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Ne   /ni/  /nˌɔrθˈist/  /ˈɛnˈi/  /neɪ/   Listen
Ne

noun
1.
A colorless odorless gaseous element that give a red glow in a vacuum tube; one of the six inert gasses; occurs in the air in small amounts.  Synonyms: atomic number 10, neon.
2.
The compass point midway between north and east; at 45 degrees.  Synonyms: nor'-east, northeast, northeastward.
3.
A midwestern state on the Great Plains.  Synonyms: Cornhusker State, Nebraska.



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"Ne" Quotes from Famous Books



... until she scorns the world; For Beranger I hate thee, and Raffet, For all the songs and all the pasquinades, And for the halo of Saint Helena. I hate thee, hate thee. I shall not be happy Until thy clumsy triangle of cloth, Despoiled of its traditions, is again What it should ne'er have ceased to be in France— The headgear of a village constable. I hate—but suddenly—how strange!—the present Sometimes with impish glee will ape the past!— Seeing thy well-known shape before me thus ...
— L'Aiglon • Edmond Rostand

... March, again at the Grange, he met the Italian minister Azeglio, and when this statesman disparaged Mazzini—a thing only permitted by Carlyle to himself—he retorted with the remark, "Monsieur, vous ne le connaissez pas du tout, du tout." At Chelsea, on his return, the fowl tragic-comedy reached a crisis, "the unprotected male" declaring that he would shoot them or poison them. "A man is not a Chatham nor a Wallenstein; but a man has work too, which ...
— Thomas Carlyle - Biography • John Nichol

... Viscountess Dowager wrote, "je scay que vous vous etes bravement batew et grievement blessay—du coste de feu M. le Vicomte. M. le Compte de Varique ne se playt qua parlay de vous: M. de Moon aucy. Il di que vous avay voulew vous bastre avecque luy—que vous estes plus fort que luy fur l'ayscrimme—quil'y a surtout certaine Botte que vous scavay quil n'a jammay sceu pariay: et que c'en eut ete fay de luy si vouseluy ...
— The History of Henry Esmond, Esq. • W. M. Thackeray

... Family that dines the latest Is in our Street esteem'd the greatest; But latest Hours must surely fall Before him who ne'er dines ...
— Fielding - (English Men of Letters Series) • Austin Dobson

... the different aeroplanes by sight, and one little girl, when I ask her for news, gives me a list of the "obus" that have arrived, and which have "s'eclate," and which have not. One can see that she despises those which "ne s'eclatent pas." One says "Bon soir, pas des obus," as in English one says, ...
— My War Experiences in Two Continents • Sarah Macnaughtan

... Austria, lying along the NE. coast of the Adriatic, and bounded on the land side by Croatia, Bosnia, and Herzegovina; half the land is pasture, only one-ninth of it arable, which yields cereals, wine, ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... the fury of the waves Knows also how to check the base one's plots: Submit with reverence to His holy will. Dear Abner, I fear God, and no one else I have to fear. I thank you, ne'ertheless, For the observant zeal with which your eyes Are open to my peril. Secretly, I see injustice galls you,—that you have Within you still the heart of Israel: Thank God for that! But are you satisfied With this unpractised virtue—secret wrath? Ah! Can that ...
— Athaliah • J. Donkersley

... creature's this with his short hairs, His little band and huge long ears, That this new faith hath founded? The Puritans were never such, The saints themselves had ne'er so much, Oh, such ...
— The Lady of Loyalty House - A Novel • Justin Huntly McCarthy

... speaking about certain national errors, make Mark Twain an author of the highest merit, and far remote from the mere buffoon. Say the "Jumping Frog" is buffoonery; perhaps it is, but Louis Quinze could not have classed the author among the people he did not love, les buffons qui ne me font rire. The man is not to be envied who does not laugh over the ride on "The Genuine Mexican Plug" till he is almost as sore as the equestrian after that adventure. Again, while studying the narrative of how Mark edited an agricultural paper in a country district, a person ...
— Lost Leaders • Andrew Lang

... quoy faire nous allons nous gendarmant par ces efforts de la science? Regardons a terre, les pauvres gens que nous y voyons espandus, la teste panchante apres leur besongne: qui ne scavent ny Aristote ny Caton, ny exemple ny precepte. De ceux-la, tire Nature tous les iours, des effects de constance et de patience, plus purs et plus roides, que ne sont ceux que nous estudions si curieusement ...
— Pot-Boilers • Clive Bell

... substitute for the bear. It will be observed that the account of the dragon in the Siward story suggested the further development of the story in the Hrlfssaga. Olrik says: "I n henseende bar Sivard den digres kamp dog noget eget. De almindelige norrne dragekampe lige fra Sigurds drab p Fvne har stadig til ml at vinde dragens guld. For Sivard digre eksisterer dette motiv ikke; han vil frelse de hjemsgte mennesker. Af alle de islandske dragekampe har kun Bjrn Hitdlekmpes noget ...
— The Relation of the Hrolfs Saga Kraka and the Bjarkarimur to Beowulf • Oscar Ludvig Olson

... acting Chapman's Conspiracy and Tragedy of Charles, Duke of Byron. The French Ambassador took umbrage at the uncomplimentary representation of the contemporary French Court, and had an order made forbidding them to act the play. But the Children, "voyant toute la Cour dehors, ne laisserent de la faire, et non seulement cela, mais y introduiserent la Reine et Madame de Verneuil, traitant celle-ci fort mal de paroles, et lui donnant un soufflet." Whereupon the French Ambassador made special complaint to Salisbury, who ordered the arrest of the author and the actors. ...
— Shakespearean Playhouses - A History of English Theatres from the Beginnings to the Restoration • Joseph Quincy Adams

... red as a radish shkin, Ne'er finds the time to molder; Shee how it shleeps its sheath within! I put it on my shoulder. While curs and bitches yelp at me, I roam, Like a ...
— The Little Clay Cart - Mrcchakatika • (Attributed To) King Shudraka

... had married a Honeycutt in a time of peace, and, when the war opened again, was regarded as a deserter, and had been forced to move over the spur to the Honeycutt side. The girl's father, Steve Hawn, a ne'erdo-well and the son of a ne'er-do-well, had for his inheritance wild lands, steep, supposedly worthless, and near the head of the Honeycutt cove. Little Jason's father, when he quarrelled with his kin, could afford to buy only cheap land on the Honeycutt side, and thus the homes ...
— The Heart Of The Hills • John Fox, Jr.

