Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Medicine   /mˈɛdəsən/   Listen
Medicine

noun
1.
The branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques.  Synonym: medical specialty.
2.
(medicine) something that treats or prevents or alleviates the symptoms of disease.  Synonyms: medicament, medication, medicinal drug.
3.
The learned profession that is mastered by graduate training in a medical school and that is devoted to preventing or alleviating or curing diseases and injuries.  Synonym: practice of medicine.
4.
Punishment for one's actions.  Synonym: music.  "Take your medicine"



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Medicine" Quotes from Famous Books



... gratuitously? My meagre horde includes pearls of several tints, black, pink, and white. They represent the paltriest prizes. in the lottery that no Government, however paternal, may prohibit, being mere "baroque," fit only to be pounded up as medicine for some Chinaman luxuriously sick. Yet there is a chance. Some day the great prize may be drawn. And then, "Canst thou draw out leviathan with an hook?" The Beachcomber may be perverted into—well, ...
— The Confessions of a Beachcomber • E J Banfield

... hard upon midnight. When it ended, both women were in tears. Cally retired to a fitful rest. At nine o'clock next morning, papa telephoned for Dr. Halstead, who came and found temperature, and prescribed a pale-green medicine, which was to be shaken well before using. The positive command was that the patient should not get out ...
— V. V.'s Eyes • Henry Sydnor Harrison

... with his watch and jeweled baubles. But one day poor little "Monsieur" sickened, and the tiny feet that had made such haste to run to him, now trod the corridor softly and bore a baby-nurse to the gentle invalid. It was a high and coveted reward for the little girls to carry "Monsieur's" medicine to his bedside, and everything that kindness and hospitality could suggest was equally lavished on him; but his feeble life, which had no doubt received a shock from the shipwreck it had barely escaped, went out peacefully like the soft flame ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science - Vol. XI, No. 27, June, 1873 • Various

... and children, belles and beaux, but with bags of powder and boxes of cartridges. Superannuated mail coaches carried blankets, oilcloths, sabres, shoes; light spring wagons held Enfield rifles; doctors' buggies medicine cases corded in with care. All these added themselves to the regular supply train of the army; great wagons marked C. S. A. in which, God knows! there was room for stores. The captures of the past days filled the vacancies; welcome ...
— The Long Roll • Mary Johnston

... Angela had returned to the room (her paint and rouge washed off, and her gay clothes replaced by a simple woollen jacket over a plain underskirt), and she began to beat up an egg, to boil some milk, to pour out a dose of medicine, and to do, with all a good woman's tact, a good woman's tenderness, the little services of which an ...
— The Woman Thou Gavest Me - Being the Story of Mary O'Neill • Hall Caine

... the crown, as having sense, And thus upbraided it. 'The care on thee depending Hath fed upon the body of my father; Therefore thou best of gold art worst of gold; Other, less fine in carat, is more precious, Preserving life, in medicine potable: But thou, most fine, most honoured, most renowned, Hast eat thy ...
— Coronation Anecdotes • Giles Gossip

... supplied all the countries of the world not only with dyestuffs and other chemical products but also with medicines discovered by their chemists and made from coal tar; which, although really nothing more than patent medicines, were put upon the market as new and great and beneficial discoveries in medicine. The Badische Anilin and Soda Fabrik, with a capital of fifty-four million marks has paid dividends in the ten years from 1903 to 1913, averaging over twenty-six ...
— My Four Years in Germany • James W. Gerard

... occasional violence as an alterative, and, for general and wholesome diet, a cooling but pretty constant neglect. At sparing intervals administer small quantities of love and kindness; but not every day, or too often, as this medicine, much taken, loses its effect. Those dear creatures who are the most indifferent to their husbands, are those who are cloyed by too much surfeiting of the sugar-plums and lollipops of Love. I have known a young being, with every wish gratified, yawn in ...
— The Virginians • William Makepeace Thackeray

... general belief in magic and witchcraft; sorcerers were burned alive in a cage. Ivan, although in advance of his age, was not free from superstition. The art of medicine was, of course, still in its infancy, and those who practiced it were in constant danger (p. 126) of their lives, because if they did not cure a patient, they ...
— The Story of Russia • R. Van Bergen

... the United States, and it is estimated that twice that number, or three million persons, are constantly unable even to care for themselves. The effect of this is felt on the patient himself, in suffering, in loss of time in which he is unable to earn money, and in the amount spent for doctors, medicine, and nursing. It is felt on the family, in which the household machinery is thrown out while the wife and mother nurses the sick members of the family, or is herself too ill to work, or when the father's income ...
— Checking the Waste - A Study in Conservation • Mary Huston Gregory

... him of their value. They are also extremely convenient, as they may be carried by the pound in a tin box, and served out in infinitesimal doses from one to ten at a time, according to the age of the patients. I had a large medicine chest, with all necessary drugs, but I was sorely troubled by the Arab women, many of whom were barren, who insisted upon my supplying them with some medicine that would remove this stigma and render them fruitful. It was in vain to deny them; I therefore gave them usually ...
— The Nile Tributaries of Abyssinia • Samuel W. Baker

... pursuance of this policy; but in justice to the Confederate authorities it should be borne in mind that they repeatedly proposed an exchange of prisoners upon the ground of humanity, seeing that neither provisions nor medicine were procurable; and, I believe, it is also a conceded fact that General Grant opposed exchanges. The testimony of General Lee given before the "reconstruction" Committee, clearly establishes the fact that he did all in his power to effect this object. In answer to a question he says: ...
— The Narrative of a Blockade-Runner • John Wilkinson

... farmer; your uncle has enough to do to look after his patients. He's a clever fo—man—so clever that some say he's got medicine on the brain." ...
— The Heiress of Wyvern Court • Emilie Searchfield

... distinction between individuals, as speaking, spoken to, or spoken of."—Ib., p. 114. "He repented his having neglected his studies at college."—Emmons's Gram., p. 19. "What avails the taking so much medicine, when you are so careless about taking cold?"—Ib., p. 29. "Active transitive verbs are those where the action passes from the agent to the object."—Ib., p. 33. "Active intransitive verbs, are those where the action is wholly confined to the agent or actor."—Ibid. "Passive ...
— The Grammar of English Grammars • Goold Brown

... on rude nations. The general establishment of medical aid for men and animals is alluded to in the edicts of Asoka;[1] and hospitals for the diseased and destitute were found by Fahian at Palibothra, whilst Hiuen Tsang speaks of the distribution of food and medicine at the Punyasalas or "Houses of Beneficence," in the Panjab. Various examples of a charitable spirit in Chinese Institutions will be found in a letter by Pere d'Entrecolles in the XVth Recueil of Lettres Edifiantes; and a similar detail in Nevius's China and the Chinese, ch. xv. (See ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... attended with a very considerable fever. He proposed to take me home for a short time, to restore my health; but this I objected to, as being likely to give a colour to the charge. It was therefore settled that I should take some medicine, prescribed by Mr. Stills[6], to calm my spirits and ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 1 • Henry Hunt

... war, and Plu'to, often called Dis or Ha'des, was the god of the lower or "infernal" regions, and hence also the god of the dead. One of the most glorious and beautiful of the gods was Apollo, god of the sun, of medicine, music, poetry, and ...
— Story of Aeneas • Michael Clarke

... Polly was going to found an orphan asylum in her house, and write poetry, besides; and Katharine wanted to support poor but honest young men by the dozen. I think that's all but Jessie. She's going to study medicine." ...
— Half a Dozen Girls • Anna Chapin Ray

