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RI

noun
1.
A state in New England; one of the original 13 colonies; the smallest state.  Synonyms: Little Rhody, Ocean State, Rhode Island.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"RI" Quotes from Famous Books



... illustrates with a vocal score musical excerpt at the point where the singer sings "Cum sanc-to spi-ri-tu, in Gloria."] ...
— Letters of Franz Liszt, Volume 1, "From Paris to Rome: - Years of Travel as a Virtuoso" • Franz Liszt; Letters assembled by La Mara and translated

... us," said the Robin. "I am absolutely freezing and must have something to distract my thoughts—ri ...
— More Tales in the Land of Nursery Rhyme • Ada M. Marzials

... fellow "—Mr. Stimcoe comprehended the crowd with an unsteady wave of his hand—"that don't 'pply 'case of men. Ne tu pu'ri tempsherish ...
— Poison Island • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch (Q)

... Always the honorable orators, Buttoning the buttons on their prinz alberts, Pronouncing the syllables "sac-ri-fice," Juggling those bitter salt-soaked syllables— Do they ever gag with hot ashes in their mouths? Do their tongues ever shrivel with a pain of fire Across those simple ...
— American Poetry, 1922 - A Miscellany • Edna St. Vincent Millay

... peasants, who were speechless from surprise, glanced sideways out of the corner of one eye, and they looked so exactly like fowls that the man with the light whiskers, when he sat up, said: "Co—co—ri—co" under their very noses, and that gave rise to another storm ...
— Maupassant Original Short Stories (180), Complete • Guy de Maupassant

... "Tra-de-ri-di-ra," exclaimed the artist, striking alternately with his knife a glass and a bottle, as if he were playing a triangle. "I must say that you choose madly gay subjects for conversation. We are truly a joyous crowd; look at Bergenheim opposite us; ...
— Gerfaut, Complete • Charles de Bernard

... obeyed, and pattered off down the stairs, while Ida went on and tapped at the door of the room in which the two boys slept. The knocking had to be repeated several times before there was any answer. At last there came a sleepy, "All ri'. What ...
— Under Padlock and Seal • Charles Harold Avery

... an inebriated United States official, who flings his spectacles overboard, and sings a flippant and absurd song about his grandmother's spotted calf, with his ri-fol-lol-tiddery-i-do. After which he crumbles, in an incomprehensible manner, into the bottom of the ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 4 • Charles Farrar Browne

... mistaking the call of an official in the corridor, "I-ri-ma sen" for a command to go to sleep, stretched out her leg to lie down. She was scolded and severely punished. Another closed her eyes in prayer. "You are sleeping," called the wardress. In vain the girl replied ...
— Korea's Fight for Freedom • F.A. McKenzie

... carrion crow sat upon an oak, Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, de ri do, Watching a tailor cutting out his cloak Sing heigh ho! the carrion crow, Fol de rol, de rol, de rol, ...
— Harry's Ladder to Learning - Horn-Book, Picture-Book, Nursery Songs, Nursery Tales, - Harry's Simple Stories, Country Walks • Anonymous

... as a marriage bell" for a page and a half; then David, fiddling away, cried out, "You are getting too fast; 'ri tum tiddy, iddy ri tum ti;" then, by stamping and accenting very strongly, he kept the piano from overflowing its bounds. The piece ended. Eve rubbed her hands. "Now you'll catch it, ...
— Love Me Little, Love Me Long • Charles Reade

... booke cal- led the Foundacion of Rhetorike, be- cause all other partes of Rhetorike are grounded thereupon, euery parte sette forthe in an Oracion vpon questions, verie profitable to bee knowen and redde: Made by Ri- chard Rainolde Maister of Arte, of ...
— A booke called the Foundacion of Rhetorike • Richard Rainolde

... o u ba be bi bo bu ca ce ci co cu da de di do du fa fe fi fo fu ga ge gi go gu la le li lo lu ma me mi mo mu na ne ni no nu pa pe pi po pu qa qe qi qo qu ra re ri ro ru sa se si so su ta ...
— The Notebooks of Leonardo Da Vinci, Complete • Leonardo Da Vinci

... department nothing was to be heard but the trampling of bare feet, and the rustling of petticoats.—The head valet was named Irinarkh, and Alexyei Sergyeitch always summoned him with a long-drawn-out call: "I-ri-na-a-arkh!"—He called the others: "Young fellow! Boy! What subject is there?!"—He could not endure bells. "God have mercy, this is no tavern!" And what amazed me was, that no matter at what time Alexyei ...
— A Reckless Character - And Other Stories • Ivan Turgenev

... husband in astonishment. "Look at the eyes of her; look at the hair of her, an' the smile, an' that there dimple! Look at Alice Robinson, that's called the prettiest child on the river, an' see how Rebecca shines her ri' down out o' sight! I hope Mirandy'll favor her comin' over to see us real often, for she'll let off some of her steam here, an' the brick house'll be consid'able safer for everybody concerned. We've known what it was to hev children, even if 't was more 'n thirty years ago, ...
— Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... no ria. (Contando.) Cuatrocientas catorce... No discuto con usted ninguna de las formalidades mercantiles, y tomo lo que, segn convenio, me corresponde. Esto no quita para que est dispuesto ahora y siempre ...
— Heath's Modern Language Series: Mariucha • Benito Perez Galdos

... awake I retail some piece of current engine gossip. "After-bilge pump jibbed at three o'clock," I say. "Aw ri' now?" he asks. "Yes, aw ri' now," I answer. "You'll have to watch the M.P. guide though—she's warm." Then, remarking that the after-well is dry, and that I've got plenty of water in the boilers for him, I leave him and go below till he relieves me. It is a point of honour among us to know ...
— An Ocean Tramp • William McFee

... wommetoo," puts in jumbo Lee, all in a huddle of words. "Ije slivsnot. Aw ri. Mon Jim. Shoonmeansmore ...
— Back Home • Eugene Wood

... of active life filled the little creek on its auriferous course from Bald Mountain, through a canyon of wild and picturesque character, until it emerged into the large and fertile valley of the Pas-sam-a-ri... the mountain stream called by Lewis and Clark in their journal 'Philanthropy River.' Lateral streams of great beauty pour down the sides of the mountain chain bounding the valley.... Gold placers were found upon these streams and occupied soon after the ...
— The Passing of the Frontier - A Chronicle of the Old West, Volume 26 in The Chronicles - Of America Series • Emerson Hough

