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Stick   /stɪk/   Listen
Stick

noun
1.
An implement consisting of a length of wood.  "The kid had a candied apple on a stick"
2.
A small thin branch of a tree.
3.
A lever used by a pilot to control the ailerons and elevators of an airplane.  Synonyms: control stick, joystick.
4.
A rectangular quarter pound block of butter or margarine.
5.
Informal terms for the leg.  Synonyms: peg, pin.
6.
A long implement (usually made of wood) that is shaped so that hockey or polo players can hit a puck or ball.
7.
A long thin implement resembling a length of wood.  "A stick of dynamite"
8.
Marijuana leaves rolled into a cigarette for smoking.  Synonyms: joint, marijuana cigarette, reefer, spliff.
9.
Threat of a penalty.



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"Stick" Quotes from Famous Books



... that walks in error or heresy, or passion, or profaneness, all which are contrary to judgment; and that walks in divisions, schisms, contentions, &c., which are contrary to peace, loseth her authority. Stick but close to this principle, and you will quickly lay the church authority of most independent congregations in the dust. But who shall determine whether they walk in judgment and peace, or not? Not themselves; for that were to make parties judges ...
— The Divine Right of Church Government • Sundry Ministers Of Christ Within The City Of London

... accoutrement of the savage, who certainly obtained the knowledge of it from his Malay forefathers. No wonder, then, that in the district explored by Grey, these arms should have given way to the equally effective boomerang, throwing-stick, and spears, and other weapons of the ...
— The History of Australian Exploration from 1788 to 1888 • Ernest Favenc

... wood she dealt the reptile a blow, but the stick being decayed and brittle, inflicted little injury on the serpent, and only caused it to turn itself towards Mrs. Jameson, and fix its keen and beautiful, but malignant eyes, steadily upon her. The witchery ...
— Woman on the American Frontier • William Worthington Fowler

... throat to his ankles in a loose black garment, something between a coat and a cloak; and, to complete him, he had a club foot. I don't doubt that Sir Jervis Redwood is the earthly alias which he finds convenient—but I stick to that first impression which appeared to surprise you. 'Ha! an artist; you seem to be the sort of man I want!' In those terms he introduced himself. Observe, if you please, that my trap caught him the moment he came my way. Who wouldn't ...
— I Say No • Wilkie Collins

... honour. He plied them with his stories. He made himself juvenile and hilarious in the company of the young lords. He went to hear Pen at a grand debate at the Union, crowed and cheered, and rapped his stick in chorus with the cheers of the men, and was astounded at the boy's eloquence and fire. He thought he had got a young Pitt for a nephew. He had an almost paternal fondness for Pen. He wrote to the lad letters with playful advice and the news of the town. ...
— The History of Pendennis • William Makepeace Thackeray

... I, as loud as I could roar, an' snatchin' up me bundle an' stick, I started in the direction of the voice. Whin I thought I had got near the place I stopped and shouted ...
— The Canadian Elocutionist • Anna Kelsey Howard

... Lieutenant or Vice-gerent, and on no university-trained Doctors, which recognizes Prince and Ploughman alike, and secures its unity through Christ and through the invisible cement of Love. "To this Assembly," writes Weigel, "doe I stick; in this holy Church doe I rejoice to be. . . . Jesus Christ is my Head, my Teacher. He is everywhere with me and in me, and I in Him. Although the Protestants should chase me amongst Papists or Atheists, yet I should still be in the holy Church ...
— Spiritual Reformers in the 16th & 17th Centuries • Rufus M. Jones

... man. "And I tell you what, Jeff; you shall take it to-day. I've got a jolly good stick here, and I've no use for the revolver, anyhow; couldn't hit a house at a dozen yards, even if I was likely to see one. Yes, you take the shooting-iron, my dear fellow; you might manage to pot something. I hope ...
— Finn The Wolfhound • A. J. Dawson

... in somewhere before dawn," said Jim once while they rested. "Where we can stick close ...
— Daughter of the Sun - A Tale of Adventure • Jackson Gregory

... see that kid. I don't know how to tell you about it, but he seemed to kind of swim different from the other fellows, and he couldn't help getting excited. They threw pieces of stick for him to get, and he would swim out and bring them in in his mouth just like a dog, and then wait for more, all anxious like. One thing about Skinny I noticed, and that was that all the fellows, even in his own patrol, got a lot of fun out of him, making him do things, ...
— Roy Blakeley's Adventures in Camp • Percy Keese Fitzhugh

... after some consideration; "but mind you stick to the same name. And you'd better make up something about him— where he lives, and all that sort of thing—so that you can stand being questioned without looking more like a silly fool than you ...
— Short Cruises • W.W. Jacobs

... derives the word from baculus, the stick which keeps the fish open; others from the German boloh, fish. In 1498 Seb. Cabot speaks of 'great fishes which the natives call Baccalaos.' He thus makes the word 'Indian;' whereas Dr. Kohl, when noticing ...
— To the Gold Coast for Gold - A Personal Narrative in Two Volumes.—Vol. I • Richard F. Burton

... approve; approbate, think good, think much of, think well of, think highly of; esteem, value, prize; set great store by, set great store on. do justice to, appreciate; honor, hold in esteem, look up to, admire; like &c 897; be in favor of, wish Godspeed; hail, hail with satisfaction. stand up for, stick up for; uphold, hold up, countenance, sanction; clap on the back, pat on the back; keep in countenance, indorse; give credit, recommend; mark with a white mark, mark with a stone. commend, belaud^, praise, laud, compliment; pay a tribute, bepraise^; clap the hands; applaud, cheer, ...
— Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases: Body • Roget

... Cumberland has sworn he will not leave England till he has turned out the present Ministers. He is the only colonel of the Horse Guards who ever does duty—Lord Cathcart being absent and Lord Harrington incapable. When he last got the gold stick from Lord Harrington he swore he would never let it out of his hands. As gold stick he ordered the gates of the Horse Guards to be closed the day of the Drawing-room, and thus obliged all the Ministers who dressed in Downing Street ...
— A Political Diary 1828-1830, Volume II • Edward Law (Lord Ellenborough)

... filament was fixed vertically to the uppermost part of the peduncle of a young and upright flower-head (the stem of the plant having been secured to a stick); and its movements were traced during 36 h. Within this time it described (see Fig. 92) a figure which represents four ellipses; but during the latter part of the time the peduncle began to bend ...
— The Power of Movement in Plants • Charles Darwin

