Diccionario ingles.comDiccionario ingles.com
Synonyms, antonyms, pronunciation

  Home
English Dictionary      examples: 'day', 'get rid of', 'New York Bay'




Set   /sɛt/   Listen
Set

verb
(past & past part. set; pres. part. setting)
1.
Put into a certain place or abstract location.  Synonyms: lay, place, pose, position, put.  "Set the tray down" , "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children" , "Place emphasis on a certain point"
2.
Fix conclusively or authoritatively.  Synonym: determine.
3.
Decide upon or fix definitely.  Synonyms: define, determine, fix, limit, specify.  "Specify the parameters"
4.
Establish as the highest level or best performance.  Synonym: mark.
5.
Put into a certain state; cause to be in a certain state.
6.
Fix in a border.
7.
Make ready or suitable or equip in advance for a particular purpose or for some use, event, etc.  Synonyms: fix, gear up, prepare, ready, set up.  "Prepare for war" , "I was fixing to leave town after I paid the hotel bill"
8.
Set to a certain position or cause to operate correctly.
9.
Locate.  Synonyms: localise, localize, place.
10.
Disappear beyond the horizon.  Synonyms: go down, go under.
11.
Adapt for performance in a different way.  Synonym: arrange.
12.
Put or set (seeds, seedlings, or plants) into the ground.  Synonym: plant.
13.
Apply or start.
14.
Become gelatinous.  Synonyms: congeal, jell.
15.
Set in type.  Synonym: typeset.  "Set these words in italics"
16.
Put into a position that will restore a normal state.
17.
Insert (a nail or screw below the surface, as into a countersink).  Synonym: countersink.
18.
Give a fine, sharp edge to a knife or razor.
19.
Urge to attack someone.  Synonym: sic.  "The shaman sics sorcerers on the evil spirits"
20.
Estimate.  Synonyms: place, put.
21.
Equip with sails or masts.  Synonyms: rig, set up.
22.
Get ready for a particular purpose or event.  Synonyms: lay out, set up.  "Set the table" , "Lay out the tools for the surgery"
23.
Alter or regulate so as to achieve accuracy or conform to a standard.  Synonyms: adjust, correct.  "Correct the alignment of the front wheels"
24.
Bear fruit.  Synonym: fructify.
25.
Arrange attractively.  Synonyms: arrange, coif, coiffe, coiffure, do, dress.



Related searches:



WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








Advanced search
     Find words:
Starting with
Ending with
Containing
Matching a pattern  

Synonyms
Antonyms
Quotes
Words linked to  

only single words



Share |





"Set" Quotes from Famous Books



... the men hurried forward and swung the wicket-gate from its hinges, and, piloted by the farmer, Dick crossed the farmyard, marched through a door into a passage, and thence into an ample kitchen, where, with the aid of the farmer, he set down his burden on a broad settle. As he did so, the boy's mother came hurrying in from the dairy. She gave a little gasping cry when she saw the ghastly face of her son, but at once took command in a quiet, ...
— The Wolf Patrol - A Tale of Baden-Powell's Boy Scouts • John Finnemore

... the only clouded face in her circle that evening; and true to her instinct, she set about banishing his trouble, whatever it might be—an easy task with her ...
— A Face Illumined • E. P. Roe

... halted early, unable to set one foot before the other, and, although their way was lighted by a brilliant aurora, they could not go on. This last meal, eaten Sunday evening under their icy tent, was very melancholy. If Heaven did not come to their aid, ...
— The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras • Jules Verne

... affairs you might suppose that all good Nationalists would remain in their country, doing their best to make the Convention a success. Mr. DILLON prefers to attack the Government at Westminster, because it proposes to set up a Conference to consider the future composition and powers of the Second Chamber. Was it not, he asked, a breach of privilege to do this without the express consent of the House of Commons? The SPEAKER thought not, and referred his questioner to the preamble of the Parliament ...
— Punch, 1917.07.04, Vol. 153, Issue No. 1 • Various

... thickets of furze that abound in the Landes, yet she did not look in the least fatigued, and as she came forward made her spirited horse fret and prance under quick, light strokes of her riding-whip—in whose handle shone a magnificent amethyst set in massive gold, and engraved with the de Foix arms. Three or four young noblemen, splendidly dressed and mounted, were with her, and as she swept proudly past our hero and his fair companion-upon whom she cast a glance of haughty disdain—she ...
— Captain Fracasse • Theophile Gautier

... the sentry post of No. 4 to study the dark and distant upheavals in the Red Rock country, where, almost every night of late, the signal fires of the Apaches were reported. Not until he was again alone did he realize that he had been almost frigidly greeted by those who spoke at all. It set him ...
— An Apache Princess - A Tale of the Indian Frontier • Charles King

... my lacquey returns in the Evening, and that I set out for Portsmouth [2] to-morrow. All here are very well, and much pleased with your politeness and attention ...
— The Works of Lord Byron: Letters and Journals, Volume 2. • Lord Byron

... Jernyngham set out for the Leslie homestead and on his arrival found Gertrude alone. Sitting down with a shiver, he looked ...
— Prescott of Saskatchewan • Harold Bindloss

... privilege of raising a few stones towards erecting the New Orphan-House, the enclosed trifle is sent for that purpose.— There will doubtless be a conspiracy from beneath, to fight against and to hinder the work; nevertheless let us make our prayer unto our God, and set a watch against ...
— A Narrative of Some of the Lord's Dealings with George Mueller - Written by Himself, Fourth Part • George Mueller

