Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




See   /si/   Listen
See

noun
1.
The seat within a bishop's diocese where his cathedral is located.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"See" Quotes from Famous Books



... yet to be able to claim you for a comrade," he said: "you are intelligent and open-minded, and cannot fail to see the futility of attempting to tinker up our worn-out society. You must see that our Socialist friends have only seized on half-truths, and they stop short where ...
— A Girl Among the Anarchists • Isabel Meredith

... there's one thing I wanted to ax you,' said Andy, resting a moment from his chopping: 'it's goin' on four months now since we see a speck of green, an' will the snow ever be off the ground agin, at ...
— Cedar Creek - From the Shanty to the Settlement • Elizabeth Hely Walshe

... time to make him descend into a well, which had a niche in the bottom in which he could conceal himself. The soldiers looked down the well a dozen times, but could see nothing. Brousson was not in the house; he was not in the chimneys; he was not in the outhouses. He must be in the well! A soldier went down the well to make a personal examination. He was let down close to the surface of the water, and felt all ...
— The Huguenots in France • Samuel Smiles

... evening, talking the proceedings of the day over with Queenie. "I'm up again and ready for the next round. Here I am, and here I stop! But new tactics! Permeation! that's the ticket. Reckon I'll nitrate and percolate the waters of pure truth into these people in such a fashion that they'll come to see that what that old uncle of yours and his precious satellites have been giving 'em was nothing but a very muddy mixture. Permeation! that's the ...
— In the Mayor's Parlour • J. S. (Joseph Smith) Fletcher

... that the Cretans did not only relate, that Jupiter was born and buried among them, but also shewed his sepulchre: and Porphyry [172] tells us, that Pythagoras went down into the Idaean cave, to see sepulchre: and Cicero, [173] in numbering three Jupiters, saith, that the third was the Cretan Jupiter, Saturn's son, whose sepulchre was shewed in Crete: and the Scholiast upon Callimachus [174] lets us know, that this was the sepulchre of ...
— The Chronology of Ancient Kingdoms Amended • Isaac Newton

... enthusiasm. We can well believe that the Aeneid was a poem after Augustus's heart, that he welcomed with pride as well as gladness the instalments which, before its publication, he was permitted to see, [67] and encouraged by unreserved approbation so thorough an exponent of his cherished views. To him the Aeneid breathed the spirit of the old cult. Its very style, like that of Milton from the Bible, was borrowed ...
— A History of Roman Literature - From the Earliest Period to the Death of Marcus Aurelius • Charles Thomas Cruttwell

... "You see, he has two stories," continued Uncle Frederick, "the one, about a sham fight in Sweden, is a good half-hour long. But the other, the battle of Waterloo, generally lasts from an hour and a half to two hours. I have heard it three times." And ...
— Tales of Two Countries • Alexander Kielland

... and also the extent to which it adheres to the unwritten moral law, which is, after all, something superior to, because higher than, mere legal enactments. I confess that as I wander about this marvellous country of Japan, as I mingle with its common people and see them in various phases of their lives I say to myself, as St. Francis Xavier said of them more than three hundred years ago, "This nation is the delight of my soul." The critic, the hypercritic, is everywhere. He suspects everybody and everything. He can find occult motives and ...
— The Empire of the East • H. B. Montgomery

... Netherlands to be crowned at Aachen (April, 1486). A war with France called him back, in the course of which he suffered a severe defeat at Bethune. At the beginning of 1488 Ghent and Bruges once more rebelled; and the Roman king, enticed to enter Bruges, was there seized and compelled to see his friends executed in the market-place beneath his prison window. For seven months he was held a prisoner; nor was he released until he had sworn to surrender his powers, as regent, to a council ...
— History of Holland • George Edmundson

... steeds and darts and armour and weapons, reduced to dust like a tree in the forest crushed by a tusker. Today the widowhood of the wives of Radha's son is at hand. Verily, they must have in their (last night's) dreams seen signs of approaching evil, O Mahadeva! Verily, thou shalt today see the wives of Karna become widows. I cannot restrain my wrath at what was done before now by this fool of little foresight when he beheld Krishna dragged to the assembly and when laughing at us he abused us repeatedly in vile words. Today, O Govinda, thou shalt behold Karna crushed by me ...
— The Mahabharata of Krishna-Dwaipayana Vyasa, Volume 3 - Books 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 • Unknown

... treated the young man well, giving him yams, plantains, and sweet potatoes, with leave to wander through their houses. "But after six or seven Months" Dampier "left that Employ," for he had heard strange tales of the logwood cutters in Campeachy Bay, and longed to see something of them. He, therefore, slipped aboard a small Jamaica vessel which was going to the bay "to load logwood," with two other ships in company. The cargo of his ship "was rum and sugar; a very good ...
— On the Spanish Main - Or, Some English forays on the Isthmus of Darien. • John Masefield

... Dr. Vince hastily, "it wouldn't do for me to try it. You see, the Lockmans have always been Presbyterians, and so Bertie ...
— Samuel the Seeker • Upton Sinclair

... the famous town in Persian Mesopotamia which however is spelt with the lesser aspirate. See p. 144. The Geographical works of Sdik-i-Ispahni, London Oriental Transl. Fund, 1882. Hamdan (with the greater aspirate) and Hamdun mean only the member masculine, which may be a delicate piece of ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 9 • Richard F. Burton

... anything more humiliating?" he cried; "was ever anything more unjust? See how it is with that poor child. The rich and poor are placed together, and the poor must suffer or be pensioners. Is it not abominable, the way these schools of St. Cyr and the Paris military are run? Two dollars for a scholars' picnic in a place where no child is supposed to ...
— The Boy Life of Napoleon - Afterwards Emperor Of The French • Eugenie Foa

... including Tromp's flagship. De Ruyter, the brilliant lieutenant of Tromp, attempted to cut Blake off from his supports on the north, and Evertsen steered between Blake and Penn's squadron on the south. (See diagram 1.) Blake's dozen ships might well have been surrounded and taken if his admirals had not known their business. Penn tacked right through Evertsen's squadron to come to the side of Blake, and Lawson foiled de Ruyter ...
— A History of Sea Power • William Oliver Stevens and Allan Westcott