... frozen in his tracks. His face had gone deathly pale, and great drops of sweat stood on his forehead. The hand that held the stick unclasped, and it rattled unheeded to ...
— The Boy Chums in the Forest - or Hunting for Plume Birds in the Florida Everglades • Wilmer M. Ely

... purlieus of the Bronx, which is where they apparently belong! I can get that kind myself. I wanted automobiles and broughams and clothes, and I got one sea-going taxi, and the dirty end of the stick! And to cap the climax he strolled in himself with a girl whose face is familiar to everybody who looks at bath tubs in the back of the magazines—Valerie West! And I want to tell you I couldn't look my Shoe-trust tea-pourers in the face; ...
— The Common Law • Robert W. Chambers

... flushed. "You're welcome to know so far as I'm concerned," he said bluntly. "I always stick up ...
— Charles Rex • Ethel M. Dell

... little girls studied the corner Maida indicated. For two or three moments they whispered together. At one point, it looked as if they would each buy a long stick of peppermint, at another, a paper of lozenges. But they changed their minds a great many times. And in the end, Dorothy bought two large pickles and Mabel bought two large chocolates. Maida saw them swapping their purchases as ...
— Maida's Little Shop • Inez Haynes Irwin

... light another fire, nearer the house or fence which we are trying to save, and then, with a brush or broom, or sometimes a little stick, whip it out, so that it cannot burn very fast. When the grass is burnt off in this way there is nothing left for what we call the 'prairie-fire' to burn, you see. If we can do this in season, the house or ...
— The Allis Family; or, Scenes of Western Life • American Sunday School Union

... coat on the iron end of the spade, and tied his hat above on a stick; then he went down the ravine about ten yards, faced us, raised his dummy, and marched quickly toward us. This was the first dummy that the rebels had ever seen march, no doubt; at any rate their whole force was at once busy; the fire rolled from left to right far ...
— Who Goes There? • Blackwood Ketcham Benson

... But notwithstanding the many advantages of the Julian year, which was used throughout Europe for sixteen centuries, till its faultiness was pointed out by Pope Gregory XIII., the Egyptian astronomers and mathematicians distrusted it from the first, and chose to stick to their old year, in which there could be no mistake about its length. Thus there were at the same time three years and three new year's days in use in Egypt: one about the 18th of July, used by the common people; one on the 29th of August, used by order of the emperor; ...
— History Of Egypt From 330 B.C. To The Present Time, Volume 11 (of 12) • S. Rappoport

... believe it to be true. And now, take my advice and be very cautious. Men are cheap in Paris, and Cordel will stick at nothing. If I can help you against him, you may be sure ...
— For The Admiral • W.J. Marx

... a cupful of vinegar, the juice of half a lemon, two cloves, a bay-leaf, an inch of stick cinnamon, a teaspoonful of salt and a pinch of black pepper. Bring to the boil and pour over salmon steaks which have been boiled, drained, and cooled. Let stand for [Page 291] two or three hours ...
— How to Cook Fish • Olive Green

... cry out and the police will come and take him and cut him in sunder.' So the husband said to him, 'O thousand-horned,[FN248] O dog, O traitor, I owe thee a deposit,[FN249] for which thou dunnest me.' And he fell to beating him grievously with a stick of live-oak, whilst he called out to the woman for help and besought her of deliverance; but she said, 'Abide in thy place till the morning, and thou shalt see wonders.' And her husband beat him within the chamber, till he [well- nigh] made ...
— Tales from the Arabic Volumes 1-3 • John Payne

... In the collected edition there are 917 of these famous pictures, all admirably drawn, and excellent likenesses. Mr. Muntz is depicted in No. 643, under the title of "A Brummagem M.P." The historical stick, the baggy trousers, and the flowing and Homeric beard, are graphically represented. The reason given for his carrying the stick was quite amusing. It was stated that the then Marquis of Waterford had made a wager that he would shave Muntz, and that Muntz carried the stick to ...
— Personal Recollections of Birmingham and Birmingham Men • E. Edwards

... Kagung. Long, or length Nagai Nagasa. Lose, to Song suru, makuru Ootoochung. Live, to Inotji Simmatong. Lacker, to Makie saru Nooyoong. Man (homo) Momo Choo. Man (vir) Otoko Ickkeega. Mast Hobasi Hasseeda. Mat Tattami Mooshooroo, or Hatung. Match (fire-stick) Skedakki, skegi Kaw. Measure, to Siakf, monosasa Gaujee hackkiyoong. Mew, to (like a cat) Neko, naku Nachoong deeoong. Milk Tji tji tji Chee. Monkey Saru, salu Saroo. Moon Tsuki Stchay. ——, full Mangets Oostitchee, or maroo. Mother Fasa kasa Umma. Mud Noro Dooroo. Nail, finger ...
— Account of a Voyage of Discovery - to the West Coast of Corea, and the Great Loo-Choo Island • Captain Basil Hall

... each other's hair. Mary affected not to see this sisterly exchange of torture. Ned whittled a stick; and, in chorus, when their teacher told them that d-o-g spelled dog, they shouted derision, and affirmed that they had no difficulty in compelling the obedience of Stump even without this particular bit of erudition. Though Mary had ...
— Judith Of The Plains • Marie Manning

... Parliament," a work which God, by His blessing on your unwearied pains, hath much furthered already, whilst He, by you, hath removed the rubbish that might hinder the raising up of that godly structure appointed and prescribed by the Lord in His Word.' They were to stick to the truth, contended the preacher, quoting the edict of the Emperor Justinian in the Arian controversy, and the reply of Basil the Great to the Emperor's deputy: 'That none trained up in Holy ...
— East Anglia - Personal Recollections and Historical Associations • J. Ewing Ritchie

... and he doesn't think Jack a genius, though Jack's mother does. Or, as is more probable, he regards it as a hand-to-mouth calling, which to-day gives its disciples a five-pound note, and to-morrow five pence. He calls to mind a saying about Literature being a good stick, but not a good crutch—an excellent auxiliary, but no permanent support; but he forgets the all-important fact that the remark was ...
— Some Private Views • James Payn

... when they cam' to Newcastle toun, And were alighted at the wa' They fand their tree three ells ower laigh, They fand their stick ...
— Northumberland Yesterday and To-day • Jean F. Terry

