seventy-five dollars and board was then set as the salary I should receive per year for my work. The Yankees told me to let him know if I was ...
— Slave Narratives: a Folk History of Slavery in the United States • Various

... at the same time affirm that the judicial condemnation which Milton so admires was illegal, unconstitutional, and in its immediate results dangerous to liberty. But feeling that far greater dangers would have been incurred if "the caged tiger had been let loose," and knowing that out of the errors and anomalies of those times a wiser revolution grew, for which the first more terrible revolution was a preparation, we may cease to examine this great historical question in any bitterness of spirit, and even ...
— The Great Events by Famous Historians, Volume 11 • Various

... see," said Maria soothingly. "I'll go over there to- morrow and talk with Will, and then I'll try to bring grandfather to some kind of reason. He can't let them starve, rich as he is, there's no sense in that—and if the worst comes, I can at least share the little I have with them. It may supply them with bread, if Molly will undertake to churn her ...
— The Deliverance; A Romance of the Virginia Tobacco Fields • Ellen Glasgow

... quite clear. "Useless," he murmured, after several trials, "useless; they are dead! They will never see morning again. Leave them in the same position until the arrival of the public prosecutor, and let us look at the ...
— Monsieur Lecoq • Emile Gaboriau

... fall back upon, nothing to make a home, she was listless and weary whenever gaiety failed her—and he, disappointed and baffled, too unbending to draw her out, too much occupied to watch over her, yielded to her tastes, and let her pursue her favourite ...
— Dynevor Terrace (Vol. I) - or, The Clue of Life • Charlotte M. Yonge

... and Pinkie Whiskers was so little that Sammy Woodchuck had to smile to himself at the idea of his moving it. However, he did not let Pinkie Whiskers see him smile, for he did not want to ...
— Hazel Squirrel and Other Stories • Howard B. Famous

... seventeenth century, unless it be Oliver Cromwell or John Milton, whose opinion on this subject we would rather know than that of Hobbes. In 1651 Hobbes had issued his great Leviathan. It is unnecessary here to insist upon the widespread influence of that work. Let it be said, however, that Hobbes was not only to set in motion new philosophies, but that he had been tutor to Prince Charles[70] and was to become a figure in the reign of that prince.[71] Hobbes's work was directed ...
— A History of Witchcraft in England from 1558 to 1718 • Wallace Notestein

... he exclaimed in a tone of satisfaction; "and now I want to arrange for a nice little party at my new home to act as a kind of—er—home warming—I think you call it. Ask the children and any of your friends who know me, and, if you let me know beforehand how many are coming, I will arrange for what, I hope, will turn out to be a very ...
— The Mysterious Shin Shira • George Edward Farrow

... Weeks since I happen'd into a very large promiscuous Company of Gentlemen and Tradesmen, at a Tavern near the Royal-Exchange; I had not been seated amongst them a Quarter of an Hour, before a Waiter came to top the Candles, and let a Snuff fall upon the Sleeve of my Coat, which instantly burnt a great hole in the Cloth. All the Satisfaction I had, was in calling him careless Rascal, and his begging my pardon. This was soon follow'd by a great Glass of Wine one of ...
— The Tricks of the Town: or, Ways and Means of getting Money • John Thomson

... this view with regard to the doctrine of Sin and Sacrifice. Let us take two or three other illustrations. Let us take the doctrine of Re-birth or Regeneration. The first few verses of St. John's Gospel are occupied with the subject of salvation through rebirth or regeneration. ...
— Pagan & Christian Creeds - Their Origin and Meaning • Edward Carpenter

... at me. I am a wild man of the prairies; my body is naked; my hands empty; my skin red. I have struck the Pawnees, the Konzas, the Omahaws, the Osages, and even the Long-knives. I am a man amid warriors, but a woman among the conjurors. Let my father speak: the ears of the Teton are open. He listens like a deer to the step ...
— The Prairie • J. Fenimore Cooper

... prisoners inside them. We are told that "the Governor of Panama perceived by this answer that no means would serve to mollify the hearts of the Pirates, nor reduce them to reason." He decided to let the townsfolk make what terms they could. In a few days more these wretched folk contrived to scrape together the required sum of money, which they paid over as ...
— On the Spanish Main - Or, Some English forays on the Isthmus of Darien. • John Masefield