... and melted by the wash of the ocean, and comparatively of greatly diminished size. It was now absolutely necessary to lose most of the hours of darkness it being much too dangerous to run in the night. The great barrier of ice was known to be close at hand; and Cook's "Ne Plus Ultra," at that time the great boundary of antarctic navigation, was near the parallel of latitude to which the schooner had reached. The weather, however, continued very favourable, and after the blow from the north-east, ...
— The Sea Lions - The Lost Sealers • James Fenimore Cooper

... you," was Dan's comment. "You're middlin' decent, you two. So's Avice; and so's old Christopher's Regina. I know of ne'er another, without it 's t' cat—and she scratches like t' rest when she's put out. There is other decent 'uns, happen. They ...
— Our Little Lady - Six Hundred Years Ago • Emily Sarah Holt

... "Nous ne sommes pas heureux a Mulhouse" were almost the first words addressed to me by that veteran patriot and true ...
— In the Heart of the Vosges - And Other Sketches by a "Devious Traveller" • Matilda Betham-Edwards

... the truth he is a sort of ne'er-do-well," the merchant laughed. "I grant that he has not had much chance. His father died when he was a child, and his mother soon married again. There is no doubt that he was badly treated at home, and when he ...
— Saint Bartholomew's Eve - A Tale of the Huguenot WarS • G. A. Henty

... of sorrow ne'er beguiles; It smiles in bitterness: but still it smiles, And sometimes with the wisest and the best. Till even the scaffold echoes with ...
— My Schools and Schoolmasters - or The Story of my Education. • Hugh Miller

... Holmes boy was fatally shot by a rattleheaded searcher near Five-Mile Pond, and distraught parents began to take thought of their own lads missing from school. Adam MacQuarry broke his leg near the Hell Hollow schoolhouse and was sent back by friends on a borrowed bobsled. Several ne'er-do-wells, long on impulse and short on stickability, drifted back to more comfortable quarters during the day, contending that if Hap were captured, the officers would claim the reward anyhow—so what was ...
— O. Henry Memorial Award Prize Stories of 1920 • Various

... and lo! my sonne Came riding downe with might and main: He raised a shout as he drew on, Till all the welkin rang again, 'Elizabeth! Elizabeth!' (A sweeter woman ne'er drew breath Than ...
— Lives of Girls Who Became Famous • Sarah Knowles Bolton

... mind all gravity Is a grave subjection; Sweeter far than honey are Jokes and free affection. All that Venus bids me do, Do I with erection, For she ne'er in heart of man Dwelt with ...
— Wine, Women, and Song - Mediaeval Latin Students' songs; Now first translated into English verse • Various

... my name Shall ne'er in STORY be forgot, But still the more increase in fame, The more the ...
— 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue • Captain Grose et al.

... commend, extol their graces, Though ne'er so black, say they have angels' faces, That man who hath a tongue I say is no man, If with that tongue he cannot win a woman. —Two Gentlemen ...
— The Spy • James Fenimore Cooper

... immortal thought, That kicks at earth with a disdainful heel, And beats at heaven gates with her bright hoofs; They would not then, with such distorted faces, And desperate censures, stab at Poesy. They would admire bright knowledge, and their minds Should ne'er descend on so unworthy objects As gold, or titles; they would dread far more To be thought ignorant, than be known poor. The time was once, when wit drown'd wealth; but now, Your only barbarism is t'have wit, and want. No matter now in virtue who excels, ...
— The Poetaster - Or, His Arraignment • Ben Jonson

... Perkunas. He thunders across the iron bridges of the skies in his chariot; and hurls his thunderbolts at the demons, like Thor. He also possesses a musical instrument, of which the demons stand in great terror. He has a ne'er-do-weel son, who has dealings with the Devil, and a mischievous little daughter, ...
— The Hero of Esthonia and Other Studies in the Romantic Literature of That Country • William Forsell Kirby

... with Cyprian bark. The merchant, timorous of Afric's breeze, When fiercely struggling with Icarian seas Praises the restful quiet of his home, Nor wishes from the peaceful fields to roam; Ah, speedily his shattered ships he mends,— To poverty his lesson ne'er extends. ...
— Echoes from the Sabine Farm • Roswell Martin Field and Eugene Field

... se baigner. Il s'appelle Moka. Je joue a la cache avec lui. Quand je lui met un morceae du pain sur son nez, je compte un, deux, trois, alors il le jette en l'air et le rattrape quand il redescend. II y a tant de choses qu'il fait que je ne puis pas ...
— Harper's Young People, August 17, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... sovereign": exactly conformable to the declaration of the French clubs and legislators:—"La souverainete est une, indivisible, inalienable, et imprescriptible; elle appartient a la nation; aucune section du peuple ni aucun individu ne peut s'en attribuer l'exercise." This confounds, in a manner equally mischievous and stupid, the origin of a government from the people with its continuance in their hands. I believe that no such doctrine has ever been heard of in any public act of any ...
— The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. V. (of 12) • Edmund Burke

... at me curiously, perceiving that in mode of speech I was somewhat different from the low tramp I looked. But youth is often impatient and hard; my appearance consorted so little with my tongue that he had much excuse for regarding me as a ne'er-do-well, the less deserving of pity because he probably owed ...
— Humphrey Bold - A Story of the Times of Benbow • Herbert Strang

... Niagara—Ne-aw-gaw-rah, thou thundering water! thy glories are departing; the abominable Railway Times has driven along thy borders; and, if I should live to see thee again ten years hence, verily I should not be astounded ...
— Canada and the Canadians - Volume I • Sir Richard Henry Bonnycastle

... in language are, upon examination, found to be in reality compounds, disguised by contraction. A few instances are, non, Lat. ne-un-(us); dont, Fr. de-unde; such, Eng. so-like; which, who-like. In like manner I believe till, to-while, and until, unto-while. Now while is properly a substantive, and signifies time, corresponding to dum, Lat., in ...
— Notes and Queries, No. 209, October 29 1853 • Various

... Ne is there hawk which mantleth on her perch, Whether high tow'ring or accousting low, But I the measure of her flight doe search, And all her prey and all ...
— Bracebridge Hall, or The Humorists • Washington Irving

... I never had been born, And ne'er the light had seen! Dear God—to look on yonder gates ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 62, Number 385. November, 1847. • Various

... thou whose love Ne'er changes nor forsakes, Thou proof, how perfect God hath stamp'd The meanest thing He makes; Thou, whom no snare entraps to serve, No art is used to tame (Train'd, like ourselves, thy path to know, By words of love and ...
— Heads and Tales • Various