... laid low, and the stiff-necked shall be humbled," he thought, as with a vicious switch of his stick he struck off a fragrant head of purple clover. "Conceited fool of a girl! Hopes to be 'my lady' does she? She had ...
— Thelma • Marie Corelli

... revolution of time in most of his apparel. Of presence good enough, but so palpably affected to his own praise, that for want of flatterers he commends himself, to the floutage of his own family. He deals upon returns, and strange performances, resolving, in despite of public derision, to stick to his own ...
— Character Writings of the 17th Century • Various

... for street and crowd-work; and the engine lying perdue in a coat pocket, might readily sally out to execution, and by clearing a great hall, a piazza, or so, carry an election by a choice way of polling, called knocking down. The handle resembled a farrier's blood-stick, and the fall was joined to the end by a strong nervous ligature, that in its swing fell just short of the hand, and was made of lignum vitae, or rather, as the poet termed it, mortis." Examen. p. 572. The following is the first stanza of "The Protestant Flail; an ...
— The Works Of John Dryden, Vol. 7 (of 18) - The Duke of Guise; Albion and Albanius; Don Sebastian • John Dryden

... the blinds drawn; past the little well, its cave looking dark and mysterious under its green canopy. Kitty, lost to the others and their talk, gazed with loving eyes at everything. "Dear little well," she thought. "Dear old 'Rover,' and Gorlay, and home, how I do love every inch and stick and stone of it! I think I should die if I ...
— Kitty Trenire • Mabel Quiller-Couch

... spears, and close upon the enemy, and so pull them off from their horses, where they could scarce stir by reason of the heaviness of their armor, and many of the Gauls quitting their own horses, would creep under those of the enemy, and stick them in the belly; which, growing unruly with the pain, trampled upon their riders and upon the enemies promiscuously. The Gauls were chiefly tormented by the heat and drought being not accustomed to either, and most of their horses ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... are frequently neglected because they are not readily inspected. Care should be taken to see that they are cleaned as thoroughly as the bore. A roughened chamber delays greatly the rapidity of fire, and not infrequently causes shells to stick. ...
— Manual for Noncommissioned Officers and Privates of Infantry • War Department

... and tiny shells and stones encrusted on the upper lid of the box. Deliberately Captain Jules scraped them off with a stick. The houseboat party and Tom were beginning to grow impatient. What made Captain Jules so slow? Philip Holt, who was standing by Mrs. Curtis's side, gazed sneeringly at the operations. He was glad, ...
— Madge Morton's Victory • Amy D.V. Chalmers

... as he reached up his hand and laid it affectionately on Gregg's waistcoat—it was a pet name of his—"you just stick to your brushes and paints and I'll stick to my commissions. If everybody in the Street had such old-fashioned notions as you have we'd starve to death. We've got to take risks, everybody has. You might as well say that when a stock is going ...
— Colonel Carter's Christmas and The Romance of an Old-Fashioned Gentleman • F. Hopkinson Smith

... more and more apparent that whatever success we might achieve locally, the power of the financial and political allies of the Prophets in Washington, aided by the executive "Big Stick" of the President, would beat us back from any attempt to rouse the state or the nation to ...
— Under the Prophet in Utah - The National Menace of a Political Priestcraft • Frank J. Cannon and Harvey J. O'Higgins

... vain for a bride who would consent to these terms, at long last, they found a maiden who agreed to be beaten morning and evening if the prince would marry her. So the wedding took place and for two or three days the prince hesitated to begin the beating; but one morning he got up and, taking a stick from the corner, went to his bride and told her that she must have her beating. "Wait a minute" said she "there is one thing I want to point out to you before you beat me. It is only on the strength of your father's position that you play the fine gentleman like this: your wealth ...
— Folklore of the Santal Parganas • Cecil Henry Bompas

... 'Tis your favourite doctrine, JOHN, And you stick to it so closely, and that's just why you get on. If you think that Dragon's dangerous—I hold 'tis but his play!— There's but one thing you've got to do—clear ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 101. October 17, 1891 • Various

... is my name: I can many a quaint game. Lo, my top I drive in same, See, it turneth round! I can with my scourge-stick My fellow upon the head hit, And lightly[196] from him make a skip, And blear on him my tongue. If brother or sister do me chide, I will scratch and also bite: I can cry, and also kick, And mock them all berew.[197] If father ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Volume I. • R. Dodsley

... England! Indeed it was. He couldn't sit still and just peep at it, he had to stand up in the little compartment and stick his large, firm-featured, kindly countenance out of the window as if he greeted it. The country under the June sunshine was neat and bright as an old-world garden, with little fields of corn surrounded ...
— Mr. Britling Sees It Through • H. G. Wells

... dissolution of the foundations of deans and chapters would open an ample source to pay the king's debts, and scatter the streams of patronage. "You would then become the darling of the commonwealth;" I give the words as I find them in Hacket. "If a crumb stick in the throat of any considerable man that attempts an opposition, it will be easy to wash it down with manors, woods, royalties, tythes, &c." It would be furnishing the wants of a number of gentlemen; and he quoted a Greek proverb, "that ...
— Curiosities of Literature, Vol. 3 (of 3) • Isaac D'Israeli

... commencement of the foregoing narrative, had galloped away, with a prodigious clatter, upon Grandfather's stick, and was not yet returned. So large a boy should have been ashamed to ride upon a stick. But Laurence and Clara had listened attentively, and were affected by this true story of the gentle lady who had come ...
— Grandfather's Chair • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... are guarding the weakest side of the castle. But look here at the naked figures in the cleft. Bring the blocks here; set your shoulders stoutly to it, Orion! one more push, Salathiel! There it goes, it crashes down if only it does not stick in the rift! No! thank God, it has bounded off-that was a leap! Well done—there were six enemies of the Lord ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... because he was supposed to be penniless. They only went to show that he was mentally unbalanced. In the original trials, these letters were introduced. The Christmas Carol was also offered as one of the exhibits, and it was allowed to stick. When the story was read in open court, every one sniffled, even the judge. The jury almost bellowed. 'As it was allowed to remain in the record, I've no doubt the Supreme Bench wept a little over Tiny Tim. In ...
— Mr. Bingle • George Barr McCutcheon