... obtained a detail for Mr. Daudridge (under eighteen) as quartermaster's clerk. And Mr. Secretary Seddon has ordered the commissary to let Mrs. Michie have sugar and flour for her family, ...
— A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital • John Beauchamp Jones

... to Africa, I'll be able to sail along my own coasts. But tell me the subject of your speech today, Agamemnon, for, though I don't plead cases myself, I studied literature for home use, and for fear you should think I don't care about learning, let me inform you that I have three libraries, one Greek and the others Latin. Give me the outline of your speech ...
— The Satyricon, Complete • Petronius Arbiter

... as though, at bottom, and in the end, something cold and critical in the French temperament, combined with ignorance and prejudice on our own part, prevented a real contact between the two nationalities. In Lorraine, at any rate, and for the first time, I felt this "something" gone. Let us only carry forward intelligently, after the war, the process of friendship born from the stress and anguish of this time—for there is an art and skill in friendship, just as there is an art and skill in love—and new horizons will open for both nations. The mutual respect, the daily ...
— Towards The Goal • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... a particular account of the ravages of the troops, as they retreated from Concord to Charlestown, would be very difficult, if not impracticable. Let it suffice to say, that a great number of the houses on the road were plundered, and rendered unfit for use; several were burnt; women in childbed were driven, by the soldiery, naked into the streets; old men peaceably in their houses were shot dead; and such scenes exhibited as would disgrace ...
— The Military Journals of Two Private Soldiers, 1758-1775 - With Numerous Illustrative Notes • Abraham Tomlinson

... the voice of one pacing under these new olives. That was the word of the new school; that was the word of new ages, and these new minds taught of nature—her priests and prophets knew it then, already, 'Let fame that all hunt after ...
— The Philosophy of the Plays of Shakspere Unfolded • Delia Bacon

... she,—she lies in my hand as tame As a pear late basking over a wall; Just a touch to try and off it came; 'Tis mine,—can I let it fall? ...
— Dramatic Romances • Robert Browning

... tried to kill Mr. Landover," said the other. "Is nothing to be done about it? We heard the shot,—every one heard it. And no one has the courage to say a word about it! What a lot of cowards we are! I don't see why he refuses to let me take the matter up with the Captain. Captain Trigger ought to know ...
— West Wind Drift • George Barr McCutcheon

... patience of a minister of the Church who, in a weekly paper, "The Ecclesiastical Review," of December 10, 1887, actually had the audacity to write in an editorial article signed with his name the following cruel sentence? "Let us pray every day and every hour for our royal family, and in particular for the Old Man (the old kaiser) and for the Young Man (the present emperor) of this race of heroes. May God in His mercy grant that the ...
— The Secret Memoirs of the Courts of Europe: William II, Germany; Francis Joseph, Austria-Hungary, Volume I. (of 2) • Mme. La Marquise de Fontenoy

... still out the door, looked back. "Slow down, Marsh," said he. "Let's see the show." Already the logs caught by the booms had taken their motion and had swept past the opening. Although the lonesome tug Heinzman had on the work immediately picked up one end of the broken boom, and with it started out into the river, she found difficulty ...
— The Riverman • Stewart Edward White

... said a great deal, he had even bared himself in spots; yes, how penuriously hadn't he scraped up the least little thing that might vindicate him in the slightest degree! How could she ask him to advise her? He would simply refer her to the newspaper advertisements: "Flats and Apartments to Let." How insignificant he suddenly appeared! Slowly he blurred before her eyes; he was blotted out; he became lost in the dim distance; she saw him as through a haze; she barely discerned his mother-of-pearl buttons and his sleek and shiny hair. She realised how her eyes had been opened during his ...
— Shallow Soil • Knut Hamsun

... exclaimed. "Tell the company to let it stand and deduct it from what they will owe me when the house ...
— More Toasts • Marion Dix Mosher

