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Pound   /paʊnd/   Listen
Pound

noun
1.
16 ounces avoirdupois.  Synonym: lb.
2.
The basic unit of money in Great Britain and Northern Ireland; equal to 100 pence.  Synonyms: British pound, British pound sterling, pound sterling, quid.
3.
A unit of apothecary weight equal to 12 ounces troy.
4.
The basic unit of money in Syria; equal to 100 piasters.  Synonym: Syrian pound.
5.
The basic unit of money in the Sudan; equal to 100 piasters.  Synonym: Sudanese pound.
6.
The basic unit of money in Lebanon; equal to 100 piasters.  Synonym: Lebanese pound.
7.
Formerly the basic unit of money in Ireland; equal to 100 pence.  Synonyms: Irish pound, Irish punt, punt.
8.
The basic unit of money in Egypt; equal to 100 piasters.  Synonym: Egyptian pound.
9.
The basic unit of money in Cyprus; equal to 100 cents.  Synonym: Cypriot pound.
10.
A nontechnical unit of force equal to the mass of 1 pound with an acceleration of free fall equal to 32 feet/sec/sec.  Synonym: lbf..
11.
United States writer who lived in Europe; strongly influenced the development of modern literature (1885-1972).  Synonyms: Ezra Loomis Pound, Ezra Pound.
12.
A symbol for a unit of currency (especially for the pound sterling in Great Britain).  Synonym: pound sign.
13.
A public enclosure for stray or unlicensed dogs.  Synonym: dog pound.
14.
The act of pounding (delivering repeated heavy blows).  Synonyms: hammer, hammering, pounding.  "The pounding of feet on the hallway"



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"Pound" Quotes from Famous Books



... indignantly, "he has not helped you at all. Why, then, should he receive anything?" "He shouldn't," came the answer; "but he belongs to a crowd of fellows, and he told me that if I didn't divvy up with them they would pound the life out of me." I pondered for some time, but I gave no advice. What advice should ...
— How To Study and Teaching How To Study • F. M. McMurry

... was performed accurately and punctually. Talk about manna in the wilderness! money in the wilderness came to the poor souls impoverished by the war as a thousandfold nicer. But over and above that, half a pound of coffee or a drink of whisky would cause a thrill of delight. One day, stopping at a logger's camp, I gave a decent-looking man a tin cup full of whisky. The first thing he did was to put it to the mouth of a toddling two-year-old child and it took a good pull. I ...
— Memoirs • Charles Godfrey Leland

... I do love thee better than five hundred pound—and so thou shalt say, for I'll leave it to stay ...
— The Comedies of William Congreve - Volume 1 [of 2] • William Congreve

... took—what!—not the pulpit, nor its Bible, nor the hymn books, nor the collecting boxes, nor the unpaid bills belonging the chapel, but—the title deeds of the old place! and to this day they have not been returned. This was indeed a sharp thing. How Shylock—how the old Jew with his inexorable pound of flesh-worship, creeps up in every section of human society! Vauxhall-road Chapel, which has passed through more denominational agony than any twenty modern places of worship put together, is situated in a poor locality—in a district where pure air, and less drink, and ...
— Our Churches and Chapels • Atticus

... whip, who had toiled at his calling for twenty long years on fifty pounds and what he could 'pick up,' was advanced to a hundred and fifty, with a couple of men under him. Instead of riding worn-out, tumble-down, twenty-pound screws, he was mounted on hundred-guinea horses, for which the dealers were to have a couple of hundred, when they were paid. Everything was in ...
— Mr. Sponge's Sporting Tour • R. S. Surtees

... weak and let your will relax Till Diane and Lorraine do govern you, Pound, knead and mould, re-melt and model you, Sire, you are ...
— Catherine de' Medici • Honore de Balzac

... summer proved wretched, reminding one of some parts of the Hebrides, a week without torrents of rain being wonderful. Castro, the almost deserted Spanish capital, could not furnish, even among hundreds of inhabitants, a pound of sugar or an ordinary knife. No one possessed either a watch or a clock, and the church bell was rung by guess by an old man who was supposed to have ...
— Life of Charles Darwin • G. T. (George Thomas) Bettany

... though it was threatened yesterday: they all like to talk a great deal before striking a blow. They believe that in the multitude of counsellors there is safety. Women singing as they pound their grain into meal,—"Oh, the march of Bwanamokolu to Katanga! Oh, the march to Katanga and back to Ujiji!—Oh, oh, oh!" Bwanamokolu means the great or old gentleman. Batusi women are very ...
— The Last Journals of David Livingstone, in Central Africa, from 1865 to His Death, Volume II (of 2), 1869-1873 • David Livingstone

... set them over against its eastern gate; and there did they offer sacrifices to them, and there did they make Titus imperator [25] with the greatest acclamations of joy. And now all the soldiers had such vast quantities of the spoils which they had gotten by plunder, that in Syria a pound weight of gold was sold for half its former value. But as for those priests that kept themselves still upon the wall of the holy house,[26] there was a boy that, out of the thirst he was in, desired some of the ...
— The Wars of the Jews or History of the Destruction of Jerusalem • Flavius Josephus

... said old Featherstone, secretly disliking the possibility that Fred would show himself at all independent. "You neither want a bit of land to make a squire of you instead of a starving parson, nor a lift of a hundred pound by the way. It's all one to me. I can make five codicils if I like, and I shall keep my bank-notes for a nest-egg. It's all ...
— Middlemarch • George Eliot