... her people said that the forbears of Katherine Muckevay had seen better days; that the ancient royal blood of Ireland ran in her veins; that the family name was really Mach-ne-veagh; and that, if every one had his own, Kitty would be wearing a diamond tiara in the highest walks of London importance. In ancient days, the Kings of Ulster used to steal a bride at times from the fair-haired folk across the sea; maybe that was where Kitty got her shining hair of dusty ...
— The Preacher of Cedar Mountain - A Tale of the Open Country • Ernest Thompson Seton

... d'amour si tendre Que Dien, sans les punir, a pu leur pardonner: Il n'avait pas voulu que l'une put donner Ce que l'autre ne pouvait prendre." ...
— Anomalies and Curiosities of Medicine • George M. Gould

... me not—I ne'er will leave thee, Ne'er loose this hand in bower or hall; This heart, this heart shall ne'er deceive thee, This voice shall answer ever to ...
— Chanticleer - A Thanksgiving Story of the Peabody Family • Cornelius Mathews

... debauchee, a saint, and a peasant. He had recently come to Ireland, he said, and wished to see me on a matter of importance: indeed, the only matter of importance for him and for me. His voice brought up before me our student years in Paris, and remembering the magnetic power ne had once possessed over me, a little fear mingled with much annoyance at this irrelevant intrusion, as I led the way up the wide staircase, where Swift had passed joking and railing, and Curran telling stories and quoting Greek, in ...
— Rosa Alchemica • W. B. Yeats

... a Marseille, etait de me baigner presque tous les soirs dans la mer. J'avais trouve un petit endroit fort agreable, sur une langue de terre placee a droite hors du port, ou, en m'asseyant sur le sable, le dos appuye contre un petit rocher qui empechait qu'on ne put me voir du cote de la terre, je n'avais plus devant moi que le ciel et la mer. Entre ces deux immensites qu'embellissaient les rayons d'un soleil couchant, je passai en revant des heures delicieuses; et la, je serais devenu poete, si ...
— Life of Lord Byron, Vol. II - With His Letters and Journals • Thomas Moore

... curious?" he exclaimed; and I was obliged to tell him that I was at the bottom of the mystery. I had had it on my conscience to assure her that she really ought to know of what her husband was capable. "Of what I am capable? Elle ne s'en dottie que trop!" said Ambient, with a laugh; but he took my meddling very good-naturedly, and contented himself with adding that he was very much afraid she would burn up the sheets, with his emendations, of which he had no duplicate. The doctor paid a long visit in the nursery, and before ...
— The Author of Beltraffio • Henry James

... handselled with the stars the teeth, like grains of pearl, That on the laughing face of wine now dance, now stirless lie. So in the niche of their delight I gave me up to joys, The veriest sinner would repent if he their like might try. The morning-glories of his face be pledge I'll ne'er, in him, Forget the writ that biddeth us ...
— The Book Of The Thousand Nights And One Night, Volume III • Anonymous

... lodgings, Sir J. Minnes being now gone wholly to his owne, and now, they being empty, they doubt Sir T. Harvy or Lord Bruncker may look after the lodgings. I did give them the best advice, poor people, that I could, and would do them any kindnesse, though it is strange that now they should have ne'er a friend of Sir W. Batten or Sir W. Pen to trust to but me, that they have disobliged. So home to bed, and all night still mightily troubled in my sleepe, with ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... been able to send a letter I had written to you, and carried on board the Admiral this morning; mais tu sais bien qu'il ne se met guere en peine d'ecrire lui-meme, and he is so full of mystery at this time that he seems unwilling any letter should be sent but those he writes to Government. It shall go some ...
— Memoirs and Correspondence of Admiral Lord de Saumarez, Vol. I • Sir John Ross

... -ei(e), -oi(e), -ai(e). The name Dobree is a Guernsey spelling of d'Aubray, Lat. arboretum, which was dissimilated (Chapter III) into arboretum. Darblay, the name of Fanny Burney's husband, is a variant. From au(l)ne, alder, we have aunai, whence our Dawnay. So also frenai has given Freeney, chenai, Chaney, and the Norm. quenai is one origin of Kenney, while the older chesnai appears in Chesney. Houssaie, from ...
— The Romance of Names • Ernest Weekley

... address Sir George asked him why he had done so, saying that the story was first published by Voltaire, who had heard it from Newton's niece, Mrs. Conduitt. Poincare looked blank and said, "Newton, et la niece de Newton, et Voltaire,—non! je ne vous comprends pas!" He had thought Sir George meant Professor Volterra of Rome, whose name in French is Voltaire, and who could not possibly have known a niece of Newton without bridging ...
— A Budget of Paradoxes, Volume I (of II) • Augustus De Morgan

... was fearful; a mightier foe Had ne'er swung his battle-axe o'er him; But hope nerved his arm for a desperate blow. And Tecumseh fell prostrate before him. He fought in defending his kindred and With a spirit most loving and loyal, And long shall the Indian, warrior sing The deeds of ...
— Neville Trueman the Pioneer Preacher • William Henry Withrow

... silence—awful silence broods Profoundly o'er these solitudes; Nought but the lapsing of the floods Breaks the deep stillness of the woods; A sense of desolation reigns O'er these unpeopled forest plains. Where sounds of life ne'er wake a tone Of cheerful praise round Nature's throne, Man ...
— Roughing it in the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... destroyed! Thus, by Gleb's longing for criminal gains, Eight thousand souls were left rotting in chains, 71 Aye, and their sons and their grandsons as well, Think, what a crowd were thrown back into Hell! God forgives all. Yes, but Judas's crime Ne'er will be pardoned till end of all time. Peasant, most infamous sinner of all, Endlessly grieve to atone ...
— Who Can Be Happy And Free In Russia? • Nicholas Nekrassov

... de la nature vivante, est en general toujours constant, toujours le meme; son mouvement, toujours regulier, roule sur deux points inebranlables: l'un, la fecondite sans bornes donnee a toutes les especes; l'autre, les obstacles sans nombre qui reduisent cette fecondite a une mesure determinee et ne laissent en tout temps qu'a peu pres la meme quantite d'individus de chaque espece"... "Les especes les moins parfaites, les plus delicates, les plus pesantes, les moins agissantes, les moins armees, etc., ont deja ...
— Darwin and Modern Science • A.C. Seward and Others

... PUD IN is almi de si re, Mimis tres Ine ver require, Alo veri find it a gestis, His miseri ne ...
— The Jest Book - The Choicest Anecdotes and Sayings • Mark Lemon

