Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Pol   /pɔl/   Listen
Pol

noun
1.
A person active in party politics.  Synonyms: political leader, politician, politico.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Pol" Quotes from Famous Books



... in the barge and crossed over the firth, which is in this place nearly a mile broad, to Castro Pol, the first town in the Asturias. I now mounted the factious mare, whilst Antonio followed on my own horse. Martin led the way, exchanging jests with every person whom he met on the road, and occasionally enlivening the ...
— The Bible in Spain • George Borrow

... nobility are altogether changed; the old barons have sunk into insignificance; the struggle of the future will lie between the King's cousins and himself, rather than with the older lords. A few non-royal princes, such as Armagnac, or Saint-Pol, or Brittany, remain and will go down with the others; the "new men" of the day, the bastard Dunois or the Constables Du Guesclin and Clisson, grow to greater prominence; it is clear that the old feudalism is giving place to a newer order, in ...
— Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois, Complete • Marguerite de Valois, Queen of Navarre

... don't," Jimmie agonized. "I've got a scheme for us all right. This—this embarrassment is only temporary. The day will come when I can provide you with Pol Roge and diamonds. My father is rich, you know, but he swore to me that I couldn't support myself, and I swore to him that I could, and if I don't do it, I'm damned. I am really, and that ...
— Turn About Eleanor • Ethel M. Kelley

... took out a bundle of satin and old lace. She looked at it fondly—often with tears in her honest black eyes. "Lor', how well I disremember the night she fust wore it—the night of the ball we give to Jineral Jackson when he first come to see old Marster. This flowered silk with pol'naize she wore at the Gov'nor's ball and the black velvet with cut steel I've seed her wearin' at many an' many a dinner here in ...
— The Bishop of Cottontown - A Story of the Southern Cotton Mills • John Trotwood Moore

... (Vol. ii., p. 478.; Vol. vii., p. 297.).—A few years ago I happened to arrive at the small sea-port of Roscoff, near the ancient cathedral town of St. Pol de Leon in Britanny, on the day appointed for the funeral of one of the members of a family of very old standing in that neighbourhood. My attention was attracted by a number of boys running about the streets ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 238, May 20, 1854 • Various

... Cornelius Vitellius, homo Italus Corneli, quod est maritimum Hetruri Oppidum, natus nobili Prosapia, vir optimus gratiosusque, omnium primus Oxonii bonas literas docuerat. [Pol. Verg. ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... Lavacherie, on the Ourthe, about seventy miles to the south-east of Cicero; and Sabinus and Cotta were at Tongres, among the Aduatuci, not far from Liege, an equal distance from him to the north-east. Caius Fabius had a legion at St. Pol, between Calais and Arras; Trebonius one at Amiens; Marcus Crassus one at Montdidier; Munatius Plancus one across the Oise, near Compiegne. Roscius was far off, but in a comparatively quiet country. The other camps lay within a circle, ...
— Caesar: A Sketch • James Anthony Froude

... them on his side, he who opposed it would make many enemies and few converts—nay, I am apt to think that some of these, if he made any, would say to him, as soon as the gaudy visions of error were dispelled, and till they were accustomed to the simplicity of truth, "Pol me occidistis." Prudence forbids me, therefore, to write as I think to the world, whilst friendship forbids me to write otherwise to you. I have been a martyr of faction in politics, and have no vocation to be ...
— Letters to Sir William Windham and Mr. Pope • Lord Bolingbroke

... Horse, a man of family, wounded in the arms. We two received our medals together. We saw the King's Palace, and the custom of the Guard Mount in the mornings daily. Their drill is like stone walls, but the nature of the English music is without any meaning. We two saw the great temple, Seyn Pol [St. Paul's?], where their dead are. It is as a country enclosed in a house. My companion ascended to the very roof-top and saw all the city. We are nothing beside these people. We two also saw the Bird Garden [Zoological Gardens] where they studiously preserve all sorts of wild animals, even ...
— The Eyes of Asia • Rudyard Kipling

... - Pizarro y Orellana, Discurso Leg. y Pol., ap. Varones Ilust. Gonzalo Pizarro, when taken prisoner by President Gasca, challenged him to point out any quarter of the country in which the royal grant had been carried into effect by a specific assignment of ...
— The History Of The Conquest Of Peru • William H. Prescott

... Pol. Nine Changes of the Watry-Starre hath been The Shepheards Note, since we haue left our Throne Without a Burthen: Time as long againe Would be fill'd vp (my Brother) with our Thanks, And yet we should, for perpetuitie, Goe hence in debt: And therefore, ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... in 1436, at the age of thirty-six, removed all restraint from Philip's thirst for aggrandizement, in the indulgence of which he drowned his remorse. As if fortune had conspired for the rapid consolidation of his greatness, the death of Philip, count of St. Pol, who had succeeded his brother John in the dukedom of Brabant, gave him the sovereignty of that extensive province; and his dominions soon extended to the very limits of Picardy, by the Peace of Arras, concluded with the dauphin, now become Charles VII., and by his finally contracting a strict ...
— Holland - The History of the Netherlands • Thomas Colley Grattan

