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Tree

noun
1.
A tall perennial woody plant having a main trunk and branches forming a distinct elevated crown; includes both gymnosperms and angiosperms.
2.
A figure that branches from a single root.  Synonym: tree diagram.
3.
English actor and theatrical producer noted for his lavish productions of Shakespeare (1853-1917).  Synonym: Sir Herbert Beerbohm Tree.



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"Tree" Quotes from Famous Books



... to preach while sitting down in the pulpit; and was so contemptibly fond of comfort that he would on summer Sundays give out to the sweltering members of his congregation the longest psalm in the psalm-book, and then desert them—piously perspiring and fuguing—and lie under a tree enjoying the cool outdoor breezes until the long psalm was ended, escaping thus not only the heat but the singing; and when we consider the quantity and quality of both, and that he condemned his good people to an extra amount of each, it seems a piece of clerical inhumanity ...
— Sabbath in Puritan New England • Alice Morse Earle

... mean and dirty town of Stratford-on-Avon. There is a tradition that Shakespeare as a very young man was one of the Stratfordians selected to drink against "the Bidford topers," and with his defeated friends lay all night senseless under a crab tree, that was long known as Shakespeare's ...
— Bacon is Shake-Speare • Sir Edwin Durning-Lawrence

... group of deracines whom I came across in Serbia was an artel of Rostof engineers. I met a family I had known in Russia. Last time I had seen them it was one evening with their children scampering round a tall Christmas tree on which all the candles were lighted. They were comfortable and capable people, and proud in their way of what they could do and of what they possessed. Now, with all the other engineers of the Vladikavsky Railway, they had fled from ...
— Europe—Whither Bound? - Being Letters of Travel from the Capitals of Europe in the Year 1921 • Stephen Graham

... is a fool—and he often is—he is the first of fools!" said the Princess. "No ape—no baboon hanging by its tail to a tree—looks such a fool as a man-fool. For a man-fool has had all the opportunities of education and learning bestowed upon him; this great universe, with its daily lessons of the natural and the supernatural, is his book laid open for his reading, ...
— Ziska - The Problem of a Wicked Soul • Marie Corelli

... I drifted back to the river slip-rails and leant over them, in the shadow of the peppermint-tree, looking at the rows of river-willows in the moonlight. I didn't expect anything, in spite of ...
— Joe Wilson and His Mates • Henry Lawson

... had been thy last. Now by this sacred sceptre hear me swear, Which never more shall leaves or blossoms bear, Which sever'd from the trunk (as I from thee) On the bare mountains left its parent tree; This sceptre, form'd by temper'd steel to prove An ensign of the delegates of Jove, From whom the power of laws and justice springs (Tremendous oath! inviolate to kings); By this I swear:—when bleeding Greece ...
— The Iliad of Homer • Homer

... wooing, and lead thee to his home. Never have mine eyes beheld such an one among mortals, neither man nor woman; great awe comes upon me as I look on thee. Yet in Delos once I saw as goodly a thing: a young sapling of a palm tree springing by the altar of Apollo. For thither too I went, and much people with me, on that path where my sore troubles were to be. Yea, and when I looked thereupon, long time I marvelled in spirit,—for never grew there yet so goodly a shoot from ground,—even ...
— DONE INTO ENGLISH PROSE • S. H. BUTCHER, M.A.

... with the soil taken from ant-heaps, and polished black after the native fashion. This space was surrounded by a high stone wall, and had at the end of it another very strong door. In its centre grew a large, shady tree under which was placed a bench. Taking the assegai with her she went to the door in the high wall and found that it was barred on the further side. Then she returned and sat down on the ...
— The Ghost Kings • H. Rider Haggard

... being delivered, the riders left the distressed wagon behind; and again the free road stretched before them; the soft air and light filled all the way and even the brown tree stems with pleasantness. The horses felt they had had a rest and pricked up their ears to be in motion again, and the minds of the riders perhaps felt a stir ...
— Say and Seal, Volume I • Susan Warner

... he reserved for himself Provence. His desertion hindered Francis from sending support to the troops in Milan, who were forced to retreat. Bayard was shot in the spine while defending the rear-guard, and was left to die under a tree. The utmost honour was shown him by the Spaniards; but when Bourbon came near him, he bade him take pity, not on one who was dying as a true soldier, but on himself as a traitor to king and country. When the French, in 1525, invaded Lombardy, ...
— History of France • Charlotte M. Yonge

... said a soft voice, in reply. "She can't be home quite so soon to-night. But the shadow of the speir has got round to the yew-tree at the gate, and ...
— The Orphans of Glen Elder • Margaret Murray Robertson

... and in supreme peace, and in the distance they could hear the monotonous sound of the brooks as they flowed over the stones. Amidst the dull noise of the insects, the nightingales were answering each other from tree to tree, and everything seemed alive with hidden life, and the sky was bright with such a shower of falling stars, that they might have been taken for white forms wandering among the ...
— The Works of Guy de Maupassant, Volume III (of 8) • Guy de Maupassant

... he had only left that shutter alone. He had no restraint, no restraint—just like Kurtz—a tree swayed by the wind. As soon as I had put on a dry pair of slippers, I dragged him out, after first jerking the spear out of his side, which operation I confess I performed with my eyes shut tight. His heels leaped together over the little ...
— Heart of Darkness • Joseph Conrad

... Pulling away a short distance Elton and Charley, and one of the men, who was a good shot, repeatedly fired and hit it, till at last the flag and staff were shot away to the astonishment of the natives, who stood looking on. Fortunately, a tree grew near the beach on one side, where there were no natives. Charley next made this his target, and the white splinters which flew out on either side must have convinced the savages that the missiles which produced them would ...
— Washed Ashore - The Tower of Stormount Bay • W.H.G. Kingston

... the marshes, and the distant bay, and of San Francisco twelve miles away. Scrub oaks and bay trees grew in a tangle all about it, even a few young redwoods and an occasional bronze and white madrona tree. Wild roses and field flowers crowded against its very walls, and under the trees there were iris and brown lilies, and a dense undergrowth of manzanita and hazelnut bushes, wild currant ...
— The Story Of Julia Page - Works of Kathleen Norris, Volume V. • Kathleen Norris