... College, and they requested the Receiver-General to make all possible payments to the Governors. But the liabilities far exceeded the assets. In January, 1850, the College officers urgently pleaded for their overdue salaries. It was decided to pay them 2s. 9d. in the pound. Accordingly, Vice-Principal Leach received L55 of the L404 in arrears; L. D. Montier, the Lecturer in French, was given L4 of the L34 due him, and the others were paid very small amounts in proportion for a year or, as in the case of the Vice-Principal, several years of work. A grant of L25 was ...
— McGill and its Story, 1821-1921 • Cyrus Macmillan

... next and the first day of January next following, in the publick hall or chamber to be appointed in the City of Edinburgh. And therein all persons shall have liberty to subscribe for such sums of money as they shall think fit to adventure in the said joynt stock, one thousand pound Scots being the lowest sum, and twenty thousand pound Scots the highest. And the two third parts of the saids stocks belonging always to persons residing in Scotland. Likeas, each and every person at the time of his subscribing ...
— The Jacobite Rebellions (1689-1746) - (Bell's Scottish History Source Books.) • James Pringle Thomson

... had become settled on board the "Medora," was to send word to my friends of my arrival in the Crimea, and solicit their aid. I gave a Greek idler one pound to carry a letter to the camp of the 97th, while I sent another to Captain Peel, who was hard at work battering the defences of Sebastopol about the ears of the Russians, from the batteries of the Royal Naval Brigade. I addressed others to many of the medical men who had known me in other ...
— Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands • Mary Seacole

... humorous; but as the day approached, it seemed to him to be but the dreariest of fooling, without a vestige of real fun. He was so panic-stricken that he persuaded three of his friends, who were giants in stature, genial and stormy voiced, to act as claquers and pound loudly at the faintest suspicion of a joke. He bribed Sawyer, a half-drunk man, who had a laugh hung on a hair-trigger, to get off, naturally and easily during the course of the evening, as many laughs as he could. He begged a popular citizen and his wife to take a conspicuous ...
— Mark Twain • Archibald Henderson

... a few weeks, or when the child seems to need stronger nourishment, one part of veal-tea, made with a pound of veal to a pint of water, may be added to one part of whey, with the white of egg and sugar of milk as before, and one part of white decoction, as it was called some two centuries ago in England. ...
— The Mother's Manual of Children's Diseases • Charles West, M.D.

... Granada has also enacted a law during the last year which levies a tax of more than $3 on every pound of mail matter transported across the Isthmus. The sum thus required to be paid on the mails of the United States would be nearly $2,000,000 annually in addition to the large sum payable by contract to the Panama Railroad Company. If the only objection ...
— A Compilation of the Messages and Papers of the Presidents - Section 3 (of 4) of Volume 5: Franklin Pierce • James D. Richardson

... Chard we called upon Mr. Dean, a large manufacturer of woollen-cloth, who had been a customer of mine to a very large amount, he having purchased of me at one deal between eight and nine thousand fleeces of valuable South-down wool, at half-a-crown a pound; which, I recollect, averaged about six shillings a fleece; so that the whole sum was about two thousand five hundred pounds. The wool was to have been paid for, as is usual, upon delivery. But when Mr. Forsey, who was ...
— Memoirs of Henry Hunt, Esq. Volume 2 • Henry Hunt

... was prepared to risk a five-pound note that you and Mr. Telfer will not carry your New ...
— Dolly Reforming Herself - A Comedy in Four Acts • Henry Arthur Jones

... thee." So he told her all that had passed from first to last, and she said, "As for him who diddled thee in the matter of the chanders-wood, thou must know that with us it is worth ten gold pieces a pound. But I will give thee a rede, whereby I trust thou shalt deliver thyself; and it is this. Go to such and such a gate whereby lives a blind Shaykh, a cripple, who is knowing, wise as a wizard and experienced; ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 6 • Richard F. Burton

... don't believe any longer what I've been believing and preaching. Hold on! let me go on. I don't quite know where I'll bring up, but I think my religion will simmer down finally to about this: A full half-bushel to the half-bushel and sixteen ounces to the pound." Here two or three cheered. "Do unto others as you'd have others do unto you." Applause from several, quickly suppressed as the speaker went on, Elder Wheat listening as if petrified, with ...
— Other Main-Travelled Roads • Hamlin Garland

... Services, particularly banking, insurance, and business services, account by far for the largest proportion of GDP while industry continues to decline in importance. GDP growth slipped in 2001-03 as the global downturn, the high value of the pound, and the bursting of the "new economy" bubble hurt manufacturing and exports. Output recovered in 2004, to 3.2% growth, then slowed to 1.7% in 2005 and 2.6% in 2006. The economy is one of the strongest in Europe; inflation, interest rates, and unemployment ...
— The 2007 CIA World Factbook • United States

... I was done with him it cost me a pound. But I applied his cosmetics and became daily worse. Then my mother spoke of making rounds. But I wouldn't leave her. I went to the school every day, but I saw the girls watching me. I heard them whisper to each other, and sometimes I caught ...
— My New Curate • P.A. Sheehan

... pound a week live without a wife!" complained the Shadchan (marriage-broker) to a group of ...
— Dreamers of the Ghetto • I. Zangwill

... of lean and fat fresh pork, ground. To each pound of this mixture, add 1 teaspoon salt, 1/8 teaspoon pepper, pinch each of sage and thyme. Add one egg beaten, mould into cakes and fry until brown. ...
— Pennsylvania Dutch Cooking • Unknown

... species, but not so strong and oily, nor so large. Sturgeon, pike, pickerel, black bass, sheep-heads, mullets, suckers, eels, and a variety of other fish, are plentiful in these waters: the spring-creeks and mill-ponds yield plenty of spotted trout, from four ounces to a pound weight: they are easily caught either with ...
— Twenty-Seven Years in Canada West - The Experience of an Early Settler (Volume I) • Samuel Strickland