... your spelling, let me see, If SHE makes sher, and RI makes ry, Good spelling-master: your crany ...
— Poems (Volume II.) • Jonathan Swift

... the Brumble farm came the dusty apparition of a boy, a tousle-headed, freckle-faced, gaunt-eyed little fellow, clad in a sort of combination suit fashioned from a pair of overalls and a woman's shirtwaist. In search of "Miss M'ri," he looked into the kitchen, the henhouse, the dairy, and the flower garden. Not finding her in any of these accustomed places, ...
— David Dunne - A Romance of the Middle West • Belle Kanaris Maniates

... universally attractive, which they chiefly ascribe to the sun, thence called 'Aditya, or the attractor,' a name designed by the mythologists to mean the child of the goddess Aditi. But the most wonderful passage on the theory of attractions occurs in the charming allegorical poem of 'Shi'ri'n and Ferhai'd, or the Divine Spirit, and a human soul disinterestedly pious,' a work which, from the first verse to the last, is a blaze of ...
— On the Antiquity of the Chemical Art • James Mactear

... invincible amour; C'est la, dans cette nuit d'horreur et de detresse, Au milieu des transports d'un peuple furieux Qui semblait en passant crier a ma jeunesse: "Toi qui pleures ce soir, n'as-ta pas ri comme eux?" C'est la, devant ce mur, ou j'ai frappe ma tete, Ou j'ai pose deux fois le fer sur mon sein nu; C'est la, le croiras-tu? chaste et noble poete, Que de tes chants divins je ...
— Legends, Tales and Poems • Gustavo Adolfo Becquer

... qu'il me doit tout, et que pour sa grandeur J'ai foul sous les pieds remords, crainte, pudeur; Qu'avec un coeur d'airain exerant sa puissance, J'ai fait taire les lois et gmir l'innocence, Que pour lui, des Persans bravant l'aversion, 870 J'ai chri, j'ai cherch la maldiction; Et pour prix de ma vie leur haine expose, Le barbare aujourd'hui m'expose ...
— Esther • Jean Racine

... held the receiver and he helped the strange, little figure to its seat in front of the 'phone. She put the tube to her lips. "Hallo, Daddy. Yes, it's Betty.... Mr. Achilles brought me, father.... Yes—yes—your little Betty—yes—and I'm all ri-i-ght...." The receiver dropped from her fingers. She had buried her face in her arms and ...
— Mr. Achilles • Jennette Lee

... would greet you with a curse'. There are golden hearts in gutters, though their owners lack the fat, And we'll back a teamster's offspring to outswear a city brat. Do you think we're never jolly where the trams and buses rage? Did you hear the gods in chorus when 'Ri-tooral' held the stage? Did you catch a ring of sorrow in the city urchin's voice When he yelled for Billy Elton, when he thumped the floor for Royce? Do the bushmen, down on pleasure, miss the everlasting ...
— In the Days When the World Was Wide and Other Verses • Henry Lawson

... from this spot I shall never find it again," thought Ri- naldo, when he had recovered his usual presence of mind. "If I knock, I shall be discovered. What am ...
— Parisians in the Country - The Illustrious Gaudissart, and The Muse of the Department • Honore de Balzac

... out of her way, and proceeded to stir up a batch of brown molasses cookies. "'Cause dey is fillin' fo' boys. An' Mistuh Val, heah, he needs some moah fat 'crost dose skinny ribs. Letty-Lou, yo'all ain't feedin' dese men-folks ri'. Now yo' chillens," she swooped down upon her own family, "yo'all gits outa heah an' don't ...
— Ralestone Luck • Andre Norton

... said Cap'n Amazon placidly, "come from that big house on the p'int—as far as you can see from our windows. More money than good sense, I guess. Though the man, he comes of good old Cape stock. But I guess that blood can de-te-ri-orate, as the feller said. Ain't much of it left in the young folks, pretty likely. They just laze around and play all the time. If 'All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,' you can take it from me, Niece ...
— Cap'n Abe, Storekeeper • James A. Cooper

... toigh leam Domhnullach neo-chosdail O nach coltach e ri cach. 'N uair bhios iadsan ag iarraidh fortain Bidh esan 'n a phrop aig fear cais Ma bha do mhathair 'n a mnaoi choir Cha do ghleidh i 'n leabaidh phosda glan, Cha 'n 'eil cuid agad do Chloinn Domhnuill, 'S Rothach no Rosach am fear. 'N uair a bhuail thu aig an uinneig Cha ...
— The Celtic Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 1, November 1875 • Various

... & Elizabeth De Snt. Michell of Martins in the fields, Spinster. Published October 19tn, 22nd, 29th 1655, and were married by Richard Sherwin Esqr one of the justices of the Peace of the Cittie and Lyberties of Westm. December 1st. (Signed) Ri. Sherwin."] ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... it seems, is a stickler of BONEY'S— Served with him, of course—nay, I'm sure they were cronies; So martial his features, dear DOLL, you can trace Ulm, Austerlitz, Lodi, as plain in his face As you do on that pillar of glory and brass Which the poor Duc de B**RI must hate so to pass, It appears, too, he made—as most foreigners do— About English affairs an odd blunder or two. For example—misled by the names. I dare say— He confounded JACK CASTLES with Lord CASTLEREAGH, And—such a mistake as no mortal hit ever on— Fancied the ...
— The Humourous Poetry of the English Language • James Parton

... she waved her hand joyfully and exclaimed, 'Welcome bri' Springtime. Wel-come to our country village. You—you behold in me the only living survivor of the wreck of the Hesperus. Parade ri' up, and give the waiter your hat, coat and vest and bevy in. Though I have just given nineteen dollars' worth of hair puffs away as sou-sou-ven—you say it, I feel like a new born child. Once again I am care fre' and heart fre'. Tra la la la le. I have just decorated ...
— The Sorrows of a Show Girl • Kenneth McGaffey

... to foighting, 'Tis ourselves who will lead 'em a dance, Till, loike the Cork bhoys, they're deloighting, Back again to their homes to advance! No longer in beating such rebels We'll take than in baiting a bull. How they'll squake, in effeminate trebles, When Ulster's battalions are full! Ri fol didder ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 102, June 18, 1892 • Various