... being prepared a second party was busily engaged in digging the holes for them. Each hole had to be of a prescribed diameter, by one metre—about 3 feet—in depth, and they were set a certain distance apart. Tree-felling might have been, and undoubtedly was, hard work to inexperienced hands, but hole digging! That was set down as the unassailable limit. Driving the pick and shovel in the rebellious ground was back-breaking in the hot sun and it ...
— Sixteen Months in Four German Prisons - Wesel, Sennelager, Klingelputz, Ruhleben • Henry Charles Mahoney

... to reach than it had been when she came from Brewer's. She labored to the tracks, and struck off across the fields. The wind stung her face with particles of ice, that cut like needles. A snow owl dropped from the gloom of a tree, poised a moment on wing, and stared at her with glittering, hungry eyes. Then, he fluttered upward and was gone. To force her way along took all her skill and experience with snow and storm. Unable to wade through ...
— The Secret of the Storm Country • Grace Miller White

... light-blue space of sky showed small rayless stars; the breeze smelt fresh of roots and heath. It was more a May-night than one of February. So strange an aspect had all these quiet hill-lines and larch and fir-tree tops in the half-dark stillness, that the boy's terrors were overlaid and almost subdued by his wonderment; he had never before been out in the night, and he must have feared to cry in it, for his ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... and most elaborate of all the anconae is in San Giovanni in Bragora, and is also the work of Lorenzo. In this, as well as in that of San Tarasio, the Mother offers the Child the apple, signifying the fruit of the Tree of Jesse and symbolical of the Incarnation. This incident, which is found thus early in art, was evidently felt to raise the group of the Mother and Child from a representation of a merely earthly relationship ...
— The Venetian School of Painting • Evelyn March Phillipps

... his diary [July 17,1668] speaks of visiting him at Belsize. He was raised to the peerage in 1667 by the title of Baron Bellasis and Wotton, and married for his second wife Anne, daughter of Philip Stanhope, second Earl of Chesterfield. Allied to this powerful house, the family tree of ...
— For the Term of His Natural Life • Marcus Clarke

... form to themselves a right judgment of true glory, and the duties essential to regal power. The Scripture alone gives us a just idea of them, and this it does in a wonderful manner, under the image of a very large and strong tree, whose top reaches to heaven, and whose branches extend to the extremities of the earth.(29) As its foliage is very abundant, and it is bowed down with fruit, it constitutes the ornament and felicity of the plains around it. It supplies a grateful shade, and ...
— The Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, • Charles Rollin

... bed of the dried-up stream the bush-cow charged, until Wilmshurst hurriedly came to the conclusion that it was quite time for him to dodge behind a tree. As he made for shelter he saw the animal's fore-legs collapse and its ponderous carcass plough ...
— Wilmshurst of the Frontier Force • Percy F. Westerman

... confused twittering of bird-notes which had infused the solemn silence with a vague hint of life, strident sounds grew dominant—a crow calling to his mate from tree to tree—a short, sharp symphony of swallows—a cock announcing the coming of ...
— The Royal Pawn of Venice - A Romance of Cyprus • Mrs. Lawrence Turnbull

... friends travelled in the ordinary vehicle of the country, which is called a cariole. The Norwegian cariole holds only one person, and the driver or attendant sits on a narrow board above the axle-tree. ...
— Chasing the Sun • R.M. Ballantyne

... He asked her if she would come into the conservatory. She had accompanied him there. Half hid by the branches of a camellia-tree all covered with white blossoms, she had said coldly, "Gerald, I cannot marry you." But Gerald had not received the word so coolly. He had burst out into passion. First he had exclaimed in wonder, next he could ...
— Stories by American Authors, Volume 3 • Various

... oddly old, but in a dry, smooth way, as fruits might shrivel on a shelf instead of ripening on the tree. Mrs. Lombard was still knitting, and pausing now and then to warm her swollen hands above the brazier; and Miss Lombard, in rising, had laid aside a strip of needle-work which might have been the same on which Wyant had ...
— The Early Short Fiction of Edith Wharton, Part 1 (of 10) • Edith Wharton

... toward Montmartre without another word. They merely wished to go away from the forge. They passed several manufactories and soon found themselves with an open field before them. A goat was tethered near by and bleating as it browsed, and a dead tree was crumbling away in the ...
— L'Assommoir • Emile Zola

... There is no room in it for him to get up safely. There is no room to go away. Momentarily the noises increase. Men are firing about him, and he strains his eyes on the opposite hill to see something to shoot at, and empties his magazine at what looks like a man but may be a tree-trunk, and then stops again and gets sick. Another long period of waiting follows. All the water is gone from his water-bottle; an intolerable thirst is scorching his throat. He does not reload his magazine, and makes up his mind to say that his rifle is jammed, so that ...
— Impressions of a War Correspondent • George Lynch

... sandal-buds, and stripes Of labdanum, and aloe-balls, Smeared with dull nard an Indian wipes From out her hair; such balsam falls Down sea-side mountain pedestals, 5 From tree-tops where tired winds are fain, Spent with the vast and howling main, To treasure half ...
— Selections from the Poems and Plays of Robert Browning • Robert Browning

... Florida are frequently found in the same rocks with these skeletons. Here occur also such, at present, widely separated trees as the gingko now native of China, and the Sequoia now native of the Pacific Coast. Fruits and leaves of the fig tree are also common, but most abundant among the plant remains are the Equisetae or horsetail rushes, some species of which possibly supplied the ...
— Dinosaurs - With Special Reference to the American Museum Collections • William Diller Matthew

... have left some doubt as to whether she referred to poor Tatters or to me, had it not been for her exceeding pride in our family tree. ...
— The Thing from the Lake • Eleanor M. Ingram