... see all things around us clearly, so may the Great Spirit make our talk plain, that we may understand each other, and that our councils shall be as brothers who have met to smoke the pipe of peace. Father, I have heard that you are great and good. Listen to me, my Father, and let your ears hear one of your children, who comes from the wigwams of his people, with truth in his heart, and no lies upon his lips. I have made many treaties with your Commissioners, and they have promised many times, but have never kept their promises; and I have now come to see my Great Father ...
— Three Years on the Plains - Observations of Indians, 1867-1870 • Edmund B. Tuttle

... eloquence the story of his love burst from his lips. "Why should you be thus tortured?" he cried. "Heaven never willed you to be mated to that boor—you, whose life should be all sunshine. Leave him—leave him. He has cast you off. We have both suffered. Let us leave this dreadful place—this isthmus between earth and hell! I will ...
— For the Term of His Natural Life • Marcus Clarke

... entirely when written and published, issuing from the mouth, aided by the feelings of sympathy and the impulses of the masses, seems to partake of the wisdom of divinity. Thus is it, also, with the passions, the sense of wrong, the appeals to vengeance, and all the other avenues of human emotion. Let them be addressed to the cold eye of reason and judgment, in the form of written statements, and the mind pauses to weigh the force of arguments, the justice of the appeals, the truth of facts: ...
— Oak Openings • James Fenimore Cooper

... spoke he edged his horse sideways to regain the interval which the Scot had left between them, saying, at the same time, "Come, Seignior Archer, let there be no unkindness betwixt us!—For my part, I always do my duty without malice, and with a light heart, and I never love a man better than when I have put my scant of wind collar about his neck, to dub him Knight ...
— Quentin Durward • Sir Walter Scott

... words well chosen; the melodious voice reminding me of the late Mrs. Gracedieu's advantages in that respect; little sighs judiciously thrown in here and there, just at the right places; everything, let me own, that could present a dutiful daughter as a pattern of propriety—and nothing, let me add, that could produce an impression on my insensible temperament. If I had not been too discreet to rush at a hasty conclusion, I might have been inclined to say: her mother's child, every ...
— The Legacy of Cain • Wilkie Collins

... Let him that is a true-born gentleman And stands upon the honour of his birth, If he suppose that I have pleaded truth, From off this Brier pluck ...
— The plant-lore & garden-craft of Shakespeare • Henry Nicholson Ellacombe

... said, "is a significant admission; I can't let it pass. Your prejudice in favor of the man has, of course, been noticeable; you have even let him see it. Don't you realize what damaging conclusions ...
— Prescott of Saskatchewan • Harold Bindloss

... impressed upon persons anxious to condemn to eternal torment all those they believe to be worse than themselves. It is great presumption in us poor creatures of clay, to anticipate the proceedings of the Infinite Wisdom. Let us leave the high prerogative of judgment to the Almighty Power, by whom only it is exercised, and in our opinions of even the worst of our fellow-creatures, let us exercise a comprehensive charity, mingled ...
— The Little Savage • Captain Marryat

... go camping, do you?" said he. "Sit down and let us talk it over. I think the young lady is all right. She looks spry enough, and I expect she could eat pine-cones like a squirrel if she was hungry and had nothing else. As for you, madam, you don't appear as ...
— The Associate Hermits • Frank R. Stockton

... of the Space Devil placed in the right spot would be the trigger to make it let ...
— Danger in Deep Space • Carey Rockwell

... mock at me,' Stephen pursued, 'I will show you an example you would do well to imitate. It is our old servant, now my kindest, truest friend. If I could hope that you will let her be your friend, it would help to put my mind at rest. Don't look down upon her,—that's such a poor way of thinking. Of all the women I have known, she is the best. Don't be too proud to learn from ...
— In the Year of Jubilee • George Gissing

... Nelson and Napoleon, was never content to 'let well enough alone,' if anything better could possibly be done. When the news came of Montcalm's great victory over Abercromby at Ticonderoga, he told Amherst he was ready to march inland at once with reinforcements. And after Louisbourg had surrendered and Boscawen had said ...
— The Winning of Canada: A Chronicle of Wolf • William Wood