... merry little chap, at all events," observed the pirate. "I like to see a fellow with some spirit in him, and I'll keep you out of ...
— A Voyage round the World - A book for boys • W.H.G. Kingston

... very existence is directly at enmity and wages war with his. In truth, one might smile at the unbelievers whose imagination is too barren for ghosts and fearful spectres, and those births of night which we see in sickness, to take root therein, or who stare and marvel at Dante's descriptions, when the commonest every-day life brings before our eyes such frightful distorted master-pieces among the works of horror. Yet, can we really and ...
— The Uncollected Writings of Thomas de Quincey, Vol. 2 - With a Preface and Annotations by James Hogg • Thomas de Quincey

... death? What have I to do with life and death? I won't stir! If the parson wants to see me he will have to come up here and see me in bed," exclaimed Old Hurricane, suiting the action to the word by jumping into bed and drawing all the comforters and blankets up ...
— Hidden Hand • Emma Dorothy Eliza Nevitte Southworth

... very crabbed old thing, so the inference is fair that she is miserable. In fact, I do not see how ...
— Melbourne House • Elizabeth Wetherell

... therefore see to it that our discourse be serviceable to ourselves, and that it may not appear to others to be vain-glorious or ambitious, and we must show that we are as willing to listen as to teach, and especially must we lay aside all disputatiousness and love ...
— Plutarch's Morals • Plutarch

... stalks, while still succulent, are eaten as a salad or are roasted or boiled like potatoes. In Europe, they are frequently employed as a garnish or as an adjunct to dishes of meat and fish. They are also largely used for making candied angelica. (See below.) Formerly the stems were blanched like celery and were very popular as a vegetable; now they are little used in the United States. The tender leaves are often boiled and eaten as a substitute for spinach. Less in America than in Europe, the seeds, which, like ...
— Culinary Herbs: Their Cultivation Harvesting Curing and Uses • M. G. Kains

... to leave the pale to go to see her dying father in Petersburg, and the police, who will have their grim joke against a Jewess, offer her "the most powerful passport in Russia"—the yellow ticket of Rahab. She accepts it desperately, and, to escape its horrible obligations, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 153, Sept. 19, 1917 • Various

... you give him any pins, mother. Suppose the neighbors should come in and see those stockings ...
— The Arena - Volume 4, No. 23, October, 1891 • Various

... a morning early As you pass a lonely rath, You may see a little curly- Headed fairy in your path. He'll be ...
— ANTHOLOGY OF MASSACHUSETTS POETS • WILLIAM STANLEY BRAITHWAITE

... Her. But you see, Lycinus, I did not depend on their judgement entirely, but on my own too. I saw the Stoics going about with dignity, decently dressed and groomed, ever with a thoughtful air and a manly countenance, as far from effeminacy as from the utter repulsive ...
— Works, V2 • Lucian of Samosata

... the satisfaction of its one joy, its one reality! I love Margaret Windsor, and there is a chance, a bare chance, of her loving me. Why did she pick out my old house, when she knew that I was living here, if she did not wish to see me again? Conspiracy or no conspiracy, my poverty, her riches, go hang. I shall ask for ...
— The King's Men - A Tale of To-morrow • Robert Grant, John Boyle O'Reilly, J. S. Dale, and John T.

... the description of Cellini's daring escape from the castle. In climbing over the last wall, he fell and broke his leg, and was carried by a waterman to the palace of the Cardinal Cornaro. There he lay in hiding, visited by all the rank and fashion of Rome, who were not a little curious to see the hero of so perilous an escapade. Cornaro promised to secure his pardon, but eventually exchanged him for a bishopric. This remarkable proceeding illustrates the manners of the Papal Court. The cardinal wanted a benefice for one of his followers, and the Pope wished to get his son's ...
— Renaissance in Italy Vol. 3 - The Fine Arts • John Addington Symonds

... Aime Martin are gaining ground. "The powers of the sexes," wrote the penetrating author of the "Spirit of the Laws," "would be equal if their education were, too. Test women in the talents that have not been enfeebled by the way they have been educated, and we will then see if we are so strong." "It is in spite of our stupid system of education," declared Aime Martin, more than fifty years ago, "that women have an idea, a mind and a soul." And even the more radical utterances of the late Eugene Pelletan find an echo. ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume III (of III) • Various

... be naturally divided into the arena and the cavea (see annexed plan, which shows the Colosseum ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... he saw Fuller standing near, and knew him as the man who had given him the dollar in the American town. He had heard that his employer had come out to see what progress was being made, but had not yet encountered him. He did not notice Ida, who was sitting in the shadow of ...
— Brandon of the Engineers • Harold Bindloss

... be excused for telling—one would not tell it in a book intended to be read only by Scotchmen, who know or ought to know the tale already—how the two Melvilles and Buchanan's nephew Thomas went to see him in Edinburgh, in September, 1581, hearing that he was ill, and his History still in the press; and how they found the old sage, true to his schoolmaster's instincts, teaching the Hornbook to his servant-lad; and how he told them ...
— Health and Education • Charles Kingsley

... care of the Home Time Line end of it; as soon as we get you an impersonator, you go to work with him. Now, let's see whom we can depend on to help us with this. Lovranth Rolk, of course; Home Time Line section of the Paratime Code ...
— Time Crime • H. Beam Piper

... "You see," said one of the three, "how a few words were sufficient to turn the tide of the people's sympathies, and to confound that fanatic priest in ...
— Joseph II. and His Court • L. Muhlbach

... what took place in the recitation room. He appeared very angry and said: "When the crazy man entered the room where I was he raised one finger, as much as to say I had but one eye, and I raised two fingers to signify that I could see out of my one eye as well as he could out of both of his. When he raised three fingers, as much as to say there were but three eyes between us, I doubled up my fist, and if he had not gone out of that room in a hurry I would have knocked ...
— Sign Language Among North American Indians Compared With That Among Other Peoples And Deaf-Mutes • Garrick Mallery

... last her eldest brother went to Great Merlin the Magician, who could tell and foretell, see and foresee all things under the sun and beyond it, and asked him where Burd Helen ...
— English Fairy Tales • Flora Annie Steel