... engaged in compelling a "free people" to pull down a flag they adored. He turned to me saying: "Things have come to a —— pretty pass when a free people can't choose their own flag. Where I came from if a man dares to say a word in favor of the Union we hang him to a limb of the first tree we come to." I replied that "after all we were not so intolerant in St. Louis as we might be; I had not seen a single rebel hung yet, nor heard of one; there were plenty of them who ought to be, however." The young man subsided. He was so crestfallen that I believe if I had ordered him to ...
— Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Complete • Ulysses S. Grant

... four elements; Adam is the rational soul, Eve, as the Hebrew name indicates, the animal soul, and the serpent is the vegetative or appetitive soul. The serpent entices Adam to eat of the forbidden tree. This means that when the lower soul succeeds in controlling the reason, the result is evil and sin, and man is driven out of the Garden, i. e., is excluded from his angelic purity ...
— A History of Mediaeval Jewish Philosophy • Isaac Husik

... certain embarrassment about the youth. "Desert me at this pinch! It is not like his father's son!" and he was sinking back, when at sight of the hunter he stumbled eagerly to his feet, but only to stagger against a tree. ...
— The Prince and the Page • Charlotte M. Yonge

... young as they are, recognize it unconsciously, and have separate tree lairs, and neither may enter the other's, without going through some mysterious and wonderful ceremony and sign language, by which permission is asked ...
— People of the Whirlpool • Mabel Osgood Wright

... the full moon silvering the tree tops does not exercise greater enchantment over the mind of the contemplative observer. In either of her roles, as morning or as evening star, Venus has no rival. No fixed star can for an instant bear comparison ...
— Other Worlds - Their Nature, Possibilities and Habitability in the Light of the Latest Discoveries • Garrett P. Serviss

... entered Langdale her chatter ceased, and her eyes sped nervously from side to side, considering the woods and fells and whitewashed farms. As they stopped, however, at the foot of the steep pitch leading to the little house, Carrie suddenly caught sight of it—the slate porch, the yew-tree to the right, the sycamore in front. She changed colour, and as she jumped down, ...
— Fenwick's Career • Mrs. Humphry Ward

... traps; he thought of her, as, hard on the trail of moose, or deer, or wolf, or bear, he scoured the valleys and hills; in the shadow of the trees at twilight, in fancy he saw her lurking; even amidst the black, barren tree-trunks down by the river banks. His eyes and ears were ever alert with the half-dread expectation of seeing her or hearing her voice. The scene Victor had described of the white huntress leaning upon her rifle was the most vivid in his imagination, ...
— In the Brooding Wild • Ridgwell Cullum

... was very old indeed. Men said that the hamlet had been there in the day of the Virgin of Orleans; and a stone cross of the twelfth century still stood by the great pond of water at the bottom of the street under the chestnut-tree, where the villagers gathered to gossip at sunset when their work was done. It had no city near it, and no town nearer than four leagues. It was in the green care of a pastoral district, thickly wooded and intersected with orchards. Its produce of wheat ...
— Stories By English Authors: France • Various

... driver, caddie, The sun shines hot, but there's half a breeze, Enough to rustle the tree-tops, laddie, Only supposing there were some trees; The year's at the full and the morn's at eleven, It's a wonderful day just straight from Heaven, And this is a hole I can do in seven— Caddie, my ...
— The Sunny Side • A. A. Milne

... and comfortably out on the grass under the shade tree where he and Bob and Ned had taken Professor Snodgrass for a little talk. They were far removed from the center of the camp, so the noise of the men drilling or at their various occupations ...
— Ned, Bob and Jerry on the Firing Line - The Motor Boys Fighting for Uncle Sam • Clarence Young

... amaist is gane, I daunder dowie and forlane; I sit alane, beneath the tree Where aft he kept his tryste wi' me. Oh, could I see thae days again, My lover skaithless, and my ain! Beloved by friends, revered by faes, We'd live in bliss ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volumes I-VI. - The Songs of Scotland of the Past Half Century • Various

... blazing, stricken tree had toppled majestically down from the sky, crashing through its smaller brethren, to come to rest on Storage Shed Number One, thereby totally destroying the ...
— Cum Grano Salis • Gordon Randall Garrett

... written and said about tree planting. Some advise one way, some another. I will give you my method, with which I have been very successful, and, as it differs somewhat from the usual mode, may be interesting to some of your readers. I go into the woods, select a place where ...
— Scientific American Supplement, No. 324, March 18, 1882 • Various

... can!" said King. "Well have our own tree Christmas morning, and Grandma and Uncle Steve are coming, and if there's snow, we'll have a sleigh-ride, and if there's ice, we'll have skating,—oh, I ...
— Marjorie's New Friend • Carolyn Wells

... from the fair water by the temple's western approach, and sat down to smoke under a tree in the precincts. The big cone of the main tower was just in sight. I had seen the walls before, and was in no analytical mood; synthesis was enough for me. I took in with my delighted eyes a roofless dome worthy to be a temple of some sort, even if it were not, a ...
— Cinderella in the South - Twenty-Five South African Tales • Arthur Shearly Cripps

... Derwater crisply, 'to prepare for an attack. The tank will go first, and when it is astride their machine-gun position we will go forward and drive them out of the brushwood into the open.—Messieurs, the machine-guns are gathered there—straight across, about forty yards from the great tree.' ...
— The Parts Men Play • Arthur Beverley Baxter

... various other comforts from the piled up packing-cases,—a rug or two, an easy chair for Mrs. Bilton, a looking-glass. They screwed in hooks behind the doors for clothes to be hung on, and they tied the canary to a neighbouring eucalyptus tree where it could be seen and hardly heard. The chief plumber found buckets and filled them with water, and the electrical expert rigged up a series of lanterns inside the shanty, even illuminating its tortuous ...
— Christopher and Columbus • Countess Elizabeth Von Arnim

... in two great trunks, the aorta and the pulmonary artery, undergo division, as in the branching of a tree. Their branches mostly come off at acute angles, and are commonly of uniform diameter in each case, but successively diminish after and in consequence of division, and in this manner gradually merge into the capillary system of blood vessels. As a general rule, the combined ...
— Special Report on Diseases of the Horse • United States Department of Agriculture

... all stand in a row and race down," announced Gracie, when they reached the top. "Aunt Avery will start us. We'll run as far as that big oak-tree on the edge of the ...
— The Bars of Iron • Ethel May Dell