... similar combination escaping the literalism of the terms of the elements? It is at this stage that the claim must be carefully studied. The inventor, or some one for him, must assume the position of a pirate, and set his wits to work to contrive an organization realizing the invention but escaping the terms of the proposed claim. When such an escaping device is schemed out, then the defect in the claim is developed and the claim must be redrawn. In this way every possible ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 1178, June 25, 1898 • Various

... them; don't let them bother you. Just tell me what has come over you, and I'll set it right, or know the ...
— The Old Countess; or, The Two Proposals • Ann S. Stephens

... twenties, and other smaller coins in his ears and hands, on his breast, etc., besides all his finery, his feather mantles, plumes, clothing, shell money, his fancy bows, painted arrows, etc. When the torch was applied they set up a mournful ululation, chanting and dancing about him, gradually working themselves into a wild and ecstatic raving, which seemed almost a demoniacal possession, leaping, howling, lacerating their flesh. Many seemed to lose all self-control. ...
— An introduction to the mortuary customs of the North American Indians • H. C. Yarrow

... inventive genius was at work among farm implements. Worlidge mentions[347] an engine for setting corn, invented by Gabriel Plat, made of two boards bored with wide holes 4 in. apart, set in a frame, with a funnel to each hole. It was fitted with iron pins 5 in. long to 'play up and down', and dibble holes into which the corn was to go from the funnels. This machine was so intricate and clumsy that Worlidge found no use for it. However, he ...
— A Short History of English Agriculture • W. H. R. Curtler

... penetrate into those unknown regions. For more than a year one of these ships had been pushing its way northward, amid snow and ice, and the sailors had endured many hardships; till at length winter set in, and the sun entirely disappeared; for many weeks there would be constant night. All around, as far as the eye could reach, nothing could be seen but fields of ice, in which the ship remained stuck fast. The snow lay piled up in great heaps, ...
— Fairy Tales of Hans Christian Andersen • Hans Christian Andersen

... reached home by a roundabout course, and found it impossible to dismiss thoughts of the boys engaged in that practice game, he eventually decided that he was a fool. Having reached this conclusion, he set off in great haste for the gymnasium, running the greater ...
— Rival Pitchers of Oakdale • Morgan Scott

... Elizabeth it was one of the principal centres of the manufacture in the county, and, indeed, caused Exeter so much jealousy that weavers, tuckers, and others, petitioned the authorities until it was ordained that the serge-market should be removed from here, and a weekly one set up in Exeter, to the great and natural indignation of Crediton. 'Their market for kersies hath been very great, especially of the finer sort,' says Westcote, 'for the aptness and diligent industry ...
— Devon, Its Moorlands, Streams and Coasts • Rosalind Northcote

... a lofty religious creed, and a sufficient law of life, and of its mechanical arts. Whether lessoned by Leonardo himself, or merely one of many disciplined in the system of the Milanese school, he learns unerringly to draw, unerringly and enduringly to paint. His tasks are set him without question day by day, by men who are justly satisfied with his work, and who accept it without any harmful praise, or senseless blame. Place, scale, and subject are determined for him on the cloister wall or the ...
— The Queen of the Air • John Ruskin

... ourselves, every rough discipline, tells us that our life and future are not our own, that they are intimately connected with a larger life, a greater future. I have been thinking of those words—so like Jesus Christ to have uttered them—me merimnesete. We are always anxious about a set of circumstances which will soon be upon us—engagements which we tremble to meet. Jesus Christ tells us, me merimnesete. I believe that work in the {103} present world would be far more free and effective if we would obey the command. We cannot enter into ...
— Letters to His Friends • Forbes Robinson

... o'clock P.M., an instantaneous motor-bomb was discharged from Repeller No. 1 into Fort Pilcher. It was set to act five seconds after impact with the object aimed at. It struck in a central portion of the unfinished fort, and having described a high curve in the air, descended not only with its own motive power, but with ...
— The Great War Syndicate • Frank Stockton

... the evening Johnson and Bell had nothing to do but to fold their arms. The launch was rocking gently in her little harbor, with her mast set, her jib lowered, and her foresail in the brails; the provisions and most of the things on the sledge had been put on board; only the tent and a little of the camping material remained to be put ...
— The Voyages and Adventures of Captain Hatteras • Jules Verne

... He set down the tray with a rattle and tried to pull the door open. But the top bolt had become displaced, and it was several seconds before ...
— True to Himself • Edward Stratemeyer

... Retell the main events of this story as briefly as you can. You can do this best by making a careful outline of the points set forth. Hand your topics to ...
— Story Hour Readings: Seventh Year • E.C. Hartwell

... and W are vertical wheels which may be successfully connected with the double horizontal drive wheel if the pulley between the two has a wide flange and is set at the proper angle. A long strip of paper is given a uniform rectilinear motion as the string attached to it is wound around the axle, V. The pen, P, has a motion compounded of two simultaneous motions at right angles to each other given by the two guide wheels. Designs ...
— The Boy Mechanic: Volume 1 - 700 Things For Boys To Do • Popular Mechanics

... stationed outside before the windows received those who jumped out on the points of their swords. But soon this butchery tired the butchers, and to get over the business more quickly, the marshal, who was anxious to return to his dinner, gave orders that the mill should be set on fire. This being done, the dragoons, the marshal still at their head, no longer exerted themselves so violently, but were satisfied with pushing back into the flames the few unfortunates who, scorched and burnt, rushed out, begging only for ...
— Celebrated Crimes, Complete • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... established at different times. Of these the Parliament of Paris was the oldest and by far the most important. The king and other suzerains administered justice, each in his own domain. The Parliament of Paris was originally a portion of the king's council that was set apart to hear causes among the fiefs. It considered all appeals and judicial questions. But in the reign of Louis IX., commissioners, or baillis, of the king, held provincial courts of appeal in his name. The great suzerains established, ...
— Outline of Universal History • George Park Fisher