... have translated as openly or openlier in English as in Latin, let wise men deem, that know well both languages, and know well the sentence of holy scripture. And whether I have done thus, or nay, ne doubt, they that con well the sentence of holy writ and English together, and will travail, with God's grace, thereabout, may make the bible as true and as open, yea, and openlier in English than it is in Latin. And no ...
— Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse • Various

... Rosalie. The younger man was much affected; he groaned aloud and covered his face with his hands. Not so the old general. 'Tenez,' said he, wiping the barrel of his weapon on his glove, 'c'est dommage! je ne contais pas la-dessus; mais, que voulez-vous? Peste! ce n'est qu'un Anglais ...
— Kate Coventry - An Autobiography • G. J. Whyte-Melville

... eyes her ample page, Rich with the spoils of time, did ne'er unroll; 50 Chill Penury repress'd their noble rage, And froze the genial current of ...
— Select Poems of Thomas Gray • Thomas Gray

... of men, women and children Inhabitinge in the severall Counties w^{th}in the Collony of Virginia. Anno D^{ne}, 1634. ...
— Colonial Records of Virginia • Various

... volunteers for the Western Front. The port contributed a goodly number, but there remained one berth vacant. The long-suffering Consul had a stroke of inspiration. Here was a means of at once swelling the man-power of his country and ridding himself of a pestilent ne'er-do-well. His boys, searching far and wide, discovered John Fanshawe in the back premises of a Malay go-down, oblivious to all things, and ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 156, April 16, 1919 • Various

... at length started him up again from the jaws of an obscene and broken catacomb. I gained on him at every step; heard the quick panting of his breath; stretched out my left to grasp him, while my right held unsheathed and ready the good stiletto that ne'er failed me. And now—now—by the great Jove! his tunic's hem was fluttering in my clutch, when my feet tripped over a prostrate column, that I was hurled five paces at the least in advance of the fugitive; and when I rose ...
— The Roman Traitor (Vol. 1 of 2) • Henry William Herbert

... Beatrice! why is not thy succour lent To him, who so much lov'd thee, as to leave For thy sake all the multitude admires? Dost thou not hear how pitiful his wail, Nor mark the death, which in the torrent flood, Swoln mightier than a sea, him struggling holds?" Ne'er among men did any with such speed Haste to their profit, flee from their annoy, As when these words were spoken, I came here, Down from my blessed seat, trusting the force Of thy pure eloquence, which thee, and all Who well have mark'd it, into honour brings." "When she had ended, her ...
— The Divine Comedy • Dante

... in a theatre, on a race-course, nor in church. This last is not, perhaps, a needless caution. In the Belgian churches you see a placard announcing: "Ici on ne mache pas du tabac.' ...
— Frost's Laws and By-Laws of American Society • Sarah Annie Frost

... came so long a train Of people, that I ne'er would have believed That ever Death so ...
— Divine Comedy, Longfellow's Translation, Hell • Dante Alighieri

... corio notissimum, post obitum, ne quid asini unquam {42} conquiescat, foraminibus delacerari, indeque factis cribris, assiduae inservire agitationi; unde dicebat Apuleius: cedentes hinc inde miserum corium, nec cribris jam idoneum relinquunt. Sed et Albertus pollicetur asinorum corium non solum utile esse ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 33, June 15, 1850 • Various

... year out from home she was, and ne'er a week in port, And nothing save the guns aboard her bright; But Captain Keats he knew the game, and swore to share the sport, For he never yet came ...
— Poems: New and Old • Henry Newbolt

... memory, I take the liberty of reminding you that on this the 28th day of April you have to appear at the Law Courts, as juryman, and, in consequence, can on no account accompany us and Kolosoff to the picture gallery, as, with your habitual flightiness, you promised yesterday; a moins que vous ne soyez dispose a payer la cour d'assise les 300 roubles d'amende que vous vous refusez pour votre cheval, for not appearing in time. I remembered it last night after you were ...
— Resurrection • Count Leo Tolstoy

... did come,—did he not?" Linda merely nodded her head. "Yes; I knew that he came when your aunt was at church, and Tetchen was out, and Herr Steinmarc was out. Is it not a pity that he should be such a ne'er-do-well?" ...
— Linda Tressel • Anthony Trollope

... loved well and faithfully, Yet knew not what we lov'd, nor why; Difference of sex no more we knew Than our guardian angels do; Coming and going, we Perchance might kiss, but not between those meals; Our hands ne'er touch'd the seals, Which nature, injur'd by late law, sets free: These miracles we did; but now, alas! All measure, and all language I should pass, Should I tell what a ...
— The Art of Letters • Robert Lynd

... with all his attention to agriculture, finds time both for the Classicks and his friends, assures me they are a distinct species, and that, when any of their calves have horns, a mixture of breed can be traced. In confirmation of his opinion, he pointed out to me the following passage in Tacitus, Ne armentis quidem suus honor, aut gloria frontis (De mor. Germ. Section 5) which he ...
— The Journal of a Tour to the Hebrides with Samuel Johnson, LL.D. • James Boswell

... "Nous ne decrivons jamais mieux la nature que lorsque nous nous efforcons d'exprimer sobrement et simplement l'impression que nous en avons recue."—M. ANDRE THEURIET, "L'Automne dans les Bois," Revue des Deux Mondes, 1st Oct. 1874, ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. XXII (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... now the meaning of the saying, dear to the French soldier, "de ne pas s'en faire," and in the lull of battle before the bombardment, Sergeant Strachan and Cleek Smith talked of old times. There had been nine Strachans in the regiment when we landed in France two and a half years ago, one of whom was then my orderly. "Any news this morning?" I would sometimes ...
— With a Highland Regiment in Mesopotamia - 1916—1917 • Anonymous

... gatraeth gan dyd Ne llewes ef vedgwyn veinoethyd Bu truan gyuatcan gyvluyd E neges ef or drachwres drenghidyd Ny chryssiws gatraeth Mawr mor ehelaeth E aruaeth uch arwyt Ny bu mor gyffor O eidyn ysgor A esgarei oswyd Tutuwlch hir ech e dir ae dreuyd Ef lladei Saesson seithuet dyd Perheit y wrhyt ...
— Y Gododin - A Poem on the Battle of Cattraeth • Aneurin

... a wild look in his eye sometimes; But sure he would not sit so much in the dark, If he were mad, or anything on his conscience; And though he does not say much, when he speaks A civiller man ne'er ...
— The Poetical Works of George MacDonald in Two Volumes, Volume I • George MacDonald