... the horses were huddled at last under the bank, and the wounded were tenderly lowered to the shade of the willows, and the dead, with soldier reverence, laid, blanket covered, under a spreading tree, the captains met to compare notes and sum up the losses. Grave indeed were their faces, for two of the best sergeants were killed as well as five veteran troopers, and nearly a dozen were more or less severely wounded. Davies, ...
— Under Fire • Charles King

... sparsely wooded country lay revealed to the gaze of the travellers, sunken between densely covered ridges, one on either side of the river. Half a mile beyond where they stood feathery blue plumes of smoke rose out of the tree tops and, dispersing, floated away on the breeze,—and there lay the town of ...
— Viola Gwyn • George Barr McCutcheon

... the tall tree bending, and Dr. Shrapnel did indeed appear to display the agitation of a full-driving storm when he was ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... the boys reached the swimming-hole. There the great elm-tree, with its ladder of exposed roots, stretched over the water. Piggy Pennington, stripped to the skin, ran whooping down the sloping bank, splashed over the gravel at the water's edge, and plunged into the deepest water. Old Abe followed cautiously, bathing ...
— The Court of Boyville • William Allen White

... d' Angleterre looking from the terrace of her Chateau over the tree tops—The poor Chateau! not a stone of which is standing to-day—Did she feel sentimental with her friend the Comte de Guiche—as I would like to feel now?—If I had someone to be sentimental with. Alas! There was an ominous hot stillness in the air, and the sky beyond ...
— Man and Maid • Elinor Glyn

... needed no guiding hand, for his mistress was far too absorbed in her thoughts to give him any attention. She did not see the ranks of gray tree-trunks through which peered glimpses of blue as the land fell away against the background of the sky; the heavy bunches of mistletoe in some leafless top failed to attract her attention; and she was blind to the beauty of the coarse ...
— A Tar-Heel Baron • Mabell Shippie Clarke Pelton

... continued. "That child to the right is in for shooting his sister. The other, to the left, for killing a boy of his own age with a hoe, and burying him under the roots of a fallen tree. Both of these boys come from the neighbourhood of Peterboro'. Your district, by the bye, sends fewer convicts to the Penitentiary than any part of ...
— Life in the Clearings versus the Bush • Susanna Moodie

... the glorious angel Gabriel) Nicolas Gonalez had urged on the soldiers, and told them that since there was no avenue of retreat open to them, there was nothing for it but to gain either the hill or heaven. They made a valiant attack upon the enemy, who were awaiting them behind a huge tree lying across the middle of the road—having no other stockades or ditches on this part of the hill, for they could not imagine that we would attack them there. They held their ground, fighting, for a time; but Captain Castelo, who was leading the vanguard, having crossed with some soldiers ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 (Vol 27 of 55) • Various

... and discovered that a pair of run-away horses had thrown a carriage against a tree, hurling the driver from his box, under the wheels. His right arm had been broken near the shoulder. In the twinkling of an eye the hall of festivities was transformed into an emergency hospital. Soelling shook his head as he examined the injury, ...
— The Continental Classics, Volume XVIII., Mystery Tales • Various

... most wonderful sight. Through a little hole in the wall the children had crept in and they were sitting in the branches of trees. In every tree that he could see there was a little child. And the trees were so glad to have the children back again that they had covered themselves with blossoms, and were waving their arms gently above the children's heads. ...
— Boys and Girls Bookshelf (Vol 2 of 17) - Folk-Lore, Fables, And Fairy Tales • Various

... the afternoon! And the wind was howling in turret and tree, and all the forest was an organ chant. So I packed up my belongings, and laid my poem in next to my heart—the last words written: "It ...
— The Journal of Arthur Stirling - "The Valley of the Shadow" • Upton Sinclair

... to her sister Peace, That lieth in her grave. When wilt thou cease To feed upon my quiet!—thou Despair! That art the mad usurper, and the heir, Of this heart's heritage! Go, go—return, And bring me back oblivion, and an urn! And ye, pale stars, may look, and only find, The wreck of a proud tree, that lets the wind Count o'er its blighted boughs; for such was he That loved, and loves, the silent Agathe!" And he hath left the sanctuary, like one That knew not his own purpose—The red sun Rose early over incense of bright mist, That girdled ...
— The Death-Wake - or Lunacy; a Necromaunt in Three Chimeras • Thomas T Stoddart

... forest when dead leaves are falling From all save some perennial green tree, So one by one I find all pleasures palling That are not linked with or enjoyed by thee. And all the homage that the world may proffer, I take as perfumed oils or incense sweet, And think of it as one thing more to offer, And sacrifice to ...
— Poems of Sentiment • Ella Wheeler Wilcox

... pendants below the cupboard. The panel which forms the door of the cupboard is wider than the sides. All the panels are carved with sacred emblems; the vine, the instruments of the Passion, the five wounds, the crucifix, the Virgin and child, and a shield, with an oak tree with acorns, surmounted by the papal tiara and the keys. ...
— Notes and Queries, Number 196, July 30, 1853 • Various

... and iodine; or perhaps pushing to Tantallon, you might lunch on sandwiches and visions in the grassy court, while the wind hummed in the crumbling turrets; or clambering along the coast, eat geans[17] (the worst, I must suppose, in Christendom) from an adventurous gean tree that had taken root under a cliff, where it was shaken with an ague of east wind, and silvered after gales with salt, and grew so foreign among its bleak surroundings that to eat of its produce was ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 16 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... first caught our eyes; it fringes every cliff, nestles beneath every rock, and blooms around every tree. The azalia, the shumac, and every variety of that beautiful mischief, the kalmia, are in equal profusion. Cedars of every size and form were above, around, and underneath us; firs more beautiful and more various than ...
— Domestic Manners of the Americans • Fanny Trollope

... up to leeward of any deer they might see, till they could get near enough to shoot them. Sometimes when the grass was short they were unable to conceal themselves. On such occasions they would lie down flat on their backs, lifting their legs up in the air so as to resemble the branches of a tree. ...
— Snow Shoes and Canoes - The Early Days of a Fur-Trader in the Hudson Bay Territory • William H. G. Kingston