... amusing creature I ever met with. He would get into the flower-garden, go to the beds where the gardener had sowed a great variety of seeds, with sticks put in the ground with labels, and then he would amuse himself with pulling up every stick, and laying them in heaps of ten or twelve on the path. This used to irritate the old gardener very much, who would drive him away. The raven knew that he ought not to do it, or he would not have done it. He would soon return to his mischief, ...
— Olla Podrida • Frederick Marryat (AKA Captain Marryat)

... frozen commonplaceness of the scene was made for me still more oppressive by Signora dell' Acqua. She was evidently satirical, and could not be happy unless continually laughing at or with somebody. 'What a stick the woman will think me!' I kept saying to myself. 'How shall I ever invent jokes in this strange land? I cannot even flirt with her in Venetian! And here I have condemned myself—and her too, poor thing—to ...
— Sketches and Studies in Italy and Greece • John Addington Symonds

... lifted his stick and showed that at the bottom a piece of wood had been artfully fitted into a hollow, and then, by being rubbed upon the ground, so worn as to appear part of a solid whole. Taking his knife from his pocket, he cut off an inch from the lower ...
— Friends, though divided - A Tale of the Civil War • G. A. Henty

... bank-notes. He bowed, offered to shake hands with me, hoped I did full justice to his good intentions, would make a point of stating at —'s that very evening what had passed between us, and walked away. I walked away too; but, as I was opening the door of the office to take away my hat and stick, I met Harding, who I must tell you (if you do not know it already) is a half-brother of Mrs. Tracy, and consequently her uncle," he said, pointing to the next room. "He bowed, and told me that, having met my father in Piccadilly, who had stopped in his gig ...
— Ellen Middleton—A Tale • Georgiana Fullerton

... can see it all pretty well now," he began. "There's slight spin on this bomb so it comes and goes. About sixty second revolutions. Nice and slow. Terribly nauseating to look at. But I'm feeling fine now, better than fine. Give me a stick and I'll move the Earth. Who was it said that? Clever fellow. You say I was out about half a minute. That makes it about three more minutes until Bannister's controls are supposed ...
— What Need of Man? • Harold Calin

... bending over a curious-looking apparatus, consisting of a bent stick held in a bow-shape by a taut leather thong. The appliance was twisted about an upright piece of wood sharpened at one end—which was rotated as the lad ran the bow back and ...
— The Boy Scouts of the Eagle Patrol • Howard Payson

... was near completion and would be ready to receive squads for instruction in a short time. Eventually we were ordered to prepare squads for gymnastic work, and those who had the privilege of attending it liked it very much. I was very fond of fencing, single stick and sword drill. This gymnasium was built and equipped, and the exercises, systematized and progressive, were the same as those at Oxford University. They were under the supervision of Professor McLaren, and in after years were introduced and used in the French ...
— A Soldier's Life - Being the Personal Reminiscences of Edwin G. Rundle • Edwin G. Rundle

... into the gloom and shouted to those behind. Philip turned to find Mrs. Becker looking at him in a timid, questioning sort of way, the laughter gone from her eyes. For a moment she seemed to be on the point of speaking to him, then picked up a short stick and ...
— Philip Steele of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police • James Oliver Curwood

... knows when his system needs cream and I want him to have all the nourishment he can get. The idea that she should think she knew more about it than Willie! She was properly punished for it, however. I myself saw Willie throw a stick of stove wood at her and hit her foolish head with it. I think Willie is going to be a soldier, a commander of an army. He has so much executive ability and never misses ...
— At the Sign of the Jack O'Lantern • Myrtle Reed

... the control-stick, thrust the throttle over full measure. A little more of this swift outrush and the precious air would be gone. He caught a glimpse of the Dome floor beneath him and the shaft-door that gave entrance to the mine below. Down there, in underground tunnels ...
— The Great Dome on Mercury • Arthur Leo Zagat

... labours as science, maths, French and Greek. So that Gordon found himself suddenly appointed to Mr Williams' Greek set No. V. with no idea of where to go. After much wandering, he eventually found the Sixth Form room. He entered; someone outside had told him to go in there. A long row of giants in stick-up collars confronted him. The Chief sat on a chair reading a lecture on the Maccabees. All ...
— The Loom of Youth • Alec Waugh

... suspicion of wrong. Hansel, who found the cake on the roof taste very good, broke off another large piece, and Grethel had just taken out a whole pane of barley-sugar from the window, and seated herself to eat it, when the door opened, and a strange-looking old woman came out leaning on a stick. ...
— Fairy Tales Every Child Should Know • Various

... temper with me; there's no occasion for it. Besides, I'm a short-tempered man myself, and if it comes to—but that's neither here nor there. I don't want to quarrel with you, Joe; I'd a deal rather we was all fast friends in the fo'c's'le. We foremast men ought to stick to one another, and back one another up; don't ...
— The Cruise of the "Esmeralda" • Harry Collingwood

... slowly about, cutting off the daisies with his stick, he met Mr Oriel, going up to the house, as was now his custom, to dine there and spend the evening, close ...
— Doctor Thorne • Anthony Trollope

... before we ourselves are entirely free from bigotry. Education in the Transvaal is by no means neglected, English as well as Dutch being taught to all that can afford both; but the tariff duty on English school-books is heavy, and from necessity the poorer people stick to the Transvaal Dutch and their flat world, just as in Samoa and other islands a mistaken policy has kept the ...
— Sailing Alone Around The World • Joshua Slocum

... a single gentleman. Luckless wight, doomed, through a whole summer day, to be the butt of mirth and mischief among the frolicsome maidens! Bolt upright in a sulky rides a thin, sour-visaged man, who, as he pays his toll, hands the toll-gatherer a printed card to stick upon the wall. The vinegar-faced traveller proves to be a manufacturer of pickles. Now paces slowly from timber to timber a horseman clad in black, with a meditative brow, as of one who, whithersoever his steed might bear him, would still journey through ...
— The Toll Gatherer's Day (From "Twice Told Tales") • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... seaside. It happened to be then a great calm, and I espied a vessel about half a league from the shore. Unwilling to lose this good opportunity, I broke off a large branch from a tree, which I carried with me to the seaside, and set myself astride upon it, with a stick in each hand ...
— Fairy Tales From The Arabian Nights • E. Dixon

... tendency. Immoral! God bless my soul, gentlemen, what is it that people mean? I am for morality, and always shall be, and for virtue and all that; and I do affirm, and always shall, (let what will come of it,) that murder is an improper line of conduct, highly improper; and I do not stick to assert, that any man who deals in murder, must have very incorrect ways of thinking, and truly inaccurate principles; and so far from aiding and abetting him by pointing out his victim's hiding-place, as ...
— Miscellaneous Essays • Thomas de Quincey