... Equitum Melitensium in Italicam linguam translata, Receptariumque Novum pro Aromatariis, aliaque opera tum Latina, tum Italica, saneque utilia et necessaria, imprimi facere intendat, dubitetque ne hujusmodi opera postmodum ab aliis sine ejus licentia et in ejus grave praejudicium imprimantur; nos propterea, illius indemnitati consulere volentes, motu simili et ex certa scientia, eidem Philippo ...
— Lives of the Most Eminent Painters Sculptors and Architects - Volume 1, Cimabue to Agnolo Gaddi • Giorgio Vasari

... spem Turcice scriptarum in tua prudentia reponimus, ita prouidere debes, vt non eueniant huiusmodi mala. Quocirca deinceps cum mandatum aut scriptum aliquod accipias, verbum ad verbum conuertatur in Latinum sermonem, ne damnum insequatur. Nosti multos habere nos inimicos conatibus nostris inuidentes, quorum malitiae vestrae est prudentiae aduersari. Hi nostri, Secretarius et minimus interpres ex nostra parte dicent ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of - The English Nation, Vol. 11 • Richard Hakluyt

... the German shells breaking around us and the wounded men being carried past us; the luncheon in the citadel with the commandant and officers in a subterranean room where the motto on the wall, above the world-renowned escutcheon of Verdun, was "On ne passe pas"—"They don't get by"; the dinner with the general and staff of the Verdun army, in a little village "somewhere in France," and their last words to me, "On les aura! Ca peut etre long, mais on les aura!"—"It may take long, but we shall get them!"—all these and a thousand more things ...
— Fighting For Peace • Henry Van Dyke

... But as he recovered, he became aware that with fatigue and dirt his appearance must be disreputable in the extreme. How was he to approach Lady Joan in such a plight? If she recognized him at once, he would but be the more ashamed! What could she take him for but a ne'er-do-weel, whose character had given way the moment he left the guardianship of home, and who now came to sponge upon her! And if he should be ill! He would rather lie down and die on the roadside than present himself dirty and ill at Cairncarque!—rather go to the workhouse, than encounter ...
— Warlock o' Glenwarlock • George MacDonald

... MCKINNEL, among whom I propose to count myself whenever, as so rarely happens, he takes an evening off from his tyrannical methods—seldom very edifying when a woman is the victim. As the gentleman says in one of OSCAR WENDELL HOLMES'S books, "Quoiqu'elle soit tres solidement montee, it ne faut pas brutaliser la machine." Here it is true that Mr. MCKINNEL started out on his familiar courses, but he soon found that he had to do with his match; that Helen's hand was always a little higher than his own. And, even when we saw him ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, February 25, 1914 • Various

... Mettez maintenant l'ame et le corps a la place de ces deux pendules; leur accord peut arriver par l'une de ces trois manieres. La voye d'influence est celle de la philosophie vulgaire; mais comme l'on ne sauroit concevoir des particules materielles qui puissent passer d'une de ces substances dans l'autre, il faut abandonner ce sentiment. La voye de l'assistance continuelle du Createur est celle du systeme des causes occasionnelles; mais je tiens que c'est faire ...
— Short Studies on Great Subjects • James Anthony Froude

... fighting following such a ruse at Landrecies that the Honorable Archer-Windsor-Clive, of the Coldstream Guards, met his death. "Another time," an artillery officer relates, "they ran into one of our regiments with some of their officers dressed in French uniforms. They said 'Ne tirez-pas, nous sommes Francais,' and asked for the C.O. He came up, and then they calmly blew his brains out!" A similar act of treachery is recorded by Lieutenant Oswald Anne, R.A., in a letter published in the Leeds Mercury: "At one place where the Berkshire Regiment was on guard a German ...
— Tommy Atkins at War - As Told in His Own Letters • James Alexander Kilpatrick

... these Enjoyments would I spend, But chuse at Night my Bottle and my Friend, Took prudent care that neither were abus'd, But with due Moderation both I us'd. And in one sober Pint found more delight, Then the insatiate Sot that swills all Night; Ne'er drown my Senses, or my Soul debase. Or drink beyond the relish of my blass For in Excess good Heav'ns design is Crost, In all Extreams the true Enjoyments lost, Wine chears the Heart, and elevates the Soul, But if we surfeit with too large a Bowl, Wanting ...
— The Pleasures of a Single Life, or, The Miseries Of Matrimony • Anonymous

... danced the royal children, and even the King himself condescended to dip his royal hands in the flames, while Archie Armstrong the jester cried out: "Now fair and softly, brother Jamie, fair and softly, man. There's ne'er a plum in all that plucking so worth the burning as there was in Signor Guy Fawkes' snapdragon when ye proved not to be his lucky raisin." For King's jesters were privileged characters in the old days, and ...
— The Children's Book of Christmas Stories • Various

... sea, Whose icy currents and compulsive course Ne'er feels returning ebb, but keeps due on To ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol 3 No 3, March 1863 - Devoted To Literature And National Policy • Various

... importance of the maxim: Business is business. The history of most civil undertakings comprises, not one Trafalgar, but many; and in journalism especially the signal Business is business—commercial equivalent of England expects—must always be flying at the mast-head. On ne badine pas avec l'amour— much less with a newspaper. Consider the effects of any lapse from the spirit of that signal in a profession where time is observed more strictly than in pugilism, where whatever one does one does in the white light of self-appointed publicity, where a single error ...
— Journalism for Women - A Practical Guide • E.A. Bennett

... for causing my tears to well * When came my beloved to bid farewell: They ne'er tasted the bitters of parting nor felt * Fire beneath my ribs that flames fierce and fell! None but baffled lover knows aught of Love, * Whose heart is lost where he ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 9 • Richard F. Burton

... house where the farmer was sick, almost dying, with three little kids and a frail little woman trying to keep things up. He worked like ten men for more than a month on that farm, and when he went away he wouldn't take a cent. That's the sort of ne'er-do-well ...
— Thomas Jefferson Brown • James Oliver Curwood

... maken mencioun, That of an old wyf gat his youthe agoon, And gat himselfe a shirte as bright as fyre Wherein to jape, yet gat not his desire In any countrie ne condicioun." ...
— Jurgen - A Comedy of Justice • James Branch Cabell

... along the ridge there fed The sheep that ne'er a shepherd know Save the shrill wind of morn, Five "Oves Ammon" of the snow; I saw the big ram lift his head, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 146, February 11, 1914 • Various