... more such devastations as they had before occasioned; for, to their violence was imputed not only the disjunction of Sicily from Italy, but also the separation of Europe from Africa, by which a passage was opened for the ocean to form the Mediterranean sea. According to some, the AEolian, or Lip{)a}ri islands were uninhabited till Lip{)a}rus, son of Auson, settled a colony there, and gave one of them his name. AE{)o}lus married his daughter Cy{)a}ne, peopled the rest and succeeded him on the throne. He was a generous and ...
— Roman Antiquities, and Ancient Mythology - For Classical Schools (2nd ed) • Charles K. Dillaway

... Simla. Oh, ri-ippmg!" said Bobby Wick, and ordered new white cord breeches on the ...
— The Works of Rudyard Kipling One Volume Edition • Rudyard Kipling

... knocking round with Swizzleford and Rattlebrain. C'sino, and V'ri'tes. Such a lark! Stole two Red Boots and a Brass Hat. Knocked down thirteen notes, and went to bed as tight ...
— A Dictionary of Austral English • Edward Morris

... Haltiat). The Genius of Finnish mythology. Het'e-wa'ne. The Finnish name of the Pleiades. Hi'si (original Hiisi). The Evil Principle; also called Jutas, Lempo, and Piru. Mon'ja-tar. The daughter of the Pine-tree. Hor'na. A sacred rock in Finland. I'ku-Tur'so. An evil giant of the sea. Il'ma-ri'nem. The worker of the metals; a brother of Wainamoinen. Il'ma-tar. Daughter of the Air, and mother of Wainamoinen. Il'po-tar. Believed to be the daughter of the Snow flake; the same as Louhi. Im-a'tra. A celebrated waterfall ...
— The Kalevala (complete) • John Martin Crawford, trans.

... everything was in order for the feast. The nobles of Ireland with their winsome consorts, the learned and artistic professions represented by the pick of their time were in place. The Ard-Ri, Corm of the Hundred Battles, had taken his place on the raised dais which commanded the whole of that vast hall. At his Right hand his son Art, to be afterwards as famous as his famous father, took his seat, and on his left Goll mor mac Morna, chief of ...
— Irish Fairy Tales • James Stephens

... (siecle XIX, ad finem) great attention was given on the continent of Am-ri-ka to increased speed in locomotion. Men and women went darting about like the big yellow gnats that we see at sundown on the western coast of our island when the bay is hazy. The whole history of that century in both Am-ri-ka and Yoo-rup might well be written around the fact of transit, ...
— The Arena - Volume 18, No. 92, July, 1897 • Various

... to do-o-o," the waitress chanted. "We think she's about ri-i-ght." She smiled tolerantly upon the misgiving of the stranger, if it was that, and then retreated when the mother and daughter began ...
— Henry James, Jr. • William Dean Howells

... AM'RI, in Absalom and Achitophel, by Dryden and Tate, is Heneage Finch, earl of Nottingham and lord chancellor. He is called "The Father ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama, Vol 1 - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook • The Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D.

... "All ri'. Come on," said Sadie, with deep disgust, but she started on a heavy trot towards the block on which her heart had been set. And when they rounded the corner and came before the little shop window, Sadie stopped with a ...
— The Girl from Sunset Ranch - Alone in a Great City • Amy Bell Marlowe

... :manularity: /man'yoo-la'ri-tee/ /n./ [prob. fr. techspeak 'manual' 'granularity'] A notional measure of the manual labor required for some task, particularly one of the sort that automation is supposed to eliminate. "Composing ...
— The Jargon File, Version 4.0.0

... ro, mo nighean donn bhoidheach, Hi-ri, mo nighean donn bhoidheach, Mo chaileag, laghach, bhoidheach, ...
— The Man From Glengarry - A Tale Of The Ottawa • Ralph Connor

... ALFIE'RI, an Italian dramatist, spent his youth in dissipation before he devoted himself to the dramatic art; on the success of his first drama "Cleopatra," met at Florence with the Countess of Albany, the wife of Charles ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... hut? or even a projecting rock to shelter him? All of a sudden, he saw before his nose on the arid, naked plain a species of wooden chalet, bearing, on a long placard in gigantic type, these letters, which he deciphered with difficulty: PHO... TO... GRA... PHIE DU RI... GI KULM. At the same instant the vast hotel with its three hundred windows loomed up before him between the great lamp-posts, the globes of which were now being ...
— Tartarin On The Alps • Alphonse Daudet

... fellow-journalist is broke and needs a twenty, Who's allus ready to whack up a portion of his plenty? Who's allus got a wallet that's as full of sordid gain As his heart is full of kindness and his head is full of brain? Whose bowels of compassion will in-va-ri-a-bly move Their owner to those courtesies which plainly, surely prove That he's the kind of person that never does go back On a fellow that's in ...
— A Little Book of Western Verse • Eugene Field

... the wants of men, Guide my hand, and guide my pen, And help me bring the truth to light, Of that dread scene and awful night, Ri, tu, ri, tu, ri, tu. There was Mister Cadoga in years a-bud, Was found next morning in tew feet mud; He strove—he strove—but all in vain, The more he got up, he fell down again. Ri, tu, ...
— Life in the Clearings versus the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... respectful tone which one should always adopt when speaking of capital, "is a man of considerable property; lives on his interest, and keeps a hoss and shay. He 's a great scholar, too, Silas; takes all the pe-ri-odicals ...
— Miss Mehetabel's Son • Thomas Bailey Aldrich

... looked at the belvedere (teyyareh, a square or round erection on the top of a house, either open at the sides or pierced with windows, our architectural term 'lantern') and its casements (shebabik, pl. of shubbak, a window formed of grating or lattice-work) and their lattices (she"ri for she"rir, pl. of sheriyyeh, a lattice), all wroughten of emeralds and rubies and other than it of precious jewels." The Sultan "goes round in the kiosk" and seeing "the casement (shubbak), which Alaeddin had purposely left ...
— Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp • John Payne

... a fire," said Jeb. "Here, you Bridgeboro troop and them two Maryland troops and the troop from Washin't'n," he called, "you make a bucket line like we practiced. Tom—whar's Tom? And you Oakwood b'ys, git the buckets out'n the provish'n camp. Line up thar ri' down t' the water's edge and come up through here. You fellers from Pennsylvany 'n' you others thar, git the axes 'n' come 'long o' me. Don't git ...
— Tom Slade at Temple Camp • Percy K. Fitzhugh