... the old man Does not stumble in the pathway, Does not break his neck by falling!" And they laughed till all the forest Rang with their unseemly laughter. 'On their pathway through the woodlands Lay an oak by storms uprooted, Lay the great trunk of an oak-tree Buried half in leaves and mosses, Mouldering, crumbling, huge and hollow. And Osseo, when he saw it, Gave a shout, a cry of anguish, Leaped into its yawning cavern, At one end went in an old man, Wasted, ...
— The Mysteries of All Nations • James Grant

... Geronimo de Cabrera, fourth Conde de Chinchon, became viceroy of Peru in 1628, holding that office until 1639. During his term there was made known the efficacy of a medicine—previously in use among the Indians—the so-called "Jesuit's bark," or "Peruvian bark," obtained from a tree found only in Peru and adjoining countries, named Chinchona by Linnaeus, in honor of the viceroy's wife (who, having been cured by this medicine, introduced its use into Spain). From this bark is obtained the drug ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XVII, 1609-1616 • Various

... exceedingly useful tree. Among the remarkable things seen by our people in those islands, and in the kingdom of China, and in other districts where Spaniards have gone—one that has most caused wonder and fixed itself in the memory—is ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898 - Volume VI, 1583-1588 • Emma Helen Blair

... the rest of the party in looking for timber to build a boat to carry my outfit of provisions and implements down the river to the vicinity of the international boundary, a distance of about 700 miles. It took several days to find a tree large enough to make plank for the boat I wanted, as the timber around the upper end of the lake is small and scrubby. My boat was finished on the evening of the 11th of July, and on the 12th I started a portion of the party to load it and go ahead with it and ...
— Klondyke Nuggets - A Brief Description of the Great Gold Regions in the Northwest • Joseph Ladue

... cypress, are imitated on a small scale by the marshy banks of rivers near Canton, which are clad with Glyptostrobus, the "water-pine" of the Chinese. Pseudolarix, Cunninghamia and Keteleeria are coniferous genera peculiar to China, which have become extinct elsewhere. The most remarkable tree in China, the only surviving link between ferns and conifers, Ginkgo biloba, has only been seen in temple gardens, but may occur wild in some of the unexplored provinces. Its leaves have been found in the tertiary beds of ...
— Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 6, Slice 2 - "Chicago, University of" to "Chiton" • Various

... tree the body is, the heart so like a stand of mirror bright, On which must needs, by constant careful rubbing, not be left ...
— Hung Lou Meng, Book I • Cao Xueqin

... scratch upon them their names and the important date of their visit. Within a hundred years after Adam left Eden, the guide probably gave the usual general flourish with his hand and said: "Place where the animals were named, ladies and gentlemen; place where the tree of the forbidden fruit stood; exact spot where Adam and Eve first met; and here, ladies and gentlemen, adorned and hallowed by the names and addresses of three generations of tourists, we have the crumbling remains of Cain's altar—fine old ruin!" Then, no doubt, he taxed ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... virtuous contribution will make good the want. And in what a rate of terrible geometrical progression, far beyond our poor computation, any act of Injustice once done by us grows; rooting itself ever anew, spreading ever anew, like a banyan-tree,—blasting all life under it, for it is a poison-tree! There is but one thing needed for the world; but that one is indispensable. Justice, Justice, in the name of Heaven; give us Justice, and we live; ...
— Latter-Day Pamphlets • Thomas Carlyle

... was silent, save when the rude blast Howl'd dismally round the old pile; Over weed-cover'd fragments still fearless she past, And arriv'd in the innermost ruin at last, Where the elder-tree grew ...
— Apparitions; or, The Mystery of Ghosts, Hobgoblins, and Haunted Houses Developed • Joseph Taylor

... largest pine tree in the world, and it has been trained in the peculiar conventional manner employed by the Japanese. Here we had a picnic luncheon and then drove some distance to the heights of Otsu, where one hundred and thirty monasteries and temples are said to be grouped. We walked up the incline, ...
— Travels in the Far East • Ellen Mary Hayes Peck

... "Get up." He kicked at the Mexican with his foot as he lay, and stirred him into action. "Get up, Juan," he repeated, and the giant obeyed meekly as a child. Curly tied his hands behind his back, took away his knife, and bound him fast to a tree. Juan offered no resistance whatever, but looked at Curly with wondering dumb protest in his eyes, as of an animal unjustly punished. Curly ...
— The Girl at the Halfway House • Emerson Hough

... the absorbed but intense dejection written on his countenance. "Why," said she, after a short pause, and affecting a playful smile, "why, how provoking is this! In general, not a common patch of green with an old tree in the centre, not a common rivulet with a willow hanging over it, escapes you. You insist upon our sharing your raptures—you dilate on the picturesque—you rise into eloquence; nay, you persuade us into your enthusiasm, or you quarrel with us for our coldness; and now, with this divinest ...
— Godolphin, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... from the public burial-place. After ten centuries of a very free and open trade, some suspicions have arisen among the more learned Catholics. They now require as a proof of sanctity and martyrdom, the letters B.M., a vial full of red liquor supposed to be blood, or the figure of a palm-tree. But the two former signs are of little weight, and with regard to the last, it is observed by the critics, 1. That the figure, as it is called, of a palm, is perhaps a cypress, and perhaps only a stop, the flourish of a comma used in the monumental inscriptions. ...
— The History of The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire - Volume 2 • Edward Gibbon

... to Marlotte—that tiny river-side village so beloved by Paris artists in summer—and I swung into a great, broad, well-kept road, cut through the bare Forest, with its thousands of straight lichen-covered tree trunks, showing grey in the ...
— The Count's Chauffeur • William Le Queux

... moon is just showing above the tree-tops, pointing a white finger here and there at the clustered teepees of the Sioux, while opposite their winter camp on the lake shore a lonely, wooded island is spread like a black buffalo robe between the white, snow-covered ice and ...
— Wigwam Evenings - Sioux Folk Tales Retold • Charles Alexander Eastman and Elaine Goodale Eastman