... currile, noctis equi! The stars move still, time runs, the clock will strike. O soul, be changed into little water-drops, And fall into the ocean, ne'er ...
— Brief History of English and American Literature • Henry A. Beers

... charm of living light Flows with resistless force, Dispelling clouds of mental night That meet its onward course, When all the soul is centred in The great and primal thought That services which hearts would win, With price can ne'er be bought. Such service heaven alone repays E'en though on earth 'tis done, Its echoes last through endless days, And dies but with the sun. A mercenary soul must find A more congenial field Than that of training human mind Wherein a soul's concealed, If it would ...
— Our Profession and Other Poems • Jared Barhite

... Miss, surely. There's ne'er another boat in the bay but herself with the bit of an old flour sack sewed on along the leach of the sail. It was only last ...
— Priscilla's Spies 1912 • George A. Birmingham

... pure service, Love, be thine, Who clothest all with rights divine, Whose great Soul burns, though ne'er so dim, In all that ...
— Voices for the Speechless • Abraham Firth

... heaven nor hell, I should be honest: I have long serv'd virtue, And ne'er ta'en wages ...
— The Duchess of Malfi • John Webster

... does burn and sweat! This does the lion-star, Ambition's rage; This Avarice, the dog-star's thirst assuage; Everywhere else their fatal power we see, They make and rule man's wretched destiny; They neither set nor disappear, But tyrannise o'er all the year; Whilst we ne'er feel their flame or influence here. The birds that dance from bough to bough, And sing above in every tree, Are not from fears and cares more free, Than we who lie, or sit, or walk below, And should by right be singers too. What prince's choir of music can excel That ...
— Cowley's Essays • Abraham Cowley

... fled with Francesco on account of the war, he painted, young as he was, a very beautiful Annunciation on a little panel for S. Francesco, a seat of the Frati de' Zoccoli; and he painted another for S. Maria ne' Borghi. For the Conventual Friars of S. Francis at Parma he executed the panel-picture of their high-altar, containing Joachim being driven from the Temple, with many figures. And for S. Alessandro, a convent of nuns in that city, he painted a panel with the Madonna ...
— Lives of the Most Eminent Painters Sculptors and Architects - Vol. 05 ( of 10) Andrea da Fiesole to Lorenzo Lotto • Giorgio Vasari

... into three separate kingdoms, as Dr. Smith relates: "Sigebert became King of Austrasia (in the Prankish tongue, Oster-rike), or the kingdom of the Eastern Franks; Chilperic was recognised as King Neustria (Ne-oster- rike), the land of the Western Franks. The limits of the two kingdoms are somewhat uncertain; but the river Meuse and the Forest of Ardennes may be taken generally as the line of demarcation. Austrasia extended from the Meuse to the Rhine; Neustria extended ...
— Bolougne-Sur-Mer - St. Patrick's Native Town • Reverend William Canon Fleming

... young Canadian. He was a "remittance man," the first one I had ever seen or heard of. Passengers explained the term to me. They said that dissipated ne'er-do-wells belonging to important families in England and Canada were not cast off by their people while there was any hope of reforming them, but when that last hope perished at last, the ne'er-do-well was sent abroad to get him out ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... good and wise Care not where their dust reposes. That to him who sleeping lies Desert rocks shall seem as roses. I've been happy above ground, I could ne'er be happy under, Out of Teviot's gentle sound. Part us, then, not ...
— Olivia in India • O. Douglas

... The Bird may rove, and still regain With spotless wings, her wonted rest, But home, once lost, is ne'er again Restored to ...
— Falkland, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... tout se fait par forme a la cour, suivant un protocole de medecin, en sorte que c'est un miracle d'elever un prince et une princesse. La nourrice n'a d'autres fonctions que de donner a teter a l'enfant quand on le lui apporte; elle ne peut pas lui toucher. Il y a des remueuses et femmes preposees pour cela, mais qui n'ont point d'ordre a recevoir de la nourrice. Il y a des heures pour remuer l'enfant, trois ou quatre fois dans la journee. Si l'enfant dort, on le reveille ...
— The Origins of Contemporary France, Volume 1 (of 6) - The Ancient Regime • Hippolyte A. Taine

... lent it will be entirely lost, both the merit and the patience [291]—considering their necessity and not their ingratitude, as a thing ordained by God. Propter miseriam asume pauperem, et propter inopiam eius ne dimitas eum vacuum; et caetera ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume 40 of 55 • Francisco Colin

... of Court etiquette and filial duty, she could never penetrate to Victoria. She was unable to conceal her disappointment and her rage. "Il n'y a plus d'avenir pour moi," she exclaimed to Madame de Lieven; "je ne suis plus rien." For eighteen years, she said, this child had been the sole object of her existence, of her thoughts, her hopes, and now—no! she would not be comforted, she had lost everything, she was to the last degree unhappy. Sailing, ...
— Queen Victoria • Lytton Strachey

... M. Hart est tres curieux, tres utile et fort interessant. Il ne me reste plus qu'a souhaiter que l'auteur nous donne maintenant une traduction d'un autre ouvrage, tres precieux, qu'il a publie recemment sous ce titre: The Violin and its Music (Londres, Dulau, 1881, in 4o). Il nous aura rendu alors un double et ...
— The Violin - Its Famous Makers and Their Imitators • George Hart

... her maidens came the bride, And as his loosened rein fell slack He muttered, "In their throats they lied Who said that I should ne'er win back To kiss her ...
— Gloucester Moors and Other Poems • William Vaughn Moody

... the happy day we reach When promisers are ne'er deceivers; When parsons practice what they preach, And seeming saints are all believers, Then the old maxim you may vary, And ...
— A Handbook for Latin Clubs • Various

... his Preface, 'Les tableaux riants sont rares dans ce livre; cela tient a ce qu'ils ne sont pas frequents dans l'histoire,' but in truth the tinge of gloom which lies upon the Legende is rather the impress upon the volume of history of the poet's own puissant individuality. He was no scientist and no savant, he had ...
— La Legende des Siecles • Victor Hugo

... qualities that are summed up in the French term l'esprit. Voltaire declared that the best comedies of Moliere n'ont pas plus de sel que les premieres lettres. "Vos maximes," Pascal assures the Jesuit Fathers, "ont je ne sais quoi de divertissant, qui rejouit toujours le monde," and they lose nothing of that character in his handling of them, so much so that it was clear from the first that the world in general would never ask whether Pascal had been quite fair to his opponents: "N'etes-vous donc pas ridicules, ...
— Miscellaneous Studies: A Series of Essays • Walter Horatio Pater