... that he was taking up on speculation, and that he was going to treat his fellow passengers to some, one day at dinner. We were a little disappointed when we found they were sweet ones, but still they were a treat. Vegetables were scarce, potatoes selling from forty to sixty cents per pound. After a few days we arrived at Sacramento, it being about one hundred miles from San Francisco by water. There were no hacks at the landing, nobody that wanted a job to carry your baggage. Governor Shannon, of Ohio, was among the passengers. He had been minister ...
— The Adventures of a Forty-niner • Daniel Knower

... job, mither, maybe I'll get one-an'-tippence a day like Dick Tamson. If I do it'll be a big help to you, mither. My! I'll soon mak' a poun' at that rate," and he laughed enthusiastically at the thought of it. A pound seemed to represent riches to his boyish mind. What might his mother not do with a pound? Ever so many things could be bought. And that was merely a start. His wages would soon increase with experience, and when he went down the pit, which would be soon, he'd earn more, and ...
— The Underworld - The Story of Robert Sinclair, Miner • James C. Welsh

... you boys to think for yourselves," Ned went on. "Don't get a theory and pound away at it. If you do, you'll overlook everything which doesn't agree with that theory. If I should show you what I have written, you might look only for clues calculated to prove it to be correct, or you might look only for ...
— The Boy Scout Camera Club - The Confession of a Photograph • G. Harvey Ralphson

... from home—not? She is not. Believe me, I knew Max Gronauer when he first started in the produce business in Jersey City and the only perfume he had was seventeen cents a pound, not always fresh killed at that. Cold storage ...
— The Best Short Stories of 1921 and the Yearbook of the American Short Story • Various

... permanent service.... The name of one of my poor fellows who was killed ought to be registered in the book of fame, and remembered with reverence, as long as bravery is considered a virtue. He was a black man, by the name of John Johnson. A twenty-four-pound shot struck him in the hip, and took away all the lower part of his body. In this state, the poor brave fellow lay on the deck, and several times exclaimed to his shipmates: 'Fire away, my boys; no haul a color down.' The other was also a black man, by the name of John Davis, and ...
— History of the Negro Race in America from 1619 to 1880. Vol. 2 (of 2) - Negroes as Slaves, as Soldiers, and as Citizens • George Washington Williams

... spot on which they stood. The frost of the region, which penetrates the earth to the depth apparently of some hundred feet, would thenceforth preserve them from decay. The tusks form an article of considerable trade, the ivory selling from a shilling to one and ninepence a pound, according to the perfection ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 61, No. 380, June, 1847 • Various

... archbishop. Our bishops now are a weakling lot. With no army to back their edicts the people smile at their proclamations, try on their shovel hats, and laugh at their gaiters. Or if they be Methodist bishops, who are only make-believe bishops, having slipped the cable that bound them to the past, we pound them familiarly on the back ...
— Little Journeys to the Homes of the Great - Volume 14 - Little Journeys to the Homes of Great Musicians • Elbert Hubbard

... Rairyganoo girl might make things awkward. So I says "My dear if you could give me a cup of tea to clear my muddle of a head I should better understand your affairs." And we had the tea and the affairs too and after all it was but forty pound, and—There! she's as industrious and straight a creeter as ever lived and has paid back half of it already, and where's the use of saying more, particularly when it ain't the point? For the point is that when she was a kissing my hands and holding them in hers and kissing them again ...
— Mrs. Lirriper's Legacy • Charles Dickens

... doctoring it, it dies 'cause it wants to. Since Uncle Pomp let me put that mixtry of nice mud and brick dust on his shoe he don't suffer with his frost-bit heel no more. He's going to stop limping next week if I put it on every day. I'm going to pound another piece of brick right now," and he went around the house with the darlingest little lope, because he always rides a stick horse, which prances most ...
— Phyllis • Maria Thompson Daviess

... there was spinach and pudding made hot; In the middle a place where the pasty — was not. Now, my Lord as for tripe, it's my utter aversion, 85 And your bacon I hate like a Turk or a Persian; So there I sat stuck, like a horse in a pound, While the bacon and liver went merrily round. But what vex'd me most was that d—'d Scottish rogue, With his long-winded speeches, his smiles and his brogue; 90 And, 'Madam,' quoth he, 'may this bit be my poison, A ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Oliver Goldsmith • Oliver Goldsmith

... have been successful also. To this each person contributes a pound of something useful, all of which is sold by auction during the evening, causing ...
— Why and how: a hand-book for the use of the W.C.T. unions in Canada • Addie Chisholm

... to separate the mucilage. In Bengal the manufacturers boil the oil water, which coagulates some albumen, and they subsequently filter through cloth, charcoal, and paper. 3. The extraction by alcohol is practised by some druggists. Each pound of paste is triturated with four pounds of alcohol, specific gravity 8.350, and the mixture subjected to pressure. The oil dissolved by the alcohol escapes very freely: one half is recovered by the distillation of the spirit, the residue ...
— The Commercial Products of the Vegetable Kingdom • P. L. Simmonds

... more—ten silver-tongued song-birds, ten messengers of mirth—the price of a hard day's toil. Take it, sir, and may it make a better and a stronger man of you. Times are good and I spend my money free. I made it packin' grub to Linderman, four bits a pound, but—easy come, easy go. Now then, who's next? You've seen me work. I couldn't baffle a sore-eyed Siwash ...
— The Winds of Chance • Rex Beach