... record, save for a set-back ever and again, he is doing more.... A quarter of a million years ago the utmost man was a savage, a being scarcely articulate, sheltering in holes in the rocks, armed with a rough-hewn flint or a fire-pointed stick, naked, living in small family groups, killed by some younger man so soon as his first virile activity declined. Over most of the great wildernesses of earth you would have sought him in vain; only in a few temperate and sub-tropical river valleys would you have found the squatting lairs ...
— The World Set Free • Herbert George Wells

... I see any force in Mr. Mivart's difficulty with respect to "the last touches of perfection in the mimicry;" as in the case given by Mr. Wallace, of a walking-stick insect (Ceroxylus laceratus), which resembles "a stick grown over by a creeping moss or jungermannia." So close was this resemblance, that a native Dyak maintained that the foliaceous excrescences were really moss. Insects are preyed on by birds and other enemies whose sight is probably ...
— On the Origin of Species - 6th Edition • Charles Darwin

... street. One can have no idea in what disfavor the Austrians are over here; a mangy dog will not take a piece of meat from them. I am sorry for poor Szechenyi; I do not dislike him. They will either drive things to a war from here, or let it come, and then they will stick the bayonet into the Austrians' backs; however peacefully people talk, and however I try to soften things down, as my duty demands, the hatred is unlimited, and goes beyond all my expectations. Since coming here ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Vol. X. • Kuno Francke

... moreover, who has his abode close by, full of changes of raiment—"here," setting his foot firmly in the mud, "is where the dining-room will be. Here," moving away a few yards through the slush, "is the billiard-room." Then, pointing towards the zenith with his stick, "Above it"—here you look up into the pitiless sky as well as the deluge will permit—"are two spare rooms, one of which will be yours when you come to see us." And ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 159, July 28th, 1920 • Various

... frequently over a yard long, not more than a quarter of a yard wide, and were adorned with as many as thirty different patterns of lace and cut and drawn work. This extreme narrowness was to enable the sampler to be rolled on a little ivory stick, like ...
— Chats on Old Lace and Needlework • Emily Leigh Lowes

... Annual Report of the Examiners in Physiology under the Science and Art Department, which, being still an Examiner he had to sign.] and have nothing to suggest except a quibble at page 4. If you take a stick in your hand you may feel lots of things and determine their form, etc., with the other end of it, but surely the stick is properly said to be insensible. Ditto with the teeth. I feel very well with mine (which are paid for) but they are surely ...
— The Life and Letters of Thomas Henry Huxley Volume 2 • Leonard Huxley

... said Cricket, conveniently deaf to this remark, "and rencounter," aiming at reconnoitre, "and if you are in any trouble, give the call, and wave a handkerchief on a stick. Perhaps I'll row back to the burning vessel, and see if I can pick up any one ...
— Cricket at the Seashore • Elizabeth Westyn Timlow

... ashamed when these tall girls, these damsels whose hearts are developed as mine won't be these half dozen years (to say nothing of their minds), ask me if they may go to bed, if they may walk, if they may go to Mr. So-and-so's, and Miss Such-a-one's to buy—a stick of candy for aught I know. Oh, oh, oh! I shall have to take airs upon myself. I shall have to leave off little words and use big ones. I shall have to leave off sitting curled up on my feet, turkey-fashion. I shall have to make ...
— The Life and Letters of Elizabeth Prentiss • George L. Prentiss

... you give me the rosette. I have sworn it by the gods, and what I vow to them, that I stick to! No, no, queen—not those sullen airs, not that angry frown. For if I cannot in earnest receive the rosette as a present, then let us do like the Jesuits and papists, who even trade with the dear God, and snap their ...
— Henry VIII And His Court • Louise Muhlbach

... in front of her stood an old woman, leaning upon a stick. She was dressed in a long red cloak, and she wore high-heeled shoes ...
— Favorite Fairy Tales • Logan Marshall

... under this noble speech of Jessie's, and for a moment was inclined to yield. But his sister's temper was roused, and she urged him to stick to her, and to say that Jessie threw the ottoman, "and now," said she, "I will go ...
— Jessie Carlton - The Story of a Girl who Fought with Little Impulse, the - Wizard, and Conquered Him • Francis Forrester

... expound for once the ground text of all, The venerable original Into my own loved German honestly turning. [He opens the volume, and applies himself to the task.] "In the beginning was the Word." I read. But here I stick! Who helps me to proceed? The Word—so high I cannot—dare not, rate it, I must, then, otherwise translate it, If by the spirit I am rightly taught. It reads: "In the beginning was the thought." But study well this first line's lesson, Nor let thy pen to error overhasten! Is it the thought ...
— Faust • Goethe

... were the younger members of the Mayow family leaning over the tideway, each with a stick and line—fishing for conger Matthew Henry explained, as Cherry took him by the ear; but Elizabeth Jane declared that, after four nights of it, she, for her part, limited her hopes ...
— The Laird's Luck • Arthur Quiller-Couch

... says that the French who were on the island did not eat it, but only the Indians. He also notices the tameness of the birds, and says that the Flammand, with its long neck, is the only bird it was necessary to use a gun against, the others being readily destroyed with a stick or taken ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 30. Saturday, May 25, 1850 • Various

... creditable piece of provincial legislation; but after all, it is about as good as any now going, or likely to be going till the world's end; and one can't be expected to strike out a new path. I shall stick to the wisdom of my predecessors, and—oh, that Cyril may make a fool ...
— Hypatia - or, New Foes with an Old Face • Charles Kingsley

... while there was a sound — very, very slight. No dry stick cracked; no dry leaves rustled; no swish of foliage; no whipping sound of branches ...
— The Flaming Jewel • Robert Chambers

... were his schoolmaster, and used to beat him with a big stick," she remarked, turning her head toward me, while Pasquale helped himself ...
— The Morals of Marcus Ordeyne • William J. Locke

... not been altered in essential features since the remote centuries when the Chinese first used them in celebrations. A cylindrical shell is mounted on a wooden stick and when the powder in the shell burns the hot gases are ejected so violently downward that the reaction drives the shell upward. At a certain point in the air, various signals burst forth, which vary in ...
— Artificial Light - Its Influence upon Civilization • M. Luckiesh