... of plates in one hand, a dish of potatoes in the other, walk fast enough to catch up the carriage in front, and finally, in spite of signal wires, sleepers and other pitfalls, deliver all safely at the "Mess." Yet this was done not once but often. We spent the whole day in the train passing St. Pol, Amiens, and Corbie, and finally towards evening reached Ribemont, where we found our billeting party waiting for us. Billets consisted of some distant dug-outs across a swampy moor, and the recent rains had made what few tracks there were too slippery for the horses. It was all very unpleasant, ...
— The Fifth Leicestershire - A Record Of The 1/5th Battalion The Leicestershire Regiment, - T.F., During The War, 1914-1919. • J.D. Hills

...Pol, me occidistis, amici, Non servastis, ait; cui sic extorta voluptas, Et demtus per vim mentis gratissimus error. HOR. Lib. ...
— The Works of Samuel Johnson in Nine Volumes - Volume IV: The Adventurer; The Idler • Samuel Johnson

... they would soon harmonise their fancies, and decipher the hieroglyphic; and this was a thing clearly demonstrated to the Queen Isabella, that Savoisy's horses were oftener stabled at the house of her cousin of Armagnac than in the Hotel St. Pol, where the chamberlain lived, since the destruction of his residence, ordered by the ...
— Droll Stories, Complete - Collected From The Abbeys Of Touraine • Honore de Balzac

... So does the ol' lady as keeps the tap at the Harbor Light, and one-eyed Pol as mops up the liquor that is spilt. And youngsters, too. A pretty leetle dear—jest a cozy armful—was winkin' at me yesterday—kinder givin' me the snuggle-up. I pities 'em. It 's their nater, God 'elp 'em, ter love me; but the ol' ...
— Wappin' Wharf - A Frightful Comedy of Pirates • Charles S. Brooks

... was a Count of St. Pol, who held all the country, and was lord thereof, and a man much valiant. He had no heir of his flesh, whereof he was sore grieving; but a sister he had, a much good dame, and a valiant woman of much avail, who was Dame ...
— Old French Romances • William Morris

... a fool, man," said Ellis, clapping him on the shoulder. "Have patience. My Pol—Mary is as dear and good a girl as ever stepped, and as dutiful. What we saw was all sentiment and emotion. She's very young, and every day she'll be growing wiser and more full of commonplace sense. Poor ...
— A Life's Eclipse • George Manville Fenn

... hereditary in the family and antedated their other nobility. The founder of the house had begun life as the son of a forester in Luxemburg. His name was Pol Staar. His fortune and title were the fruit of contracts for horses and provisions which he made with the commissariat of Napoleon I. in the days when the Netherlands were a French province. But though Pol Staar's hands were callous and his manners plain, his tastes were aristocratic. ...
— The Valley of Vision • Henry Van Dyke

... the King, whom men called "The Fell," but who was, he said, the ablest of the Valois, and would do much for France—though not by the means then deemed most honorable,—being far ahead of his Age. He spoke of the brave, dead St. Pol, the Constable—after Dunois, the greatest since Du Guesclin's time. He told her of their palaces . . . of the life of their women, though he touched but lightly upon its loose gayety . . . of the cities . . . of the great ...
— Beatrix of Clare • John Reed Scott

... Brittany with the object of securing for British merchant ships safety in the navigation of the Channel and of creating a diversion in favour of the German forces, then our allies. A company of men from Lower Brittany, from the towns of Treguier and Saint-Pol-de-Leon, says Villemarque, were marching against a detachment of Scottish Highlanders. When at a distance of about a mile the Bretons could hear their enemies singing a national song. At once they halted stupefied, for the air ...
— Legends & Romances of Brittany • Lewis Spence

... He then passed us on to his Subs. The latter most obligingly gave us some food at a Restaurant. Chateaubriand excellent, Sole a la Normande decent, but Potage a la bisque too rich. Mistake to order the latter, as one can never get it really good, except on the Continent. Wine tol-lol. Pol Royer of '84. However, spent a very pleasant evening. Both Subs, when you know ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 100, May 2, 1891 • Various

... accomplished by interposing between the parts a section of the seacoast. This operation would automatically flank the positions held by the British at Arras, force the British to fall back from Vimy Ridge, and from Lens toward St. Pol, and, as they retreated, to uncover the Ypres salient and the positions held in the high ground to the east and south of Ypres—that is, the Messines and ...
— World's War Events, Volume III • Various