... my taste; sure I niver thought to see the swate spot where I could pick out me property an' pick up me ...
— The Golden Dream - Adventures in the Far West • R.M. Ballantyne

... as Alan's death was and bitterly and sincerely as she mourned his loss Tony could see that he had after all chosen the happiest way out for himself as well as for her and his cousin. It was not hard to forgive a dead lover with a generous act of renunciation his last deed. It would have been far less easy to forgive a living lover with such a stain upon his life. Even though ...
— Wild Wings - A Romance of Youth • Margaret Rebecca Piper

... part of the subject, and giving certain rules and instruction calculated to develop Man's wonderful "thought-machine" that will be of the greatest interest and importance to all of our students. When the lessons are concluded you will see that the present arrangement is most ...
— A Series of Lessons in Raja Yoga • Yogi Ramacharaka

... to do anything we can," broke in Betty quickly, for the Outdoor Girls never liked to be thanked. "And we'd like so much to have you see our Hostess House. That is, if you'd care to," she added, suddenly remembering that the old woman might not be so helpless and alone as she had seemed—might have made some other plans. But ...
— The Outdoor Girls at the Hostess House • Laura Lee Hope

... knight's youngest daughter loaded asses with all the silver and gold to be found in the castle, and she set out with Ian the soldier's son for the house where her second sister was waiting to see what would befall. She also had asses laden with precious things to carry away, and so had the eldest sister, when they reached the castle where she had been kept a prisoner. Together they all rode to the edge ...
— The Orange Fairy Book • Various

... sceptical about the letter," said Dr. O'Grady, "but I expect when she's talked it over with Ford she'll see the sense of ...
— General John Regan - 1913 • George A. Birmingham

... cried, in a tone of despair. "Let us go into the orchard, we shall escape him. We can stoop as we run by the hedge, and he will not see us." ...
— The Lily of the Valley • Honore de Balzac

... nit, A worm, a grasshopper, a rat, An owl, a monkey, hedgehog, bat. But hold, why not by fairy art Transform the wretch, into—? Ixion once a cloud embraced, By Jove and jealousy well placed; What sport to see proud Oberon stare And flirt it with a—!' Then thrice she stamped the trembling ground, And thrice she waved her wand around; When I, endow'd with greater skill, And less inclined to do you ill, Mutter'd some words, withheld her arm, And kindly stopp'd the unfinish'd charm. ...
— Selected English Letters (XV - XIX Centuries) • Various

... The reader will see at once, in descending to the fifth row in Plate XIV., representing the windows of the fifth order, that they are nothing more than a combination of the third and fourth. By this union they become the nearest approximation to a perfect Gothic form which ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume II (of 3) • John Ruskin

... on the list; Senator Anthony is twenty-first. Those who followed these two Senators through the Direct Primary bill fight will see immediately that Wright has crowded into undeserved standing. There is a very good reason for this. In the Senate, the roll of Senators is called alphabetically, and Senator Wright's name is the last on the list. A glance at the table will show that Senator Wright did not vote once ...
— Story of the Session of the California Legislature of 1909 • Franklin Hichborn

... now, honorable citizens, for my mental faculties. You see before you an engineer whose nerves are in no way inferior to his muscles. I have no fear of anything or anybody. I have a strength of will that has never had to yield. When I have decided on a thing, all America, all the world, ...
— Rubur the Conqueror • Jules Verne

... eternal laws of nature and of reason, the social forms springing from your present mode of production and form of property—historical relations that rise and disappear in the progress of production—the misconception you share with every ruling class that has preceded you. What you see clearly in the case of ancient property, what you admit in the case of feudal property, you are of course forbidden to admit in the case of your own bourgeois ...
— Manifesto of the Communist Party • Karl Marx

... has, however, by no means set himself right with the household; they continue to look askance at him. Set fights or duels between men of the same house are very rare. If a Kayan of one house kills one of another, his chief would see that he paid a proper compensation to the relatives, as well as a fine to his own house. If a man killed his own slave, he would be liable to no punishment unless the act were committed in the house; but public opinion ...
— The Pagan Tribes of Borneo • Charles Hose and William McDougall

... and they were no longer the Powells of Forest-hill. [Footnote: The vouchers for the statements in the text about the transfer of Forest-hill to Sir Robert Pye in May or June, 1646, are in various documents printed in Mr. Hamilton's Milton Papers. See especially p. 56 and Documents xxii., xli., xlii., and xlv. in the Appendix. The Forest-hill property, we shall find, did eventually come back to the Powell family; but it is worthy of remark that in Mr. Powell's own "Particular" of the state of his property in ...
— The Life of John Milton Vol. 3 1643-1649 • David Masson

... mystification as Youghal, but here Elaine was herself responsible for some of the perplexity which enshrouded his character in her eyes. She had taken more than a passing fancy for the boy—for the boy as he might be, that was to say—and she was desperately unwilling to see him and appraise him as he really was. Thus the mental court of appeal was constantly engaged in examining witnesses as to character, most of whom signally failed to give any testimony which would support ...
— The Unbearable Bassington • Saki

... know the place better that he begins to to notice the differences. The first prevailing impression is that a slice of Liverpool has been bodily transplanted to the Antipodes, that you must have landed in England again by mistake, and it is only by degrees that you begin to see that the resemblance is more ...
— Town Life in Australia - 1883 • R. E. N. (Richard) Twopeny

... where it is difficult or impossible for young men and women to see one another before the wedding-day, the praising of candidates by and to intermediaries has been a general custom. Dr. T. Loebel (9-14) relates that before a Turk reaches the age of twenty-two his parents look about for a bride for him. They send out female friends and intermediaries who ...
— Primitive Love and Love-Stories • Henry Theophilus Finck

... you, Scholar, that Diogenes walked on a day, with his friend, to see a country fair; where he saw ribbons, and looking-glasses, and nutcrackers, and fiddles, and hobby-horses, and many other gimcracks; and, having observed them, and all the other finnimbruns that make a complete country-fair, he said to his friend, " Lord, how many things ...
— The Complete Angler • Izaak Walton