... Then suddenly, wide-stretching under heaven, lay the sea, as God gave bidding. The great deep was sundered from the land. The Warden of life, the Lord of hosts, beheld the dry ground far outspread. And the King of glory called it earth. For the ocean-billows and the wide-flung sea He set a lawful path and ...
— Codex Junius 11 • Unknown

... According to the earlier law, (Gaii Instit. p. 27,) a man might marry his niece on the brother's, not on the sister's, side. The emperor Claudius set the example of the former. In the Institutes, this distinction was abolished ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 4 • Edward Gibbon

... in it. I hated to go. I knew I was no "show" dog, even though Miss Dorothy and the Master did their best to keep me from shaming them. For before we set out Miss Dorothy brings a man from town who scrubbed and rubbed me, and sand-papered my tail, which hurt most awful, and shaved my ears with the Master's razor, so you could most see clear through 'em, and sprinkles ...
— Ranson's Folly • Richard Harding Davis

... be supposed that they intended to "swarm" up this rope hand by hand. For the height of a dozen yards or so, any of them could have accomplished that. But there would be a hundred and fifty yards of "swarming" to be done before they could set foot upon the top of the cliff; and the smartest sailor that ever crawled up a main-stay—even Sinbad himself—could not have done half the distance. They had foreseen this difficulty from the very first; and the ...
— The Cliff Climbers - A Sequel to "The Plant Hunters" • Captain Mayne Reid

... they should doo God good seruice in prouiding for the wealth of the realme, and the aduancement of the church by their periurie. For whereas the late deceassed king vsed himselfe not altogither for their purpose, they thought that if they might set vp and creat a king cheflie by their especiall meanes and authoritie, he would follow their counsell better, and reforme such things as they iudged to be amisse. But a great cause that mooued manie of the ...
— Chronicles of England, Scotland and Ireland (2 of 6): England (4 of 12) - Stephan Earle Of Bullongne • Raphael Holinshed

... never intended woman to reason, they shut their college doors against her so that she can not study that manly accomplishment, and then they blame her for taking a short cut to the same conclusion they reach in their roundabout, lumbering processes of ratiocination. Do these gentlemen wish us to set aside God's laws, pick up logic on the sidewalks, and go step by step to a point we can reach with one flash of intuition? As long as we have the gift of catching truth by the telegraph wires, neither the sage of Bloomington nor Robert ...
— History of Woman Suffrage, Volume II • Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage

... and took her out of herself a little by extemporaneous pictures; he told her all his thrilling adventures by flood and field, not one of which had ever occurred, yet he made them all sound like truth; he invented strange characters, and set them talking; he went after great whales, and harpooned one, which slapped his boat into fragments with one stroke of its tail; then died, and he hung on by the harpoon protruding from the carcass till a ship came and picked him up. He shot a lion that was carrying off his favorite Hottentot. He ...
— A Simpleton • Charles Reade

... and withdraw from the canvass. That's the way I put it up." He had brought a lot of chicken feathers, and dried apples, and leaf tobacco, and rags, and old shoes, and sulphur, and asafoetida, and one thing or another; and he, piled them on a breadth of sheet iron in the middle of the floor, and set ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... for payment; with defeat, it is shame to demand reward, as did the runaways of Gruyere after the battle of Serizolles." Thus Rabelais mocked the last Gruyere soldiers as Tasso praised the first, and an undeserved stigma was set on the banner which had been carried unstained through six centuries of ...
— The Counts of Gruyere • Mrs. Reginald de Koven

... was in the guise of that noble, brave, frolicsome, impetuous young gentleman. The intense vitality, the glancing glee, the intrepid spirit—all were preserved; and the brilliant text was spoken with faultless fluency. It is difficult to realise that the same actor who set before us that perfect image of comic perplexity, the bland and benevolent Dean, in Dandy Dick, could ever have been the bantering companion of Romeo and truculent adversary of fiery Tybalt. Yet this contrast but faintly indicates the versatile character ...
— Shadows of the Stage • William Winter

... yuse yure risin', not the least bit in the world, till there's some one to set yu ...
— Forsyte Saga • John Galsworthy

... the United States was at war with the German Empire, to-wit, that the defendants willfully conspired to have printed and circulated to men who had been called and accepted for military service under the Act of May 18, 1917, a document set forth and alleged to be calculated to cause such insubordination and obstruction." Affirming the conviction, the Court, speaking by Justice Holmes said: "It well may be that the prohibition of laws abridging ...
— The Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation • Edward Corwin

... for keeping his fortifications from falling into the hands of the enemy already made, he set about fulfilling them. He examined the magazine and had everything in readiness. Then he ordered all his troops to report to the general commanding the nearest fortress, placed a fuse to the magazine, lighted it, and ...
— The boy Allies at Liege • Clair W. Hayes

... follow their example. The old type individualism of the landowning-operating farmer has long handicapped the farmer in his relations with other industrial groups. And it is with many mistakes and setbacks that he is now endeavoring to follow the example so ably set by the multimillionaires of the other groups. Better organization, not for exploitation but for protection and maintenance of a safe balance of influence in economic affairs, is fully justified, and the minister of the gospel is serving the farmer ...
— Church Cooperation in Community Life • Paul L. Vogt