... could allow a man to remain in such a state; they said they were obliged to do so, as the funds were so limited that they had not money to buy clothes for him, and that if they had clothes they would have let him out.... I went to another cell, and though the individual was not chained, he was nearly in as bad circumstances as the other. Altogether these two cases were the most frightful I ever witnessed. I could not describe ...
— Chapters in the History of the Insane in the British Isles • Daniel Hack Tuke

... think you could?" asked Tom, and this time he had mastered his emotions. He was not going to let Andy Foger make him angry. "Maybe you can beat me at racing, too?" he went on. "If you think so, bring out your Red Streak and I'll try the Arrow against her. I beat you twice, and ...
— Tom Swift and his Airship • Victor Appleton

... never told her love, But let concealment, like a worm i'th' bud, Feed on her damask cheek: She pin'd in thought, And sate like Patience on a ...
— Eighteenth Century Essays on Shakespeare • D. Nichol Smith

... would say no. Her mother, I have reason to believe—Let me sound them—discreetly." The old pastor's red face glowed redder, yet with pleasurable anticipation; he was ...
— The Love of Ulrich Nebendahl • Jerome K. Jerome

... pace! He is dead—let him rest. Whatever his faults, his wife of course was true to him while he lived; she considered him worthy of fidelity—is it ...
— Vendetta - A Story of One Forgotten • Marie Corelli

... of parents to do evil by their child, but we have done little or nothing to increase and stimulate their powers to do good. We may prevent them doing some sorts of evil things to the child; they may not give it poisonous things, or let it live in morally or physically contagious places, but we do not insure that they shall give it wholesome things—better than they had themselves. We must, if our work is ever to reach effectual fruition, go on to the logical completion of that process ...
— New Worlds For Old - A Plain Account of Modern Socialism • Herbert George Wells

... her to have been interrupted in her devotions, the attitude is still appropriate. But if that moment be chosen in which she expressed her submission to the divine will, "Behold the handmaid of the Lord! let it be unto me according to thy word!" then she might surely kneel with bowed bead, and folded hands, and "downcast eyes beneath th' almighty Dove." No attitude could be too humble to express that response; and ...
— Legends of the Madonna • Mrs. Jameson

... let the young woman leave her husband to show me out," he went on. "When I found myself a prisoner, I thought I would try this door before periling the sleep of a patient in the small-pox. You seem to have ...
— Weighed and Wanting • George MacDonald

... far. When I felt inclined for a joke of this nature, I turned it to profit in a conjuring trick, or waited till my friend took leave of me, and then recalled him: "Stay," I would say, handing him the stolen article, "let this serve as a lesson to put you on your guard against persons less ...
— The Lock and Key Library/Real Life #2 • Julian Hawthorne

... I am not clever enough; and, besides, mamma doesn't like us to argue upon religious subjects—she says it is unsettling; so I will only say that I know you are wrong, and then we will let the matter drop and talk about Christopher. ...
— The Farringdons • Ellen Thorneycroft Fowler

... night were passed over in a very headlong manner: we stopped only once, as we heard the cry of some hounds on the south side, and then on again, keeping our horses just within their speed, till at the worst place on the road, we gave up the reins and let them go. In less than two hours from Picolata, we snuffed the salt air again; and reaching the open country, walked our horses leisurely ...
— The Knickerbocker, or New-York Monthly Magazine, January 1844 - Volume 23, Number 1 • Various

... night wind, and the faces round the punch are lit up, with shifting emphasis, against a background of complete and solid darkness. It is all picturesque enough; but the fact is, we are aweary. We yawn; we are out of the vein; we have made the wedding, as the song says, and now, for pleasure's sake, let's make an end on't. When here comes striding into the court, booted to mid-thigh, spurred and splashed, in a jacket of green cord, the great, famous, and redoubtable Blank; and in a moment the fire kindles again, and the night is witness of our laughter as ...
— Essays of Travel • Robert Louis Stevenson

... will be hanged, and the French will burn the town," responded the envoy. "Let them begin to hang and burn and be damned, for I'll not surrender the castle or the British flag so long as I've a man to defend it, to ...
— The Judgment House • Gilbert Parker