... 'Only don't go and make yourself ill by over-work. I hope you'll go on with a cup of new milk every morning, for I am sure that is the best medicine; and put a teaspoonful of rum in it, if you like; many a one speaks highly of that, only we had no rum in the house.' I brought with me an atmosphere of active life which I think he had begun to miss; and it ...
— Cousin Phillis • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... really we are outraging not only the objective child, but the subjective one also—that in ourselves, namely, which is innocent and pure, and without which we had better not be at all. Now I do not mean to say that the only medicine that can cure this malady is legitimate children's literature; wise parents are also very useful, though not perhaps so generally available. My present contention is that the right sort of literature is an agent of great efficiency, and may be very ...
— Confessions and Criticisms • Julian Hawthorne

... transportation to Pittsburgh was estimated at fully a third of the total quantity, and before the oil boats started it is safe to say that another third was lost by leakage. The oil gathered by the Indians in the early days was bottled in Pittsburgh and sold at high prices as medicine—a dollar for a small vial. It had general reputation as a sure cure for rheumatic tendencies. As it became plentiful and cheap its virtues vanished. What ...
— Autobiography of Andrew Carnegie • Andrew Carnegie

... one end of the country to the other, arguing with chiefs, making fervid speeches to assembled warriors, and in every possible manner impressing his people with his great idea. The Prophet went with him; and when the orator's logic failed to carry, conviction, the medicine-man's imprecations were relied upon to save the day. Events, too, played into their hands. The Leopard-Chesapeake affair, * in 1807, roused strong feeling in the West and prompted the Governor-General of Canada to begin intrigues looking to an alliance with the redskins in the event ...
— The Old Northwest - A Chronicle of the Ohio Valley and Beyond, Volume 19 In - The Chronicles Of America Series • Frederic Austin Ogg

... in the advertising office where he worked Van Moore was known as something of a fool, redeemed by his ability to string words together. He wore a heavy black braided watch chain and carried a cane and he had a wife who after marriage had studied medicine and with whom he did not live. Sometimes on a Saturday evening the two met at some restaurant and sat for hours drinking and laughing. When the wife had gone to her own place the advertising man continued the fun, going from saloon to saloon and making ...
— Marching Men • Sherwood Anderson

... gave her the attention that a brother or a mother would give; I was careful; I hid what was happening within me; I acted as though I were watching over a sick child which was dear to me. I entertained her with conversation; I spoke in a low voice; I gave her medicine and confectionery. Afterward I began to read. More than once she had said that my reading was music. I was reading Musset. You do not know, mother, who Musset is. He is the poet of love—of that love exactly which the world calls forbidden. She wanted something from the neighboring chamber; ...
— The Argonauts • Eliza Orzeszko (AKA Orzeszkowa)

... occasion when my creditors pounced on my property, do you think I was discouraged? Nothing of the sort! My regular medical practice had broken down under me. Very well—I tried my luck as a quack. In plain English, I invented a patent medicine. The one thing wanting was money enough to advertise it. False friends buttoned ...
— Blind Love • Wilkie Collins

... gently relinquishing his hold upon Bertrand's wrist, and got up to pour something out of a bottle on the mantelpiece into a medicine-glass. ...
— The Rocks of Valpre • Ethel May Dell

... hands; old Maria, my nurse, is a skilful leech, and Angela here and I have been able to watch beside you, if we could do nothing more. Now, tell me, are you hungry? You should be, for you have taken nothing except Maria's horrid medicine for two whole days, and how long before that I know not. Now, however, nurse has something more palatable for you; she said you would awake soon and be better, and she has made you some excellent broth. Shall she bring ...
— Under the Meteor Flag - Log of a Midshipman during the French Revolutionary War • Harry Collingwood

... transcendentalism, and spent its last strength in the anti-slavery agitation and the enthusiasms of the Civil War."[1] The movement was contemporary with the preaching of many novel gospels in religion, in sociology, in science, education, and medicine. New sects were formed, like the Universalists, the Spiritualists, the Second Adventists, the Mormons, and the Shakers, some of which believed in trances and miracles, others in the quick coming of Christ, and still others in the reorganization of society; and the pseudo-sciences, ...
— A Social History of the American Negro • Benjamin Brawley

... things dangerous to the human system, there must have grown up, at a very early day, a belief in the remedial character of various vegetables as agents to combat disease. Here, of course, was a rudimentary therapeutics, a crude principle of an empirical art of medicine. As just suggested, the lower order of animals have an instinctive knowledge that enables them to seek out remedial herbs (though we probably exaggerate the extent of this instinctive knowledge); and ...
— A History of Science, Volume 1(of 5) • Henry Smith Williams

... expressive of affection. Struck with his originality and the extent of his acquirements, Scott earnestly recommended him to select a different profession from the simple art of his fathers, especially suggesting the study of medicine. But Laidlaw deemed himself too ripe in years to think of change; he took a farm at Traquair, and subsequently removed to a larger farm at ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... send you strong broth and a medicine," the Senora said; and sent her both by the hands of Margarita, whose hatred and jealousy broke down at the first sight of Ramona's face on the pillow; it looked so much thinner and sharper there than it had when she was sitting up. "Oh, Senorita! Senorita!" ...
— Ramona • Helen Hunt Jackson

... the building from being struck, but it does provide an easy and direct path to earth for the lightning discharge, thus preventing damage and destruction. This has nothing to do with the old school of lightning rod salesmen trained in medicine show methods. Proper equipment and competent men working under inspection by the Underwriters Laboratories are now available. Incidentally, radio antennae should be properly grounded and have an ...
— If You're Going to Live in the Country • Thomas H. Ormsbee and Richmond Huntley

... this a small light of confusion. "Oh I don't mean he's a doctor for medicine. He's a clergyman—and my aunt says he's a saint. I don't think you've many in England," ...
— The Awkward Age • Henry James

... Sunlight is a glorious medicine for the woman of nerves. If I had a nervous fuss-budget under my care, the first thing I would do would be to feed her well. I'd give her nourishing broths and daintily-served vegetables, and little steaks and chops and plenty of fattening cereals and drinks. I would bundle her off ...
— The Woman Beautiful - or, The Art of Beauty Culture • Helen Follett Stevans

... from nature and life does she, looking death in the face with a smile, dawn upon the vision of the invalid! She brings a little health, a little strength to fight, a little hope to endure, actually lapt in the folds of her gracious garments; for the soul itself can do more than any medicine, if it be fed ...
— The Seaboard Parish Vol. 3 • George MacDonald

... to sunset nothing is eaten, nobody leaves the house, there are neither visits nor company—indeed, nothing but praying. This ceremony is so strictly observed that invalids frequently fall victims to it, as they will take neither medicine nor food during the day; they believe that if they were to eat only a mouthful, they would forfeit the salvation to be obtained by fasting. Many of the more enlightened make an exception to this custom in cases of illness; however, in such an instance the physician must send a written ...
— A Woman's Journey Round the World • Ida Pfeiffer

... prigs, in whom their friends had seemed to see some especial merit and had forthwith hoisted them into a position that was as foolish as it was distasteful. They were hailed as youthful prodigies and exploited around the country like a patent medicine or a side-show. What is remarkable at eighteen is not so striking at twenty-eight. So when their extreme youth was no longer a cause for surprise, the boy preachers settled down into every-day dulness, with nothing except the memory of a flimsy fame to compensate ...
— The Uncalled - A Novel • Paul Laurence Dunbar

... and fifty years the human mind has been in the highest degree active; that it has made great advances in every branch of natural philosophy; that it has produced innumerable inventions, tending to promote the convenience of life; that medicine, surgery, chemistry, engineering, have been very greatly improved; that government, police and law, have been improved, though not to so great an extent as the physical sciences. Yet we see that during these two hundred and fifty years Protestantism ...
— Pius IX. And His Time • The Rev. AEneas MacDonell