... disciplined; wherever he was sent, there, without question, he would go. Never against exile, against ill-health, against climate did he make complaint. Nor when he was moved on and down to make way for some ne'er-do-well with influence, with a brother-in-law in the Senate, with a cousin owning a newspaper, with rich relatives who desired him to drink himself to death at the expense of the government rather than at their own, did old man Marshall point to his record as a claim ...
— My Buried Treasure • Richard Harding Davis

... her spirit! Two comely sons, her first and second-born, had after a time despised her teachings, and had grown up almost to manhood only to bring shame and poverty on their home; and had then drifted away beyond her ken to lose themselves in the wandering tribe of ne'er-do-wells in some distant colony. But her daughter had been left to her, the clear-minded thoughtful girl who would not be corrupted by the weakness and vices of a father, nor meet with such temptations as her brothers had been powerless to resist; and in loving this dear girl with the whole ...
— Fan • Henry Harford

... ne exeat—(Latin) "let him not leave"; a legal writ forbidding a person to leave ...
— The Kellys and the O'Kellys • Anthony Trollope

... up the promise true, And ne'er forget will I; And for bonnie Annie Laurie I'd lay ...
— A Daughter of Raasay - A Tale of the '45 • William MacLeod Raine

... the promise he hath given denies, Will find the world most justly him despise; Be cautious then how thou a promise make, But, having made it, ne'er that promise break. ...
— A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume Two • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... Gui Camoys sang, riding deeper into the tattered, yellowing forest. By an odd chance Camoys had lighted on that song made by Thibaut of Champagne, beginning Signor, saciez, ki or ne s'en ira, which denounces all half-hearted servitors of Heaven; and this he sang with a lilt gayer than his matter countenanced. Faintly there now came to Osmund and the Queen the sound of Camoys' singing, and they found it, in the ...
— Chivalry • James Branch Cabell

... after dinner, "to be prettier for milor demain!" and then when she had tucked me up, and was turning out the light in the centre of the room, she looked back. "Mademoiselle is too beautiful like that," she said, as if it slipped from her. "Mon Dieu! il ne ...
— Red Hair • Elinor Glyn

... struggle gallantly. At length the Brigadier for a moment got the uppermost. Still retaining in his left hand the weapon of his enemy, he dealt him with his right a cut from his own sabre, which cleft his skull from his crown to the eyebrows. The Mohammedan once shouted "Ne Ullah!" (O God!) and ...
— Our Soldiers - Gallant Deeds of the British Army during Victoria's Reign • W.H.G. Kingston

... Ne had now reached a state of the utmost satisfaction with himself and the situation. Betty was friendly and charming. He walked with her, and he talked with her by the hour; and always he was being entangled deeper and deeper in the web of her attraction. ...
— The Prodigal Judge • Vaughan Kester

... "and yet I cannot help wishing that Harold—" Here the hound, hearing his name, suddenly rose and looked at Gerard, who smiling, patted him and said, "We were not talking of thee, good sir, but of thy great namesake; but ne'er mind, a live dog they say ...
— Sybil - or the Two Nations • Benjamin Disraeli

... Graemes of the Netherby clan; Forsters, Fenwicks, and Musgraves, they rode and they ran; There was racing and chasing on Cannobie Lea, But the lost bride of Netherby ne'er did they see! ...
— MacMillan's Reading Books - Book V • Anonymous

... woman, and the verbs I had to write as punishments were of the most elaborate and complicated nature— Demander pardon pour Avoir Siffle comme un Gamin quelconque, Vouloir ne plus Oublier de Nettoyer mes Ongles, Essayer de ne pas tant Aimer les Poudings, are but a few examples of her achievements in this particular ...
— The Solitary Summer • Elizabeth von Arnim

... away to the house on the brow, Gaffer-Gray; And knock at the jolly priest's door. 'The priest often preaches Against worldly riches; But ne'er gives a mite to ...
— The Adventures of Hugh Trevor • Thomas Holcroft

... vous me dites que le bill contre les titres ecclesiastiques ne menera a rien, me parait vraisemblable, grace aux moeurs du pays. Mais pourquoi faire des lois pires que les moeurs? C'est le contraire qui devait etre. Je vous avoue que j'ai ete de coeur et d'esprit ...
— The Life of William Ewart Gladstone, Vol. 1 (of 3) - 1809-1859 • John Morley

... ne'er a soul saw his face again. Year after year, old Parkyn, his tenant, took the rent of Tremenhuel out of his right pocket and paid it into his left: and in time, there being no heir, he just took over the property ...
— I Saw Three Ships and Other Winter Tales • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... sails up from the Swan's Bath, Death Gods grip the Dead Man's hand. Look where lies her luckless husband, Bolder sea-king ne'er swung sword! Asmund, keep the kirtle-wearer, For last night the Norns were crying, And Groa thought they told of thee: Yea, told ...
— Eric Brighteyes • H. Rider Haggard

... contained in the recent Papal Decrees against mixed marriages, and in regard to the right of Catholic clergy to claim exclusion from the courts of justice. The Irish Parliament will be debarred from acting on these decrees, and thus the whole agitation against "Ne ...
— Home Rule - Second Edition • Harold Spender

... so much lov'd thee, as to leave For thy sake all the multitude admires? Dost thou not hear how pitiful his wail, Nor mark the death, which in the torrent flood, Swoln mightier than a sea, him struggling holds?" "Ne'er among men did any with such speed Haste to their profit, flee from their annoy, As when these words were spoken, I came here, Down from my blessed seat, trusting the force Of thy pure eloquence, which thee, and all Who well have ...
— The Vision of Hell, Part 1, Illustrated by Gustave Dore - The Inferno • Dante Alighieri, Translated By The Rev. H. F. Cary

... leaves for paper and an iron stylus for a pen. "L'escriture ne leur sert que pour s'escrire les uns aux autres, car ils n'ont point d'histoires ny de Livres d'aucune Science; nos Religieux ont imprime des livres en la langue des Isles des choses de nostre Religion." Relation ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1803 • Emma Helen Blair

... decided. Mrs. Douglas thought her, what she was, an elegant, interesting-looking girl. The Laird, as he peered at her over his spectacles, pronounced her to be but a shilpit thing, though weel eneugh, considering the ne'er-do-weels that were aught her. Miss Jacky opined that she would have been quite a different creature had she been brought her like any other girl. Miss Grizzy did not know what to think; she certainly was pretty—nobody ...
— Marriage • Susan Edmonstone Ferrier