... arrival, M. Roussillon returned to Vincennes, and if he was sorely touched in his amour propre by seeing his suddenly acquired military rank and title drop away, he did not let it be known to his fellow citizens. He promptly called upon the new commander and made acquaintance with Lieutenant Fitzhugh Beverley, who just then was superintending the work of cleaning up an old cannon in the fort and mending some breaks in ...
— Alice of Old Vincennes • Maurice Thompson

... immediately, or I shall give you a thrashing!" But Parent replied: "What do I want? I want to tell you who these people are." George, however, was in a rage and shook him; was even going to strike him, but the other said: "Just let me go. I am your father ... There, look whether they recognize me now, the wretches!" And the alarmed young man, removed his hands, and turned to his mother, while Parent, as soon as he ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume II (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... shore. For example, A and B in Fig. 37 may represent the positions of two prominent objects whose position is marked upon an ordnance map of the neighbourhood, or they may be flagstaffs specially set up and noted on the map; and let C represent the boat from which the bearings of A and B are taken by a prismatic compass, which is marked from 0 to 360. Let the magnetic variation be N. 15 W., and the observed bearings A 290, B 320, then the position stands as in Fig. ...
— The Sewerage of Sea Coast Towns • Henry C. Adams

... profound, and stirring thoughts of mine, Ye long to sever the maternal ties Of the afflicted soul, and like to proud And able bowmen, draw at the mark, Which is the germ of all your high conceits. In those steep paths where cruel beasts may be, Let not heaven leave ye! Remember to return, and summon back The heart that tarries with the wild wood nymph; Arm ye with love, Warm with the flame of domesticity, And with strong repression guard thy sight, That strangers keep thee ...
— The Heroic Enthusiasts,(1 of 2) (Gli Eroici Furori) - An Ethical Poem • Giordano Bruno

... skill of the practitioner, and it is recognized as a general rule that such cases deserve very little confidence. Yet they may sound well enough, one at a time, to those who are not fully aware of the fallacies of medical evidence. Let me state a case in illustration. Nobody doubts that some patients recover under every form of practice. Probably all are willing to allow that a large majority, for instance, ninety in a hundred, ...
— Medical Essays • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... exclaimed Prohaska. "Let us take a wounded soldier into our house, and I will nurse him as a brother, teaching him how to use his wooden leg, while you are at the hospital, attending to the other sufferers. But you have not ...
— NAPOLEON AND BLUCHER • L. Muhlbach

... see what use it can be fretting yourself,—and you so poorly. If you will let me go, I will see every attention paid to the remains ...
— Paul Clifford, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... in this will or testament I have not used legal forms or words (and thereto I have my reasons), that every one may let me be the person that I am in truth, namely, openly and known both in heaven and earth, and in hell, and let me have respect and authority enough so that I may be trusted and believed more than any lawyer. ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume I • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... hurdles with every sign of confidence. Then, though Lisle felt the hoofs slide as the beast took off, they were over and flying faster than ever across a long, wet field. As they approached the end of the first round, the chestnut began to drop back; Lisle could let the bay go and he determined to bring him home the winner. It was his first fast ride in England; and he had, indeed, seldom urged a horse to its utmost pace—the British Columbian trails, for the most part, led steeply up or down rugged hillsides, where speed was out of the ...
— The Long Portage • Harold Bindloss

... fact," he continued, "we have sent for you to know whether you can offer us any assistance in our hour of difficulty? Pray take a chair, and let us talk the matter over and see what conclusion ...
— My Strangest Case • Guy Boothby

... one felt for him in a measure; he amused him, he cheered him; and the colonel had been so much used to leaving action of all kinds to his daughter that when he came to close quarters with the question of a son-in-law he felt helpless to decide it, and he let her decide it, as if it were still to be decided when it was submitted to him. She was competent to treat it in all its phases: not merely those of personal interest, but those of duty to the broken Southern past, sentimentally dear to him, and practically absurd ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... an honourable game? I have recovered valuable property—did I touch it and take it away? Did I expose to the public an affair that would have caused a scandal? You will do nothing and you know it. You did not even dare to tell the servants here what has happened, for the servant who let me in was not a bit surprised. Now, if you have finished your breakfast, will you kindly ...
— The Man Who Lost Himself • H. De Vere Stacpoole