... bet a pound Each dance the others would Off the ground. Out of their coats They slipped right soon, And neat and nicesome, Put each his shoon. One - Two - Three! - And away they go, Not too fast, And not too slow; Out from the ...
— Peacock Pie, A Book of Rhymes • Walter de la Mare

... on in her deep-bosomed chair, undisturbed by the click of switch or burst of light into her enveloping dusk. She had a magazine, face downward, in her lap; also a one-pound box of mixed chocolates, open. Her head had fallen upon her chair-back; a position which brought the strange dark little mustache into prominence, and also threw into relief the unexpected heaviness of the ...
— V. V.'s Eyes • Henry Sydnor Harrison

... ruin which swept high and low alike into its net. When the poor rate rose to twenty and twenty-five shillings in the pound it followed that the distinction between rich and poor vanished, and there were plenty of instances of men, accounted well off, who had subscribed liberally to others at the beginning of the famine, who were themselves ...
— The Story Of Ireland • Emily Lawless

... called the "Dutch pound," at this time was worth 40 cents intrinsically. Money had many times the purchasing power that it ...
— The Age of the Reformation • Preserved Smith

... Haj Lameen, brother of the governor of Ghat, took an oath during the past year that he would never again purchase slaves. This is a remarkable instance of the progress of opinion. I afterwards gave Lameen a present, consisting of one pound of tea, five pounds of coffee, and four heads of loaf sugar. This was the first considerable present I made. In the evening we observed Mercury in conjunction with Venus. The heavens were unusually bright for Mourzuk. We saw also Jupiter's satellites at seven in the ...
— Narrative of a Mission to Central Africa Performed in the Years 1850-51, Volume 1 • James Richardson

... fifteen hundred pounds a year; which is mortgaged for six thousand pounds; but it is impossible to convince him that if he sold as much as would pay off that debt, he would save four shillings in the pound, which he gives for the vanity of being the reputed master of it. Yet if Laertes did this, he would, perhaps, be easier in his own fortune; but then Irus, a fellow of yesterday, who has but twelve hundred ...
— The Coverley Papers • Various

... remained, one single vial, and one single box of pills. As he sat upon his prostrate foe, first he forced the box of pills into his gasping mouth, and then with the lower end of the vial he drove it down his throat, as a gunner rams home the wad and shot into a thirty-two pound carronade. Choked with the box, the fallen knight held up his hands for quarter; but Timothy continued until the end of the vial breaking out the top and bottom of the pasteboard receptacle, forty-and-eight of antibilious pills rolled in haste down Red-head's throat. Timothy then seized ...
— Japhet, In Search Of A Father • Frederick Marryat

... not latched, but it might as well have been the steel door of a bank vault. Miller began to pound on it, shouting: ...
— The Day Time Stopped Moving • Bradner Buckner

... their liues. And although the Erle of Cumberland lay still about those Islands, yet they met not with him, so that after much paine and labour they got into the Road before Angra, where with all speede they vnladed and discharged aboue fiue millions of siluer, all in pieces of 8 or 10 pound great: so that the whole Kay lay couered with plates and chests of siluer, full of Ryales of eight, most wonderfull to behold, (each million being ten hundred thousand duckats,) besides pearles, gold and other stones, which were not registred. The Admirall and chiefe ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries of The English Nation, v. 7 - England's Naval Exploits Against Spain • Richard Hakluyt

... lend to it. Do not let it be a ghastly skeleton in a closet, but let it come as far as it will into daily life. When you read in Colburn's Oral Arithmetic, "that a man bought mutton at six cents a pound, and beef at seven," ask your mother what she pays a pound now, and do the sum with the figures changed. When the boys come back after vacation, find out where they have been, and look out Springfield, and the Notch, and Dead River, and Moosehead Lake, ...
— How To Do It • Edward Everett Hale

... that I wass not born a savitch," returned Fergus with a grim smile. "What in all the world iss the use of ceevilisation if it will not make people happy? A man wants nothing more than a goot supper an' a goot bed, an' a goot shelter over him, an' it is a not five hunderd pound a year that we will ...
— The Buffalo Runners - A Tale of the Red River Plains • R.M. Ballantyne

... said, handing her a lump weighing about a pound. "With the balance in the heap there you can stagger the best-dressed woman you meet at ...
— The Wings of the Morning • Louis Tracy

... is, for the possessor is an Englishman, and the English have an uncommon taste for snod houses and trim gardens; but at the time it was built, there was not a better in the town, though it's now but of the second class. Yearly we hear both from Mrs Macadam and her sister, with a five-pound note from each to the poor of the parish, as a token of their remembrance; but they are far off, and, were any thing ailing me, I suppose the gift will not be continued. As for Captain Malcolm, he has proved, in many ways, a friend to such of our young men as have gone to sea. He has now ...
— The Annals of the Parish • John Galt

... first came from. We can only mention a few of these phrases, such as "a Daniel come to judgment," which Shylock says to Portia in the "Merchant of Venice," and which is often used now sarcastically. From the same play comes the expression "pound of flesh," which is now often used to mean what a person knows to be due to him and is determined to have. "Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing," "to gild refined gold," "to wear one's heart ...
— Stories That Words Tell Us • Elizabeth O'Neill

... thought—to leave Soames? But he felt this thought so unbearable that he at once put it away; the shady visions it conjured up, the sound of family tongues buzzing in his ears, the horror of the conspicuous happening so close to him, to one of his own children! Luckily, she had no money—a beggarly fifty pound a year! And he thought of the deceased Heron, who had had nothing to leave her, with contempt. Brooding over his glass, his long legs twisted under the table, he quite omitted to rise when the ladies left the room. He would ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... leg; and arter that was well 'is inside went wrong. We didn't think much of it at first, not understanding figures; but at the end o' six months the club hadn't got a farthing, and they was in Tom's debt one pound seventeen-and-six. ...
— Light Freights • W. W. Jacobs