... beat all. Niel gow! niel gow! niel gow! off we go! off we go! off we go! followed by rapid conversations, the words unintelligible but perfectly articulate, and interspersed with the oddest chuckles, plans of pleasure for the day, no doubt. Then ri tiddle tiddle tiddle tiddle tiddle tiddle! playing a thing like a fiddle with wires; then "off we go" again, and bow! wow! wow! jug! jug! jug! jug! jug! and the whole lot in exuberant spirits, such extravagance of drollery, such rollicking jollity, ...
— It Is Never Too Late to Mend • Charles Reade

... running over to the van. "You must have muffled old Dobbin's feet to have crept in so quietly. How is Ri—Mr. Hook?" she added, all ...
— The Motor Maids at Sunrise Camp • Katherine Stokes

... this cannot here be more than suggested, but the latter fact seems to bear upon the association of the Hindoos with ourselves in the great Aryan family, Our do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si, do correspond with the Hindoo sa, ri, ga, ma, pa, dha, ni, sa, and the intervals are the same—two semi-tones, of which the Malaysian is destitute. The Hindoos have also terms in their language for the tonic, mediant and dominant, so that they know something of harmony, of which the ...
— Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science, Volume 22. October, 1878. • Various

... a ri richid rain corbom etal risin dail: co cloister cech ni atber i sanct cech sen, ...
— The Latin & Irish Lives of Ciaran - Translations Of Christian Literature. Series V. Lives Of - The Celtic Saints • Anonymous

... in parts of the Jaintia Hills (ka lyngkor), also a harrow (ka iuh moi). In dealing with agriculture, the lands of the Khasi and Jaintia Hills may be divided into the following classes:—(a) Forest land, (b) wet paddy land called hali or pynthor, (c) high grass land or ka ri lum or ka ri phlang, (d) homestead land (ka 'dew kyper). Forest lands are cleared by the process known as jhuming, the trees being felled early in the winter and allowed to lie till January or February, ...
— The Khasis • P. R. T. Gurdon

... Orion (O-ri-on), with its striking array of brilliant stars, Betelguese, Rigel, the Three Kings, etc., is generally admitted to be the finest constellation ...
— Boy Scouts Handbook - The First Edition, 1911 • Boy Scouts of America

... take yeh in. I'm goin' to kick yeh off'n the face of the earth," he continued, prodding uncertainly at Danvers. "Stop, I tell yeh! Why do I want yeh to walk slow? 'Cos (hic) I want to wipe the road up with yer English hide. Yeh think yeh're all ri', but yeh ain't. Yeh look's if yeh owned the town, an' ...
— A Man of Two Countries • Alice Harriman

... Achaeus, even in their father's lifetime, led some of their followers along the Isthmus of Corinth, and down into the peninsula, where they founded two flourishing states, called, after them, A-cha'ia and I-o'ni-a. Thus, while northern Greece was pretty equally divided between the Do'ri-ans and AE-o'li-ans, descendants and subjects of Dorus and AEolus, the peninsula was almost entirely in the hands of the I-o'ni-ans and A-chae'ans, who built towns, cultivated the soil, and became bold navigators. They ventured farther and farther out ...
— The Story of the Greeks • H. A. Guerber

... or Brri, is the Welsh authority cited by Thomas in his Tristan. Cf. Gaston Paris, Romania, viii. ...
— Epic and Romance - Essays on Medieval Literature • W. P. Ker

... "All ri', schipper, don' you worry," bawled a great hulking Dutchman in reply. "Dere's blendy of dime yet; and ve're nod going do move ...
— A Middy of the Slave Squadron - A West African Story • Harry Collingwood

... bridge is broke and I have to mend it, Fol de rol de ri do, fol de rol de ri do, The bridge is broke and I have to mend it, Fol ...
— The Spectacle Man - A Story of the Missing Bridge • Mary F. Leonard

... bar' go im mor' tal ized prin' ci ple col' o nists rep re sen ta' tion de ri' sion pa' tri ot ism Phil a del' ...
— De La Salle Fifth Reader • Brothers of the Christian Schools

... Phingari, the moon. [[Greek: phenga/ri] is derived from [Greek: phenga/rion,] dim. of ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... get mad's 'ell an' quit me," said Breede. "Only st'nogfer ever found gimme minute's peace. Dunno why—talk aw ri'. He un'stan's me; res' ...
— Bunker Bean • Harry Leon Wilson

... lantern. Every day the kozo[u] (man or boy as apprentice) of the utility shop in Asakusa Umacho[u] slowly took down the lantern covered with white paper. In a straight line, before the eyes of all, he passed along Kuramaedo[u]ri, crossing Asakusa. From Yokoyamacho[u] he crossed to Daimaru no Mae. Passing through Norigyo[u]cho[u] he reached the Nakamura-za in Sakaicho[u]. As he passed along these streets crowded with people, the eyes ...
— The Yotsuya Kwaidan or O'Iwa Inari - Tales of the Tokugawa, Volume 1 (of 2) • James S. De Benneville

... don't worry," he said. "It will be all ri. . . . But how well you are looking! And how you have grown! And how glad your poor mother will be to ...
— The Woman Thou Gavest Me - Being the Story of Mary O'Neill • Hall Caine

... is // knowledge pitie, that commonlie, more care is had, yea and // of a good that emonges verie wise men, to finde out rather a cunnynge // witte. man for their horse, than a cunnyng man for their // A good Ri- children. They say nay in worde, but they do so // der better in deede. For, to the one, they will gladlie giue // rewarded a stipend of 200. Crounes by yeare, and loth // than a good to offer to the other, 200. shillinges. God, that // ...
— The Schoolmaster • Roger Ascham

... letter delivered? I summoned hastily the foreman, printers, and office-boy, but without eliciting any thing. No one had seen the letter delivered, nor knew any thing of the bearer. A few days later, I had a visit from my laundry-man, Ah Ri. ...
— Tales of the Argonauts • Bret Harte

... infatuated; and if his science makes him read in the stars the fate of men, I have the science of reading in the eyes of people the names of those they love. Hold up your head a little, and open your eyes wide. E, by itself, E; r, i, ri, Eri; p, h, y, phy, Eriphy; l, e, le, Eriphyle. You are in love with ...
— The Magnificent Lovers (Les Amants magnifiques) • Moliere