... He set his burden down at the door of his pleasant home, expecting to see an expression of wonder or pleasure on the boy's face; but only a sensuous look of satisfaction at the comforts which the laborer had gathered about him was visible ...
— Allegories of Life • Mrs. J. S. Adams

... Arthur, and I set off to return to the city. On the way our uncle told us that our mother had solemnly promised him not to change her religion, and to suffer anything rather than be induced to do so. He had also spoken to our father, who seemed very anxious, but who declared that, rather ...
— The Wanderers - Adventures in the Wilds of Trinidad and Orinoco • W.H.G. Kingston

... my expectation of finding that war pushed women back into primitive conditions of toil, crushed them under the idea that physical force rules the world, and made them subservient. I chanced upon her as she was acting as ticket-puncher at the Yarmouth station. She was well set-up, alert, efficient, helpful in giving information, and, above all, cheerful. There were two capable young women at the bookstall, too. One had lost a brother at the front, the other her lover. I felt that they regarded their loss as one ...
— Mobilizing Woman-Power • Harriot Stanton Blatch

... and even confirmed him in it; for meeting some other knights Tristram declined to just with them. They spent the night together at an abbey, where Tristram submitted patiently to all their jokes. The Seneschal gave the word to his companions that they should set out early next day, and intercept the Cornish knight on his way, and enjoy the amusement of seeing his fright when they should insist on running a tilt with him. Tristram next morning found himself alone; ...
— Bulfinch's Mythology • Thomas Bulfinch

... however, made such good use of his night-stick that he knocked down two of his assailants, whereupon the third ran away, and he brought both of his prisoners to the station-house. Then he went round to the hospital, had his broken hand set in plaster, and actually reported for duty at the next tour, without losing one hour. He was a quiet fellow, with a record free from complaints, and we made ...
— Theodore Roosevelt - An Autobiography by Theodore Roosevelt • Theodore Roosevelt

... not ignore the fact that seven States had separated themselves from the others and set up a federal government of their own; and that these were ceaselessly agitating the people of the remaining Southern States by inflammatory speeches, and writings skilfully addressed to their interests and sympathies, to induce them to join in this new movement. They could not doubt the assurances ...
— A Report of the Debates and Proceedings in the Secret Sessions of the Conference Convention • Lucius Eugene Chittenden

... spoke, and the two great lights, sun and moon, were set to give light—day and night—upon the earth, and to order the seasons. "And God saw that it was good. And the evening and the morning were the ...
— Twilight And Dawn • Caroline Pridham

... what he could to set his life on a solid basis again. But he was unable to arouse in himself a very vital interest in his work; some prompter-nerve in him seemed to have been injured. And often, he was overcome by the feeling that this perpetual preoccupation with music was only a trifling with existence, an ...
— Maurice Guest • Henry Handel Richardson

... Poet's intellectual plenipotence in so ordering and moving the several characters of a play as that they may best draw out each other by mutual influences, and set off each other by mutual contrasts. The persons are thus assorted and attempered with perfect insight both of their respective natures and of their common fitness to his purpose. And not the least wonderful thing in his works is the exquisite congruity of what comes ...
— Shakespeare: His Life, Art, And Characters, Volume I. • H. N. Hudson

... of a summer night (9th July, 1575), the sun having for some time set, and all were in anxious expectation of the Queen's immediate approach. The multitude had remained assembled for many hours, and their numbers were still rather on the increase. A profuse distribution of refreshments, ...
— Kenilworth • Sir Walter Scott

... The stage was set for the production of the Doctrinas. That there were Chinese xylographic models upon which the books could be based is evidenced by the account of Mendoza of the considerable number of Chinese books brought to Manila by Martin de Rada as early as 1575. A more likely model was ...
— Doctrina Christiana • Anonymous

... (only by conjecture); but let the artists be who they would, the effigies do them great credit, and were highly deserving of better treatment than they have experienced. In the church is a fine-toned organ. In the steeple are twelve musical bells, and a set of chimes, that play with great accuracy a different tune every day in the week, at the hour of three, six, nine and twelve; and they are so contrived, that they shift from one tune to another, by means of their own ...
— A Description of Modern Birmingham • Charles Pye

... I got everything on board, charged my gun, set sail cautiously, along shore. As I passed by Battle Lagoon, I ...
— An English Grammar • W. M. Baskervill and J. W. Sewell

... magnitude, how to harmonise this new draught of external power and activity with the old and more mellow wine of faith, self devotion, loyalty, reverence, and discipline. And all that we have said is aimed, not at Mr. Tennyson, but at a lay-figure which he has set up, and into the mouth of which he has put words ...
— Famous Reviews • Editor: R. Brimley Johnson

... burnt.[308] Moreover the President of Panama himself, in a letter to Spain describing the event which was intercepted by the English, admits that not the buccaneers but the slaves and the owners of the houses set fire to the city.[309] The buccaneers tried in vain to extinguish the flames, and the whole town, which was built mostly of wood, was consumed by twelve o'clock midnight. The only edifices which escaped were the government buildings, a few churches, ...
— The Buccaneers in the West Indies in the XVII Century • Clarence Henry Haring

... the woods for perhaps an hour, keeping ever within hearing of the stream, Pierre set his burden on the ground and threw himself down beside her to snatch a moment's rest. The little one was in her bare feet, so it was impossible for her to walk in that rough and difficult region. Indeed, she had nothing on but a ...
— The Raid From Beausejour; And How The Carter Boys Lifted The Mortgage • Charles G. D. Roberts