... squeak. You've druv me from my home, and I'll have your curst blood for it yet. I'll sarve you, as I sarved your old father—You got my small bore, I expect, and if its any good to you to know that one of its nineties to the pound, sent the old rascal to the devil—why then you have it from Jeremiah Desborough's own lips, ...
— The Canadian Brothers - or The Prophecy Fulfilled • John Richardson

... five-pound note,' put in Fergus; 'and when I told him to shut up, for it was all bosh, he ...
— Beechcroft at Rockstone • Charlotte M. Yonge

... for Paradise Lost. I cannot bring myself to join in the lamentations of the biographers over this bargain. Surely it is better so; better to know that the noblest monument of English letters had no money value, than to think of it as having been paid for at a pound the line. ...
— Milton • Mark Pattison

... Christian benevolence were extended to the prisoners by their friends and sympathizers; among these none deserve more honorable mention than the noble act of Thomas L. Kane (son of Judge Kane, and now General), in tendering all the prisoners a sumptuous Thanksgiving dinner, consisting of turkey, etc., pound cake, etc., etc. The dinner for the white prisoners, Messrs. Hanaway, Davis, and Scarlett, was served in appropriate style in the room of Mr. Morrison, one of the keepers. The U.S. Marshal, A.E. Roberts, Esq., ...
— The Underground Railroad • William Still

... and two wounded. But one of the killed was James Hall, an Englishman on board the Karteria—an old sailor of a most excellent character, and possessed of considerable knowledge in every branch of his profession. He was killed by a twelve-pound shot from the battery at Tricheri. This shot, after breaking the claw of an anchor, rebounded, and, in falling, struck Hall in the pit of the stomach, and rolled on the deck, as if it had hardly touched his clothes. He fell instantly, and was ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine, Volume 58, Number 360, October 1845 • Various

... prisons, the inmates are allowed books and the privilege of writing, but are all obliged to labor, each, if he wishes, choosing the trade in which he is fitted best to succeed. The men receive a pound and a half of bread per day, and the women ...
— Paris: With Pen and Pencil - Its People and Literature, Its Life and Business • David W. Bartlett

... slavery to this ten-pound daughter greatly amused my friends and neighbors. To see "the grim Klondiker," in meek attendance on a midget sovereign was highly diverting—so I was told by Mary Easton, and I rather think she was right. However, I was undisturbed ...
— A Daughter of the Middle Border • Hamlin Garland

... not supped, so he ran to the public buffet. But the little rascals had better legs than he; when he arrived, they had stripped the table. There remained not so much as a miserable camichon at five sous the pound. Nothing remained upon the wall but slender fleurs-de-lis, mingled with rose bushes, painted in 1434 by Mathieu Biterne. It ...
— Notre-Dame de Paris - The Hunchback of Notre Dame • Victor Hugo

... brilliant one for an Anglo-Saxon, and his coon-skin cap is said to have cost over a pound sterling. ...
— Comic History of England • Bill Nye

... MANSON watching them. He then moves up to the fire, and burns the five-pound note. He watches the flames leap ...
— The Servant in the House • Charles Rann Kennedy

... but somehow he couldn't fetch up stomach to wear that rory-tory shako, but took his way towards Merry-Garden carrying it a-dangle by the chin-strap. However, by the time he reached the gate he had begun to feel more accustomed to his grandeur, and likewise that in for a penny was in for a pound: so, clapping the blessed thing tight on his head and pulling down the strap, he marched up the steps with a ...
— Merry-Garden and Other Stories • Sir Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... be mentioned here with applause. The writer lost a pocket-book containing a passport and a couple of modest ten-pound notes. The person who found the portfolio ingeniously put it into the box of the post-office, and it was faithfully restored to the owner; but somehow the two ten-pound notes were absent. It was, however, a great comfort ...
— Little Travels and Roadside Sketches • William Makepeace Thackeray

... had very ill husbanded the great revenue acquired by the plunder of the church: his profuse generosity dissipated faster than his rapacity could supply; and the parliament was surprised this session to find a demand made upon them of four tenths, and a subsidy of one shilling in the pound during two years: so ill were the public expectations answered, that the crown was never more to require any supply from the people. The commons, though lavish of their liberty, and of the blood of their fellow-subjects, ...
— The History of England in Three Volumes, Vol.I., Part C. - From Henry VII. to Mary • David Hume

... According to his own description she is a "good knock-about kind of a wife." I recollect seeing her, during a press of work, rendering assistance to her Vulcan in a manner worthy of a Cyclop's spouse. She was wielding an eighteen-pound sledgehammer, sending the sparks flying at every blow upon the hot iron, and making the anvil ring again, while her husband turned the metal at every stroke, as if attending on Nasmyth's patent ...
— Eight Years' Wandering in Ceylon • Samuel White Baker

... confidence. Dear old Bogey! He'll be happy with such a master—ah, and do him service too. I tell you, Sir, that horse, to a quiet, considerate sort o' gent like yourself, who wants to work his animal, not to wear it out, is worth forty pound, every penny of ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 99., December 13, 1890 • Various

... France, Edward found his own shores devastated by a French fleet, whilst at the same time his hands were full with fresh difficulties from Scotland and Wales. In the summer of 1295, the city furnished the king with three ships, the cost being defrayed by a tax of twopence in the pound charged on chattels and merchandise. John le Breton, then warden, advanced the sum of L40, which the aldermen and six men of each ward undertook to repay.(323) In the following year (1296) the city agreed, after some little hesitation, to furnish forty men with ...
— London and the Kingdom - Volume I • Reginald R. Sharpe