... sure; but let me thank you for what you did, and let's get acquainted." Mildred held out her hand, which the other took somewhat shyly. "Don't you have to go home with ...
— Dorian • Nephi Anderson

... never knew; but you must remember that his sister did more; she loved him with a single-hearted devotion, and it still grieves her to the quick to write anything which may seem to detract from his memory. Only, above all things, let us speak the truth. Much of what I have told you needs, I feel, further explanation, but this I cannot give, for I do not understand the circumstances. Mr. Gaskell, your guardian, will, I believe, add to this account a few notes of his own, which may tend to ...
— The Lost Stradivarius • John Meade Falkner

... because you seemed to think Alice was with me in the hospital. She was in the psychopathic ward. The same doctor feeds us both, and told me. Don't let them tell you we take this well. Miss Paul vomits much. I do, too, except when I'm not nervous, as I have been every time against my will. I try to be less feeble-minded. It's the nervous reaction, and I can't control it much. I don't imagine bathing ...
— Jailed for Freedom • Doris Stevens

... decided to what State and part of the State an emigrant will remove, let him then conclude to take as little furniture and other luggage as he can do with, especially if he comes by public conveyances. Those who reside within convenient distance of a sea port, would find it both safe ...
— A New Guide for Emigrants to the West • J. M. Peck

... by this time), blaze up, nearly expire, and finally fire the punk,—thank God! And I said to myself, "The public don't want any more of this thing: it is played out. Either have a box of matches, or let ...
— Baddeck and That Sort of Thing • Charles Dudley Warner

... leave him where he is, and let's get away. I've heard say there were ghosts on L'Etat, and now I know it. No good comes of ...
— A Maid of the Silver Sea • John Oxenham

... a hold-up?" cried the man, evidently frightened. "Let go of me!" And he tried to pull away and then attempted to draw a revolver ...
— The Mansion of Mystery - Being a Certain Case of Importance, Taken from the Note-book of Adam Adams, Investigator and Detective • Chester K. Steele

... loosened him from the seat of the boat to which he was tied, and held the rope in his hand. A little after this, observing that he was not very narrowly watched, Quibio sprung into the water, and Sanchez let go the rope that he might not be dragged in after him. Night was coming on, and the people in the boat were in such confusion that they could not see or hear where he got on shore, for they heard no more of him than if a stone had fallen into the water and disappeared. That ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. III. • Robert Kerr

... "Let 'em have it! As fast as you can pull the triggers!" cried the old hunter. "We'll show 'em what ...
— Through the Air to the North Pole - or The Wonderful Cruise of the Electric Monarch • Roy Rockwood

... glitter which begins to arm Thy clouded brows, lo! from thy lips I see A smile come stealing, like a loaded bee, Heavy with sweets and perfumes, all ablaze With soft reflections from the flowery wall Whereon it pauses. Yet I will not raise One question more, let smile or frown befall, Taxing thy love where I should only praise, And asking changes ...
— Library Of The World's Best Literature, Ancient And Modern, Vol. 5 • Various

... "Let her have a run with Leo," he used to say; or, "Get her a horse, and teach her to ride. That will do her more ...
— Minnie's Pet Parrot • Madeline Leslie

... are moving somewhere; in an infinite variety of directions, with an infinite variety of speed they hasten this way and that. It would be impossible for any to remain still, for even supposing it had been so 'in the beginning,' the vast forces at work in the universe would not let it remain so. Out of space would come the persistent call of gravitation: atoms would cry silently to atoms. There could be no perfect equality of pull on all sides; from one side or another the pull would be the stronger. Slowly ...
— The Children's Book of Stars • G.E. Mitton

... as if it were a questionable sovereign, but on second thoughts he wonderfully smiled. "Do you think that after you've let me have it you can tell? You could, of course, if you hadn't." He appeared to work it out for Mr. Cashmore's benefit. "But I don't mind," ...
— The Awkward Age • Henry James