... engagement. It was practically announced. He was to be married to Miss Sanford—an heiress and a great catch—early in June, and this led to the chaplain speaking of Ray, whom in days gone by he was prone to look upon with little favor, if not indeed as a ne'er-do-well. "I always feared that he would fall, and I am so rejoiced in this new ...
— Under Fire • Charles King

... this: We praise one helpful whom we call The Holder of the Ploughshare. The great deed ne'er grows small." (vol. xv. ...
— A Handbook to the Works of Browning (6th ed.) • Mrs. Sutherland Orr

... as to the communication of exact ideas of their beliefs. As to literal exactitude in such communications, my inquiries have already convinced me that there must be other and higher standards than a hap-hazard I-au-ne-kun-o-tau-gade, or trade interpreter, before the thing can be attempted. Fortunately, I have, in my kind and polite friend Mr. Johnston, who has given me temporary quarters at his house, and the several intelligent members of his family, the means ...
— Personal Memoirs Of A Residence Of Thirty Years With The Indian Tribes On The American Frontiers • Henry Rowe Schoolcraft

... yourself to him, like a sister or a mother. You'd put Harry aside for a time as a pleasure that mustn't be indulged in. Now that's just where you're wrong. No! I want to see you being ever so good and kind to dear Harry as a duty to a ne'er-do-well of ...
— The Limit • Ada Leverson

... "Who ne'er his bread in sorrow ate, Who never in the midnight hours Sat weeping on his lonely bed, He knows ...
— All Saints' Day and Other Sermons • Charles Kingsley

... said. "Oh, non! ne parlez pas Francais, Soames. What is that old lady, your aunt, ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... lectures planned for the autumn months had to be abandoned. Bergson has not, however, been silent during the conflict, and he has given some inspiring addresses. As early as November 4th, 1914, he wrote an article entitled La force qui s'use et celle qui ne s'use pas, which appeared in that unique and interesting periodical of the poilus, Le Bulletin des Armees de la Republique Francaise. A presidential address delivered in December, 1914, to the Academie des sciences morales et politiques, ...
— Bergson and His Philosophy • J. Alexander Gunn

... thee a shirt, Sir King, And worked that shirt, Sir King, with gold, Should Marsk Stig hear of that he’d ne’er With favour ...
— Marsk Stig - a ballad - - - Translator: George Borrow • Thomas J. Wise

... The pilot tried to speak, but his voice broke. He said: "No, I can't eat. When you passed us, we baith started to cry; and when you whistled for us, maw heart com' oot on its place, an' it'll gan back ne mair." The poor men had had no food for two days. In spite of his tragic statement, the pilot recovered, and ate a very good breakfast indeed; and his boat towed astern of us till he placed us at ...
— The Romance of the Coast • James Runciman

... dry by noon. Then there is the Kurhaus always open; palatial building, not to be outdone in size and beauty by Casino at Monte Carlo; but sound of roulette tablets silent. The "game is made" for ever; on ne va plus. Sometimes, on wet afternoons, there is found in the lofty, and otherwise cool room, one or two elderly gentlemen, who play doleful game of ecarte, poor shivering ghosts of departed ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 93, September 24, 1887 • Various

... a positive gain to have the road cleared of a mass of rubbish, that has hindered the advance of knowledge. History must be worked at in a scientific spirit, as biology or chemistry is worked at. As M. Seignobos says, "On ne s'arrete plus guere aujourd'hui a discuter, sous sa forme theologique la theorie de la Providence dans l'Histoire. Mais la tendence a expliquer les faits historiques par les causes transcendantes persiste dans des theories plus modernes ou la metaphysique se deguise sous des formes scientifiques." ...
— Introduction to the Study of History • Charles V. Langlois

... York talks a little to her, and then she goes away, and then he follows her again like a dog. He observes that none of the nobility come out of the country at all, to help the King, or comfort him, or prevent commotions at this fire; but do as if the King were nobody; nor ne'er a priest comes to give the King and Court good council, or to comfort the poor people that suffer; but all is dead, nothing of good in any of their minds: he bemoans it, and says he fears more ruin hangs over our heads. ...
— The Diary of Samuel Pepys • Samuel Pepys

... proved, Nor yet were true to God, but for themselves Were only. Mercy and Justice scorn them both. Speak not of them, but look and pass them by.' Forthwith, I understood for certain this the tribe Of those ill spirits both to God displeasing And to His foes. Those wretches who ne'er lived, Went on in nakedness, and sorely stung By wasps and hornets, which bedewed their cheeks With blood, that mix'd with tears dropp'd to their feet, And by disgustful worms was ...
— Bunyan Characters - Third Series - The Holy War • Alexander Whyte

... across the way Where ne'er is heard a human tread, Where trade is paralyzed and dead, With ne'er a customer a day. The people come, The people go, But never there. They do not know There's such a shop beneath the skies, Because he does not advertise! While I with ...
— The Wit and Humor of America, Volume VI. (of X.) • Various

... ideas and the discussion of affairs of every-day life, avoid such poetic forms as o'er for over, ne'er for never, 'mid for amid, e'en for even, 'gan for began, 'twixt for betwixt, 'neath for beneath, list for listen, oft for often, morn for morning, eve for evening, e'er for ever, ere for before, 'tis for it is, ...
— Slips of Speech • John H. Bechtel

... woman wanted to cross the Forth, and some ferrymen would have persuaded her to go in their boat when she was confident that a tempest was coming on, which would have made the ferry unsafe. They told her at last that she must trust to Providence. 'Na, na,' said she, 'I will ne'er trust to Providence while there is a brigg at Stirling.' The common practice is, you know, with the old woman.—We will not trust to the highest support we profess to have, till nothing else is left us. We worship philosophy, but never think of making use ...
— Deerbrook • Harriet Martineau

... we go, my Boat and I— Frail man ne'er sate in such another; Whether among the winds we strive, Or deep into the clouds [5] we dive, Each is ...
— The Poetical Works of William Wordsworth, Vol. II. • William Wordsworth

... mal ne grevance, Dieu mercy, mais suis sain et fort, Et passe temps en esperance Que paix, qui trop longuement dort, S'esveillera, et par accort A tous fera liesse avoir ; Pour ce, de Dieu soyent maudis Ceux qui sont dolens de veoir ...
— French Lyrics • Arthur Graves Canfield



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