... over and in every emergency was loyalty and devotion itself. Nothing could have proved her faithfulness more effectually than an incident connected with one of my stolen visits home. I went home one night to get medicine for the boys wounded in the battle of Lone Jack whom I was nursing in the woods some miles away. As I sat talking with my mother two of my brothers watched at the windows. There was soon the dreaded cry, "the militia are surrounding the house," and in the excitement ...
— The Story of Cole Younger, by Himself • Cole Younger

... idealization of particular ages, the thirteenth century in England, for example, or the age of the Antonines. The former is presented with the brightness of a missal, the latter with all the dignity of a Roman inscription. One is asked to compare these ages so delightfully conceived, with a patent medicine vendor's advertisement or a Lancashire factory town, quite ignoring the iniquity of mediaeval law or the slums and hunger and cruelty of ...
— New Worlds For Old - A Plain Account of Modern Socialism • Herbert George Wells

... philosophers and lawgivers, went to school. The Egyptians knew the length of the year and the form of the earth; they could calculate eclipses of the sun and moon; were partially acquainted with geometry, music, chemistry, the arts of design, medicine, anatomy, architecture, agriculture, and mining. In architecture, in the qualities of grandeur and massive proportions, they are yet to be surpassed. The largest buildings elsewhere erected by man are smaller than their pyramids; which are also the oldest human ...
— Ten Great Religions - An Essay in Comparative Theology • James Freeman Clarke

... him as if he were my own. Sometimes I have thought I ought to try and see if any of his relatives would help us, but I cannot bear to, and so we have just worried along as we could. But Phil needs a doctor and medicine, and more than ...
— Prince Lazybones and Other Stories • Mrs. W. J. Hays

... gaun to dae it, just as a bairn tak's medicine; because you are forced. I asked if that was a', and it seems to be. But what if I don't have onything mair ...
— The Underworld - The Story of Robert Sinclair, Miner • James C. Welsh

... town was brilliant from the absence of the unclean advertisements of quack-medicine men. That irrepressible species have not, as yet, committed their nuisance in its streets, and disfigured the walls and fences with their portentous placards. It is the only clean place I know of. The nostrum-makers have labelled all the features of Nature on the mainland, as if our country ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 17, No. 101, March, 1866 • Various

... of Sancerre is exceedingly proud of having given birth to one of the glories of modern medicine, Horace Bianchon, and to an author of secondary rank, Etienne Lousteau, one of our most successful journalists. The district included under the municipality of Sancerre, distressed at finding itself ...
— Parisians in the Country - The Illustrious Gaudissart, and The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... medicine with a doubtful look; smacked his lips; took another taste; and put the cup ...
— Oliver Twist • Charles Dickens

... to India. It has the sanction of Firdsi, in the great Persian epic, the Shah Nmeh, and it is considered by some[16] as more original than the one just quoted. According to it, the Persian physician read in a book that there existed in India trees or herbs supplying a medicine with which the dead could be restored to life. At the command of the king he went to India in search of those trees and herbs; but, after spending a year in vain researches, he consulted some wise people on the subject. They told him that the medicine of which he had read as ...
— Chips from a German Workshop - Volume IV - Essays chiefly on the Science of Language • Max Muller

... know there are young soldiers and young soldiers. There are the weedy, narrow chested chaps as seems to be made special for filling a grave; and there is the sturdy, hardy young chap, whose good health and good spirits carries him through. That's your sort, I reckon. Good spirits is the best medicine in the world; it's worth all the doctors and apothecaries in the army. But how did you come to be pressed? it's generally the ne'er do well and idle who get picked out as food for powder. That doesn't look your sort, ...
— The Bravest of the Brave - or, with Peterborough in Spain • G. A. Henty

... suppose that he trembled for fear. With that, he kneeled and made a very beautiful and Christian prayer. Before he laid his head upon the block he felt the edge of the axe, and said, with a smile upon his face, that it was a sharp medicine, but would cure the worst disease. When he was bent down ready for death, he said to the executioner, finding that he hesitated, 'What dost thou fear? Strike, man!' So, the axe came down and struck his head off, in the ...
— A Child's History of England • Charles Dickens

... it at the druggist's. One of her boys was over for medicine. Dr. Mason sewed up her head. He was drivin' by, on his way to ...
— Tom Grogan • F. Hopkinson Smith

... above and carried down cots and blankets. She heated kettles of water and fed the huge stove until it blazed and roared; then she brought from the Captain's room the medicine chest and the liquor that were kept ...
— Janet of the Dunes • Harriet T. Comstock

... than I was; I can even laugh heartily at American humour, and that I take to be a sign of health. Health is what I have gained. The devotion of eight or ten hours a day to the work of the factory has been the best medicine any one could have prescribed to me. It was you who prescribed it, and it was your crowning act of kindness to me, dear Mrs. Ormonde. It is possible that I have grown coarser; indeed, I know that I associate on terms of equality and friendliness with ...
— Thyrza • George Gissing

... There was something terrifying to him in the swiftness and efficiency of the great hornet. Presently the grub, not having received quite a big enough dose of its captor's anaesthetic, came to under the devouring jaws and began to lash out convulsively. Another touch of the medicine in the hornet's tail, however, promptly put a stop to that, and once more it tightened up into an unresisting ball. Then straddling it again firmly, and handling it cleverly with its front legs as a raccoon might handle a big apple, she bit into it here and there, sucking eagerly ...
— Children of the Wild • Charles G. D. Roberts

... called at the Crags with his report. The mother, he said, was very much out of health, but not incurable; he had promised to send her some medicine. A month or two at the seashore would do her ...
— Elsie's children • Martha Finley

... following any other fixed course of life which they may select as the right one, train their minds to do that which they believe can be done, the profession of doctors may in time be abolished. Mind will be the universal medicine; will, not simply the cure, ...
— Flames • Robert Smythe Hichens

... "Aye, and medicine, too," returns Gammer, "I wonder what we poor souls might come to, if we tooke nowt for our ails and aches but what we could buy o' the potticary. We've got noe Dr. Clement, we poor folks, to be our ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Volume 2, No. 12, May, 1851. • Various

... A new and complete dictionary of the terms used in Medicine, Surgery, Dentistry, Pharmacy, Chemistry, and kindred branches; with over 100 new and elaborate tables and many handsome illustrations. By W.A. Newman Dorland, M.D., Editor of "The American Pocket Medical Dictionary." Large octavo, 850 pages, bound ...
— Essentials of Diseases of the Skin • Henry Weightman Stelwagon

... divided into what was known as the trivium and the quadrivium. The trivium embraced Grammar, Logic, and Rhetoric; the quadrivium, Arithmetic, Geometry, Astronomy, and Music. These constituted the seven liberal arts. Greek, Hebrew, and the physical sciences received but little attention. Medicine had not yet freed itself from the influence of magic and astrology, and alchemy had not yet given birth to chemistry. The Ptolemaic theory of the universe still held sway. However, in all these matters the European mind was making progress, ...
— A General History for Colleges and High Schools • P. V. N. Myers

... at the Beginning, and before the Patient was exhausted, we should order immediately a Medicine proper to cleanse the Stomach, that is to say, a gentle Vomit, such as is the Ipecacuanha, in a Dose proportioned to the Age and Temperature of the sick Person, to be taken in a little Broth or common ...
— A Succinct Account of the Plague at Marseilles - Its Symptoms and the Methods and Medicines Used for Curing It • Francois Chicoyneau