... effects of spreading out learning periods can be made as follows: Divide the class into two equal divisions. Let one division practice on a substitution experiment as explained in Exercise 1, for five ten-minute periods of practice in immediate succession. Let the other division practice for five days, ten minutes a day. What do the results indicate? The divisions should ...
— The Science of Human Nature - A Psychology for Beginners • William Henry Pyle

... his head. "Let her amuse herself for a bit," he said. "With Martha occupied, you can give your attention ...
— The Fourth R • George Oliver Smith

... kept warning the whole party, above all things, not to let themselves go to sleep. He had heard that the air of the Pontine Marshes had a peculiar tendency to send one to sleep; and if one should yield to this, the consequences might be fatal. Fever, he, ...
— Among the Brigands • James de Mille

... the lives of the Monmouth prisoners or not is everywhere discussed, with an almost general opinion that, under all the circumstances, the Government cannot let the law take its course. It is impossible for any reasoning to be more fallacious, because, if pushed to its just conclusion, it must result that they ought to escape altogether, which nobody expects or ...
— The Greville Memoirs (Second Part) - A Journal of the Reign of Queen Victoria from 1837 to 1852 - (Volume 1 of 3) • Charles C. F. Greville

... we got up to the door, 'don't go in: I am sure there is danger. There's time yet; let us go back—to Ireland—anywhere!' And she put herself before the door, in one of her theatrical ...
— Barry Lyndon • William Makepeace Thackeray

... the Syrian tribes worshiped a god of lightning,[67] like all primitive races. That god opened the reservoirs of the firmament to let the rain fall and split the giant trees of the woods with the double ax that always remained his emblem.[68] When the progress of astronomy removed the constellations to incommensurable distances, the "Baal of the Heavens" (Ba'al [vs]amin) had ...
— The Oriental Religions in Roman Paganism • Franz Cumont

... the president, "let us write our thirteen names, each on a slip of paper. We put them in a hat. He whose name is first drawn shall ...
— The Companions of Jehu • Alexandre Dumas, pere

... be said is that as the Vedas are Speech or Words, the Creator had to utter words symbolizing his ideas before creating anything. It is remarkable that there is a close resemblance between the spirit of the first chapter of Genesis with what is contained in the Srutis on the subject of Creation. Let there be Earth, and there was Earth, says the inspired poet of Genesis. Nilakantha cites exactly similar words from the Srutis as those which Brahman uttered for creating the Earth, such as, Bhuriti vyaharau as Bhumimasrijat. Then the four modes of life with the duties of each, the modes of worship, ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 - Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 • Unknown

... M. Francisco, that M. Michael abstained from speaking of Rome, the mother of painting, so as not to talk of his own works? Now what he would not do, let us not fail to do for the purpose of ensnaring him the more, for when one deals with famous paintings, no other has such value as the fount from which they are derived and proceed. And this work is in the head and fount of the Church, ...
— Michael Angelo Buonarroti • Charles Holroyd

... asked mischievously. "Let it go as it will," he answered eagerly, waving his hand. But the next instant he dropped it again, saying thoughtfully: "No, no; it won't do, there is ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... Infessura, is repeated in Matarazzo and in Nantiporto with slight variations. One says that the girl's hair was yellow, another that it was of the glossiest black. What foundation for the legend may really have existed need not here be questioned. Let us rather use the mythus as a parable of the ecstatic devotion which prompted the men of that age to discover a form of unimaginable beauty in the ...
— Renaissance in Italy, Volume 1 (of 7) • John Addington Symonds

... quickly, or, as there is reason to believe, by lessening the danger from occasional falls. But it does not follow from this fact that the structure of each squirrel is the best that it is possible to conceive under all natural conditions. Let the climate and vegetation change, let other competing {181} rodents or new beasts of prey immigrate, or old ones become modified, and all analogy would lead us to believe that some at least of the squirrels would decrease in ...
— On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection • Charles Darwin

... got under way for New York; but, meeting again with head winds, we ran into Maurice's River, in Delaware Bay. New Jersey, in which that place lies, is not a slave state. So I said to the captain, 'Let me have a boat, and set me on the free land once more; then I will travel home over land; for I will not run the risk of going back to Virginia any more. The captain said there was no danger, but I exclaimed, 'No, no! captain, I will not try it; put my feet ...
— Narrative of the Life of Moses Grandy, Late a Slave in the United States of America • Moses Grandy