... on August 16 began a new three days' conference at the historic meeting-place of the kings near Gisors. This also ended fruitlessly; some of the French even attacked the English position, and then cut down in anger the old elm tree under which so many conferences had taken place. Philip was, however, in no condition to push the war upon which he had determined. The crusading ardour of France which he himself did not feel, and which had failed to bring about a peace at Gisors, ...
— The History of England From the Norman Conquest - to the Death of John (1066-1216) • George Burton Adams

... once attracted by the portrait of a handsome lieutenant of artillery, dressed in the regimental coat, with long skirts, of 1845, and wearing a sword-belt fastened by two lion's heads. This officer, in parade costume, was painted in the midst of a desert, seated under a palm-tree. ...
— A Romance of Youth, Complete • Francois Coppee

... once invited him to smell their fists. Afterwards a little girl in a blue-and-white checked pinafore actually followed them for a quarter of a mile crying for 'the precious Baby', and then she was only got rid of by threats of tying her to a tree in the wood with all their pocket-handkerchiefs. 'So that the bears can come and eat you as soon as it gets dark,' said Cyril severely. Then she went off crying. It presently seemed wise, to the brothers ...
— Five Children and It • E. Nesbit

... society' in England. This will give her a chance, because these good ladies and gentlemen who are dying to see what she's like, and persuade her to tell their pasts and futures, are at the top of the tree. It's a cheap way for us to make her happy—and we can ...
— The Second Latchkey • Charles Norris Williamson and Alice Muriel Williamson

... have black mouths all through the month of July from the quantities of cherries that they devour. I can bear witness that they are irresistible, for one kind old gentleman, seeing me painting near his house, used to bring me daily a branch of a cherry-tree with all the cherries on it. "Son piccole," he would say, "ma son gustose"—"They are small, but tasty," which indeed they were. Seeing I ate all he gave me—for there was no stopping short as long as a ...
— Alps and Sanctuaries of Piedmont and the Canton Ticino • Samuel Butler

... when we started on our homeward way, there was a noise of firing in the village, and, coming round a shoulder of the hill in single file we saw Sheykh Yusuf seated on a chair against the wall of his house, and screened by a great olive tree, the slits in whose old trunk made perfect loopholes, blazing away at a large crowd of hostile fellahin. He used, in turn, three rifles, which his sons kept loading for him. He was seated, as we afterwards found out, because he had been ...
— Oriental Encounters - Palestine and Syria, 1894-6 • Marmaduke Pickthall

... the woodland paths along which I had once idled so happily with my little Mary. At every step I saw something that reminded me of her. Here was the rustic bench on which we had sat together under the shadow of the old cedar-tree, and vowed to be constant to each other to the end of our lives. There was the bright little water spring, from which we drank when we were weary and thirsty in sultry summer days, still bubbling its way downward to the lake as cheerily as ever. As I listened to the companionable murmur of ...
— The Two Destinies • Wilkie Collins

... commanding point of view, surveys an expanse of mountain and valley, and plain and lake and river, clothed in the summer sunlight, does not pause and check his pleasing and elevated emotions, to note with cynical eye, each stagnant pool, or noxious weed, or unsightly decaying tree that may lie within the limits of the noble vision. He rather admires the harmony and beauty of the whole, though he may know that there are within the scene before him imperfect, unbeautiful and unwholesome things. Such is the feeling of the patriot ...
— The Relations of the Federal Government to Slavery - Delivered at Fort Wayne, Ind., October 30th 1860 • Joseph Ketchum Edgerton

... refute the historical proofs of the truth of Christianity, was, on that account, appointed, by the council of education and of government at Zurich, professor of divinity to the new Zurich academy. Burgomaster Hirzel (nicknamed "the tree of liberty" on account of his uncommon height) stood at the head of the enthusiastic government party by which this extraordinary appointment had been effected; the people, however, rose en masse, the great council was compelled to meet, and the anti-Christian party suffered a most disgraceful ...
— Germany from the Earliest Period Vol. 4 • Wolfgang Menzel, Trans. Mrs. George Horrocks

... Christopher was greatly surprised to see, on casually glancing to one side, another man standing close to the shadowy trunk of another tree, in a similar attitude to his own, gazing, with arms folded, as blankly at the windows of the house as Christopher himself had been gazing. Not willing to be discovered, Christopher stuck closer to his tree. While he waited thus, the stranger began murmuring ...
— The Hand of Ethelberta • Thomas Hardy

... the earth, no wide foreboding on the air. One man, sitting over his little fire, alternately removed and touched his lips to the sooty rim of his tin cup, swearing because it was too hot. He swore still more loudly and in tones more aggrieved when a bullet, finding that line, cut off a limb from a tree above and dropped it into his fire, upsetting the frying pan in which he had other store of things desirable. Repairing all this damage as he might, he lit his pipe and leaned against the tree, sitting with his knees high in front of him. There came other bullets, singing, sighing. Another bullet ...
— The Girl at the Halfway House • Emerson Hough

... that felleth timber, after he hath sawn down a tree meet for the purpose, and taken off all the bark skilfully round about, and hath wrought it handsomely, and made a vessel thereof fit for the ...
— Deuteronomical Books of the Bible - Apocrypha • Anonymous

... limits and artificial boundaries, the Japanese genius excels. It has been well said that "the Japanese mind is great in little things and little in great things." To cut the tap-root of a pine-shoot, and, by regulating the allowance of earth and water, to raise a pine-tree which when fifty years old shall be no higher than a silver dollar, has been the proud ambition of many an artist in botany. In like manner, the Tokugawa Sh[o]guns (1604-1868) determined to so limit the ...
— The Religions of Japan - From the Dawn of History to the Era of Meiji • William Elliot Griffis

... fro on the stone terrace in front, rendered so small by the distance that they seemed unreal and fairy-like. Down to the verge of the park and upward, curving through the woods, she could trace the chestnut avenue by wreaths of colored lanterns that blazed from tree to tree like mammoth jewels chaining them together. Now and then a carriage broke to view, sweeping along the macadamized avenue, clearly revealed by the light that fell ...
— The Old Countess; or, The Two Proposals • Ann S. Stephens