... battles, stained with the blood of their brothers and their friends, has raised them from base to regal estate, have found in place of the felicity they expected an infinity of cares and fears, and have proved by experience that a chalice may be poisoned, though it be of gold, and set on the table of a king. Many have most ardently desired beauty and strength and other advantages of person, and have only been taught their error by the death or dolorous life which these very advantages entailed upon them. And so, ...
— The Decameron, Volume I • Giovanni Boccaccio

... this way I mean to tell him that he ought to have one good battle an' be done with it. Thar's no use piddlin' along like this twil we're all worn out and thar ain't a corn-field pea left in Virginny. Look here (to Big Abel), you set right down on that do' step an' I'll give you something along with yo' marster. It's a good thing I happened to look under the cow trough yestiddy or thar wouldn't have been an egg left in this house. That's right, ...
— The Battle Ground • Ellen Glasgow

... vigilant power, humanly super-human, sovereignly intelligent, and, for all we know, even personal—must it not, at first sight, seem more reverent, worthier, to offer complete submission, trying only to master our terror, than tranquilly to set on foot a patient, laborious investigation? But is the choice possible to us; have we still the right to choose? The beauty or dignity of the attitude we shall assume no longer is matter of moment. It is truth and sincerity that are called for to-day for ...
— The Buried Temple • Maurice Maeterlinck

... a lady of doubtful reputation who had originally been his mistress. Marriage had been the only available means of keeping the beautiful girl to himself, and he could not do without her. After having exercised its veto in vain, his family absolutely closed its doors to its erring member who had set aside its sacrosanct authority. The town—all those, that is, who mattered, who, as usual, were absolutely united in any matter that touched the moral dignity of the community—sided bodily against the rash couple. The explorer learned to his cost ...
— Jean-Christophe Journey's End • Romain Rolland

... lectures delivered by the celebrated Professor Tartlet of San Francisco. Indeed, we ought to have seen them! The unhappy Carefinotu perspired profusely as he went through the elementary exercises. He was docile and willing, nevertheless; but like all his fellows, his shoulders did not set back, nor did his chest throw out, nor did his knees or his feet point apart! To make a Vestris or a Saint Leon of ...
— Godfrey Morgan - A Californian Mystery • Jules Verne

... in Switzerland. I am so sorry. Flora still more sorry. She is accustomed to have her own way, and she had set her heart on hearing Darrell read 'Manfred' in sight of ...
— What Will He Do With It, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... of small, low wooden houses, scattered at intervals for the distance of a mile and a half, and therefore ill fitted for defence. The English had the frame of a blockhouse, or, as some say, of two blockhouses, ready to be set up on their arrival; but as the ground was hard frozen it was difficult to make a foundation, and the frames were therefore stored in outbuildings of the village, with the intention of raising them ...
— A Half-Century of Conflict, Volume II • Francis Parkman

... our hero set to work, and in the course of twenty minutes or so the difficulty was obviated. The kite ...
— Herbert Carter's Legacy • Horatio Alger

... outside of Ascalon, save when the flashes of lightning in the storm that rolled down from the mountains to the sea lit it up, showing the thousands of white tents set round the city, the walls and the sentries who watched upon them, the feathery palms that stood against the sky, the mighty, snow-crowned range of Lebanon, and encircling all the black breast of the troubled ocean. In a little open space ...
— The Brethren • H. Rider Haggard

... pleasant, that David and I, who in general are great sleepy-heads, had no desire to rest; perhaps from having seen so much that was new during the day. The sailors are too used to such visits to think any thing about them; and, besides, they are a mighty independent set of men, and care as little for the world as the world for them. Clarendon sat on one end of the schooner reading some English papers by the moonlight, which was intensely bright, while at the other end Brown Tom and some of his friends were regaling themselves with a smoke and a long yarn. I had ...
— Hurrah for New England! - The Virginia Boy's Vacation • Louisa C. Tuthill

... quinqueremes, hastened forward to the Piraeus, and took under his command the ships left there by Lucius Apustius, lieutenant-general, for the protection of Athens. At the same time, two fleets set sail from Asia; one of twenty-four quinqueremes, under king Attalus; the other belonging to the Rhodians, consisting of twenty decked ships, and commanded by Agesimbrotus. These fleets, joining near the island of Andros, sailed for Euboea, which was separated from them only by a narrow strait. They ...
— History of Rome, Vol III • Titus Livius

... hope not! I don't know where in time I'd set 'em, 'less they'd eat at the secont table," Mrs. Gray ...
— Main-Travelled Roads • Hamlin Garland

... sulphuric acid on the balsam, and heats the mixture, when the balsam dissolves to a cherry-red fluid, without evolving sulphurous acid, but with the escape of benzoic or cinnamic acid, if no common resin is present. On the contrary, the balsam foams, blackens, and much sulphurous acid is set free, if it is adulterated with common ...
— The Art of Perfumery - And Methods of Obtaining the Odors of Plants • G. W. Septimus Piesse

... enchantment you did here, A ring in chase of you; so did I abuse Myself, my servant, and, I fear me, you. Under your hard construction must I sit, To force that on you, in a shameful cunning, Which you knew none of yours; what might you think? Have you not set mine honour at the stake, And baited it with all th' unmuzzled thoughts That tyrannous heart can think? To one of your receiving Enough is shown. A cypress, not a bosom, Hides my heart. So, let ...
— Twelfth Night; or, What You Will • William Shakespeare [Hudson edition]