... witch, they killed her and dragged her body about a large piece of ground in front of the house, and wherever the blood fell Indian corn sprang up. Kanati then tried to get the wolves to kill the two boys, but they trapped them in a huge pound, and burned almost all of them to death. Their father not returning from his visit to the wolves, the boys set out in search of him, and, after some days, found him. After killing a fierce panther in a swamp, and exterminating ...
— The Child and Childhood in Folk-Thought • Alexander F. Chamberlain

... I know. Listen: 'A quarter of a pound of suet, half a pound of bread crumbs, four ounces of sugar, the juice of two lemons, the grated rind of one, and one egg. Boil it well in an Agate ...
— Half a Dozen Girls • Anna Chapin Ray

... POUND. 'Pound St. Paul's Church into atoms and consider any single atom; it is to be sure good for nothing; but put all these atoms together, and you have St. Paul's Church,' ...
— Life of Johnson, Volume 6 (of 6) • James Boswell

... the third or fourth round, when I had seemed quite unequal to the first. Professing the most absolute bankruptcy from the very beginning, giving the man no sort of hope that I would pay even one farthing in the pound, I never could be made ...
— Autobiographic Sketches • Thomas de Quincey

... Piketon on the 9th without much opposition. General Nelson arrived there on the 10th, when the rebels leaving the State and retreating through Pound Gap, he was ordered to report with his command to General ...
— The Army of the Cumberland • Henry M. Cist

... a sweeper who never sweeps.—This fellow is a vagabond of the first-water, or of the first-mud rather. His stock in trade is an old worn-out broom-stump, which he has shouldered for these seven years past, and with which he has never displaced a pound of soil in the whole period. He abominates work with such a crowning intensity, that the very pretence of it is a torture to him. He is a beggar without a beggar's humbleness; and a thief, moreover, without a thief's hardihood. He crawls lazily about the public ...
— Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, No. 437 - Volume 17, New Series, May 15, 1852 • Various

... acre from 300 to 500, and in a few instances to 550 pounds. When the crop was picked and ginned, we had twelve hundred bales of fine cotton. The quality of the fibre in the whole lot, was so excellent and so uniformly well ripened, that we were offered two cents per pound above the ruling price of ordinary cotton. As a result, this one crop gave the farm a cash income of $65,000. $60,000 for the fibre, and $5,000 for the seed, oil and oil cake. Choice seed for planting, was a large item in the last ...
— Solaris Farm - A Story of the Twentieth Century • Milan C. Edson

... room by means of the small pipe leading through the blank wall into the street; perhaps if this could be dislodged it might be pushed in through the aperture thus made. On receipt of the file an English five-pound note will be conveyed to him in the same way as this letter, and another if secrecy is observed and those in the ...
— A Bid for Fortune - or Dr. Nikola's Vendetta • Guy Boothby

... B were still back to back. Then Exhibit B responded: "Miss Morgan, you ast him if he didn't cuss and damn me, and say he was goin' to pound me to death if I ever come ...
— The Court of Boyville • William Allen White

... at the hundred-pound-note, and twisting it into her little pocket with apparent sangfroid, though she held it with a tight grasp, murmured that it was quite unnecessary, and then offered to give her new ...
— Endymion • Benjamin Disraeli

... sudden fall of rents took place. The income of every landed proprietor was diminished by five shillings in the pound. The cry of agricultural distress rose from every shire in the kingdom; and for that distress the government was, as usual, held accountable. The gentry, compelled to retrench their expenses for a period, saw with indignation the increasing splendour and profusion ...
— The History of England from the Accession of James II. - Volume 1 (of 5) • Thomas Babington Macaulay

... such torpid communities as Saxony political discontent was at length engendered by bodily discomfort. Men who were proof against all the patriotic exaltation of Stein and Fichte felt that there must be something wrong in a system which sent up the price of coffee to five shillings a pound, and reduced the tobacconist to ...
— History of Modern Europe 1792-1878 • C. A. Fyffe

... "there were two young brothers made it up to rob the 'squire's house, down at Gidleigh. They separated in the garden after they cracked the crib, agreeing to meet here in this very place, and share the swag, for they had got nigh seventy pound. They met and quarrelled over the sharing up; and the elder one drew out a pistol, and shot the younger dead. The poor boy was sitting much where you are sitting now, and that long tuft of grass grew up ...
— The Recollections of Geoffrey Hamlyn • Henry Kingsley

... "I want every pound of thrust you have on that power deck, Astro," roared Commander Walters into the intercom. "We just received word from a freighter that picked up an S O S from ...
— Treachery in Outer Space • Carey Rockwell and Louis Glanzman

... Md.—"What kind of silk is used for balloons, what is the varnish which covers them, and what amount of common illuminating gas will support one pound weight?" Silk for large balloons is now rarely used, stout cotton cloth being substituted. Ordinary boiled linseed oil makes a good varnish. Any elastic varnish will do, however. The specific gravity of ordinary illuminating gas ranges from 0.540 ...
— Scientific American, Vol. 17, No. 26 December 28, 1867 • Various

... Sam began to pound Ned, but the bank employee, though suffering, would not call for help, to summon back Tom, who was, by this time, at the rear of the shop, looking about. Silently in the dark the two fought, and Ned found that Sam was getting away. Then Ned's hand came in contact ...
— Tom Swift and his Electric Runabout - or, The Speediest Car on the Road • Victor Appleton