... resulted in more than 200,000 deaths, forced more than 48,000 refugees into Tanzania, and displaced 140,000 others internally. Only one in two children go to school, and approximately one in 10 adults has HIV/AIDS. Food, medicine, and electricity remain in short supply. Political stability and the end of the civil war have improved aid flows and economic activity has increased, but underlying weaknesses - a high poverty rate, poor education rates, ...
— The 2007 CIA World Factbook • United States

... her lips open, her eyes closed. She vanished at once, and there were the mantelpiece and his bronzes. But those bronzes and the mantelpiece had not been there when she was, only the fireplace and the wall! Shaken and troubled, he got up. 'I must take medicine,' he thought; 'I can't be well.' His heart beat too fast, he had an asthmatic feeling in the chest; and going to the window, he opened it to get some air. A dog was barking far away, one of the dogs at Gage's farm no doubt, beyond the coppice. ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... retract all my fond complaints of mercantile employment; look upon them as lover's quarrels. I was but half in earnest. Welcome dead timber of the desk, that makes me live. A little grumbling is a wholesome medicine for the spleen, but in my inner heart do I approve and embrace this our close, but unharassing way of life. I am quite serious. If you can send me Fox, I will not keep it six weeks, and will return it, with warm thanks to yourself ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... learnt that they were shot by a Chinese junk which was passing for Nangasaki. Shortly after, the old king sent for me to come to dinner at the Dutch house, and to bring Mr Eaton with me, and a bottle of wine.[33] Mr Eaton had taken medicine, and could not go out, but I went. We had an excellent dinner, the dishes being dressed partly in the Japanese fashion, and partly according to the Dutch way, but no great drinking. The old king sat at one table, accompanied ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume IX. • Robert Kerr

... that the name "Druid" was a Greek appellation derived from the Druidic cult of the oak ([Greek: drus]).[1002] The word, however, is purely Celtic, and its meaning probably implies that, like the sorcerer and medicine-man everywhere, the Druid was regarded as "the knowing one." It is composed of two parts—dru-, regarded by M. D'Arbois as an intensive, and vids, from vid, "to know," or "see."[1003] Hence the Druid was "the very knowing or wise one." It is possible, however, ...
— The Religion of the Ancient Celts • J. A. MacCulloch

... friends. And what, I asked, is corn compared with a friend? Oh, I grew really oratorical! I gave it as my opinion that there should be vines around the house (Waste of time, said Horace), and that no farmer should permit anyone to paint medicine advertisements on his barn (Brings you ten dollars a year, said Horace), and that I proposed to fix the bridge on the lower road (What's a path-master for? asked Horace). I said that a town was a useful adjunct for a farm; but I laid it down as a principle that no town should be too near a ...
— Adventures In Contentment • David Grayson

... handsomely and with small personal inconvenience, his spirits rose, and his confidence increased. When he remembered the great estimation in which his office was held, and the constant demand for his services; when he bethought himself, how the Statute Book regarded him as a kind of Universal Medicine applicable to men, women, and children, of every age and variety of criminal constitution; and how high he stood, in his official capacity, in the favour of the Crown, and both Houses of Parliament, the Mint, the Bank of England, and the Judges of the land; when he recollected ...
— Barnaby Rudge • Charles Dickens

... men folks to learn to trust us women. If Labe, my husband, hadn't trusted me all these years, he'd have done some worryin', I cal'late. All right, Gertie, I'm with you till the last plank sinks. But," with a chuckle, "I'm kind of sorry for your pa. The medicine may cure us all in the end, but it'll be a hard dose for ...
— Cap'n Dan's Daughter • Joseph C. Lincoln

... yourself warm," said the doctor, who was not in the habit of taking his patients into his confidence. "I'll send round some medicine." ...
— At Sunwich Port, Complete • W.W. Jacobs

... is exactly right," said his mother. "Ain't I been tellin' you the whole endurin' time that you'd never get a call unless you practised manners as well as medicine? Ain't I, now?" ...
— A Daughter of the Land • Gene Stratton-Porter

... he asked, turning slowly toward the window. "The commissioner sent 'em up to me from Regina. Nothing like a good cigar on a dreary day like this. Whew, listen to the wind—straight from Medicine Hat!" ...
— Philip Steele of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police • James Oliver Curwood

... serious, Doctor Church? They will hang you if they catch you in Boston.' He replied, 'I am serious, and am determined to go at all adventures.' After a considerable conversation, Doctor Warren said, 'If you are determined, let us make some business for you.' They agreed that he should go to get medicine for their ...
— The Romance of Old New England Rooftrees • Mary Caroline Crawford

... twilight touched everything into colour. In the chamber which was the centre of all interest no one knew or cared how the hours went, and whether it was morning or noon or night. Instead of these common ways of reckoning, they counted by the hours when the doctor came, when the child must have his medicine, when it was time to refresh the little cot with cool clean linen, or sponge the little hot hands. The other attendants took their turns and rested, but Lucy was capable of no rest. She dozed sometimes with her eyes half opened, hearing every movement and little cry. Perhaps ...
— Sir Tom • Mrs. Oliphant

... enable Muschat, on false pretences to obtain a divorce from her. The brutal devices to which these worthy accomplices resorted for that purpose having failed, they endeavoured to destroy her by administering medicine of a dangerous kind, and ...
— The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... student, only a desultory reader. Yet I suggest that, as was pointed out in the case of the fine arts, certain branches of the divine scholarship, if I may call it so, may be arrested temporarily in any development they may have reached. Let us take medicine. Medicine is primarily based upon the study of anatomy or structure—physiology—or the scheme of structure carried out in life; and upon botany and chemistry as representing the vegetable and mineral worlds where the remedies ...
— Masques & Phases • Robert Ross

... one of the learned professions, Solomon—have you ever thought of medicine?" he inquired. Mr. Mahaffy laughed. "But why not, Solomon? There is nothing like a degree or a title—that always stamps a ...
— The Prodigal Judge • Vaughan Kester

... ship. The long stress and strain upon his physical as well as his mental health had weakened him until his strength was slowly ebbing away; his heart beat feebly, and his whole system had fallen under a nervous depression. Now was the time when, as a medicine, the alcohol, which was poison and death to his wife, would prove restoration to him. Could he but keep up his vital powers until the voyage was ended, all would be well with him. His life might be prolonged for those few years he so ardently desired. He could ...
— Brought Home • Hesba Stretton

... children if their disease was not treated sharply, that the neighbours couldn't stand it. However, I'm happy to say that all that is gone by now; the disease is either extinct, or exists in such a mild form that a short course of aperient medicine carries it off. It is sometimes called the Blue-devils now, or the Mulleygrubs. Queer names, ...
— News from Nowhere - or An Epoch of Rest, being some chapters from A Utopian Romance • William Morris

... been overlooked. Accordingly it has long been noticed for congratulation in manufactures and the useful arts— and for censure in the learned professions. We have now, it is alleged, no great and comprehensive lawyers like Coke: and the study of medicine is subdividing itself into a distinct ministry (as it were) not merely upon the several organs of the body (oculists, aurists, dentists, cheiropodists, &c.) but almost upon the several diseases of the same ...
— The Notebook of an English Opium-Eater • Thomas de Quincey

... willed to be free." There was a little blob of foam at one corner of his mouth, but the square pale face was composed, even impassive. "Once, not so long ago, I filled a place of standing in the professions of Surgery and Medicine; I knew what it was to be esteemed and respected by the world. For your dear sake I promise to regain what I have lost; be even more than I used to be, achieve greater things than are done by other men of equal powers ...
— The Dop Doctor • Clotilde Inez Mary Graves