... I have no hopes of getting her," I replied, for I was out of humour with myself that day. "In spite of what you say, I know she doesn't care a brass farthing to marry me. So let's ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... "Ah," said the King, "let fetch the best horse that may be found, and bid Sir Ontzlake arm him in all haste, and take another good ...
— Stories of King Arthur and His Knights - Retold from Malory's "Morte dArthur" • U. Waldo Cutler

... name of the law,' I said. I might have put it, 'In the King's name,' but what I meant was that we are to proceed in decency and order—no unseemly rabbling, scuffling, or mischief making—otherwise ye have me to reckon with. Let no word of ghosts and siclike be heard. The case is ...
— The Dew of Their Youth • S. R. Crockett

... to buy "those repulsive goat's-hair socks." When she had bought what he advised I said I had come especially to buy "a repulsive pair of socks." He immediately explained that he had advised the lady not to get them because they only had two pairs left, and he did not want to sell them. He let me have a pair, and the only time I wore them I thought with amusement of his advice and explanation. The lady was undoubtedly well out of them, and I hope never to use them again. Some people swear by them, so all tastes must ...
— Ski-running • Katharine Symonds Furse

... unquestionable sign that a tempest has been raging at no great distance. The raft labors hard against the waves, and Curtis, Falsten, and the boatswain, employ the little energy that remains to them in strengthening the joints. Why do they give themselves such trouble? Why not let the few frail planks part asunder, and allow the ocean to terminate our miserable ex- istence? Certain it seems that our sufferings must have reached their utmost limit, and nothing could exceed the torture that we are enduring. The sky pours down upon us a heat like that ...
— The Survivors of the Chancellor • Jules Verne

... Rene," said Molly, turning her face, beautifully glowing from the caress of the keen air, eagerly to her companion. And he, nothing loth to let loose a naturally garrulous tongue in such company, and on such a theme, started off upon a long story ...
— The Light of Scarthey • Egerton Castle

... risk I run. Selfish, you call it; gross, unmaidenly; Is it unmaidenly to hesitate In the surrender of my maiden state? Your epithets belong to those who fail To think at all, or only think of this: What's the man's income? Will he let me have A house in the right quarter? Keep a carriage? And is he in society? Such women Plant nightshade, and affect to wonder why The growth is not of ...
— The Woman Who Dared • Epes Sargent

... to have got on board the ship, to let them know of the boats being safe and what we had discovered of the reef; but the breakers between us, and the darkness of the night cut off all hope of communication before morning. They burned blue lights every half hour, as a guide to the Bridgewater; but her light was lost to ...
— A Voyage to Terra Australis Volume 2 • Matthew Flinders

... interrupted cheerfully enough, "and if you could I am not sure I should let you now. I've an ambition to complete my wilderness education, and though I'm no butcher, I'll manage this piece of work somehow. You will have to give me instructions, and though I may botch the business, I'll save the meat. Now just give me a lecture in the art of skinning and cleaning ...
— A Mating in the Wilds • Ottwell Binns



Words linked to "Let" :   give, rent, grant, leave, make, intromit, terrorist group, consent, cause, endure, tolerate, disallow, foreign terrorist organization, legitimate, allow in, terrorism, lessor, Lashkar-e-Tayyiba, sublease, legitimatize, pass, favor, stimulate, decriminalize, stick out, act of terrorism, furlough, clear, admit, forbid, legalise, favour, terrorist organization, let loose, stomach, terrorist act, legitimize, net ball, service, let it go, go for, authorise, legitimise, put up, letter, let alone, prevent, brook, stand, digest, privilege, trust, legalize, suffer, leave behind, abide, let go of, Islamic Republic of Pakistan, authorize, accept, Army of the Pure, induce, include, decriminalise, FTO, legitimatise, bear, Pakistan, West Pakistan, support, serve, leave alone, lease



Copyright © 2019 Diccionario ingles.com