... crystals of lead to "tree" over from the negative to the positive plates is well known. An idle battery is one in which this action tends to take place. Treeing will occur through the pores of the separators and as there is no flow of electrolyte in or out of the ...
— The Automobile Storage Battery - Its Care And Repair • O. A. Witte

... called Tuy. The chiefs took more than one thousand four hundred Indian bearers. Don Luis, having reached the river called Tuy, [50] which is at the entrance of the said province, ordered a cross to be made there on a tree, rendered thanks to God, and took possession, in his Majesty's name, on the fifteenth of July of the said year. On the sixteenth, after having told the inhabitants of that village, which was called Tuy, that he came in order to make them friends of the Castilians, and to have them render homage ...
— The Philippine Islands, 1493-1898: Volume XIV., 1606-1609 • Various

... and pausing before an excavation, a sort of grotto in the hillside, exclaimed: "This is the Lupercal den where the wolf suckled Romulus and Remus. Just here at the entry used to stand the Ruminal fig-tree ...
— The Three Cities Trilogy, Complete - Lourdes, Rome and Paris • Emile Zola

... knowledge of the true God. Jesus was seized and led to crucifixion, and the Aeon Christ now departed from Him; but, as His body was composed of the finest ethereal elements, and was, in fact, a phantom, He did not really suffer on the accursed tree. Many of the Gnostics taught that there are two spheres of future enjoyment. They held that, whilst the spiritual natures shall be restored to the Pleroma, the physical or animal natures shall be admitted to an inferior state of happiness; and that ...
— The Ancient Church - Its History, Doctrine, Worship, and Constitution • W.D. [William Dool] Killen

... said good-bye to their master and mistress and went off to see what they could find. And they went on and on, and couldn't find a nice place to stop. Then it began to grow dark, and the cock said: "Let's spend the night on a tree. I'll fly up on to a branch, and you take shelter in the hollow. We'll get through ...
— More Russian Picture Tales • Valery Carrick

... plant trees in natural chimps know very well that they cannot keep from making regular lines and symmetrical figures, unless by some trick or other, as that one of throwing a peck of potatoes up into the air and sticking in a tree wherever a potato happens to fall. The pews of this meeting-house were the usual oblong ones, where people sit close together, with a ledge before them to support their hymn-books, liable only to occasional contact with ...
— The Autocrat of the Breakfast-Table • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. (The Physician and Poet not the Jurist)

... pleasing scene, and out of question by far the most populous and cultivated tract that I had seen in Persia.... Next morning we quitted Derrood ... by a very indifferent but interesting road, the glen being finely wooded with walnut, mulberry, poplar, and willow-trees, and fruit-tree gardens rising one above the other upon the mountain-side, watered by little rills.... These gardens extended for several miles up the glen; beyond them the bank of the stream continued to be fringed with white sycamore, willow, ash, mulberry, ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo Volume 1 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... Lieutenant Murden sent this letter by me. Good night. I'll see you again to-morrow some time, but it will be late in the evening;" and with these words he stole from the store as noiselessly as a serpent creeping towards a paroquet sleeping on a gum tree. ...
— The Gold Hunter's Adventures - Or, Life in Australia • William H. Thomes

... last, so that the final and absolute degree must be something to which the utmost quiet obtainable on earth is uproar. One by one the lights went out in the houses, till the only ones left were in the windows of the Seminary, visible over the tree-tops a ...
— Hooking Watermelons - 1898 • Edward Bellamy

... gaze, parodied, sentimentalized, degraded.... There were, however, marvels to stir her, strange landscapes, cities, seas, and ships,—once a fire in the forest of a western reserve with gigantic tongues of orange flame leaping from tree to tree. The movies brought the world to Hampton, the great world into which she longed to fare, brought the world to her! Remote mountain hamlets from Japan, minarets and muezzins from the Orient, pyramids from Egypt, domes from Moscow resembling gilded beets turned upside down; grey houses of ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... England; and one of his first acts was to hold that memorable assembly, to which the history of the world offers none alike, at which this bargain was ratified, and a strict league of amity established. We do not find specified the exact date of this meeting, which took place under an enormous elm-tree, near the site of Philadelphia, and of which a few particulars only have been preserved by the uncertain record of tradition. Well and faithfully was that treaty of friendship kept by the wild denizens of the woods; "a friendship," ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 3 of 8 • Various

... children's lives too, and their children's after them. I'd be your patron, Tom. I'd take you under my protection. Let me see the man who should give the cold shoulder to anybody I chose to protect and patronise, if I were at the top of the tree, Tom!' ...
— Life And Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit • Charles Dickens

... the Menzel Documents disclose to Friedrich and us. How, in a space of ten years, the small seed-grain of a Treaty of Warsaw, or Treaty of Petersburg, planted and nourished in that manner, in the Satan's Invisible World, has grown into a mighty Tree there,—prophetic of Facts near at hand; which were extremely sanguinary to the Human Race for the ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. XVII. (of XXI.) - Frederick The Great—The Seven-Years War: First Campaign—1756-1757. • Thomas Carlyle