... treatise upon Friendship. This book once belonged to William Burton the Leicestershire historian; as we learn from this inscription below the colophon: "Liber Willmi Burton Lindliaci Leicestrensis socij inter. Templi, ex dono amici mei singularis M^{ri}. Iohanis Price, socij Interioris. Templi, 28. Jan. 1606. Anno regni regis Iacobi quarto." On the reverse is a fac-simile of the same subscription, beneath an exceedingly well executed head of Burton, ...
— A Bibliographical, Antiquarian and Picturesque Tour in France and Germany, Volume Two • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... coats, belted round the waist, with a strong, sour smell always clinging to them. And on the women's side, one could hear nothing but the patter of bare feet, the swish of petticoats. The chief valet was called Irinarh, and Alexey Sergeitch always called him in a long-drawn-out call: 'I-ri-na-a-arh!' The others he called: 'Boy! Lad! Whoever's there of the men!' Bells he could not endure: 'It's not an eating-house, God forbid!' And what used to surprise me was that whatever time Alexey ...
— A Desperate Character and Other Stories • Ivan Turgenev

... (Ali Baba of Vanity Fair), one of the brightest and most original, as well as one of the most generous spirits who ever handled Indian subjects, has drawn a picture in his Twenty-one Days in India of a Raja and his Sow[a]ri [Cavalcade] which could not be bettered by a ...
— Twenty-One Days in India; and, the Teapot Series • George Robert Aberigh-Mackay

... der Franzoys heizet flo'ri' Der glast kom sinem velle bi, Parzival's schoen' was nu ein wint; Und Absalon Davides kint, Von Askalun Vergulaht Und al den schoene was geslaht, Und des man Gahmurete jach Do man'n in zogen sach Ze ...
— From Ritual to Romance • Jessie L. Weston

... a single person, from [Greek: Palikari] [[Greek: palleka/ri]], a general name for a soldier amongst the Greeks and Albanese, who speak Romaic: it means, ...
— The Works of Lord Byron, Volume 2 • George Gordon Byron

... heaven appeared; there ocean flowed; There the orbed moon and sun unwearied glowed; There every star that gems the brow of night— Ple'iads and Hy'ads, and O-ri'on's might; The Bear, that, watchful in his ceaseless roll Around the star whose light illumes the pole, Still eyes Orion, nor e'er stoops to lave His beams unconscious of the ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... Gittin' religion ain't goin' to help him much. If he ever hears tell 'bout the gate of heaven bein' open 't the last day, he won't 'a' begun to begin thinkin' 'bout gittin' in tell he hears the door shet in his face; 'n' then he'll set ri' down's comf'table's if he was inside, 'n' say, 'Wall, better luck next time: slow an' sure 's my ...
— Timothy's Quest - A Story for Anybody, Young or Old, Who Cares to Read It • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... she responded, as they moved on again, "it doesn't come easy for us Southerners to think of your country as being beautiful; but we notice that nearly all the landscapes in our books are made in 'barren New England,' and we have a pri-vate cu-ri-os-i-ty to know how you all ...
— John March, Southerner • George W. Cable

... Gilbert caught hold of him again. "I woul'n be a young chap," he muttered, "not for ... not for nothink. You ... you're a young chap, ain't you? Yesh you are! You needn't tell me you ain't! I can see as wellsh anythink! You're a young chap ri' enough. Well ... well, Gawd, 'elp you, young feller! Thash all I got to sy ... subjec!' Goo-ni', gen'lemen!" He staggered off the pavement, and went half way across the deserted street. Then he turned and looked at them for a few moments. ...
— Changing Winds - A Novel • St. John G. Ervine

... hinsolent Hage, and without no respect for Authority. The cry of them demmycrat 'owlers is all for low In-fe-ri-or-ity. Things is about bottom uppards, as far as I judges, already, And if the porochial dignity's floored, what is left to ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100., Jan. 10, 1891 • Various

... Conchulaind fortissimi herois Scottorum la Lugaid mac tri con, i. ri Muman, agus la Ercc, i. ri Temrach, mac Coirpri Niad fir, agus la tri maccu Calattin de Chonnachtaib; vii. mbliadna a aes intan rogab gaisced. xvii. mbliadna dano a aes intan mboi indegaid ...
— The Ancient Irish Epic Tale Tain Bo Cualnge • Unknown

... Down in de lonesome valley, Go down in de lonesome valley, my Lord, Ri' 2. You feed on milk and honey, You feed on milk and ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 2, August, 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... the air; The sweetest flowers I have found Grow rather close unto the ground, And highest places are most bare. Why, you had better win the grace Of our poor cussed Af-ri-can, Than win the eyes of every man In love ...
— The Book of Humorous Verse • Various

... will not listen; they are trying to be what they are not, trying to wear clothes not made for them, trying to be like nations and people utterly foreign to them; and they will not succeed. But, "into a sack holding a ri, only a ri will go," and these sacks of our young people are full to overflowing with this, which seems to me dearly acquired knowledge, and there is not room for more. Time will help, and they will learn caution and discretion in life's halls of experience, and ...
— My Lady of the Chinese Courtyard • Elizabeth Cooper

... all the worl' to-day know' the new class of American," she said—"your class. Many year' ago we have another class which Europe didn' like. That was when the American was ter-ri-ble! He was the—what is that you call?—oh, yes; he 'make himself,' you say: that is it. My frien', he was abominable! He brag'; he talk' through the nose; yes, and he was niggardly, rich as he was! But you, you yo'ng men of the new generation, you are ...
— His Own People • Booth Tarkington

... NERVOUS TISSUE consists of soft, pulpy matter, enclosed in a sheath, called neu-ri-lem'a. This tissue consists of two substances. The one, of a pulpy character and gray color, is called cin-e-ri'tious, (ash-colored.) The other, of a fibrous character and white, is named med'ul-la-ry, (marrow-like.) In ...
— A Treatise on Anatomy, Physiology, and Hygiene (Revised Edition) • Calvin Cutter

... ri, ro, The summer comes once mo! To beer, boys! to beer The winter lies in bands, O! And he who won't come here, We'll trounce him with our wands, O! Yo, yo, yo, ...
— O. T. - A Danish Romance • Hans Christian Andersen

... occupy ane palace at Edinburgh, and had there ane valziant man, who did him man-service by keeping the croft, or corn-land, which was tilled for the convenience of the King's household, and was thence callit Croft-an-ri, that is to say, the King his croft; quhilk place, though now coverit with biggings, is to this day called Croftangry, and lyeth near to the royal palace. And whereas that some of those who bear this auld and honourable name may take scorn that it ariseth from the tilling of the ground, ...
— Chronicles of the Canongate • Sir Walter Scott