... engineer and was employed by the government as inspector of bridges and highways. He passed a busy life in exacting outdoor work but at the same time his active intellect played over a large range of human interests. He became especially concerned with historical origins and set himself to learn Latin and Greek that he might get at the sources. Not satisfied that he had come to the root of the matter he learned Arabic, Syriac, Hebrew and Chaldean. Diderot says "Il lisait et tudiait partout, ...
— Baron d'Holbach - A Study of Eighteenth Century Radicalism in France • Max Pearson Cushing

... his life was to find the young girl, and atone for the cowardice which had made him avoid her for a time. He had resolved that the fact that she was Olympia's child should not prevent him acting this manly part; but when that degradation was lifted from her by the woman's own words, his heart was set free from an intolerable weight, and went back to its old love with a happy rebound. He remained in London some days, spending the time in vain efforts to learn something of the beautiful fugitive, and then started back to the neighborhood of ...
— The Old Countess; or, The Two Proposals • Ann S. Stephens

... another messenger followed the first in quick succession—one manipule of soldiers had been overpowered, and driven into some houses where they defended themselves, though hard set, with their missiles—the multitude was thundering at the gates of the City Prisons; and, if not quelled immediately, would shortly swell their numbers by the accession of all the desperate criminals, convicted ...
— The Roman Traitor (Vol. 2 of 2) • Henry William Herbert

... acquired mainly by imitation. But there is the rub the case of the geography class mentioned on page 258 shows conclusively that the natural tendency of young people to imitate the example of initiative set by their teachers gives very little guarantee of the exercise of similar initiative on their ...
— How To Study and Teaching How To Study • F. M. McMurry

... John," said Oliver. They approached slowly under the fruit-trees, not to intrude. Sir Constans was showing the courtier an early cherry-tree, whose fruit was already set. The dry hot weather had caused it to set even earlier than usual. A suit of black velvet, an extremely expensive and almost unprocurable material, brought the courtier's pale features into relief. ...
— After London - Wild England • Richard Jefferies

... the genie and princess all in flames. They threw flashes of fire out of their mouths at one another, until they came to it hand to hand; then the fires increased, with a thick burning smoke, which mounted so high, that we had reason to fear that it would set the palace on fire. But we very soon had a more pressing occasion of fear; for the genie, having got loose from the princess, came to the gallery where we stood, and blew flames of fire upon us. We had all perished, if the princess, running to our assistance, had not forced him, by her ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments Volume 1 • Anonymous

... said Mrs. Bull. "Now, John, I can trust you. Whatever you do, I know you won't wake your father unnecessarily. You are a bold, brave child, and I highly approve of your erecting yourself against Master Wiseman and all that bad set. But, be wary, John; and, as you have, and deserve to have, great influence with your father, I am sure you will be careful how you wake him. If he was to make a wild rush, and begin to dance about, on the Platform in the Hall, I ...
— Harper's New Monthly Magazine, Vol. 2, No. 8, January, 1851 • Various

... wet, dreary one. Our car leaked, our fire went out, and we were most thoroughly uncomfortable. The evening found us at the mountain city of Lynchburg, which is literally "set on a hill." Here we discovered that we had missed the connection, and would have to wait for twenty-four hours. We were very sorry for this, as we were in a great hurry to get to our own lines, and had been talking all ...
— Daring and Suffering: - A History of the Great Railroad Adventure • William Pittenger

... readings, his faithful friends like Forster would gladly have seen him abandon a practice which could add little to his future fame, while it threatened to shorten his life. But, however arduous the task which he set himself, when the moment came Dickens could brace himself to meet the demands and satisfy the high expectations of his audience. His nerves seemed to harden, his voice to gain strength; his spirit flashed out undimmed, and he won triumph after triumph, ...
— Victorian Worthies - Sixteen Biographies • George Henry Blore

... he was here now," said she; "I will go through the woods, toward the high-road, and see if he is coming," and putting on her bonnet and shawl, she set out. She had just entered the wood when two advancing figures caught her attention. The path was so narrow that they were walking one behind ...
— The Rector of St. Mark's • Mary J. Holmes

... the battles of his nation, and was only reduced to quiescence by the entrance of Sophy, who expressed a desire to see a coral worm, apparently perplexing the showman, who, to gain time, hemmed, and said, 'A very unusual species, ma'am,' which set all the younger ones in a double giggle, such as confused Sophy, to find herself standing up, with every one looking at her, and listening for her words. 'I thought you undertook for any impossibility in earth ...
— The Young Step-Mother • Charlotte M. Yonge

... evident that Victor had returned. He wondered if he had met the men in the hall as they were leaving the house, and had wormed out of them what they had been doing. He would be sure to miss the picture—had no doubt missed it already, while he had been laying the tea-things. The screen had not been set back, and a blank space was visible on the wall. Perhaps some night he might find him creeping upstairs and trying to force the door of the room. It was a horrible thing to have a spy in one's house. He had heard ...
— The Picture of Dorian Gray • Oscar Wilde

... have this interpretation of mine in any way affect my father's memory. I never could bring myself to believe it, knowing him as I knew him. But, at the same time, the very idea that there was such a charge in writing disturbed me. Your explanation, Sir, has made all clear, and has set my mind at rest ...
— The Cryptogram - A Novel • James De Mille

... enclosed a drawing of the hat I meant to wear as leader—a ripping scheme, turned up at one side and with a bunch of feathers. All the answer I got was a few brief words of acknowledgment and a request to set about it at once and report myself somewhere or other. Not a word of the State recognition I was to receive, and the drawing of the hat returned with 'Not approved' scrawled across it. So I've chucked the whole business. And now don't let us talk ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 147, September 2nd, 1914 • Various

... it, then," Greenleaf said, his jaw set. "That young man will have to remain with ...
— The Winning Clue • James Hay, Jr.