... of patent medicines have been wiser in their generation than the newspaper men, and from the days of Mrs. ——'s Soothing Syrup until now their cook-books have been passports for their medicines into many a home, not that a call for medicine was the natural result of the use of these recipes, but that the name of the medicine became a household word through the use of the cookbook, and hence was the first thought when any panacea was required. Such good prices have been paid ...
— The Writer, Volume VI, April 1892. - A Monthly Magazine to Interest and Help All Literary Workers • Various

... quality of the blood; ten drops of the tincture of the chloride of iron taken in water through a glass tube by adults; for children five to ten drops of the syrup of the iodide of iron. In either case the medicine should be taken three times daily ...
— The Home Medical Library, Volume II (of VI) • Various

... realization, for there is too much creative impulse in me not to nourish hope along with it. My previous continual anxiety about my health has also now been relieved by the conviction I have since gained of the all- healing power of water and of nature's medicine; I am in the way of becoming and, if I choose, of remaining a perfectly healthy man. If you wretched people would only get a good digestion, you would find that life suddenly assumes a very different appearance from what ...
— Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt, Volume 1 • Francis Hueffer (translator)

... come home from studying in 'El-Azhar' at Cairo—I fear to die. I went with Sheykh Yussuf, at his desire, to see if I could help him, and found him gasping for breath and very, very ill. I gave him a little soothing medicine, and put mustard plasters on him, and as it relieved him, I went again and repeated them. All the family and a lot of neighbours crowded in to look on. There he lay in a dark little den with bare mud walls, worse off, to our ideas, than any ...
— Letters from Egypt • Lucie Duff Gordon

... L'Araich, soon after which they gained a naval victory over the forces of Sidan, which was very disastrous to the Africans; for the Spaniards, besides other plunder, got possession of 3000 Arabic books, on theology, philosophy, and medicine. Sidan, however, notwithstanding this disaster, maintained his right to the crown. He was of a liberal and charitable mind. He protected and granted to the Christians various privileges; but he ordered that Christians of all sects, and ...
— An Account of Timbuctoo and Housa Territories in the Interior of Africa • Abd Salam Shabeeny

... M.D., F.A.C.S. Professor of Laryngology, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia; Professor of Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania; Member of the American Laryngological Association; Member of the Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society; Member of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto-Laryngology; ...
— Bronchoscopy and Esophagoscopy - A Manual of Peroral Endoscopy and Laryngeal Surgery • Chevalier Jackson

... conditions in various parts of their own country. Mrs. Jarley conducted a wax-works performance, and there was a moving-picture show in which Mrs. Cornelia Gracchus, the favorite example of the "Antis," was shown lecturing in the Forum on medicine to grave and reverend seigneurs, Joan of Arc leading her troops, and Florence Nightingale bending over ...
— An American Suffragette • Isaac N. Stevens

... answer. She took some work and sat down by him. Mrs. Boyce, who had been tidying a table of food and medicine, came and asked him if he would be wheeled into another room across the gallery, which had been arranged as a sitting-room. He shook his ...
— Marcella • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... when he was to leave London, my friend kindly came to keep me company for a while. He was followed into my room by Mrs. Mozeen, with a bottle of medicine in her hand. This worthy creature, finding that the doctor's directions occasionally escaped my memory, devoted herself to the duty of administering the remedies at the prescribed intervals of time. When she left the room, having performed her ...
— Little Novels • Wilkie Collins

... observed Don John, thoughtfully, for he had little belief in medicine generally, and none at all in the ...
— In The Palace Of The King - A Love Story Of Old Madrid • F. Marion Crawford

... thereafter live forever, how the world would pour in money like snow and rain, so that because of the throng of the rich no one could find access! But here in Baptism there is brought free to every one's door such a treasure and medicine as utterly destroys death and preserves all ...
— The Large Catechism by Dr. Martin Luther

... Nicolette, "you must do as I tell you. For the beast has a medicine that will cure Aucassin of all his pain. Ah! I have five pieces of money in my purse. Take them, and tell him. He must come and hunt within three days, and if he does not, he ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Vol. I • Various

... To-day those Icelanders own farms clear of debt, own stock that would be considered the possession of a capitalist in Iceland, and have money in the savings banks. Their sons and daughters have had university educations and have entered every avenue of life, farming, trading, practicing medicine, actually teaching English in English schools. Some are members of Parliament. It was a hard beginning, but it was a rebirth to a new life. They are now among the ...
— Canada: the Empire of the North - Being the Romantic Story of the New Dominion's Growth from Colony to Kingdom • Agnes C. Laut

... his feet. He had but recently had a taste of the white man's medicine, and his savage heart was filled with bitterness and hate. In another moment the rumble of the war-drums rose from the village, calling in the hunters from the forest and the ...
— The Beasts of Tarzan • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... there cannot be snow where there is intense heat. The sun is deflected from its course in winter, which derangement causes the river to run shallow in that season. The religious practice of the land are well described, including the process of embalming; oracles, animals, medicine, writing, dress are all treated. He notes that in Egyptian records the sun has twice risen in the west and twice ...
— Authors of Greece • T. W. Lumb

... university to education in the canon and civil law; but, five years subsequently, the same king issued a fresh patent, adding the faculties of theology and the arts; and, in the following year, he still farther added the faculty of medicine.—To give permanency to the work thus happily begun, the states of Normandy preferred their petition to Pope Eugene IVth, who issued two bulls, dated the thirtieth of May, 1437, and the nineteenth of May, 1439, by which the new university received the sanction of the holy ...
— Account of a Tour in Normandy, Vol. II. (of 2) • Dawson Turner

... to take their place among their old-world surroundings; and fitly so, for they are the oldest gardens of their kind in the country, having been originated by the Earl of Danby as an assistance to the study of medicine, nearly ...
— Oxford • Frederick Douglas How

... track and at the same time to keep vigilant watch for the Sioux. They expected the regular train from the east to overtake them, but did not even see its smoke. There must have been a wreck or telegraph messages to hold it back at Medicine Bow. ...
— The U.P. Trail • Zane Grey

... the ocean seemed to do Tom a world of good. Daily he grew stronger, until he could walk on deck. The doctor attended him from time to time, but gave the sufferer little medicine. ...
— The Rover Boys in Alaska - or Lost in the Fields of Ice • Arthur M. Winfield

... run[4], passions to be poized, merit to be received from dependence, and a machine to be serene, is perfectly new. The Dr. has a happy talent at invention, and has had the glory of enriching our language by his phrases, as much as he has improved medicine by his bills.' The critic then proceeds to consider the poem more minutely, and to expose it by enumerating particulars. Mr. Addison in a Whig Examiner published September 14, 1710, takes occasion to rally ...
— The Lives of the Poets of Great Britain and Ireland (1753) - Vol. III • Theophilus Cibber

... not getting up," said Tula stolidly. "I am kneeling before you, my General. See! I pray to you on the tiles for that Judas. All the women are praying. Also the old women have made medicine to send El Aleman once more on this trail, and see you,—it has come to pass! You have him in your trap, but he is ours. Excellency, come once and see all the women on their knees before the saint ...
— The Treasure Trail - A Romance of the Land of Gold and Sunshine • Marah Ellis Ryan

... interpretation, one contemporary witness has been held to testify that Shakespeare stemmed the tide of Jonson's embittered activity by no peace-making interposition, but by joining his foes, and by administering to him, with their aid, the identical course of medicine which in the 'Poetaster' is meted out to his enemies. In the same year (1601) as the 'Poetaster' was produced, 'The Return from Parnassus'—a third piece in a trilogy of plays—was 'acted by the students in St. John's College, Cambridge.' In this piece, as ...
— A Life of William Shakespeare - with portraits and facsimiles • Sidney Lee