... with the exception of [Ch] (an interrogative, by the way, which here happens to mean "why" but in other contexts is equivalent to "how," "which" or "what"): [Ch][Ch][Ch][Ch] "Affair why must ancient," or in more idiomatic English, "Why necessarily stick to the ways of the ancients in such matters?" Or take a proverbial saying like [Ch][Ch][Ch][Ch][Ch][Ch], which may be correctly rendered "The less a man has seen, the more he has to wonder at." It is one thing, however, to translate it correctly, and another to explain how this ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 2 - "Chicago, University of" to "Chiton" • Various

... greatest inconsistency I ever committed. I am compelled to conduct an English concert programme right down to the end; that says everything. I have got into the middle of a slough of conventionalities and customs, in which I stick up to the ears, without being able to lead into it the least drop of pure water for my recreation. "Sir, we are not accustomed to this"—that is the eternal echo I hear. Neither can the orchestra recompense me. It consists almost exclusively of Englishmen, that is clever machines which ...
— Correspondence of Wagner and Liszt, Volume 2 • Francis Hueffer (translator)

... I am sure that Peter will get him out somehow. He is a very good stick to lean on, Peter, although he seems so hard and stupid and silent, which, after all, is in the nature of sticks. But look, there is the cathedral—is it not a fine place?—and a great crowd of people waiting round the gate. Now smile, Cousin. Bow ...
— Fair Margaret • H. Rider Haggard

... Unhappily, however, before he reached it, a young man named Alcander, hasty in his resentments, though not otherwise ill-tempered, came up with him, and, upon his turning round, struck out one of his eyes with a stick. Lycurgus then stopped short, and, without giving way to passion, showed the people his eye beat out, and his face streaming with blood. They were so struck with shame and sorrow at the sight, that they surrendered Alcander to him, and conducted him home with the ...
— Ideal Commonwealths • Various

... "Fine soles!—soles, a match for Macpherson's!" was a Brompton fishmonger's greeting to Sir John, etc. In the neighbourhood of Brompton he was known by the sobriquet of "the Gentle Giant," from his usually riding a very small pony, flourishing in the most determined manner a huge oak stick over the little animal's head, but, of course, never ...
— A Walk from London to Fulham • Thomas Crofton Croker

... babes of the wild that he was most anxious to hear about. In this department of woods lore, Bill was so deeply ignorant that, not caring to lean too heavily on his imagination, lest it should break and stick into him, he used to avoid it quite obstinately. He would say—"Them youngsters is all alike, anyhow, an' it ain't worth while to waste no time a-studyin' 'em!" So here Uncle Andy had the field all to himself. Whenever he undertook to enlighten the Babe ...
— Children of the Wild • Charles G. D. Roberts

... younger women welcome the messages which Mrs. Stanton, at Susan's insistence, sent to every convention. Susan herself often wished her good friend would stick more closely to woman suffrage instead of introducing extraneous subjects, such as "Educated Suffrage," "The Matriarchate," or "Women and the Church," but nevertheless she proudly read her papers to successive conventions. Insisting that the conventions were too academic, Mrs. ...
— Susan B. Anthony - Rebel, Crusader, Humanitarian • Alma Lutz

... difficult task to move transport on the roads. Lorries skidded, and double teams of horses could only make slow progress with limbers. Off the road it became almost impossible to move. The ground was a quagmire. On the sodden hills the troops bivouacked without a stick to shelter them. The wind was strong and drove walls of water before it, and there was not a man in the attacking force with a dry skin. Sleep on those perishing heights was quite out of the question, and on the day when it was hoped ...
— How Jerusalem Was Won - Being the Record of Allenby's Campaign in Palestine • W.T. Massey

... nor did I; yet I could not rid myself of the conviction that Howard spoke the truth when he declared in face of Coroner and jury that they could not connect him with this crime; and whether this conclusion sprang from sentimentality or intuition, I was resolved to stick to it for the present night at least. The morrow might show its futility, but the morrow ...
— That Affair Next Door • Anna Katharine Green

... was little likely to forget it. It now seemed the charge for the room was eleven shillings weekly, without 'attendance.' But Mrs. Pelly had never been a woman to stick out over trifles, that she hadn't; and, right or wrong, though she hoped she might never live to rue the day, she would let the gentleman this room for nine shillings a week, and include 'attendance' in that merely nominal rate—'So there, ...
— The Record of Nicholas Freydon - An Autobiography • A. J. (Alec John) Dawson

... Moors. The crest an anchor winged, I think it is, and the motto too tedious: "Regio floret, patrocinio commercium, commercioque Regnum." Thence back by water to Greatorex's, and there he showed me his varnish which he had invented, which appears every whit as good, upon a stick which he hath done, as the Indian, though it did not do very well upon my paper ruled with musique lines, for it sunk and did not shine. Thence home by water, and after a dance with Pembleton to my office and wrote by the ...
— Diary of Samuel Pepys, Complete • Samuel Pepys

... that direction. But next morning after breakfast, an excellent chestnut horse was waiting at the door, along with Harry's new pony. Mr. Arnold would see them go off. This did not exactly suit Miss Cameron, but if she frowned, it was when nobody saw her. Hugh put Harry up himself, told him to stick fast with his knees, and then mounted his chestnut. As they trotted slowly down the avenue, Euphrasia heard Mr. Arnold say to himself, "The fellow sits well, at all events." She took care to make herself agreeable to ...
— David Elginbrod • George MacDonald

... female 'art you think you'll mash, By sporting stick-up collars and a la-di-da moustache. But I tell you straight it'll be a long time Before I take you to be ...
— Punch, Or The London Charivari, Vol. 100. February 14, 1891. • Various

... Thor's hammer struck him, and he was not crushed. At this Loki grew perfectly furious with envy and hatred. "And why is Baldur to be so honored," said he "that even steel and stone shall not hurt him?" Then Loki changed himself into a little, dark, bent old woman, with a stick, and hobbled away from the Peacestead to Frigga's crystal saloon. At the door he ...
— Young Folks Treasury, Volume 2 (of 12) • Various

... master's death. And now the Marquis, gathering from a word or two that he heard and from his son's delay that something special had occurred, hobbled out into the hall. 'Mr Melmotte is— dead,' said his son. The old man dropped his stick, and fell back against the wall. 'This man says that he is dead, and here is a letter from Marie asking me to go there. How was ...
— The Way We Live Now • Anthony Trollope