... the very day, October, 1677, that they proposed, in obedience to his Majesty's command, to pass an order that "the Governor and all inferior magistrates should see to the strict observation of the Acts of Navigation and Trade," they made an order "that the law requiring all persons, as well inhabitants as strangers, that have not taken it, to take the oath of ...
— The Loyalists of America and Their Times, Vol. 1 of 2 - From 1620-1816 • Egerton Ryerson

... the very first an almost mystical attraction between them. Miss Barrett might have contented herself all her life with this delightfully personal and literary correspondence, but Browning soon grew impatient and expressed his desire to see her. The admission of a new friend to Miss Barrett's room was at no time a thing to be undertaken lightly, so hedged about was she by the care of her family; and in this case she herself seems to have hesitated long before allowing Browning to call, for the very ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 7 • Charles H. Sylvester

... glad to see you," he repeated, with singular earnestness—"glad to see you and to feel you; and to-night of all nights in ...
— David Poindexter's Disappearance and Other Tales • Julian Hawthorne

... life but once, which was merely writing my name upon the back o't, and that cost me three hundred pounds—exactly sixteen pounds, two shillings and threepence, and a fraction, for every letter in the name of Nicholas Middlemiss, as my wife has often told me. Therefore, sir, I would never wish to see the face o' a bill again; or, I should say, the back ...
— Wilson's Tales of the Borders and of Scotland Volume 17 • Alexander Leighton

... schoolmaster's few chattels to the windmill, and packed the books to take to London. With them he packed the little old etching that had been bought from the Cheap Jack. "It's a very good one," said the painter. "It's by an old Dutch artist. You can see a copy in the British Museum." But it was not in the Museum that Jan first saw a duplicate ...
— Jan of the Windmill • Juliana Horatia Ewing

... did this person seem to hold himself poised on the very edge of a fuller enlightenment. This was when, in the venerable company of several benevolent persons, he was being taken from place to place to see the more important buildings, and to observe the societies of artificers labouring at their crafts. The greater part of the day had already been spent in visiting temples, open spaces reserved to children ...
— The Mirror of Kong Ho • Ernest Bramah

... was at length to see the mysterious Annapla, but the masculine nature of the footfall told him he was ...
— Doom Castle • Neil Munro

... PEOPLE WHO ARE MARRIED.—Be exceedingly careful of license and excess in your intercourse with one another. Do not needlessly expose, by undress, the body. Let not the purity of love degenerate into unholy lust! See to it that you walk according to the divine Word. "Dwelling together as being heirs of the grace of life, that your ...
— Searchlights on Health - The Science of Eugenics • B. G. Jefferis and J. L. Nichols

... St. Johns President St. Johns Stake photo, first home photo. United Order Est. in Muddy settlements development not a general Church movement in Lehi on L. Colorado r. at Woodruff Utah Creation of Territory seeks land north of Colorado r. Utah, Camp See Lehi Utahville See Lehi Ute Ford See Crossing ...
— Mormon Settlement in Arizona • James H. McClintock

... I don't see that there is the slightest exotic spirit in the conception or style of that novel. It is certainly the most tropical of my eastern tales. The mere scenery got a great hold on me as I went on, perhaps because (I may ...
— An Outcast of the Islands • Joseph Conrad

... Lord, Lord, why, in what a fit Are you in, husband! so enrag'd, so mov'd, And for so slight a cause, to read a letter! Did this letter, love, contain my death, Should you deny my sight of it, I would not Nor see my sorrow nor eschew my danger, But willingly yield me a patient Unto the doom that your displeasure gave. Here is the letter; not for that your incensement [Gives back the letter.] Makes me make offer of it, but your health, Which anger, I do fear, hath ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition) • Various

... Master Sheriff," said Breckenridge, quietly. "As for blood being upon my head for this day's work, you can see that I am unarmed," and he spread his hands widely. "Besides, I have nothing to do with this grant at the present time. The township of Bennington has taken the farm upon its own hands, and it will oppose your entrance with armed resistance. ...
— With Ethan Allen at Ticonderoga • W. Bert Foster

... or rounded flower-cluster; in a strict use it is applied only to such clusters when the central flower does not bloom first. See cyme, 26. ...
— Trees of the Northern United States - Their Study, Description and Determination • Austin C. Apgar

... see the chess-board stands prepared and so, If Mark permits, 'tis I who in his place Will lead the crimson pawns today, as we Were wont to do in former days. I love The game but have no friend with whom ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... means to pass the dollars out into circulation. Then he said he would split. Maybe he did split. I didn't wait to see. I just killed him and lighted out ...
— The Valley of Fear • Arthur Conan Doyle

... is uncommonly clever; it picks out with skill all the most conjectural parts, and brings forward well all the difficulties. It quizzes me quite splendidly by quoting the 'Anti-Jacobin' versus my Grandfather. You are not alluded to, nor, strange to say, Huxley; and I can plainly see, here and there, —'s hand. The concluding pages will make Lyell shake in his shoes. By Jove, if he sticks to us, he will be a real hero. Good-night. Your well- quizzed, but not sorrowful, and ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume II • Francis Darwin

... reason to believe that the production of species is a slow process, and if fresh-water areas have not continued as a rule through long geological periods, we can see how variation has been constantly checked by the destruction, first in one part, then in another, of all the fresh-water species; and on these places being again occupied by fresh water they would be colonised by forms ...
— The Naturalist in Nicaragua • Thomas Belt

... for race-persistence? Not just what you see on the physical plane. There is what we should call an astral mold; and this is fed and nourished,—its edges kept firm and distinct,—by forces from the plane of causes, the thought-plane. When this mold has ...
— The Crest-Wave of Evolution • Kenneth Morris

... pills of dog-ginger and put it in his hand. Calandrino thrust it forthwith between his teeth and began to chew it; but no sooner was his tongue acquainted with the aloes, than, finding the bitterness intolerable, he spat it out. Now, the eyes of all the company being fixed on one another to see who should spit out his pill, Bruno, who, not having finished the distribution, feigned to be concerned with nought else, heard some one in his rear say:—"Ha! Calandrino, what means this?" and at ...
— The Decameron, Vol. II. • Giovanni Boccaccio