... noble Vncle Lancaster? Ri. What comfort man? How ist with aged Gaunt? Ga. Oh how that name befits my composition: Old Gaunt indeed, and gaunt in being old: Within me greefe hath kept a tedious fast, And who abstaynes from meate, that is not gaunt? For sleeping ...
— The First Folio [35 Plays] • William Shakespeare

... dear Zir-ri,[7] tune your lyres and lutes, And sing of love with chastest, sweetest notes, Of Accad's goddess Ishtar, Queen of Love, And Izdubar, with softest measure move; Great Samas'[8] son, of him dear Zir-ri sing! Of him whom goddess Ishtar warmly wooed, Of him whose breast with virtue was imbued. He ...
— Babylonian and Assyrian Literature • Anonymous

... it is impossible to say which is correct. Again, a family bearing the name Theobald is of French origin and used really to be called Du Val. In Steiermark, which had been over-run with Turks two hundred years ago, there are many family names of Turkish origin. Thus Hasenhrl may come from Hassan ri; Salata from Saladin; Mullenbock, from Mullei ...
— Robin Hood • J. Walker McSpadden

... 'Altro, altro! Not Ri—' Before John Baptist could finish the name, his comrade had got his hand under his chin and fiercely shut ...
— Little Dorrit • Charles Dickens

... especially useful for study or imitation. It then became a rhetorical exercise to recast, adapt or interweave such passages. Sopater, the commentator on Hermogenes, wrote on [Greek: metabolai kai metapoiseis tn Dmosthenous chrin], "adaptations or transcripts of passages in Demosthenes." Such manipulation could not but lead to interpolations or confusions in the original text. Great, too, as was the attention bestowed on the thought, ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 8, Slice 2 - "Demijohn" to "Destructor" • Various

... in the evening into some of the coffee-houses of the Algerian upper town, you will hear even today, Moors speak among themselves, with winks and chuckles, of a certain Sidi ben Tart'ri, an amiable, rich European who—it now some years ago—lived in the upper town with a little local ...
— Tartarin de Tarascon • Alphonse Daudet

... when he pleased was inalienable. This was the statement of his inner consciousness. Unfortunately, its outward expression was vague, being limited to a repetition of the following formula—"Su'shine all ri'! Wasser maar, ...
— Selected Stories • Bret Harte

... curiously explained by various quotations. The Hokke-Monku says:—"The effect of a wheel is to crush something; and the effect of the Buddha's preaching is to crush all delusions, errors, doubts, and superstitions. Therefore preaching the doctrine is called, 'turning the Wheel.'"... The Sei-Ri-Ron says: "Even as the common wheel has its spokes and its hub, so in Buddhism there are many branches of the Hasshi Shodo ('Eight-fold Path,' or eight rules of conduct)." VII.—The Crown of Brahma. Under the heel of the Buddha is the Treasure-Crown (Ho-Kwan) of ...
— In Ghostly Japan • Lafcadio Hearn

... fluctuating groups began to swim before the eyes of our hero as they gradually closed; nor did he re-open them till the morning sun was high on the lake without, though there was but a faint and glimmering twilight in the recesses of Uaimh an Ri, or the King's Cavern, as the abode of Donald Bean Lean was ...
— Waverley, Or 'Tis Sixty Years Hence, Complete • Sir Walter Scott

... tini Yon moune yo aim; Toutt moune tini Yon moune yo chri; Toutt moune tini Yon doudoux yo. Jusse moin tou sle ...
— Two Years in the French West Indies • Lafcadio Hearn

... Tra-di-ri-di-ra and so on... merely to gain time. I tell you he is in our hands, that's certain! But what was most amusing," he continued, with a sudden, good-natured laugh, "was that we could not think how to address the reply! If not as 'Consul' and of course not as 'Emperor,' it ...
— War and Peace • Leo Tolstoy

... 's truagh an sgeula tha 'n diugh ri fheutainn, Thug gal air ceudan a measg an t-sluaigh, Mu Eachainn gleusta 'bha fearail, feumail, Gun da ghlac an t-eug thu a threun-laoich chruaidh: 'S mor bron do Chinnidh, mar eoin na tuinne Tha 'n cronan duilich ...
— The Celtic Magazine, Vol. 1, No. 3, January 1876 • Various

... your lyres and lutes, And sing of love with chastest, sweetest notes, Of Accad's goddess Ishtar, Queen of Love, And Izdubar, with softest measure move; Great Samas'[8] son, of him dear Zir-ri sing! Of him whom goddess Ishtar warmly wooed, Of him whose breast with virtue was imbued. He as a giant towered, lofty grown, As Babil's[9] great pa-te-si[10] was he known, His armed fleet commanded on the seas And erstwhile travelled on the foreign leas; His mother Ellat-gula[11] ...
— Babylonian and Assyrian Literature • Anonymous

... yes," I told him, "come along," Tu ri lum diddle day. "The weather is certainly fine just now," Fum lum dum skiddle fay. But the grasshopper fell in a deep, dark bog, And I pulled him out on a sunken log, And then came along a bad, savage dog, And ...
— Buddy And Brighteyes Pigg - Bed Time Stories • Howard R. Garis

... I've got home all ri——[Defiantly.] Who says I sh'd never 've opened th' door without 'sistance. [He staggers in, fumbling with the reticule. A lady's handkerchief and purse of crimson silk fall out.] Serve her joll' ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... perhaps significant, that the word eriko, in Greek, [Greek: e)ri/ko], whence erica is probably derived, means to break ...
— The Symbolism of Freemasonry • Albert G. Mackey

... the east end door and answer the roll-call, as he has for thirty years. Miss Ollie Mingle is going over too. She must be expecting that Paynesville young man again. If the competition between her and Ri Hawkes gets any keener, Ollie will have to meet the train down at the crossing and nab the young man there. Sim Atkinson is taking a handful of letters down to the station as usual. Ever since he had his row with Postmaster Flint, he has refused to add to the receipts of the office, ...
— Homeburg Memories • George Helgesen Fitch

... why do you give way to grief? What has happened is by the decree of heaven. It was not the will of the gods that I should accompany you. You have a long journey to make, and a wide extent of sea to cross, before you reach the shores of Hes-pe'ri-a, where the Ti'ber flows in gentle course through the rich fields of a warlike race. There prosperity awaits you, and you shall take to yourself a wife of a royal line. Weep not for me. The mother of the gods keeps me in this land to serve her. And now farewell, ...
— Story of Aeneas • Michael Clarke