... of it all; he would be like Moliere, a profound philosopher first, and a writer of comedies afterwards. He was studying the world of books and the living world about him—thought and fact. His friends were learned naturalists, young doctors of medicine, political writers and artists, a number of earnest ...
— A Distinguished Provincial at Paris • Honore de Balzac

... of inhabitants all enjoy perfect health. The government controls the whole field of medical science just as we do the post office department. No patent medicine on Dorelyn. Many new ideas picked up in medicine ...
— Life in a Thousand Worlds • William Shuler Harris

... every week by travelling, and which cost only a franc a bottle: it began as a bon ordinaire, and the little that returned to Cairo ranked with a quasi-grand vin, at least as good as the four-shilling Medoc. Finally, Dr. Lowe, of Cairo, kindly prepared for us a medicine chest, containing about 10 worth of the usual drugs and appliances—calomel, tartar emetic, and laudanum; ...
— The Land of Midian, Vol. 1 • Richard Burton

... the hall and performed strange antics and a curious play, fragments of which have come down to our own time. The youths of the villages of England still come round at Christmas-time and act their mumming-drama, in which "St. George" kills a "Turkish knight," who is raised to life by "Medicine Man," and performs a very important part of the play—passing round the money-box. This is a remnant of the mumming of ancient days, and perhaps of some "mystery" play, of which I told you in ...
— Old English Sports • Peter Hampson Ditchfield

... Therefore those who cannot nurse the sick ones at home take them to the Bikkur-Holim, which a doctor visits once every few days. A mother, wife, or father goes with the patients to give them the necessary food and medicine, for in the Bikkur-Cholem there are no trained nurses. The relatives also keep the patients clean and tidy; but little cooking is done there, as the food is generally brought cooked ...
— Pictures of Jewish Home-Life Fifty Years Ago • Hannah Trager

... pipe and ran, followed by the two boys and Abbott, who paused only to catch up his medicine case from the veranda, and then sped like the wind after the others. Mrs. Clyde had turned ghastly white at Debby's cry and had sprung up to follow the men. But the sight of the little messenger lying in a pathetic heap by her chair, stopped ...
— Blue Bonnet's Ranch Party • C. E. Jacobs

... Next, Ortega asks for certain grants from the royal bounty for his order: a fixed sum for the building of the burnt monastery; an increased allowance for the yearly support of the religious, as prices have risen; allowances of wine, oil, and medicine for the Augustinian convent at Manila; and an increase in the number of religious provided for it. He complains that the Dominicans are, by their mission to the Chinese, intruding upon the rights ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume IX, 1593-1597 • E. H. Blair

... information necessary to life. But long familiarity with an illiterate peasantry like the Italian one, inclines me to think that we grossly exaggerate the need of such book-grown knowledge. Except as regards scientific facts and the various practices—as medicine, engineering, and the like, founded on them—such knowledge is really very little connected with life, either practical or spiritual, and it is possible to act, to feel, and even to think and to express one's self with propriety and grace, while having simply no ...
— Hortus Vitae - Essays on the Gardening of Life • Violet Paget, AKA Vernon Lee

... never saw him look so dreadful before. He must be in an awful state, or else he'd have been able to take something from the medicine-chest to help him hold out longer. But there, it's of no use to give way like this. We must get back to camp with this water. Do you ...
— The Peril Finders • George Manville Fenn

... sharply, and Gabriella went to let in the doctor, a brisk, authoritative young man of the new school, who had learned everything there was to be known about medicine except the way to behave in a sickroom, and who abhorred a bedside manner as heartily as if it were calomel or castor oil. His name was Darrow, and he was the assistant of old Dr. Walker, Mrs. Carr's family physician, who never ...
— Life and Gabriella - The Story of a Woman's Courage • Ellen Glasgow

... stands out as the supreme master, one of the greatest short-story writers of the world. He was born in Taganarok, in the Ukraine, in 1860, the son of a peasant serf who succeeded in buying his freedom. Anton Chekhov studied medicine, but devoted himself largely to writing, in which, he acknowledged, his scientific training was of great service. Though he lived only forty-four years, dying of tuberculosis in 1904, his collected works consist of sixteen fair-sized ...
— Best Russian Short Stories • Various

... piece of blanket for me to lie on. Then she heated some milk in a saucepan, and poured it in a saucer, and watched me while Miss Laura went upstairs to get a little bottle of something that would make me sleep. They poured a few drops of this medicine into the milk ...
— Beautiful Joe - An Autobiography of a Dog • by Marshall Saunders

... or you will be so ill that I cannot leave you. Dr. Grantlin impressed upon us, the necessity of keeping your nervous system quiet. Take your medicine now, and try to sleep until I come ...
— At the Mercy of Tiberius • August Evans Wilson

... can be lifted for the first time to the eternal. The rest was superstition and the quaking use of a false physics. That appeal to the supernatural which while the danger threatens is but forlorn medicine, after the blow has fallen may turn to sublime wisdom. This wisdom has cast out the fear of material evils, and dreads only that the divine should not come down and be worthily entertained among us. In art, in politics, ...
— The Life of Reason • George Santayana

... through all the night, fanning him softly, keeping his chest covered from the air, giving him his medicine at the proper intervals, and putting drink to his lips when he needed it. But never trusted her eyelids to close for a moment. Jenny shared her vigil by nodding in an easy chair; and Solomon Weismann, a young medical student, by sleeping ...
— The Missing Bride • Mrs. E. D. E. N. Southworth

... leg to stand on; so every time you turn a wheel on this property it's goin' to cost you just what the last trip through the pass cost Jerkline Jo. You started something, my friend, and you can't finish it—that's all. Take your medicine like a sport." ...
— The She Boss - A Western Story • Arthur Preston Hankins

... one time that she would almost be willin' to wed you to get a chance to give you a good course of spring medicine for that thar liver," remarked Judith casually. And then she looked up with a wan little smile, to find an expression in her uncle's eyes that ...
— Judith of the Cumberlands • Alice MacGowan

... life." I had as hard a time keeping Radbourne from overworking as I had in getting enough work out of some other players. "I guess I'll let the Rube take his medicine. I hate to lose this game, but if we have to, we can stand it. I'm curious, anyway, to see what's the matter with the Rube. Maybe he'll settle ...
— The Redheaded Outfield and Other Baseball Stories • Zane Grey

... apology. After my return from Lady J.'s on Monday night, or rather morning, I awoke from my short sleep unusually indisposed, and was at last forced to call up the good daughter of the house at an early hour to get me hot water and procure me medicine. I could not leave my bed till past six Monday evening, when I crawled out in order to see Charles Lamb, and to afford him such poor comfort as my society might perhaps do in the present dejection of ...
— In a Green Shade - A Country Commentary • Maurice Hewlett

... the greatest disaster the Republican party had ever experienced. In November, 1882, Mr. Cleveland was elected governor by the most enormous majority ever known, and the defeat extended not only through the State of New York, but through a number of other States. It was bitter medicine, but, as it afterward turned ...
— Volume I • Andrew Dickson White

... placed within the snowy sheets of a heavily-carved bedstead, whose crimson canopy shed a ruby light down on the laced and ruffled pillows. Mrs. Murray administered a dose of medicine given to her by Dr. Rodney, and after closing the blinds to exclude the light, she felt the girl's pulse, found that she had fallen into a heavy sleep, and then, with a sigh, went down to take her breakfast. It was several hours before Edna awoke, ...
— St. Elmo • Augusta J. Evans