... to go through such a virtuous design as we are engaged in; but more fatal will this delay prove if we be discovered, and the design be frustrated; for Caius will then become more cruel in his unjust proceedings. Do we not see how long we deprive all our friends of their liberty, and give Caius leave still to tyrannize over them? while we ought to have procured them security for the future, and, by laying a foundation for the happiness of others, gain to ourselves great admiration and honor for ...
— The Antiquities of the Jews • Flavius Josephus

... "Do you see that town, Willetts?" he asked, laying his fingers on his companion's sleeve. "That's the best town in the ...
— The Gentleman From Indiana • Booth Tarkington

... the necessity of suspending any law upon which the liberty of the most innocent persons depend: neither do I think this practice has made the taste of arbitrary power so agreeable as that we should desire to see it repeated. Every rebellion subdued, and plot discovered, contributes to the firmer establishment of the Prince: in the latter case, the knot of conspirators is entirely broken, and they are to begin their work ...
— Irish Wit and Humor - Anecdote Biography of Swift, Curran, O'Leary and O'Connell • Anonymous

... with a bound he was in the carriage and at her feet. "You were not an out and out gift, poor fellow," she said, stroking his head. "I expected you to be partly my dog, all the same, and now we will see if she ...
— The Girl at Cobhurst • Frank Richard Stockton

... is the point, you know. However, it doesn't much matter What one wants, I suppose, is to predetermine the action, So as to make it entail, not a chance-belief, but the true one. Out of the question, you say, if a thing isn't wrong, we may do it. Ah! but this wrong, you see;—but I do not know that it matters. Eustace, the Ropers are gone, and no one can ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 1, No. 7, May, 1858 • Various

... seeks the cave of wondrous size, The sibyl's dread retreat, The sibyl, whom the Delian seer Inspires to see the future clear, And fills with frenzy's heat; The grove they enter, and behold Above their heads the ...
— Michelangelo - A Collection Of Fifteen Pictures And A Portrait Of The - Master, With Introduction And Interpretation • Estelle M. Hurll

... oration with the following brief exordium: "You see, Athenians, what forces are prepared, what numbers gathered and arrayed, what soliciting through the assembly, by a certain party—and all this to oppose the fair and ordinary course of justice in the state. As ...
— Mosaics of Grecian History • Marcius Willson and Robert Pierpont Willson

... it very dreadful?" And again those distractingly solicitous eyes, full of sympathetic anxiety, were raised to his. Andrew shook himself mentally to see if it could possibly be a dream he was having, and a little thrill shot through him at the reality ...
— Andrew the Glad • Maria Thompson Daviess

... QUEEN. I see no reason why a king of years Should be to be protected like a child.— God and King Henry govern England's realm. Give up your staff, sir, ...
— King Henry VI, Second Part • William Shakespeare [Rolfe edition]

... Rolfe!" he exclaimed. "You are coming on. Anyone can see that you've the makings of a ...
— The Hampstead Mystery • John R. Watson

... 'We shall see,' she returned with a smile. 'I will take you the nearest way, and you shall tell me on your honour if you ...
— Wilfrid Cumbermede • George MacDonald

... and very difficult to see two feet in advance. I soon found that my observations as to the places of the sentries had been useless. Still, in the darkness and thickness of the night, I thought that the chance of detection ...
— The Ocean Wireless Boys And The Naval Code • John Henry Goldfrap, AKA Captain Wilbur Lawton

... be safer to follow these tracks for a time at least, to see where they come out. There are some tracks across the stream there, but they are older and dimmer and might have ...
— A Woman Tenderfoot • Grace Gallatin Seton-Thompson

... other countries; 20 of 27 Antarctic consultative nations have made no claims to Antarctic territory (although Russia and the US have reserved the right to do so) and do not recognize the claims of the other nations; also see the Disputes - ...
— The 2005 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency

... lunch. Solomon John had constantly pointed to his mouth as he opened it and shut it, putting out his tongue; and it looked a great deal more as if he were inviting them to eat, than asking them to teach. Agamemnon suggested that they might carry the separate dictionaries when they went to see the teachers, and that would show that they meant lessons, and ...
— The Peterkin Papers • Lucretia P Hale

... breath Honor said, "But we needn't worry about all of it now, dear. We haven't got to wait the four—or six years—all at once! Just a month, a week, a day at a time. And the time will fly,—you'll see! You'll have to ...
— Play the Game! • Ruth Comfort Mitchell

... much as hinted at. I scorn so ungallant an action as to compel my heroine to make a voyage nearly round the world, or within thirty degrees of longitude of it, in such a draggle-tailed and sluttish condition; so that you see, madam, I have made this digression for the sole purpose of setting your mind at ease on the score of Isabella's gowns, frocks, hose, and those other articles of the "inner temple" whose names I dare not even think of, ...
— An Old Sailor's Yarns • Nathaniel Ames

... labors under the same difficulty. He puts the mind in the body, in the brain, but he does not put it there frankly and unequivocally. It is in the brain and yet not exactly in the brain. Let us see if this is ...
— An Introduction to Philosophy • George Stuart Fullerton

... without your skates," said the big boy, "but I won't try to take 'em off for you. We'd both be walked on while I was doing it. Come on, we'll see if these folks are in too big a hurry to let us get ...
— Sunny Boy and His Playmates • Ramy Allison White

... opportunities of gaining an insight into "all seemly and generous arts and affairs." London was a great centre of traffic, a motley crowd of adventurers and traders even in those days, and the boy Milton must often have wandered down to the river below London Bridge to see the ships come in. His poems are singularly full of figures drawn from ships and shipping, some of them bookish in their origin, others which may have been suggested by the sight of ships. Now it is Satan, who, after his fateful journey through ...
— Milton • Sir Walter Alexander Raleigh

... the river. But beyond Camps 16th September or 1st October, you must keep by the river along my route back, and not follow the circuitous track which I took through Brigalow to the westward. After about four miles by the river, you will see, by the map, that my return track again crossed the outward track over the downs, so that you may fall into the route westward of the great northern bend of the Victoria. I fear you must depend on the latitude, pace measurement, and bearings, for ascertaining the ...
— Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia • Thomas Mitchell

... gross domestic product (GDP) or value of all final goods and services produced within a nation in a given year. GDP dollar estimates in the Factbook are derived from purchasing power parity (PPP) calculations. See the note on ...
— The 2001 CIA World Factbook • United States. Central Intelligence Agency.