... was rather out of his line; and how he prayed so long and absurdly that the Colonel ordered him under arrest, but that even while soldiers stood over him with gleaming bayonets, the reckless being sang a preposterous song about his grandmother's spotted calf, with its Ri-fol-lol-tiddery-i-do; after which ...
— The Complete Works of Artemus Ward, Part 1 • Charles Farrar Browne

... [o]r[e]t[e] orrerter. rapturous. raep[ts][er]r[e]s raptsherers or raptshrers. parasite. paer[e]sait parrersite. obloquy. [o]bl[e]kwi oblerquy. syllogise. sil[e][dz]aiz sillergize. equivocal. ikwiv[e]k[er]l ikwivverk'l. immaterial. im[e]ti[e]ri[e]l immertierierl. miniature. mini[ts][e] minnitsher. extraordinary. ikstr[o]:dnri ikstrordnry. salute. s[e]lu:t [-lju:-] serloot and serlute. solution. s[e]lu:[s][e]n [-lju:-] serloosh'n and serl[u]sh'n. subordinate (adj.). s[e]b[o]:d[n.]it ...
— Society for Pure English, Tract 2, on English Homophones • Robert Bridges

... Robert, "we have had such a glo-ri-ous day! Arthur Montford and I got on famously together. I taught him all the English plays I could think of, and he let me gallop about on his Shetland pony,—a splendid wild one, mamma,—till I lost my hat, and was all out of breath, and got ...
— Stories of Many Lands • Grace Greenwood

... Upon the Iceland cruise, But never left me money, Not e'en a couple sous. But—ri too loo! ri tooral loo! ...
— An Iceland Fisherman • Pierre Loti

... when they lived upon the earth, and shadowy beings offering roasted meat to Anu and Enlil, and cool drinks poured out from waterskins. In this House of Dust dwelt high priests, ministrants, the magician and the prophet, and the deities Etana, Sumukan, Eresh-kigal, Queen of the Earth, and Blitsri, who registered the ...
— The Babylonian Story of the Deluge - as Told by Assyrian Tablets from Nineveh • E. A. Wallis Budge

... Scarecrow found himself among his friends again, he was so happy that he hugged them all, even the Lion and Toto; and as they walked along he sang "Tol-de-ri-de-oh!" at every ...
— The Wonderful Wizard of Oz • L. Frank Baum

... the Orange militia walked into Maclone, And hunted the Catholics out of the town. Ri' turen nuren nuren naddio, ...
— The Beth Book - Being a Study of the Life of Elizabeth Caldwell Maclure, a Woman of Genius • Sarah Grand

... of Volume 160, because it had the most anomalies in it. The software was created by Electronic Book Technologies of Providence, RI, and is called Dynatext. The software works only ...
— LOC WORKSHOP ON ELECTRONIC TEXTS • James Daly

... thee well! and if for ever, Still for ever, fare thee well: Even though unforgiving, never 'Gainst thee shall my heart rebel. Would that breast were bared before thee[ri] Where thy head so oft hath lain, While that placid sleep came o'er thee[rj] Which thou ne'er canst know again: Would that breast, by thee glanced over, Every inmost thought could show! Then thou would'st at last discover 'Twas not well to spurn it so. Though the world for this commend ...
— The Works Of Lord Byron, Vol. 3 (of 7) • Lord Byron

... little forest-brook The farthest hem of silence shook: When in the hollow shades I heard,— Was it a spirit, or a bird? Or, strayed from Eden, desolate, Some Peri calling to her mate, Whom nevermore her mate would cheer? Pe-ri! pe-ri! peer!" ...
— The Home Book of Verse, Vol. 3 (of 4) • Various

... as Woden. Olympian (o lim' pi an). Pertaining to Olympus, the seat of the gods. Orion (o ri' on). A giant hunter, whose name was given to a constellation. Orpheus (or' fe us). A poet and musician, who with his sweet lyre charmed the very rocks and trees ...
— Classic Myths • Retold by Mary Catherine Judd

... speli[n], nameli, that with it it wud be imposibel tu disti[n]gwish homonimz, m[u]st be met in the same way. No dout it iz a serten advantej if in reiti[n] we kan disti[n]gwish right, rite, write, and wright. B[u]t if, in the h[u]ri ov konversashon, ther iz hardli ever a dout hwich w[u]rd iz ment, shureli ther wud be m[u]ch les danjer in the slow proses ov readi[n] a kontiniu[u]s sentens. If vari[u]s speli[n]z ov the same w[u]rd ar nesesari tu point out diferent meani[n]z, we shud rekweir eight ...
— Chips From A German Workshop, Vol. V. • F. Max Mueller

... there was an added note of apprehension. It broke very faintly but pitifully, before dying away to the sound of light footsteps. Half a dozen stairs were pressed, then came a stumble and a girlish "A-ah." She recovered herself as the hateful voice from behind said, "Aw ri', m'dear," and older, surer feet felt the stairs and pushed on behind the girl. Through the veiling canvas and the old walls I seemed to see the pair ascending. A few seconds more, and a slight farm rounded the jamb of the door. The girl's eyes blinked in the ...
— The Best British Short Stories of 1922 • Edward J. O'Brien and John Cournos, editors

... "Ri tumpty,—that is to say, there is no gainsaying that fact,—my own cousin. And by natural consequence, Margaret, the own cousin of your father, and by further consequence, your first cousin once ...
— Margaret Montfort • Laura E. Richards

... "Auctochthones" instead of Home-Rulers, we should get along better? Must consult JUSTIN on this point. Should have to teach some of them to pronounce their new name, though. "Autochthones," spoken in wrath, with a rich brogue, after dinner, would, I should think, beat Phillippopolis, or "Ri' l'il, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 103, September 17, 1892 • Various

... Then Leocritus [Footnote: Le-oc'-ri-tus.], who was one of the suitors, answered: "Surely thy wits wander, O Mentor, that thou biddest the people put us down. Of a truth, if Ulysses himself should come back, and should seek to drive the suitors from the hall, it would fare ...
— The Story Of The Odyssey • The Rev. Alfred J. Church