... with the Church of England, and his brother having consented to make him an allowance of one pound per week if he would quit England, he retired to the Isle of Man. After nine weeks his brother ceased to remit; and to support himself, Taylor wrote for the two newspapers then published in the island, but his articles attracting attention, he was summoned before the Bishop, and compelled to quit ...
— Ancient and Modern Celebrated Freethinkers - Reprinted From an English Work, Entitled "Half-Hours With - The Freethinkers." • Charles Bradlaugh, A. Collins, and J. Watts

... sods together, use a wooden mallet, and pound the sod into close contact with the loam beneath, flattening all joints so that the growth will ...
— Making a Lawn • Luke Joseph Doogue

... however, was one of those happy mortals, of foolish, well-oiled dispositions, who take the world easy, eat white bread or brown, whichever can be got with least thought or trouble, and would rather starve on a penny than work for a pound. If left to himself, he would have whistled life away in perfect contentment; but his wife kept continually dinning in his ear about his idleness, his carelessness, and the ruin he was bringing on his family. ...
— The Literary World Seventh Reader • Various

... good-bye, Daddy, and I don't think that crisis is far off. It would have come long ago, only I do happen to know a provoking deal more about books than any assistant he ever had before. Last week I picked him up a copy of "Bells and Pomegranates" for one and nine, and he sold it next day for two pound sixteen. There's business for you, Daddy. That put off our breach at least a fortnight, but unless I discover a first folio of Shakespeare for sixpence between now and then, I don't see what's to postpone the agony after that—and if I did I should probably speculate in ...
— The History of David Grieve • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... first time to-day, I saw men bringing tobacco to market in bags. One old man brought a bag of natural leaf into camp to sell to the soldiers, price ten cents per pound. He brought it to a poor market, however, for the men have been bankrupt for weeks, and could not buy tobacco at a ...
— The Citizen-Soldier - or, Memoirs of a Volunteer • John Beatty

... clear out the barn. The next day is the market at Llanilwyn; they must go there and buy a cow which Jones Pant y rych is going to sell. I have told Ebben he is not to give more than 8 pounds for her, and that is one pound more than she ...
— By Berwen Banks • Allen Raine

... the other pains of war: Transport disorganised and credit shaken, The fear of hunger knocking at the door, And threepence extra on a pound of bacon; In fact, I'd be the most resigned of creatures If you'd ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, August 19th, 1914 • Various

... the Lady of Shalott's palace; no water. There was a dirty hydrant in the yard, four flights below, which supplied the Lady of Shalott and all her neighbors. The Lady of Shalott kept her coal under the bed; her flour, a pound at a time, in a paper parcel, on the shelf, with the teacups and the pewter spoon. If she had anything else to keep, it went out through the palace scuttle and lay on the roof. The Lady of Shalott's palace opened directly upon a precipice. ...
— Stories of Childhood • Various

... I will try and finish my letter. I have had a serious talk with my brother, and he appears to feel very much troubled over his American escapade, confessed that he had done wrong, and gave me this hundred pound note, which I inclose for the benefit of the girl; and I sincerely trust she will do nothing more to disturb a happy household, and one which will be very much annoyed by ...
— Virgie's Inheritance • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... pointed at the ducks they were near together, I Shot at the ducks and accidently Shot the head of one off, this Duck and brant was Carried to the house and every man Came around examined the Duck looked at the gun the Size of the ball which was 100 to the pound and Said in their own language Clouch Musket, wake, com ma-tax Musket which is, a good Musket do not under Stand this kind of Musket &c. I entered the Same house I Slept in, they imediately Set before me their best roots, fish ...
— The Journals of Lewis and Clark • Meriwether Lewis et al

... be liable to falling sickness, and therefore fall down in convulsions when they are hunted—hence their name "eleend." Sailors are said to have purchased on the north-west coast of Norway for ten crowns and a pound of tobacco three knots of wind from the Lapps living there, who were all magicians; when the first knot was loosed, a gentle breeze arose, the second gave a strong gale, the third a storm, during ...
— The Voyage of the Vega round Asia and Europe, Volume I and Volume II • A.E. Nordenskieold

... to supply the music for the night, and the Dago orchestra was playing the swellest ragtime music you ever heard. Well, them two gets to blows, and about fifteen others are jumping around ready to pile in when Jimmy Duggan begins to pound on the table with a wooden hammer what they uses in ...
— William Adolphus Turnpike • William Banks

... belt of cedars, indeed, hedged the island; but De Monts had ordered them to be spared, that the north wind might spend something of its force with whistling through their shaggy boughs. Cider and wine froze in the casks, and were served out by the pound. As they crowded round their half-fed fires, shivering in the icy currents that pierced their rude tenements, many sank into a ...
— Pioneers Of France In The New World • Francis Parkman, Jr.

... do; he brought me a French doll nearly as big as I was then myself,—and a whole five-pound box of candy. He is a lovely man. But I've never seen Aunt Isabel or ...
— Patty Fairfield • Carolyn Wells

... auoir du clau? What wyll ye haue of the nayll? Que donrai ie de la pierre? What shall I gyue for the stone? Que vault la liure What is worth the pound De cest laine daygneaulx?" Of this wulle of lambes?" 16 Vous responderes Ye shall ansuere Ainsi que est escript ailleurs. Also as it is ...
— Dialogues in French and English • William Caxton

... past him, up the steep hill. The one he snatched at had something in his hand, and aimed a vicious blow at his face with it; he had barely time to block it with his forearm. Then he was clutching the Fuzzy and disarming him; the weapon was a quarter-pound ballpeen hammer. He put it in his hip pocket and then picked up the ...
— Little Fuzzy • Henry Beam Piper