... and he wrote to Sir J. Hooker:—"I find fish will greedily eat seeds of aquatic grasses, and that millet-seed put into fish and given to a stork, and then voided, will germinate. So this is the nursery rhyme of 'this is the stick that beats the ...
— The Life and Letters of Charles Darwin, Volume I • Francis Darwin

... see that the chubby-fisted little fellows who, not possessing even a doll, rig out a little stump of an old sailor or soldier, or even a bunch of greenery on a stick, as well as the girls who now promenade their dolls of varying degrees of respectability, have an historical background of some dignity, when, on the morning of the first of May, they line our streets and reflect the glories of the past to an unsentimental generation which ...
— Fragments of Two Centuries - Glimpses of Country Life when George III. was King • Alfred Kingston

... clad in a half-worn suit of clothes, which, with Mr. Pickwick's assistance, had been released from the pawnbroker's. He wore clean linen too, and had had his hair cut. He was very pale and thin, however; and as he crept slowly up, leaning on a stick, it was easy to see that he had suffered severely from illness and want, and was still very weak. He took off his hat as Mr. Pickwick saluted him, and seemed much humbled and abashed at the ...
— The Pickwick Papers • Charles Dickens

... on the next afternoon, and as he walked along its paths alone he could almost fancy that his dead father paced with the help of his stick at his side, talking, as had been his wont, of this or that improvement needed by the farms, pointing out to him a meadow in the hollow beneath which might soon be coming into the market, and always ending up with ...
— Running Water • A. E. W. Mason

... was so much the favourite of her time, that she was welcomed on the stage when she trod it by the help of a stick.' Piozzi Letters, ii. 319. ...
— Life Of Johnson, Volume 4 (of 6) • Boswell

... he tells me, to give notice but he'll only have to pay a week's rent in lieu of it. I have promised to be with him at ten to morrow morning, to help him to get away. I shall take my heaviest walking-stick; one must be prepared for every emergency. Glance over the police news on Tuesday, Mrs. Cross, just to see whether I ...
— Will Warburton • George Gissing

... it were, signed a compact, Roger, never to let on that we care for each other. As gentlemen we must stick to it.' ...
— Echoes of the War • J. M. Barrie

... could stick my tongue out just once more at Sarah," whispered Tavia, as she crossed back of the ...
— Dorothy Dale • Margaret Penrose

... The coals were red now. From the depths of his hunting-coat he procured a little bag of salt and some strips of dried meat. These strips he laid for a moment on the hot embers, until they began to sizzle and curl; then with a sharpened stick he removed them and ate like a hungry ...
— The Man of the Forest • Zane Grey

... but it was characteristic that her level eyes met Pringle's fearlessly. "But before that—he—he persecuted me, John. Chris must not know. He would kill him. But I wanted you to know in case anything happened to Chris. There is nothing they will stick at, these men. Lisner is the vilest; he hates Chris worst of all." She was in deep distress; there were tears in her eyes as she smiled at him. "And I wish—oh, John Wesley, you don't know how I wish you were staying here—dear ...
— The Desire of the Moth; and The Come On • Eugene Manlove Rhodes

... the Frenchman's land, We forc'd them back upon their strand; For we fought till not a stick would stand Of the gallant Arethusa. And now we've driven the foe ashore, Never to fight with Britons more, Let each fill a glass To his favourite lass! A health to our captain, and officers true, And all that belong to the jovial crew, On ...
— Drake, Nelson and Napoleon • Walter Runciman

... general. "Ain't it funny how things happen? When I fetched you over in my car t'other night didn't I say I hoped you and me'd meet again? That's what I said. And now we've met twice since. Once in the old boneyard and now here, eh? And they tell me you like East Wellmouth so much you're goin' to stick around for a spell. Good business! Say, I'll be sellin' you a piece of Wellmouth property one of these days to settle down on. That's the kind of talk, eh, ...
— Galusha the Magnificent • Joseph C. Lincoln

... groaned; the sides of his face and his eyes were of different colors and expressions; he wore horns or a forked headdress to represent the lightning, and with his hands he hurled the meteors. His manifestations were fourfold, and one of the four winds was the drum-stick he used ...
— The Myths of the New World - A Treatise on the Symbolism and Mythology of the Red Race of America • Daniel G. Brinton

... his pass; as he had none he was seized and put in Newbern jail. He was there advertised, his description given, &c. His master saw the advertisement and sent for him; when he was brought back, his wrists were tied together and drawn over his knees. A stick was then passed over his arms and under his knees, and he secured in this manner, his trowsers were then stripped down, and he turned over on his side, and severely beaten with the paddle, then turned over and severely beaten on the other side, and then turned back again, ...
— The Anti-Slavery Examiner, Omnibus • American Anti-Slavery Society

... past generation. This was the odder as the year was 1913, and he was exactly thirty. He always wore a buttonhole—to-day it was made of violets to match his violet socks—and invariably carried a black ebony stick, ...
— Bird of Paradise • Ada Leverson

... The King was sentenced to death that day. As he went out, one solitary soldier said, 'God bless you, Sir!' For this, his officer struck him. The King said he thought the punishment exceeded the offence. The silver head of his walking-stick had fallen off while he leaned upon it, at one time of the trial. The accident seemed to disturb him, as if he thought it ominous of the falling of his own head; and he admitted as much, now it ...
— A Child's History of England • Charles Dickens

... am a Quaker of the Isaac T. Hopper sort; though, alas! here the resemblance fails also, for I do no good. Dear me! I wish sometimes that I could have been one of the one-sided men; it is so easy to run in one groove! and it 's all the fashion in these days. But, avaunt expediency! Let me stick to my principles, and be a rounded mediocrity, pelted on every hand, and pleasing [302] nobody. By the bye, Mrs. Gibbons [Mrs. James Gibbons of New York, daughter of Isaac T. Hopper] I has just sent me a fine medallion of her, father, beautifully mounted. ...
— Autobiography and Letters of Orville Dewey, D.D. - Edited by his Daughter • Orville Dewey

... one arm by the aid of the little stick that hung over the middle of the bed, and putting out the other thin, trembling arm, left bare by the sleeve falling back from it, she took the glass mademoiselle held out to ...
— Germinie Lacerteux • Edmond and Jules de Goncourt

... a queer, trembly voice. How was she ever going to thank Betty for seeing what no one else saw, and helping her to stick to it and get her chance in a nice quiet way that wouldn't make her feel ...
— Betty Wales Senior • Margaret Warde

... knives, but they are like strips of sharp steel fastened on to the cylinder. They are 'bout half an inch high, and run the whole length of the cylinder in a spiral way, just the same as I would wind a string round this stick from bottom to top, if every time the string went round it was an inch from where it went ...
— Under Fire - A Tale of New England Village Life • Frank A. Munsey

... Amgiad, "and I will break your bones, to teach you to lie, and disappoint me." He then rose up, took a stick, and gave him two or three slight blows; after which he sat ...
— The Arabian Nights Entertainments vol. 2 • Anon.