... gentleman, good-naturedly. "But as to helping me up, do not, I pray you, attempt it on any account; we shall both of us go in if you do. Let us both roll away in opposite directions from the crack before we attempt to get on our feet. See ...
— Ernest Bracebridge - School Days • William H. G. Kingston

... wherever he could put them; steeped in perfumes, and in fine a model of cleanliness. He was accused of putting on an imperceptible touch of rouge. He had a long nose, good eyes and mouth, a full but very long face. All his portraits resembled him. I was piqued to see that his features recalled those of Louis XIII., to whom; except in matters of courage, he was ...
— Marguerite de Navarre - Memoirs of Marguerite de Valois Queen of Navarre • Marguerite de Navarre

... is speaking of the first-mentioned good of nature, which consists in "being, living and understanding," as anyone may see who reads the context. ...
— Summa Theologica, Part I-II (Pars Prima Secundae) - From the Complete American Edition • Saint Thomas Aquinas

... his head. He knew now that he could never have told her or made her understand. She would have thought him silly—or disloyal. She would never see that this new love had nothing to do with the Robert who would die if Christine left him. It had to do with another boy who longed for bands and processions and worshipped happy, splendid people who did ...
— The Dark House • I. A. R. Wylie

... Vestry do meet the third Monday in February next, at the Glebe house, in order to see what repairs are wanted to it and the New Church, and the Church Wardens are ordered to give notice to workmen to appear there to undertake the work and also to repair the Pohick ...
— A Virginia Village • Charles A. Stewart

... and laid hold of the girls to drag them away. They screamed out, and that roused us, and we sent the nig—Malays staggering back. For you see, sir, as Englishmen—" ...
— Middy and Ensign • G. Manville Fenn

... told him you killed that napo from MacPherson? Ain't I told him enough to set us both swinging?" He bent over David until his breath struck his face. "I'm glad you didn't die, Raine," he repeated, "because I want to see you when you shuffle off. We're only waiting for the Indians to go. Old Wapi starts with his tribe at sunset. I'm sorry, but we can't get the heathen away any earlier because he says it's good luck to start a journey at sunset in the moulting moon. You'll start yours ...
— The Courage of Marge O'Doone • James Oliver Curwood

... the piece by raising the rear sight,—that is, raising the rear sight has the effect of raising the muzzle, for the higher you raise the rear sight the higher must you raise the muzzle in order to see the front sight and get it in line with the object aimed at and the ...
— Manual of Military Training - Second, Revised Edition • James A. Moss

... not easily explained, Oakes. We see parents and children without any visible resemblance to each other; and then we find ...
— The Two Admirals • J. Fenimore Cooper

... your evenings, and what kind of books you are reading, and how many meeting-houses there are in Canton, and where you go to meeting. Whenever you have to stay there over the Sabbath, I would like to have you write out a full account of the sermons that you hear. We all hope that you will come to see us next Saturday night. Bob says that you are so busy that you will not be able to leave; and that you have to sit up all night, and then sleep in the day-time. Bob and Mamie send their best love. I will ...
— John Whopper - The Newsboy • Thomas March Clark

... 'Why do I see my people here in arms against the palace of my fathers? Is it that you think your sovereign a prisoner, and wish to release him? If so you have done well; but you are mistaken. I am no prisoner. The strangers are my guests. I remain with them only for ...
— The True Story Book • Andrew Lang

... harbour possesses, as anyone who enters it can see, excellent natural defences. Manhattan Island, upon which the city is built, lies at the mouth of the Hudson between two arms of that river. At the estuary are a number of small islets well suited for the emplacement of powerful guns. The southern bank runs northward ...
— A History of the United States • Cecil Chesterton

... hath sent off here even to us, We men of the West Danes, as now I have weening, 'Gainst the terror of Grendel. So I to that good one For his mighty mood-daring shall the dear treasure bid. Haste now and be speedy, and bid them in straightway, The kindred-band gather'd together, to see us, And in words say thou eke that they be well comen To the folk of the Danes. To the door of the hall then Went Wulfgar, and words withinward he flitted: 390 He bade me to say you, my lord of fair battle, The elder of East-Danes, that he your ...
— The Tale of Beowulf - Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats • Anonymous

... and some outhouses gave them cover. Here they waited while the covenanters gallantly made the best of their way upwards. Then Montrose turned to young O'Gahan, who commanded the Irish, and said gaily, 'Come, what are you about? Drive those rascals from our defences, and see we are not troubled by ...
— The Red Book of Heroes • Leonora Blanche Lang

... lips had language! Life has passed With me but roughly since I heard thee last. Those lips are thine—thy own sweet smile I see, The same that oft in childhood solaced me; Voice only fails, else how distinct they say, 'Grieve not, my child, chase all thy fears away!' The meek intelligence of those dear eyes (Blest be the art that can immortalize, The art that baffles Time's tyrannic claim To quench it) here shines ...
— English Poets of the Eighteenth Century • Selected and Edited with an Introduction by Ernest Bernbaum

... and went on: "Here, I suppose, is the article you speak of. I see it is in my hand-writing, and lest by any chance it should again fall into your hands, I ...
— Ellen Walton - The Villain and His Victims • Alvin Addison

... grew radiant. Nimbly he hobbled to the door, to see the Boy already on the bridge, opening the gate. To his amazement, in strode Black Angus the Boss, with the bright green glitter of Ananias-and-Sapphira on his shoulder screeching varied profanities—and whom at his heels but ...
— The Backwoodsmen • Charles G. D. Roberts

... will," one of the party shouted. "Wait till the crowd get here from Farley's, an' then we'll see who runs ...
— Down the Slope • James Otis

... was sitting by the table in Ericson's room. Dr. Anderson had not called that day, and he did not expect to see him now, for he had never come so late. He was quite at his ease, therefore, and busy with two things at once, when the doctor opened the door and walked in. I think it is possible that he came up quietly with some design of surprising ...
— Robert Falconer • George MacDonald