... upon the horse himself, and galloped away, full tear, to the next stage. At length, all was ready; and the little parcel having been handed up, with many injunctions and entreaties for its speedy delivery, the man set spurs to his horse, and rattling over the uneven paving of the market-place, was out of the town, and galloping along the turnpike-road, in ...
— Oliver Twist • Charles Dickens

... Author of Nature has not made even a single hair without a definite design. A hundred years before, one, Nehemias Grew, had said that it was necessary for pollen to reach the stigma of a flower in order that it might set fertile seed, and Linnaeus bad to come to his rescue with conclusive evidence to convince a doubting world that he was right. Sprengel made the next step forward, but his writings lay neglected over seventy years ...
— Wild Flowers, An Aid to Knowledge of Our Wild Flowers and - Their Insect Visitors - - Title: Nature's Garden • Neltje Blanchan

... Sophia has no spirit. She is very different from her niece, Mrs. Dean Crawford over-harbour. You know the Dean Crawfords had five boys and now the new baby is another boy. All the connection and especially Dean Crawford were much disappointed because their hearts had been set on a girl; but Mrs. Dean just laughed and said, 'Everywhere I went this summer I saw the sign "MEN WANTED" staring me in the face. Do you think I could go and have a girl under such circumstances?' There is spirit for you, Mrs. Dr. dear. ...
— Rilla of Ingleside • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... board then! This certainty of knowledge by evidence of his own eyes, set his blood leaping. Whatever the purposes of these people he was again upon the right trail. The uplifted curtain was immediately lowered, and, if any signal had thus been conveyed, there was no other evidence visible. A little later one of the two better dressed fellows loafing on the pier, a rather ...
— The Case and The Girl • Randall Parrish

... beautiful Jehane de Saint-Pol. Jehane of the Fair Girdle, the beloved of Richard Coeur de Lion, Richard Yea-and-Nay. Her eyes were gray green while yours are of the most wonderful blue, but there is something about your height and slenderness, your poise, the set of your head, the glory of your hair that suggests her. If Mother gives the fancy dress ball that she is threatening, please go as Jehane. I should like ...
— Molly Brown's Orchard Home • Nell Speed

... The column set out at 1 a.m. in the direction of Elandskloof. It was a bright night, although a thick white mist hung everywhere. The 19th Hussars, who knew the difficult country, conducted the advance. After marching for two hours ...
— The Record of a Regiment of the Line • M. Jacson

... Whatever the wearer's object, England was satisfied that he had a notable purpose, and persisted in regarding the act as significant of cowardice or of insolence, of anxiety to keep within the lines of parliamentary privilege or of readiness to set all law at defiance. At the time and long after Bradshaw's death, that hat caused an abundance of discussion; it was a problem which men tried in vain to solve, an enigma that puzzled clever heads, a riddle that was interpreted as an insult, a caution, a protest, a menace, a doubt. Oxford ...
— A Book About Lawyers • John Cordy Jeaffreson

... Gil Blas," said he, "to defend the character of our practise against this little abortion of the faculty. So he takes upon him to set his face against watery drenches in dropsical cases? An ignorant fellow! I maintain, I do, in my own person, that the use of them may be reconciled to the best theories. Yes, water is a cure for all sorts of dropsies, ...
— International Short Stories: French • Various

... manner also in which they are composed or framed, and of the form under which they make their appearance to the reader. It will therefore, as I imagine, be not improper, in pursuance of the admonition given us by Plato himself in his dialogue named Phaedrus[22] and in imitation of the example set us by the ancient Platonists to distinguish the several kinds; by dividing them, first, into the most general; and then, subdividing into the subordinate; till we come to those lower species, that particularly ...
— Introduction to the Philosophy and Writings of Plato • Thomas Taylor

... first words assured them of that fact, and he went on to say that Dorothy's disappearance, however, would make no difference in the reading of Doctor Bryan's will, which was set for that day ...
— Pretty Madcap Dorothy - How She Won a Lover • Laura Jean Libbey

... marching back to Lee's army. But the march of troops and the rumbling of artillery have ceased to be novel spectacles to our community. Some aged ladies ran out as they passed, calling the bronzed Texans their "children," and distributed loaves of bread and other food among them. I never saw a merrier set than these brave soldiers, who have been through the "fire and the flood" numberless times. Some of them had three or ...
— A Rebel War Clerk's Diary at the Confederate States Capital • John Beauchamp Jones

... matters of common knowledge. It was common knowledge in Centralia and adjoining towns that the I.W.W. hall was to be raided on Armistice Day. Yet eight loggers have been sentenced from twenty-five to forty years in prison for the crime of defending themselves from the mob that set out to murder them! But let us see how the conspiracy was operating in Centralia to make ...
— The Centralia Conspiracy • Ralph Chaplin

... scenery, and resting her from the strenuous task of keeping Bo well in hand at stations, she lapsed again into dreamy gaze at the pine forests and the red, rocky gullies and the dim, bold mountains. She saw the sun set over distant ranges of New Mexico—a golden blaze of glory, as new to her as the strange fancies born in her, thrilling and fleeting by. Bo's raptures were not silent, and the instant the sun sank and the color faded she just as rapturously importuned Helen to ...
— The Man of the Forest • Zane Grey

