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Sit out   /sɪt aʊt/   Listen
Sit out

verb
1.
Not participate in (an activity, such as a dance or a sports event).
2.
Endure to the end.






WordNet 3.0 © 2010 Princeton University








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"Sit out" Quotes from Famous Books



... that eventful week we used to sit out after dinner under the rays of a glorious full moon, in the most perfect climatic conditions, and hear heated discussions of the pros and cons of this occurrence, which savoured more of medieval times than of our own. The moon ...
— South African Memories - Social, Warlike & Sporting From Diaries Written At The Time • Lady Sarah Wilson

... with vehemence. "It's perfectly horrid. I hope you're not wanting to dance, Major Herne? For I want to sit out, and—and ...
— Rosa Mundi and Other Stories • Ethel M. Dell

... goes about, And you will always meet him "everywhere," And sometimes after supper he'll sit out A dance or two, ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 104, April 1, 1893 • Various

... the arrivals at the house, that three bridge tables were in contemplation, she had made up her mind to "squeeze it in," so that there would be nine gamblers, and Isabel or her mother, if they had any sense of hospitality to their guests, would be compelled to sit out for ever and ever. Miss Mapp had been urgently invited: sweet Isabel had made a great point of her squeezing it in, and if sweet Isabel, in order to be certain of a company of eight, had asked quaint Irene ...
— Miss Mapp • Edward Frederic Benson

... the pleasure which persons of all conditions found in listening to him. Women often crowded the court-rooms to hear him, and as often astonished him, not only by the patience, but the visible enjoyment with which they were wont to sit out his argument to the end,—even when the topic was too dry to interest them, or too abstruse for them to understand his discourse.... His oratory was not of that strong, bold, and impetuous nature which ...
— Choice Specimens of American Literature, And Literary Reader - Being Selections from the Chief American Writers • Benj. N. Martin

... officer; "she's able to walk about, but not to stand, and sit out a dinner, and dance, and all this sort of thing. Too bad, ...
— The Princess Aline • Richard Harding Davis

... and I wouldn't criticize the people of Ashbury Heights simply because they use their well-curtained windows only to admit the light, and do not lean out and gossip with their neighbors and yell to their children, "Mahree, Mahree," nor sit out on their steps in the evening and play Rigoletto on the accordion. It's all ...
— Vignettes of San Francisco • Almira Bailey

... sit out the tragedy till the curtain falls. After the four stages of meditation are passed, the Buddha (and every being is to become a Buddha) enters first into the infinity of space, then into the infinity of intelligence, and thence he passes into the third region, the realm of nothing. ...
— The Destiny of the Soul - A Critical History of the Doctrine of a Future Life • William Rounseville Alger

... to treat a guest," she said as they walked slowly towards home. "To sit out with him in the middle of the night and keep him awake. You make me selfish. I've never talked about Louis to anyone before. You make me dependent, ...
— Captivity • M. Leonora Eyles

... hastily (now the color of his cheeks had grown crimson). "Only—only I might not have selected her." The cavaliere looked up at him with evident surprise. "Am I obliged to dance the cotillon at all, cavaliere?" added Nobili, more and more confused. "Can't I sit out?" ...
— The Italians • Frances Elliot

... Belle went at once to the stable of the Temperance House. Yes, there he was, Blazing Star, in all his beauty. Then she went into the hotel and mounted guard in the little parlour. Dr. Carson came down and was sent to sit out of doors. At length the sound of the foot she awaited came from the stairs and she ...
— The Preacher of Cedar Mountain - A Tale of the Open Country • Ernest Thompson Seton

... Lucy in her prettiest frock and hat and Jane with her big red cloak over her arm to protect the young girl from the breeze from the sea, which in the early autumn was often cool, especially if they should sit out on Mrs. Cavendish's piazza. ...
— The Tides of Barnegat • F. Hopkinson Smith

... dance given by the Gordons in the ranchman candidate's big house opposite the Weatherfords' in Mesa Circle, and Blount went, hoping that Patricia would be there. She was there; and in the heart of the evening, when Blount had persuaded her to sit out a dance with him in a corner of the homelike reception-hall, he began to pry at a little stone of stumbling which was threatening to grow too large to ...
— The Honorable Senator Sage-Brush • Francis Lynde

... don't want to be a cog in any machine. I'm here to give myself a chance to grow—sit out in the sun and hatch an individuality—give myself lots ...
— The Vision Spendid • William MacLeod Raine