... "I see you are shuddering, Lef Nicolaievitch," said the latter, at length, "almost as you did once in Moscow, before your fit; don't you remember? I don't know what I ...
— The Idiot • (AKA Feodor Dostoevsky) Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... of the celebrated treatise on "Annuities and Assurances," we see by the English papers died recently near London at the advanced age of seventy-eight. He is said to have left behind him the most complete collection extant on subjects connected with the statistics ...
— The International Monthly, Volume 2, No. 4, March, 1851 • Various

... soon if we didn't break up the fever, so we concluded to take all the ashes under the camp-fire, fill up his cloze, which was loose, tie his sleeves at the wrists, and his pants at the ankles, give him a dash of condition powders and a little whiskey to take the taste out of his mouth, and then see what ...
— Remarks • Bill Nye

... garlands wither on your brow, Then boast no more your mighty deeds, Upon Death's purple altar now, See where the victor-victim bleeds: All heads must come to the cold tomb; Only the actions of the just Smell sweet, and blossom in ...
— The Loyalists, Vol. 1-3 - An Historical Novel • Jane West

... Asylum stands on a bright and breezy hill; those glazed corridors are pleasant to walk in, in bad weather. But there are iron bars to all the windows. When it is fair, some of us can stroll outside that very high fence. But I never see much life in those groups I sometimes meet;—and then the careful man watches them so closely! How I remember that sad company I used to pass on fine mornings, when I was a schoolboy!—B., with his arms full of yellow weeds,—ore from the gold ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes

... coming to anchor in Morant Bay he was blown ashore by the hurricane. The governor had him arrested, and gave a commission to Colonel Modyford, the son of Sir Thomas, to assemble the justices and proceed to trial and immediate execution. He adjured him, moreover, to see to it that the pirate was not acquitted. Colonel Modyford, nevertheless, sharing perhaps his father's sympathy with the sea-rovers, deferred the trial, acquainted none of the justices with his orders, and although Johnson and two of his men "confessed ...
— The Buccaneers in the West Indies in the XVII Century • Clarence Henry Haring

... beside the second. While I have that money on me, he said, I am a scoundrel, not a thief, for I can always go to my insulted betrothed, and, laying down half the sum I have fraudulently appropriated, I can always say to her, 'You see, I've squandered half your money, and shown I am a weak and immoral man, and, if you like, a scoundrel' (I use the prisoner's own expressions), 'but though I am a scoundrel, I am not a thief, for if I had been a thief, I shouldn't have ...
— The Brothers Karamazov • Fyodor Dostoyevsky

... radical development of Wagner's theories we see in "The Flying Dutchman." In "Tanhhaeser" and "Lohengrin" they find full sway. The utter revolt of his mind from the trivial and commonplace sentimentalities of Italian opera led him to believe that the most heroic and lofty motives alone should furnish the dramatic foundation of opera. For ...
— The Great German Composers • George T. Ferris

... Fjenneslev. Absalon was the keeper of the King's conscience who was not afraid to tell him the truth when he needed to hear it. And where they were Esbern was found, never wavering in his loyalty to either. Within a year Absalon was made bishop of Roskilde, the chief See of Denmark. Saxo innocently discovers to us King Valdemar's little ruse to have his friend chosen. He was yet a very young man, scarce turned thirty, and had not been considered at all for the vacancy. There were three candidates, all of powerful families, and, ...
— Hero Tales of the Far North • Jacob A. Riis

... it, published in the City of Mexico, and also your letter in reference to Mr. Davis. I understand and appreciate the motives which prompted both letters, and think they will be of service in the way you intended. I have been much pained to see the attempts made to cast odium upon Mr. Davis, but do not think they will be successful with the reflecting or informed portion of the country. The accusations against myself I have not thought proper to notice, or even to ...
— Recollections and Letters of General Robert E. Lee • Captain Robert E. Lee, His Son

... In its widest terms survey of the work of such a mission would involve survey of the whole state of society In its narrower terms it is survey of a mission establishing a Church In this case most of the preceding tables could be used, omitting proportions to area and population Then we could see force at work Then we could see forms of work Then we could place the mission in a survey ...
— Missionary Survey As An Aid To Intelligent Co-Operation In Foreign Missions • Roland Allen

... the spring of 1848, that two men, Americans, came into the office and inquired for the Governor. I asked their business, and one answered that they had just come down from Captain Sutter on special business, and they wanted to see Governor Mason in person. I took them in to the colonel, and left them together. After some time the colonel came to his door and called to me. I went in, and my attention was directed to a series of papers unfolded on his table, in which lay about half an ounce of placer ...
— The Memoirs of General W. T. Sherman, Complete • William T. Sherman

... were good. She was determined to see who it was that could so infatuate her dear little Momselle; and, as on such an evening as the present afternoon promised to merge into all New Orleans promenaded on the Place d'Armes and the levee, her charm was ...
— The Grandissimes • George Washington Cable

... friction of the tides acts like a brake on the earth, and gradually tends to check its mighty rotation? The progress of lengthening the day by the tides is thus readily intelligible. It is not quite so easy to see why the ebbing and the flowing of the tide on the earth should actually have the effect of making the moon to retreat; this phenomenon is in deference to a profound law of nature, which tells us that action and reaction are equal and opposite ...
— Time and Tide - A Romance of the Moon • Robert S. (Robert Stawell) Ball

... not care to look over again, and, moreover, knew that I could not see it. I mind every jutting stone and twisted yew that is on the cliff there, to this day. However, one of the others went a little to one side, where Erpwald had appeared, and swung himself to the tiny ...
— A Prince of Cornwall - A Story of Glastonbury and the West in the Days of Ina of Wessex • Charles W. Whistler

... he thought at first we were surely joking. However, he would endeavor to accommodate us. If we would leave our order that evening he thought he could arrange it at the time desired, but we could easily see that it was going to upset the traditions of the staid hotel, for the breakfast hour is never earlier than nine o'clock. However, we had breakfast at 7:30 and found one other guest in the room—undoubtedly ...
— British Highways And Byways From A Motor Car - Being A Record Of A Five Thousand Mile Tour In England, - Wales And Scotland • Thomas D. Murphy