... know,' said Mr. Hale, after a pause. 'She ought to see him if she wishes it so much, for I believe it would do her much more good than all the doctor's medicine,—and, perhaps, set her up altogether; but the danger to him, ...
— North and South • Elizabeth Cleghorn Gaskell

... she can rely, namely, the detection of worms in the stools of the child. Until these expelled intruders are actually found she should be slow to believe that the child is thus affected, and still slower to give worm medicine. Before beginning treatment, let the mother wait until the need of it is made out by the result of ...
— The Physical Life of Woman: - Advice to the Maiden, Wife and Mother • Dr. George H Napheys

... battle-fields of science which might not for want of time be dwelt upon at length the lecturer reviewed the battle grounds of medicine and anatomy on which some of the ...
— Scientific American, Vol.22, No. 1, January 1, 1870 • Various

... can be made wherein she had put Bhang. Then she ordered one of her eunuchs go to the damsel Kut al-Kulub and bid her to the banquet, saying, "The Lady Zubaydah bint Al-Kasim, the wife of the Commander of the Faithful, hath drunken medicine to-day and, having heard tell of the sweetness of thy singing, longeth to divert herself somewhat of thine art." Kut al-Kulub replied, "Hearing and obedience are due to Allah and the Lady Zubaydah," and rose without stay or delay, unknowing what was hidden for her in the Secret Purpose. Then she ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 8 • Richard F. Burton

... something they wished to teach, and of youth who desired to learn. * * * It was the eternal need of the human spirit in its relation to the unseen that originated the University of Paris. We may say then that it was the improvement of the professions of medicine, law and theology which led to the inception and organization ...
— Colleges in America • John Marshall Barker

... century, is shown by a comparison of the encyclopaedia of Cato(2) with the similar treatise of Varro "concerning the school-sciences." As constituent elements of non-professional culture, there appear in Cato the art of oratory, the sciences of agriculture, of law, of war, and of medicine; in Varro—according to probable conjecture—grammar, logic or dialectics, rhetoric, geometry, arithmetic, astronomy, music, medicine, and architecture. Consequently in the course of the seventh century the sciences of war, jurisprudence, and agriculture had been converted from general into professional ...
— The History of Rome (Volumes 1-5) • Theodor Mommsen

... indefatigable architect of palaces, that spoke; collector though he was, he did not collect useless information; and all his questions had a purpose. After etiquette, government, law, the police, money, and medicine were his chief interests—things vitally important to himself as a king and the father of his people. It was my part not only to supply new information, but to correct the old. 'My patha he tell me,' or 'White man he tell me,' would be his constant beginning; 'You think he lie?' Sometimes ...
— In the South Seas • Robert Louis Stevenson

... condemnatus, et ad ignem applicatus et incineratus. Hic, ut dicitur, missus fuit ab haereticis Pragensibus de Bohemia, qui tune in maleficiis nimium praevalebant, ad inficiendum regnum Scotorum, recommissus per ipsorum literas, tanquam praecellens arte medicine. Hic in sacris literis et in allegatione Bibliae promptus et exercitatus inveniebatur; sed ad insipientiam sibi, omnes quasi illos articulos erroneos Pragenses et Wiklivienses pertinaciter tenebat: sed per venerabilem virum magistrum Laurentium de Londoris, ...
— The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6) • John Knox

... on the side of the agitation led so heroically for many years by Mrs. Josephine Butler. On my return to London after the lecture I naturally made inquiry as to the volume and its contents, and I found that it had been written by a Doctor of Medicine some years before, and sent to the National Reformer for review, as to other journals, in ordinary course of business. It consisted of three parts—the first advocated, from the standpoint of medical science, ...
— Annie Besant - An Autobiography • Annie Besant

... early as 1538, the Dominican friars obtained a papal bull for the establishment of a university, and in 1558 the institution known as the University of St. Thomas of Aquino was inaugurated by them in Santo Domingo City, with faculties of medicine, philosophy, theology and law, the principal branch being theology. This university acquired considerable celebrity, but practically disappeared during the colony's decline, being revived by royal decree of May 26, 1747, which gave ...
— Santo Domingo - A Country With A Future • Otto Schoenrich

... but again and again ordered the heart-stricken travellers to leave the village with their dying child. As a further aggravation, after the father had twice administered laudanum, the vial containing the medicine disappeared from their tent, and could no more be found. There were all the usual accompaniments of the cholera, and in that high region the night air was cold. Collecting dry weeds, they managed to kindle ...
— History Of The Missions Of The American Board Of Commissioners For Foreign Missions To The Oriental Churches, Volume II. • Rufus Anderson

... further by a streak of half-dried blood, reminiscent of the night's encounter. The fight had gone against him—that was all right. There was a time for getting square. Till then he was man enough to take his medicine, ...
— Children of the Tenements • Jacob A. Riis

... ladies all welcomed the newcomer as the best medicine both to the spirit and body of their Queen. She was regularly enrolled among the Queen's maidens, and shared their meals. Mary dined and supped alone, sixteen dishes being served to her, both on "fish and flesh days," and the reversion of these as well as a provision of their ...
— Unknown to History - A Story of the Captivity of Mary of Scotland • Charlotte M. Yonge

... shooting-stars, and new discoveries might have been within his reach, his loss made him more inconsolable than ever. In sheer desperation, he endeavored to increase the intensity of his vision by applying to his eyes some belladonna which he found in the Dobryna's medicine chest; with heroic fortitude he endured the tortures of the experiment, and gazed up into the sky until he was nearly blind. But all in vain; not a single fresh ...
— Off on a Comet • Jules Verne

... fled. He remained to combat the fiend—his side unguarded, his toils unshared—infection might even reach him, and he die unattended and alone. By day and night these thoughts pursued me. I resolved to visit London, to see him; to quiet these agonizing throes by the sweet medicine of hope, or the opiate ...
— The Last Man • Mary Shelley

... correction of proofs in Latin and Greek. He earned in this way twelve francs a day—far more than those canons of Toledo, who formerly had appeared to him as great dukes. He lived in a small inn for students near to the School of Medicine, and his vehement discussions at night with his fellow-lodgers over the smoke of their pipes taught him as much as the books of that hated science. Those students who lent him books, or who told him of those he should search for in his free hours in the ...
— The Shadow of the Cathedral • Vicente Blasco Ibanez

... Good-night and good-bye. [With a look of disgust, he has gone to the table, held a medicine bottle to the light to look at the label and poured a spoonful into a wine-glass filled with water. As FREDERIK leaves the house, the DOCTOR taps on a door and calls.] Catherine! [CATHERINE enters, and shows by the glance she directs at the front door that she ...
— The Return of Peter Grimm • David Belasco

... one occasion. According to this tale, the business manager of the paper came to Mr. Daniels, one day, and informed him that he needed sixty dollars more to make the payroll, and didn't know where he was going to get it. The only ready asset in sight, it is related, was several cases of a patent medicine known as "Mrs. Joe Persons' Remedy," which had been taken by the "News and Observer" in payment for advertising space. Mr. Daniels had a few dollars, and his business manager had a railroad pass. With these resources the latter ...
— American Adventures - A Second Trip 'Abroad at home' • Julian Street

... all day and all night at Medicine Bow. Four passenger trains packed into two, and long freight trains passed us ...
— The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 1 of 2) • Ida Husted Harper

... me from helping you by pill or potion. Medicine can give nobody good spirits. My art halts at the threshold of Hypochondria: she just looks in and sees a chamber of torture, but can neither say nor do much. Cheerful society would be of use; you should be as little alone as ...
— Villette • Charlotte Bronte