... dale, away sweeps the mad cavalcade. 'Tis neck or nothing, and leaps that only dares the devil. Overtaken, the bearer of the flag yields it up to his successful competitor, who shouting his triumphant vo-ri-ra-ka hurries onwards with the whole legion at his heels. So they race until the hardy horses, though eager as their riders for the victory, are obliged at last to halt for breath. But after an interval of rest, starting with another hurrah the ...
— Life of Schamyl - And Narrative of the Circassian War of Independence Against Russia • John Milton Mackie

... sinistre! C'etait l'astre d'un favori Qui se croyait un grand ministre Quand de nos maux il avait ri. Ceux qui servaient ce dieu fragile Ont deja cache son portrait.... —Encore une etoile qui file, Qui ...
— French Lyrics • Arthur Graves Canfield

... ri, Oh' on a ri, Why should she lose King Shames, man? Oh' rig in di, Oh' rig in di, She shall break a' her banes then; With furichinish, an' stay a while, And speak a word or twa, man, She's gi' a straike, out o'er the neck, ...
— A Collection of Ballads • Andrew Lang

... and remarks that "Ekkeri, akai-ri," literally translated, just gives the familiar "One-ery, two-ery," which is etymologically analogous to "Hickory, dickory," ...
— Children's Rhymes, Children's Games, Children's Songs, Children's Stories - A Book for Bairns and Big Folk • Robert Ford

... no private house of his own. The slave, nevertheless, could own a house or receive it in payment of a debt. This is illustrated by an interesting contract in which reference is made to Ustanni, the Tatnai of the Book of Ezra, who is called "the governor of Ebir-nri," "the other side of the river." The contract is ...
— Babylonians and Assyrians, Life and Customs • Rev. A. H. Sayce

... Gaul saluted their general, Avi'tus, emperor, and the Roman senate and people at first acquiesced in the choice. Rut Avi'tus was soon found unfit to hold the reins of power at a time of so much danger and difficulty; the senate, influenced by Ri'cimer, the commander of the barbarian auxiliaries, voted his deposition. He died shortly after, whether by disease or ...
— Pinnock's Improved Edition of Dr. Goldsmith's History of Rome • Oliver Goldsmith

... others, with more or less certainty, think that it should be replaced by Amuru, Amurru, the country of the Amorites. But the question has now been settled by Babylonian contract and law tablets of the period of Khaminurabi, in which the name is written A- mu-ur-ri (ki). Hommel originated the idea that Martu might be an abbreviation of Amartu, that is, Amar with the feminine termination of nouns in the Canaanitish dialect: Martu would thus actually signify the country ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 4 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... kind rattle of Of an thing orde-al by battle That I There's an love end of to tittle look tattle, up- When your on, enemy is dead. So It's an let arrant us molly- sing, coddle Long Fears a live crack upon the his King, noddle, And his And he's son only fit to Hi- swaddle, In a la- downy fea- ri-on! ther bed! ...
— The Complete Plays of Gilbert and Sullivan - The 14 Gilbert And Sullivan Plays • William Schwenk Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan

... illness, and very grave and proper expressions concerning the affliction and terror it produced in the kingdom, he looked at me very fixedly,, and, with an arching brow, said, "Mais, mademoiselle—aprs tout—le roi—est il bien guri?"(25) ...
— The Diary and Letters of Madame D'Arblay Volume 3 • Madame D'Arblay

... alone, let him tap upon the lid of the jug (to make the demon fancy there's some one with him), and addressing himself by his own name and the name of his mother, let him say, "Thy mother has bid thee beware of Shavriri, vriri, riri, iri, ri," in a white cup. Rashi says by this incantation the demon gradually contracts and vanishes as the sounds of the ...
— Hebraic Literature; Translations from the Talmud, Midrashim and - Kabbala • Various

... gretest trees that ony man may fynde In forest to shade the dere for her comforte. He breketh he{m} aso{n}der or rendith he rote & ri{n}de Out of the erthe this is his dysporte. So that the deere shall haue noo resorte. Wythin shorte tyme to noo maner shade Where thorough the ...
— The Assemble of Goddes • Anonymous

... with infinitive in -an preceded by ri- or the double consonants mm, nn, ss, bb, cg (gg), add -ede for the preterit, and -ed for the past participle, the double consonant ...
— Anglo-Saxon Grammar and Exercise Book - with Inflections, Syntax, Selections for Reading, and Glossary • C. Alphonso Smith

... et inexplicabilis bonitatis et continentiae, Conformitatum scilicet vitae Beati Fr[a]. ad vit[a] D[i]. [n]ri Jesu x[p]i. Mediolani, in edibus Zanoti castilionei ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 78, April 26, 1851 • Various

... across the narrow strait and see Shimonoseki, on the mainland of Japan. Thus far we have been traversing the island of Kiu-shiu, separated from the main island by a strait but a few hundred yards wide at Shimonoseki. From Kokura the jinrikisha road leads a couple of ri farther to Dairi; thence footpaths traverse hills and wax-tree groves for another two miles (a ri is something over two English miles) to the village of Moji. Here I obtain passage on a little ferry-boat across to Shimonoseki, ...
— Around the World on a Bicycle Volume II. - From Teheran To Yokohama • Thomas Stevens

... stigh ri bhun, Chaidh slabhraidh a chuir a nuas; S roimh an t slabhraidh cha do ghabh-ar crith Ach chaidhearurra na m'ruith suas. S roimh ...
— Memories of Canada and Scotland - Speeches and Verses • John Douglas Sutherland Campbell

... present, tout le monde a ete temoin de sa folie, et vous n'avez plus rien a craindre de sa douleur; il ne dit mot. Au reste, je viens seulement de le rencontrer, plus mort que vif, qui traversoit la galerie pour aller chez lui. Vous auriez trop ri de le voir soupirer; il m'a pourtant fait pitie: je l'ai vu si defait, si pale et si triste, que j'ai eu peur qu'il ne se ...
— A Selection from the Comedies of Marivaux • Pierre Carlet de Chamblain de Marivaux

... "Cr-r-ri-key!" said Hinchcliffe, as the car on a wild cant to the left went astern, screwing herself round the angle of a track that overhung the pond. "If she only had two propellers, I believe she'd talk poetry. She ...
— Traffics and Discoveries • Rudyard Kipling

... speake it to my greate glorie So deare and ioy full vn to me, As when I did first con quere thee O Kerme sine, of all myne foes The most cruell, of all myne woes The smartest , the sweetest My proude con quest My ri chest pray O once a daye Lend me thy sight Whose only light Keepes ...
— The Arte of English Poesie • George Puttenham



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