... As we shall see when we begin to write court reports, it is necessary to exercise every possible trick to put interest into the story. In the actual court room all that relieves the dreary monotony of legal proceedings is an occasional bit of interesting testimony. And when the reporter tries to report a case ...
— Newspaper Reporting and Correspondence - A Manual for Reporters, Correspondents, and Students of - Newspaper Writing • Grant Milnor Hyde

... res-publica, but only a multitudinous res-privata; every man for himself. It is not republicanism which fails now in America; it is your model science of political economy, brought to its perfect practice. There you may see competition, and the "law of demand and supply" (especially in paper), in beautiful and unhindered operation.[64] Lust of wealth, and trust in it; vulgar faith in magnitude and multitude, instead of nobleness; ...
— The Crown of Wild Olive • John Ruskin

... though it be formal, is nevertheless friendly and inviting. One does not go in "church" clothes nor with ceremonious manner; but in an informal and every-day spirit, to see one's friends and ...
— Etiquette • Emily Post

... charming all by her beauty, gentleness, and majesty. Suddenly her countenance brightened, and she approached a tall, stout gentleman standing in the midst of the committee of the artists. "M. Manager Iffland,"[50] she said, "let me bid you welcome. I expected to see you here to-day, in order to express once more my thanks for the joy you afforded me on my last birthday, and for the sufferings you underwent for my sake. But I should like to hear an account of the event from your own lips, and I ask of you, as ...
— Napoleon and the Queen of Prussia • L. Muhlbach

... of the presence or absence of a substance or condition, without regard to quantity. Thus a compass held near a wire might determine qualitatively whether a current was passing through the wire, but would not be sufficient to determine its quantity. (See Quantitative.) ...
— The Standard Electrical Dictionary - A Popular Dictionary of Words and Terms Used in the Practice - of Electrical Engineering • T. O'Conor Slone

... Hindu architecture, and the carvings and perforated marble work are of the most delicate and beautiful designs. The treasury, which contains the family jewels and plate, is the chief object of tourist curiosity, and they are a collection worth going far to see. The pearls and emeralds are especially fine, and are worth millions. The saddles, bridles, harness and other stable equipments are loaded with gold and silver ornaments set with precious stones, and the trappings for elephants are covered with the most ...
— Modern India • William Eleroy Curtis

... see you are already as busy as a general of an army, I shall leave you, and will ...
— Ten Years Later - Chapters 1-104 • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... meek, and sot demute for a couple of minutes. I see that I had convinced him about the Equinomical Counsel; he see that it wouldn't do, and he wouldn't make no ...
— Samantha at the World's Fair • Marietta Holley

... stopped the natural progress of civilization in Africa. We cut her off from the opportunity of improvement. We kept her down in a state of darkness, bondage, ignorance, and bloodshed. Was not this an awful consideration for this country? Look at the map of Africa, and see how little useful intercourse had been established on that vast continent! While other countries were assisting and enlightening each other, Africa alone had none of these benefits. We had obtained as yet only so much knowledge of her productions, ...
— The History of the Rise, Progress and Accomplishment of the - Abolition of the African Slave-Trade, by the British Parliament (1839) • Thomas Clarkson

... were also naked, and her short petticoat discovered her legs half way up to the knee. She stood there, within a few inches of the precipice below, carelessly surveying the waves as they dashed over the rocks, for she was waiting until the light would enable her to see further on the horizon. By those who might have leaned over the ridge above, as well as by those who sailed below, she might have been taken, had she been seen to move, for some sea bird reposing after a flight, so small was her frame in juxtaposition ...
— Snarleyyow • Captain Frederick Marryat

... said Mr. Cooke, with admirable humility; "I see it. I was wrong to haul you into this, Trevor. And the only thing to consider now is, how to ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... law prescription as to light, that the right to "ancient lights'' now depends upon positive enactment alone, and does not require, and ought not to be rested on, any fiction of a "lost grant'' (see EASEMENT.) There has been much difference of judicial opinion as to what constitutes an actionable interference with "ancient lights.'' On the one hand, the test has been prescribed that if an angle of 45 deg. —uninterrupted ...
— Project Gutenberg Encyclopedia

... see, he has a good understanding with the shepherds in the plains, the fishermen of the Tiber, and the smugglers of the coast. They seek for him in the mountains, and he is on the waters; they follow him on the waters, and he is on the open sea; then they pursue him, and ...
— The Count of Monte Cristo • Alexandre Dumas, Pere



Words linked to "See" :   capitalise, run down, catch sight, capitalize, search, take stock, cross-check, envisage, undergo, allegorise, realize, check off, respect, come, believe, wise up, make, mythicise, realise, catch a glimpse, relativize, auscultate, proofread, disrespect, abstract, tick, card game, read between the lines, seat, x-ray, forgather, bet, mark off, live, conceive, favour, episcopate, deliberate, tick off, play, skim, take for, intersect, test, preview, associate, evoke, attend, reinterpret, idealize, include, cards, take account, endure, scan, mythicize, bishopric, spectate, State of the Vatican City, see-through, read, perceive, insure, determine, notice, glance over, misconceive, tour, extract, call, disesteem, allegorize, check, suffer, spiritualize, escort, prize, know, draw out, like, expect, ensure, card, esteem, care, enjoy, feel, behold, minister, cross, glimpse, favor, assort, receive, affiliate, consider, reify, verify, conceive of, trip up, proof, cover, give care, get a line, literalise, lay eyes on, appreciate, gather, scrutinise, reconsider, comprehend, seeing, moot, misapprehend, take, assemble, deem, misconstrue, detect, wager, call in, spot-check, mark, idealise, scrutinize, inspect, accompany, think, observe, get a look, view as, foregather, get the goods, misinterpret, hold, prise, double-check, treasure, be amiss, view, cinch, candle, literalize, imagine, peruse, tend, invite, rake, value, educe, elicit, ideate, debate, autopsy, misunderstand, consort, regard, visit, relativise, survey, diocese, identify, spiritualise, turn over, size up



Copyright © 2019 Diccionario ingles.com