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Roue   Listen
Roue

noun
1.
A dissolute man in fashionable society.  Synonyms: blood, profligate, rake, rakehell, rip.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Roue" Quotes from Famous Books



... say something first. Mrs. D'Alloi, I would not have had that occurrence happen in your home or presence if I had been able to prevent it. It grieves me more than I can tell you. I am not a roue. In spite of appearances I have lived a clean life. I shall never live any other in the future. I—I love Leonore. Love her very dearly. And if you will give her to me, should I win her, I pledge you my word that I will give her the love, ...
— The Honorable Peter Stirling and What People Thought of Him • Paul Leicester Ford

... pushed Philippe and Mariette into a "mariage en detrempe,"—a Parisian term which is equivalent to "morganatic marriage," as applied to royal personages. Philippe when they left the house revealed his poverty to Giroudeau, but the old roue reassured him. ...
— The Two Brothers • Honore de Balzac

... to be drawn into a promised alliance with that titled roue? Involuntarily the soldier's face grew hard and stern; the count's tactics were so apparent—flattering attention to the elderly gentlewoman and a devoted, but reserved, bearing toward the young girl in which he would rely upon patience and perseverance for the consummation ...
— The Strollers • Frederic S. Isham

... long before he came round to their view. He found that Sir Harry, in spite of his gentlemanly speech and bearing, was a battered old roue, who was never happy but when gambling, and whose air and title were baits to victims of a lower class than himself; young clerks and medical students who were flattered by his condescension. He did not actually fleece ...
— The Three Brides • Charlotte M. Yonge

... but the non-payment of a tradesman's bill involves only a breach of faith in a gentleman's relations with a lower order. At least, some gentlemen do not feel any apprehension of incurring the odium of the circle in which they move by cheating of this kind. In the same manner the roue, or libertine of rank, may often be guilty of all manner of falsehoods and crimes to the females of the class below him, without any fear of incurring the odium of either males or females of his own circle; on the contrary, the more crimes ...
— Rambles and Recollections of an Indian Official • William Sleeman

... systems!' exclaimed I; 'I will not be so foolish as wilfully to adopt the role of roue when I feel called upon to play the plain role of true lover. Let those who like play the part of Lovelace! As for myself, I will love; upon the whole, that is what pleases best.' And I jumped headlong into the torrent without troubling myself as ...
— Gerfaut, Complete • Charles de Bernard

... to discover whether in this thin strip of deal there were ligneous fibres strong enough to let her lightly trip across it from the bureau to the department, from a salary of eight thousand a year to twelve thousand. The clever woman believed she could play her own game with this political roue; and Monsieur des Lupeaulx was partly the cause of the unusual expenditures which now began and were continued in the ...
— Bureaucracy • Honore de Balzac

... hear one word of this; he was too happy, too impassioned, too young, to listen to the words of warning and caution of the old roue. He read again and again, and with ever- increasing rapture, the letter of the princess; he pressed it to his throbbing heart and glowing lips, and fixed his loving eyes upon those characters which her hand had written ...
— Berlin and Sans-Souci • Louise Muhlbach

... the antiquated idea that woman is only fit for a plaything or a household drudge. Nor can I see how it is less dignified to go to a public building to deposit a vote than to frequent the concert-room, whirl through the waltz in happy repose on some roue's bosom, or mingle in any public crowd which is, in modern times, quite admissible in polite society. Dethrone the idol and raise the soul to its true and noble elevation, supported on a foundation of undying ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... nuage de poudre, Par un galop precipite, Aussi promptement que la foudre Comme il est doux d'etre emporte! Le sable bruit sous la roue, Le vent autour de vous se joue; Je veux voir des sites nouveaux: ...
— French Lyrics • Arthur Graves Canfield

... entertaining, and most profitable, and not in the least risky. Immediately after the adventure with the advertiser, Mary decided that a certain General Hastings would make an excellent sacrifice on the altar of justice—and to her own financial profit. The old man was a notorious roue, of most unsavory reputation as a destroyer of innocence. It was probable that he would easily fall a victim to the ingenuous charms of Aggie. As for that precocious damsel, she would run no least risk of destruction by the satyr. So, presently, there were elaborate plottings. ...
— Within the Law - From the Play of Bayard Veiller • Marvin Dana

... think it is," retorted Betty. "Mark me, doctor, Dorothy will not put up an instant with a roue and a brute." ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... throws light on another curious and shameful page of French history. The 'roue,' by which word now is meant a man of profligate character and conduct, is properly and primarily one broken on the wheel. Its present and secondary meaning it derived from that Duke of Orleans who was Regent of France after the death of Lewis XIV. It was his miserable ambition to gather ...
— On the Study of Words • Richard C Trench

... ff. there is developed a piece of faithful and entertaining character-drawing, as the old roue Lysidamus fawns upon his militant spouse Cleostrata, with ...
— The Dramatic Values in Plautus • Wilton Wallace Blancke

... malitia, was on thine muthe. wickedness ripe luthernesse ripe. was in thy mouth. noldest thu on thine huse. 225 Thou wouldst not in thy house herborwen theo wrecchen. shelter the poor, ne mihten heo under thine roue. nor might they under thy roof none reste finden. find any rest; noldest thu naefre helpen. nor wouldst thou ever help tham orlease wrecchen. 230 the unhappy wretches; ac thu sete on thine benche. but thou sate on thy bench, underleid mid ...
— The Departing Soul's Address to the Body • Anonymous

... such embarrassments, as there is also in the excitement of drink. But then, at last, the time does come when the excitement is over, and when nothing but the misery is left. If there be an existence of wretchedness on earth it must be that of the elderly, worn-out roue, who has run this race of debt and bills of accommodation and acceptances—of what, if we were not in these days somewhat afraid of good broad English, we might call lying and swindling, falsehood and fraud—and who, having ruined all whom he should ...
— Framley Parsonage • Anthony Trollope

... of Lola's debut one of the omnibus-boxes was occupied by Lord Ranelagh, a raffish mid-Victorian roue, who had brought with him a select party of "Corinthians" in frilled shirts and flowered waistcoats. It was observed that he paid but languid attention to the opera. As soon, however, as the promised novelty, El Oleano, was reached, he exhibited a sudden interest ...
— The Magnificent Montez - From Courtesan to Convert • Horace Wyndham



Words linked to "Roue" :   profligate, rakehell, rounder, libertine, debauchee



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