... radical wrote to me as to his entering upon a fast. I probably wrote him as I now find it necessary to write all who feel that fasts are necessary and cannot have my personal care, "Go on a fast and stick to it until hunger comes or until your friends begin to suffer the pangs of sympathetic starvation; then compromise with the sin of ignorance by eating the least that will bring peace to their ...
— The No Breakfast Plan and the Fasting-Cure • Edward Hooker Dewey

... shake still—"It's art's decline, my son! You're not of the true painters, great and old; Brother Angelico's the man, you'll find; Brother Lorenzo stands his single peer: Fag on at flesh, you'll never make the third!" 'Flower o' the pine, You keep your mistr. . .manners, and I'll stick to mine!' I'm not the third, then: bless us, they must know! {240} Don't you think they're the likeliest to know, They with their Latin? So, I swallow my rage, Clinch my teeth, suck my lips in tight, and paint To please them—sometimes do, and sometimes don't; For, doing most, there's ...
— Introduction to Robert Browning • Hiram Corson

... cambiar, to change, to alter consignar, to consign, to record contrato social, articles of partnership cordoban, morocco leather despacio, slowly despreciable, despicable dinero efectivo, cash discutir, to discuss especulacion, speculation, venture garrote, cudgel, stick *impedir, to hinder, to preclude ladron, thief (el) matiz, shade *mover, to move, to actuate mozalbete, beardless youth *quebrantamiento, breakage, break down reflejo, reflection *seguir, ...
— Pitman's Commercial Spanish Grammar (2nd ed.) • C. A. Toledano

... in trouble and I have been thinking only of my own dignity. And I stood above the river, torn between desire to rush back and wounded pride, that bade me stick it out. Over the plains came the shout of returning plunderers. I could hear the throb, throb of galloping hoofs beating nearer and nearer over the turf, and reflected that I might make the danger from returning Bois-Brules ...
— Lords of the North • A. C. Laut

... Stick-up, v. tr. (1) The regular word for the action of bushrangers stopping passers-by on the highway ...
— A Dictionary of Austral English • Edward Morris

... back to our figuring, with a sort of desperate courage. "Now will you get those clothes, Sophy Smith?" she resumed, through her teeth, and the pink came back to her cheek, and her eyes deepened. "And do you agree to stick it out, you and I shoulder to shoulder, town or no town, ha'nts or no ha'nts; ...
— A Woman Named Smith • Marie Conway Oemler

... replied his wife, "always stick up for sinners. P'r'aps you'd make better use of your time ef you'd ...
— Romance of California Life • John Habberton

... salt to taste, and if liked a few drops of onion juice. Stir constantly until thick and smooth, remove from the fire, add the prepared eggs, mix well, and when cold form into the shape of chops, dip in beaten egg and fine bread crumbs and fry in boiling fat until a delicate brown; stick a sprig of parsley in the small end of each chop, arrange in the middle of a platter and serve with a white sauce around them, or ...
— The Golden Age Cook Book • Henrietta Latham Dwight

... walking-stick Denis began to scratch the boar's long bristly back. The animal moved a little so as to bring himself within easier range of the instrument that evoked in him such delicious sensations; then he stood stock still, softly grunting ...
— Crome Yellow • Aldous Huxley

... the General, when he'd finished. 'That proves my contention to the hilt. Maybe I'm a bit of a pro-Boer, but I stick to it,' he says, 'that under proper officers, with due regard to his race prejudices, the Boer'ud make the finest mounted infantry in the Empire. Adrian,' he says, 'you're simply squandered on a cattle-run. You ought to be at the Staff ...
— Traffics and Discoveries • Rudyard Kipling

... to bereaved sons, and pattern in the eyes of all performers of funerals, musing over a fragment of writing-paper on the desk, and scratching figures on it with a pen. The old man's chair, and hat, and walking-stick, were removed from their accustomed places, and put out of sight; the window-blinds as yellow as November fogs, were drawn down close; Jonas himself was so subdued, that he could scarcely be heard to speak, and only seen to walk across ...
— Life And Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit • Charles Dickens

... years as Hugh Fraser, the man whose pallid face told her that he knew at last that he was under the sword of Damocles! Clad in white linen, his sun helmet in his hand, steadying himself with a jeweled bamboo crutch-handled stick, the old Anglo-Indian waited until Berthe Louison's voice rang out, as clear as a silver bell: "Marie! I am not to be interrupted." she calmly said. "You may ...
— A Fascinating Traitor • Richard Henry Savage

... this etiquette and considered it frivolous in the face of his need, or whether his need, now grown desperate, unhinged his mind, I know not, but Pombo the idolater took a stick and ...
— The Book of Wonder • Edward J. M. D. Plunkett, Lord Dunsany



Words linked to "Stick" :   bow, ganja, fasten, meet, linstock, lever, stick shift, adorn, club, conglutinate, punishment, stump, margarine, attach, polo, secure, sports equipment, leg, tree branch, fuddle, follow, ornament, butt, ice hockey, dowser, mix up, discombobulate, penalisation, escape, move, decorate, fag, bedevil, margarin, mold, contact, hockey game, swizzle stick, penalization, touch, espouse, oleo, stay in place, remain, embellish, penalty, limb, divining rod, riddle, marihuana, befuddle, cannabis, fox, agglutinate, adjoin, beautify, confound, butter, dislodge, persist, marijuana, field hockey, waterfinder, cigarette, cigaret, implement, force, confuse, staff, be, elude, spindle, marge, adopt, dowsing rod, stick cinnamon, polo mallet, water finder, redeposit, stob, fix, thrust, backsword, oleomargarine, coffin nail, pierce, hockey, fish stick, grace, throw



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