... one short year ago it was in the very centre of the struggle. If Arras and Vimy had not held, things would have been grave indeed. Had they been captured, says the official report of the Third Army, "our main lateral communications—Amiens—Doullens—St. Pol—St. Omer—would have been seriously threatened if not cut." The Germans were determined to have them, and they fought for them with a desperate courage. Three assault divisions were to have carried the ...
— Fields of Victory • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... Account of the Strange Wooing pursued by the Sieur Marcel de Saint-Pol; Marquis of Bardelys, and of the things that in the course of it befell him in Languedoc, in the ...
— Bardelys the Magnificent • Rafael Sabatini

... Tramecourt now, but on the way we were to make a couple of stops. Our way was to take us through St. Pol and Hesdin, and, going so, we came to the town of Le Quesnoy. Here some of the 11th Argyle and Sutherland Highlanders were stationed. My heart leaped at the sight of them. That had been my boy's regiment, although he had belonged to a different battalion, ...
— A Minstrel In France • Harry Lauder

... wooden dolls, jointed at the knees and elbows, the same as tante Yvonne used to sell for two sols at Saint Pol de Leon—." ...
— Old Fires and Profitable Ghosts • A. T. Quiller-Couch

... Lavallee, "attempted, or projected, all the innovations of modern France." Diplomacy, the modern makeshift for the international office of the mediaeval papacy, dates from him. Historians have dwelt on his cruelty, perfidy, and superstition.[12] Turbulent nobles, like St. Pol and Armagnac, were brought to the block; treacherous ministers, like Cardinal La Balue, were kept for years in iron cages; vulgar criminals swung from gibbets on every highroad. But this severity toward ruffians of high and low degree, who had preyed on ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 3 of 8 • Various

... his; et in his sunt omnia: siue beati Te decor eloquij, seu rer[u] pondera tangunt. Angel: Pol: ...
— Catalogue of the Books Presented by Edward Capell to the Library of Trinity College in Cambridge • W. W. Greg

... Administrative divisions: 30 provinces (velayat, singular - velayat); Badakhshan, Badghis, Baghlan, Balkh, Bamian, Farah, Faryab, Ghazni, Ghowr, Helmand, Herat, Jowzjan, Kabol, Kandahar, Kapisa, Konar, Kondoz, Laghman, Lowgar, Nangarhar, Nimruz, Oruzgan, Paktia, Paktika, Parvan, Samangan, Sar-e Pol, Takhar, Vardak, Zabol note: there may be a new province of Nurestan (Nuristan) Independence: 19 August 1919 (from UK) Constitution: the old Communist-era constitution has been suspended; a new Islamic constitution has yet to be ratified Legal system: a new legal system ...
— The 1993 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... mamma was travelling with us," thought the perplexed little girl. "She wouldn't 'low me to hold this naughty, naughty baby forever 'n' ever! Because, you know, she never'd go off to the other end of the car and talk pol'tics." ...
— Dotty Dimple Out West • Sophie May

... Pol'n. Keep'm open," and he proceeded forthwith to shut them with an air of infinite peacefulness. I grasped his hand and shook it gently, on which he opened his eyes and looked at me sleepily. The housekeeper stroked his head, keeping her face half-turned from me—as ...
— The Mystery of 31 New Inn • R. Austin Freeman

... demand from the new cotton-fields; or to migrate himself, with his caravan of Negroes, to open a new home in the Gulf region. During the period of this survey the price for prime field-hands in Georgia averaged a little over seven hundred dollars. [Footnote: Phillips, in Pol. Sci. Quart., XX., 267.] If the estimate of one hundred and fifty dollars for Negroes sold in family lots in Virginia is correct, it is clear that economic laws would bring about a condition where Virginia's resources would in part depend upon her supply of slaves to the cotton-belt. [Footnote: ...
— Rise of the New West, 1819-1829 - Volume 14 in the series American Nation: A History • Frederick Jackson Turner

... to us as milk to babies, Or water is to fish, or pendlums to clox, Or roots and airbs unto an Injun doctor, Or little pills unto an omepath. Or Boze to girls. Are is for us to brethe. What signifize who preaches ef I can't brethe? What's Pol? What's Pollus to sinners who are ded? Ded for want of breth! Why Sextant when we dye Its only coz we cant brethe no more—that's all. And now O Sextant! let me beg of you To let a little are into our cherch (Pewer are is sertin proper for the pews); And dew it week days and on Sundys tew— ...
— Memories and Anecdotes • Kate Sanborn