... and as there was no one to set it, he told his nephew to get a pail of plaster of Paris, and he himself would tell him how to manage ...
— The Reminiscences of an Irish Land Agent • S.M. Hussey

... household, however, was as nothing to her position in the estate and the neighbourhood. That was the amazing thing which had by now begun to set all tongues wagging. Sir Henry Chicksands, meeting Mrs. Gaddesden at the station, had poured himself out to her. 'That extraordinary young woman your father has got hold of, is simply transforming the whole place. The farmers on the whole like her very much. But ...
— Elizabeth's Campaign • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... congratulates Henry on his success in a just and pious war; and complains that the prosperity of his own empire is disturbed by the audacious enterprises of the Norman Robert. The lists of his presents expresses the manners of the age—a radiated crown of gold, a cross set with pearls to hang on the breast, a case of relics, with the names and titles of the saints, a vase of crystal, a vase of sardonyx, some balm, most probably of Mecca, and one hundred pieces of purple. To ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 5 • Edward Gibbon

... he was a card-sharp," said Jim. "Wal, grab a box or a chair to set on an' let's start. Come along, Jack; you don't look as keen to ...
— The Mysterious Rider • Zane Grey

... said;—"you must be very quiet. Your shoulder has been set. It is all right now. Heaven be praised that we did not kill you as we fell!" she added aside, and her sweet motherly face showed the sympathy he was in ...
— Idle Hour Stories • Eugenia Dunlap Potts

... 1769. An officer proposed to make a walking tour round the island with me, but when the time came to set out he excused himself, so I resolved to go alone. But knowing that I should often have to camp out in the woods alone, I took two negroes with me to carry provisions, and I armed myself with a double-barrel ...
— The World's Greatest Books, Volume 19 - Travel and Adventure • Various

... pounded the crest just beyond. Finally all the crests were covered by little fluttering red and white flags, while the Bulgarians fled headlong down the opposite slopes. On the following day a period of very bad weather set in and drowned further operations ...
— The Story of the Great War, Volume VI (of VIII) - History of the European War from Official Sources • Various



Words linked to "Set" :   temper, physical exercise, collection, establish, imbricate, threescore, nestle, ordered, posit, volume, synchronise, advance, emplacement, triad, price, zero in, load, attune, arranged, parallelize, sync, unmoving, put back, attack, close-set, thrust, calibrate, middle, rise, disposition, tax, trio, approximate, party, conspiracy, natural process, tune, cognitive state, social group, estimate, sum, prime, zero, product, sit down, format, range of a function, music, dispose, set-back, procreate, domain of a function, activity, receiving set, topological space, stand, exercise, socialise, portfolio, confederacy, justify, space, image, recess, pillow, diagonal, hard, tee up, psychological science, originate, abstraction, rest, play, intersection, Egyptian deity, align, assess, postpose, socialize, sign, park, harmonize, septette, quartet, prearrange, solidify, rack up, band, root, descent, mise en scene, curry, exercising, groom, modulate, write, judge, gauge, crystal set, field, tendency, nucleus, readjust, lose, descend, octette, perch, winterize, hone, cock, quintet, barrel, insert, displace, superpose, company, crop, receiving system, take, intersperse, mathematics, period of play, represent, game, congelation, stick in, jar, plastination, abstract entity, tabularise, brace, octet, assault, neaten, singleton, aggregation, replant, choir, tree, scene, quintuplet, harmonise, seat, receiver, ingroup, universal set, come down, repose, lean, psychology, inner circle, astronomy, clap, suite, accumulation, regulate, identify, transpose, quintuple, pack, change, ordinate, dentition, quintette, inclination, compose, depressurize, provide, positioning, plumb, work, place down, sow, assail, fine-tune, marshal, lay over, quadruple, sender, four hundred, communication system, clique, introduce, electronic equipment, trim, set point, mount, put down, install, citify, tabularize, table, stand up, synchronize, prepose, quartette, guess, pair, value, underlay, down, cram, coterie, pitch, natural action, bury, coffin, fall, locating, equip, state of mind, sextette, septet, glycerolize, start, trench, seed, car pool, bottle, reposition, print, ship, horsey set, outfit, congealment, siphon, conjugation, union, focalise, focalize, initialize, alter, focus, core group, charge, mislay, group, core, sestet, teeth, uranology, keynote, place upright, tee, nonmoving, bucket, sextet, time, forest, playing period, date, multiply, superimpose, physical exertion, tabulate, join, put in, camp, appose, interval, bracket, snuggle, sharpen, assemblage, linearise, inclose, summerize, linearize, locus, decompress, initialise, proportion, solution, situate, summerise, instal, butt, quantify, consort, move, replace, bob, stage, maths, pile, set-apart, sink, mathematical space, docket, math, location, depressurise, set on, filiate, puddle, bed, coordinate, Cartesian product, afforest, pigeonhole, scenery, make, poise, deposit, pick out, score, graduate, workout, tune up, match, ladle, action, step, winterise, misplace, initiate, stratify, upend, choose, shelve, transmitter, domain, precondition, dibble, reconcile, placement, recline, mathematical group, pressurise, communication equipment, ensconce, fit out, cohort, name, present, triple, sit, juxtapose, reproduce, select, emplace, modify, enclose, impress, ground, checkrow, representation, quadruplet, glycerolise, complex instruction set computer, lay down, triplet, range, throw, wave, pressurize, cultivate



Copyright © 2019 Diccionario ingles.com