... Sloane, waltzing from one end of the room to the other. "And we're off to Ab-yss-in-ia in the morn-ing," he sang. "There's plenty in my money belt," he cried, slapping his sides, "you can hear the ten-pound notes crackle whenever I breathe, and it's all yours, my dear boy, and welcome. And I'll prove to you that the Winchester ...
— Cinderella - And Other Stories • Richard Harding Davis

... view. There is a foreboding silence as I near the heavy entrance-way at the top. But before I can pound for admittance, the great door swings deferentially open, a guard within salutes still more deferentially, I advance, friend, and proffer the countersign,—and the Monte Orgullo ...
— A Midsummer Drive Through The Pyrenees • Edwin Asa Dix

... them who have proved thersen willin, To help the unfortunate ones from their stooar; An if freely bestowed, be it pence, pound, or shillin, They shall nivver regret what they've given to th' poor. An if we all do what we can for our naybor, We shall sooin drive this bitter starvation away; Till th' time when gooid wages reward honest labor:— That's a nooation aw had as aw went ...
— Yorkshire Lyrics • John Hartley

... then, John? Why, what's the matter now? What, can't ye get along? B'ye run a-ground? An' can't pay twenty shillens vor a pound? What can't ye put a lwoaf ...
— Poems of Rural Life in the Dorset Dialect • William Barnes

... vault or cellar, covering it with any sort of green and rank weeds, such as dock, thistles, hemlock, &c. to a good thickness: Thus let it continue near a fortnight, by which time 'twill become a perfect mucilage: Then pound it all exceedingly in a stone mortar, 'till it be a tough past, and so very fine, as no part of the bark be discernable: This done, wash it accurately well in some running stream of water, as long as you perceive the least ordure or ...
— Sylva, Vol. 1 (of 2) - Or A Discourse of Forest Trees • John Evelyn

... Head: Marry, it has a good Neighbour of Guild-hall. It takes many a fair Pound upon that 'n ...
— The City Bride (1696) - Or The Merry Cuckold • Joseph Harris

... nobility. If he should ever catch hold of you by the arm and take you aside for a moment from the madding crowd of a lawn-tennis party to whisper in your ear the arrival of a complimentary Kharita and a pound of sweetmeats from the Foreign Office for the Jam of Bredanbatta you should let off smiles and blushes in token of the honour and glory thus ...
— Twenty-One Days in India; and, the Teapot Series • George Robert Aberigh-Mackay

... saying that although he did not know how to roast, he was pretty well posted in the art of frying. He further explained, and this time to the gratification of us all, that he had in a box, on the tender of the engine, a ten-pound turkey that he had bought up the line to take home for Christmas, and which we were quite welcome to. The only drawback to the bird was that it was frozen as hard as a rock, and would probably take a lot of thawing out. If we wished, however, he would do his best to ...
— A Lover in Homespun - And Other Stories • F. Clifford Smith

... the telephone and began restlessly to pace the room. The charred briar was produced and stuffed with that broad cut Latakia mixture of which Nayland Smith consumed close upon a pound a week. He was one of those untidy smokers who leave tangled tufts hanging from the pipe-bowl and when they light up strew the ...
— The Insidious Dr. Fu-Manchu • Sax Rohmer

... that there is nobody to blame, to listen to one or two extracts from the report. Mr. Warden, Member of the Council, gave evidence in 1832 that the money-tax levied on Surat cotton was 56 rupees per candy, leaving the grower only 24 rupees, or rather less than 3/4d. per pound. In 1846 there was so great a decay of the cotton-trade of Western India, that a committee was appointed in Bombay, partly of Members of the Chamber of Commerce and partly of servants of the Government, and they made a report in which they stated that from every candy of cotton— a ...
— Speeches on Questions of Public Policy, Volume 1 • John Bright

... the fairies play,'" wrote Pauline, and the next line said, "Prime middle cuts at Octavius Smith's, Elevenpence a pound." ...
— In the Mist of the Mountains • Ethel Turner

... answered the general, "because during the war I was a member of the Experiment Commission. The 100-pound cannon of Dahlgren, with a range of 5,000 yards, gave their projectiles an initial speed ...
— The Moon-Voyage • Jules Verne

... every man according to his several ability." verses 14, 15, In St. Luke's account of the parable, what the master gave to his servants is spoken of as pounds, and each servant is said to have received one pound. These talents or pounds both mean the same thing. They denote something with which we can do good, and make ourselves useful. And it is plain, from both these parables, that the Master gave at least one talent, or one pound, to each of his servants. None of them ...
— The Life of Jesus Christ for the Young • Richard Newton

... not a bad fellow when in good fortune, this Altamont. He ordered a smart livery for Grady, and made poor old Costigan shed tears of quickly dried gratitude by giving him a five-pound note after a snug dinner at the Back Kitchen, and he bought a green shawl for Mrs. Bolton, and a yellow one for Fanny: the most brilliant "sacrifices" of a Regent Street haberdasher's window. And a short time after this, upon her ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray



Words linked to "Pound" :   palpitate, move, ram, foot-pound, pound net, stone, Cypriot monetary unit, piaster, fragment, penny, poet, throb, blow, British monetary unit, mil, pulsate, partition, author, ounce, piastre, hold, thrash, writer, walk, symbol, force unit, Irish monetary unit, avoirdupois unit, Cypriot pound, confine, partition off, enclosure, restrain, flutter, fragmentize, fragmentise, break up, pulse, poke, Irish punt, oz., Syrian monetary unit, hit, quarter, Lebanese monetary unit, Sudanese monetary unit, flap, quid, thrust, Egyptian monetary unit



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