... some idea of savages, but it was not based upon any actual acquaintance with such people, but upon imperfectly apprehended statements of ancient writers. At the famous ball at the Hotel de Saint Pol in Paris, in 1393, King Charles VI. and five noblemen were dressed in close-fitting suits of linen, thickly covered from head to foot with tow or flax, the colour of hair, so as to look like "savages." In this attire nobody ...
— The Discovery of America Vol. 1 (of 2) - with some account of Ancient America and the Spanish Conquest • John Fiske

... Gourney, Cires-les-Mello, Creil, Royamont, Nogent-les-Vierges, Villers-St.-Pol, indeed nearly every village and town within the royal domain, present values and comparisons which place nearly all of its contemporary structures, be they large or small, at a grand height above those of other less prolific sections. Lest it be thought that this statement ...
— The Cathedrals of Northern France • Francis Miltoun

... bloud, Headles carkasses piled vp in heapes, Virgins halfe dead dragged by their golden haire, And with maine force flung on a ring of pikes, Old men with swords thrust through their aged sides, Kneeling for mercie to a Greekish lad, Who with steele Pol-axes dasht out their braines. Then buckled I mine armour, drew my sword, And thinking to goe downe, came Hectors ghost With ashie visage, blewish, sulphure eyes, His armes torne from his shoulders, and his breast Furrowd ...
— The Tragedy of Dido Queene of Carthage • Christopher Marlowe

... men have set out in the glorious career of discovery and invention, monopoly and oppression cannot be necessary to prevent them from returning to a state of barbarism.'—Godwin's "Enquirer", Essay 2. See also "Pol. Jus.", ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... perform this part of the work. Besides, many sculptors such as Beauneveu and Hennequin were equally skilled in the art of painting. The result of these influences is shown in the Book of Hours of the Duke of Berry, the work of Pol de Limburg, and in the pictures painted in Dijon for Philip the Bold by Melchior Broederlam. The latter's Annunciation, Presentation in the Temple and Flight into Egypt prepare the way for the Adoration of the Lamb, though far from being equal to it. These pictures serve as a link between ...
— Belgium - From the Roman Invasion to the Present Day • Emile Cammaerts

... of quiet, monotonous years. Always around the little one, they went into raptures at everything he did. His mother called him Poulet, and as he could not pronounce the word, he said "Pol," which amused them immensely, and the nickname of "Poulet" ...
— Une Vie, A Piece of String and Other Stories • Guy de Maupassant

... at Paris we started for Rennes,—reached Caen and halted a little—thence made for Auray, where we made excursions to Carnac, Lokmariaker, and Ste.-Anne d'Auray; all very interesting of their kind; then saw Brest, Morlaix, St.-Pol de Leon, and the sea-port Roscoff,—our intended bathing place—it was full of folk, however, and otherwise impracticable, so we had nothing for it, but to "rebrousser chemin" and get to the south-west again. ...
— Life and Letters of Robert Browning • Mrs. Sutherland Orr

... Kunstmann, Die Fahrt der ersten Deutschen nach dem portugiesischen Indien in Hist. pol. Blaetter f. d. Kath. Deutschl., Muenchen, 1861, vol. ...
— The Influence of India and Persia on the Poetry of Germany • Arthur F. J. Remy



Words linked to "Pol" :   Nellie Ross, candidate, party boss, party man, peel, Charles Joseph Clark, William Jennings Bryan, Jesse Louis Jackson, Ross, leader, Salmon Portland Chase, Stephen Arnold Douglas, William Maxwell Aitken, Tom Bradley, McCarthy, Joseph Raymond McCarthy, Little Giant, Boy Orator of the Platte, Beaverbrook, noncandidate, statesman, nominee, Mullah Omar, burr, Nancy Witcher Astor, 1st Baron Beaverbrook, Rankin, DeWitt Clinton, rabble-rouser, Jeannette Rankin, Clark, Davy Crockett, solon, Grigori Aleksandrovich Potemkin, Andre Maginot, federalist, Nellie Tayloe Ross, communist, democrat, campaigner, Alben William Barkley, Clinton, clay, Viscountess Astor, Moynihan, Mullah Mohammed Omar, Joe Clark, Robert Peel, Bradley, demagog, David Crockett, demagogue, Aaron Burr, Jackson, Astor, Houston, Webster, standard-bearer, republican, sachem, ward-heeler, Thomas Bradley, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, Sam Houston, Grigori Potemkin, Great Commoner, Glenda Jackson, William Henry Seward, socialist, Maginot, Seward, Crockett, Henry Clay, Whig, Alben Barkley, Sir Robert Peel, chase, boss, Stephen A. Douglas, Joseph McCarthy, Potyokin, hack, Barkley, Samuel Houston, Salmon P. Chase, Douglas, Jesse Jackson, Grigori Potyokin, mugwump, Daniel Webster, Potemkin, technocrat, Bryan, Labourite, national leader, party liner, the Great Compromiser



Copyright © 2020 Diccionario ingles.com