... Dr. Goldbeck have a more arduous task, but with medicine chest at his side, and two able assistants to carry out his instructions, he toiled unceasingly ...
— The River of Darkness - Under Africa • William Murray Graydon

... how he might take it; however, nothing could have been better received. The King has not appeared since he has been here, now ten days, and has confined himself to his room under a slight affection of gout, for which he is taking Wilson's medicine, but he received him most graciously, talked for an hour and a half, and Wynn came away delighted. I am quite happy that he came down for the purpose. I can't make out exactly how matters stand at the Pavilion. The Regnante has not yet arrived. He has been quite alone, literally, with ...
— Memoirs of the Court of George IV. 1820-1830 (Vol 1) - From the Original Family Documents • Duke of Buckingham and Chandos

... extraordinary and mysterious charm was as wax in his hands. In the presence of the man who had cast such a strange spell about her she was utterly helpless. There was no suggestion of hypnotism—she herself scouted the idea—yet ever since Sir Hugh had taken her to consult this man of medicine at a small suburban villa, five years ago, he had entered her life never again to ...
— The Doctor of Pimlico - Being the Disclosure of a Great Crime • William Le Queux

... eye with which the Universe Beholds itself and knows itself divine; All harmony of instrument or verse, All prophecy, all medicine is mine, All light of art or nature;—to my song 35 Victory and praise in ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... He was not even in Paris at the time of her death, nor did he so much as know the woman had left the money to him!—One cannot well be more innocent than that! Well, after M. Camusot examined him, he hanged himself in his cell. Law, like medicine, has its victims. In the first case, one man suffers for the many, and in the second, he dies for science," he added, and an ugly smile stole over his lips. "Well, I know the risks myself, you see; poor and obscure little attorney as ...
— Cousin Pons • Honore de Balzac

... dinner on the train, so she spent her time in asking me questions the length of the table, and in getting acquainted with me. She had brought a bottle of some sort of medicine downstairs with her, and she took a claret-glassful, while she talked. The stuff was called Pomona; shall I ...
— When a Man Marries • Mary Roberts Rinehart



Words linked to "Medicine" :   diagnostics, fixed-combination drug, anesthesiology, penalisation, unguent, antidepressant drug, drug cocktail, dermatology, ophthalmology, cut off, immune suppressant drug, antidiarrheal, antibacterial drug, astringent, blocking agent, dope up, transfuse, confirming, prosthetics, restorative, podiatry, aviation medicine, ob, licensing fee, acyclovir, license fee, phlebotomize, autopsy, regime, Metrazol, antiarrhythmic medication, antiprotozoal drug, general medicine, pharmaceutical, decoagulant, gynaecology, splint, pain pill, depressant, cathartic, allopurinol, pedology, ethical drug, pharmacology, alendronate, bloodletting, resistance, anthelmintic, dope, balm, holistic medicine, ankylose, demulcent, maturation, snake oil, anodyne, paregoric, donor, plaster, immunology, prescription, pharmacy, sedative, anticonvulsant drug, bring around, prescription medicine, over-the-counter drug, oxytocic, therapeutic, doctor, strap, nux vomica, antibacterial, care for, tincture, antiseptic, algid, bronchodilator, invasive, dose, anticonvulsant, penalization, immunise, antiepileptic drug, Cuprimine, chiropody, expectorator, clopidogrel bisulfate, clonic, low-level radioactive waste, materia medica, medical science, hygienics, geriatrics, carrier, physic, irrigation, gauze, pediatric medicine, penalty, medication, plexor, forensic pathology, Isordil, urology, music, imaging, tolerate, tomography, general, epidemic, teras, nephrology, haematinic, uranalysis, virology, counterirritant, nosology, physostigmine, haematology, acute, anticholinesterase, antispasmodic agent, psychiatry, contraindication, expectorant, self-limited, diaphoretic, therapeutics, vermicide, dispense, inhalation, heal, HAART, anticoagulant medication, immunize, psychopathology, antispasmodic, antidiuretic, statin, infusion, tropical medicine, epidemiology, bactericide, cure, zymosis, antidiuretic drug, purgative, unction, antiarrhythmic drug, diagnose, neuropsychiatry, truss, local, Plavix, immunity, emergency procedure, phlebotomise, antiemetic, dress, anti-inflammatory drug, medicine ball, calcium blocker, hematology, germ theory, vaccinate, tonic, anticholinergic, gauze bandage, over-the-counter, vicarious, highly active antiretroviral therapy, therapy, indication, insufflation, obstetrics, infuse, hygiene, psychotic, Zovirax, percussor, prescription drug, immune carrier, bleed, otolaryngology, preventive medicine, anthelminthic, digitalize, antiarrhythmic, bacteriology, antiviral agent, decongestant, carminative, veterinary medicine, gynecology, succedaneum, antidepressant, slough off, pharmaceutics, accident surgery, clinical neurology, traumatology, Isuprel, scatology, Mecholyl, eviscerate, antiemetic drug, paediatrics, aperient, nuclear medicine, curvature, medicinal, sucralfate, tocology, inhalant, palpate, suppository, neurotropic, pediatrics, lipid-lowering medication, radiation, clofibrate, catatonic, febrifuge, feel, regimen, monster, potentiation, positive, noninvasive, pentylenetetrazol, clinician, pentamethylenetetrazol, Atromid-S, urogenital medicine, drug, antihypertensive drug, quack, urinalysis, analgesic, disfunction, remedy, antitussive, learned profession, helminthic, disulfiram, antiviral, spasmolytic, antiepileptic, dysfunction, penicillamine, downer, anticholinergic drug, medicament, ointment, vermifuge, reserve, anticoagulant, probenecid, rhinolaryngology, anti-inflammatory, specific, rubefacient, Inocor, resect, hematinic, powder, inject, oncology, amputate, isoproterenol, antiprotozoal, nurse, gerontology, rejection, camphorated tincture of opium, localised, treat, endocrinology, disconfirming, poultice, actinotherapy, medicate, gastroenterology, otorhinolaryngology, antihistamine, antiviral drug, aerospace medicine, venesect, U.S. National Library of Medicine, astringent drug, statin drug, localized, salve, palpable, oxytocic drug, relieve, chronic, Imuran, proctology, angiogenesis inhibitor, explore, Fosamax, azathioprine, calcium-channel blocker, suppuration, topical, symptom, blocker, antipyretic, antidiabetic drug, leech, stubborn, ancylose, soothing syrup, immunosuppressant, inoculate, negative, chelation, antihypertensive, sudatory, nonspecific, radiation therapy, isosorbide, cup, styptic, medical, dosage, Drixoral, iatrogenic, punishment, visualise, Carafate, parenteral, gemfibrozil, soup, antidiarrheal drug, auscultate, immunosuppressor, pharmacological medicine, sign, corroborant, nonprescription, host, Zyloprim, radiotherapy, malignance, fulgurating, invasion, amrinone, irradiation, refractory, midwifery, APC, cold medicine, Antabuse, immunosuppressive drug, operate on, group practice, patent medicine, malignancy, atomic cocktail, odontology, plessor, sedative drug, otology, achromia, antidiabetic, cardiology, pharmaceutic, placebo, bandage, immunosuppressive, festering, license tax, biomedicine, angiology, cytotoxic drug, infection, tyrosine kinase inhibitor, operate, rheumatology, histamine blocker, vet, sudorific, visualize, Lopid, dentistry, neurology, venipuncture, painkiller, shoot, allergology, administer, curative, methacholine



Copyright © 2021 Diccionario ingles.com