... essential—plenty of fresh air and sunshine. While there is fever he should be at rest in bed. For the greater part of each day, unless the weather is blustering and raining, the windows should be open. On the bright days he can sit out-doors on a balcony or porch, in a reclining chair. He must be in the open air all that is possible to be. A great many patients spend most of the time out in the open air now. In the country places this can be easily carried out. In the summer he should ...
— Mother's Remedies - Over One Thousand Tried and Tested Remedies from Mothers - of the United States and Canada • T. J. Ritter

... called out to an old gentleman, "Sit out here, guvinor, on the back piazza," or to another, "Don't crowd there; stay where the breezes blow," the dude looked daggers, and at last, grabbing the conductor's elbow and indicating the young man by ...
— Toasts - and Forms of Public Address for Those Who Wish to Say - the Right Thing in the Right Way • William Pittenger

... a duty I cannot shirk. I will consult the doctor about it. I will make him see that I both understand and shall insist upon my rights in this matter. But you may tell Miss Doris that I will sit out of sight, and that I shall not obtrude myself unless my name is brought up in ...
— Initials Only • Anna Katharine Green

... enemy; for quitting, or sleeping on one's post; all capital offences, according to the military codes of Europe. Neither were there provisions for quartering or billeting soldiers, or impressing waggons and other conveyances, in times of exigency. To crown all, no court-martial could sit out of Virginia; a most embarrassing regulation, when troops were fifty or a hundred miles beyond the frontier. He earnestly suggested amendments on all these points, as well as with regard to the soldiers' pay; which was ...
— The Life of George Washington, Volume I • Washington Irving

... the use of all that," Jack asked, grumblingly—for he was getting hungry! "What's the use of all that if the Chinks sit out there like blooming cigar-store images and never give a hint as to where we are? We are likely to starve before the American ambassador can act ...
— Boy Scouts on Motorcycles - With the Flying Squadron • G. Harvey Ralphson

... bearings, this answer seemed an improvement; it encouraged her for the moment. But it seemed impossible for them to sit out there and talk in a man-to-man relation; they were Society. The very phrases of society,—even the flowers, the supper, the yawning shack,—everything, it seemed to her, was against it. It is in the nature of things; and the Devil is on the man's ...
— The Wrong Woman • Charles D. Stewart

... of the stupid joke, and Mrs. James suggested he should sit out for a while. Gowing consented and ...
— The Diary of a Nobody • George Grossmith and Weedon Grossmith

... lad, it won't be so long before the snow will be down on us, and I'm thinking what shall we do with them when the long winter days set in." He nodded his head toward the cabin. "It's already getting too cold for them to sit out of doors as they do. I should have windows in my cabin—if I could get the glass up here. They can't live there in the darkness, with the snow banked around them, with nothing to use their fingers on as women like to do. Now, if they had ...
— The Eye of Dread • Payne Erskine

... we will not discuss the sex. You and I are too old to be cynical, and too young to be appreciative. And besides, it is a rule of mine, whenever I sit out a dance, that my partner shall avoid the ...
— Five Little Plays • Alfred Sutro

... Deighton of the Horse Battery through the mist. 'Whar you raise dat tonga? I'm coming with you. Ow! But I've a head and a half. I didn't sit out all night. They say the Battery's awful bad,' ...
— Under the Deodars • Rudyard Kipling

... and beyond, always on each side and in front, the thick green walls of the forest quite shutting in the quiet little place. We are usually the last outside. It grows cooler as the evening gets on, and I fancy it is not wise to sit out too late after the hot bath ...
— Chateau and Country Life in France • Mary King Waddington

... the library feasting on Spanish masters, so if you don't mind we'll sit out here," ...
— The Net • Rex Beach

... return not to me save after the third day.'" Now when the four men who were closeted together heard these words they were perplext as to their affair, and said one to other, "What shall we do? Indeed we are unable to sit out three days in this stead." Hereupon the Pieman said to them, "Nay, rather let us play a prank whereby we may escape," and said they, "What may be the device thou wouldest devise?" Quoth he, "Whatso I do that do ye look upon and then ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... comes the bursting of a shell immediately overhead, and the rattle of its fragments on the roof of the bomb-proof dug-out. Think what it must have meant to this eager, ardent, pleasure-loving spirit to sit out, day after day, in a chill, sodden, verminous trench, a grand orchestral concert of this ...
— Poems • Alan Seeger



Words linked to "Sit out" :   forbear, brook, tolerate, stand, refrain, endure, bear, sport, abide, stick out, athletics, digest, stomach, support, suffer, put up



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