Words linked to "Tree" :   Leucaena leucocephala, oak, Elaeocarpus grandis, Bombax ceiba, Pimenta acris, Pouteria zapota, Myroxylon balsamum pereirae, obeche, Lithocarpus densiflorus, Panama redwood tree, zebrawood, Melia azederach, Melia azedarach, Sarcocephalus diderrichii, Oxandra lanceolata, arishth, caracolito, palm, Andaman marble, Calophyllum calaba, beech, dhak, Pterocarpus macrocarpus, Ceratopetalum gummiferum, Lysiloma bahamensis, kiaat, rosewood, cladogram, ice-cream bean, rose chestnut, Caesalpinia coriaria, chaulmugra, msasa, kurchi, peach-wood, Gymnocladus dioica, elephant's ear, go after, yellow jacaranda, alder, langset, wild fig, Sophora japonica, Castanopsis chrysophylla, white mangrove, African walnut, Sabinea carinalis, plane figure, Caesalpinia bonducella, dipterocarp, Conocarpus erectus, lemon-wood, Pongamia glabra, Taraktogenos kurzii, Pithecellobium dulce, Phellodendron amurense, maria, amboyna, chase after, red saunders, kino, crown, elm, Caesalpinia echinata, true sandalwood, Poncirus trifoliata, brazilwood, ketembilla, poon, oak chestnut, camachile, Stenocarpus salignus, winter's bark, Cercidium floridum, trifoliata, wild orange, mayeng, silk wood, histrion, Muntingia calabura, tag, Taraktagenos kurzii, Sophora secundiflora, rose-apple tree, camwood, mangosteen tree, two-dimensional figure, lepidobotrys, coffee, lemonwood, Pterocarpus indicus, idesia, scrub beefwood, breakaxe, sissu, Enterolobium cyclocarpa, aroeira blanca, Caesalpinia ferrea, Virgilia capensis, silkwood, birch, medlar, Caesalpinia bonduc, turreae, Cordia gerascanthus, Indian beech, huamachil, Melia Azadirachta, stemma, vegetable hummingbird, Holarrhena pubescens, Schinus terebinthifolius, African sandalwood, Vangueria madagascariensis, Caryocar nuciferum, peachwood, kingwood, basswood, Sophora sinensis, andelmin, calaba, Jamaican cherry, bitter orange tree, Schinus chichita, Osmanthus americanus, padauk, Spanish elm, Persian lilac, divi-divi, Pisonia aculeata, Leucaena glauca, hackberry, manoeuver, dhava, Christmas bush, Bombax malabarica, chinaberry, Azadirachta indica, black mangrove, Eucarya acuminata, Alstonia scholaris, Dalbergia cearensis, Stenocarpus sinuatus, nakedwood, guide, Ceylon gooseberry, kowhai, direct, princewood, Plagianthus regius, Santalum album, Lansium domesticum, Jamaica dogwood, soapberry, Hydnocarpus laurifolia, ordeal tree, calabura, Clusia flava, yellowwood, sapwood, Drimys winteri, heartwood, ebony, Burma padauk, Virgilia divaricata, millettia, duramen, Tarrietia argyrodendron, linden, Vangueria infausta, Dalbergia sissoo, frijolillo, role player, Fusanus acuminatus, Chrysolepis chrysophylla, Ruptiliocarpon caracolito, Hydnocarpus kurzii, woody plant, macadamia tree, steer, Parkinsonia florida, ash, lime, Australian nettle, hop hornbeam, chase, shade tree, bonduc, Diospyros ebenum, trunk, tipu, bole, elongate, Myroxylon toluiferum, dita bark, theatrical producer, guama, arere, Aegiceras majus, cinchona, Sloanea jamaicensis, marble-wood, obechi, Adenanthera pavonina, blue fig, willow, carib wood, player, simal, samba, Pterocarpus marsupium, channelize, silver ash, Triplochiton scleroxcylon, Dalbergia retusa, Calophyllum candidissimum, Mesua ferrea, sapling, pandanus, arbor, mahogany, marblewood, Guinea pepper, gum, chinchona, keurboom, coral bean, coralwood, Myroxylon pereirae, Calocarpum zapota, trifoliate orange, puka, Brya ebenus, fish fuddle, kitembilla, stretch, prickly ash, maple-leaved bayur, snag, tanbark oak, wild cinnamon, Pseudobombax ellipticum, peacock flower fence, hazel, woods, Chloroxylon swietenia, cassia, break-axe, pride of Bolivia, breakax, Schinus molle, Cordyline australis, screw pine, Firmiana simplex, Kirkia wilmsii, Xylopia aethiopica, Jamaica bayberry, albizia, burl, trail, point, Diospyros kurzii, head, Brisbane quandong, gliricidia, Palaquium gutta, Inga edulis, pernambuco wood, negro pepper, souari, evergreen beech, Castanea chrysophylla, clusia, Calycophyllum candidissimum, golden chinkapin, Peruvian balsam, button mangrove, acacia, wood, mammee, platan, brazilian ironwood, Acrocarpus fraxinifolius, chicot, stump, Spanish tamarind, Hoheria populnea, cocobolo, sissoo, give chase, Hydnocarpus wightiana, manila tamarind, Virgilia oroboides, Meryta sinclairii, molle, aalii, Crescentia cujete, Psychotria capensis, wild medlar, Sophora tetraptera, dhawa, forest, track, Idesia polycarpa, souari nut, plant, Pterocarpus santalinus, angelim, red sanderswood, conessi, shittah tree, conacaste, limb, sisham, manoeuvre, casuarina, opepe, granadillo, giant chinkapin, Pomaderris apetala, devilwood, Lysiloma latisiliqua, hornbeam, button tree, Nauclea diderrichii, thespian, padouk, chaulmoogra, wild tamarind, quandong, Inga laurina, palo verde, coral-wood, houhere, Holarrhena antidysenterica, bonsai, ligneous plant, Piscidia erythrina, locust, balata, cockspur, Manilkara bidentata, albizzia, Calophyllum longifolium, Plagianthus betulinus, orchid tree, Myroxylon balsamum, Burmese rosewood, calabash, Tectona grandis, sycamore, Pterocarpus angolensis, blackwood, Barbados pride, dagame, inga, set, Avicennia officinalis, satinwood, Butea frondosa, Baphia nitida, Lovoa klaineana, quandang, ribbonwood, Leucadendron argenteum, red sandalwood, dita, channelise, white popinac, Chinese parasol, Laguncularia racemosa, dak, frijolito, chestnut, lancewood, kitambilla, erythrina, Butea monosperma, southern beech, pride-of-India, Sesbania grandiflora, actor, Brachystegia speciformis, ironwood, mescal bean, bayberry, quira, palas, cacao tree, sapote, neem, Piscidia piscipula, margosa, azedarach, Pterospermum acerifolium, pollard, langsat, tail, Dovyalis hebecarpa, red sanders, azederach, beefwood, Montezuma, Orites excelsa, maneuver, dog, laurelwood, lacebark



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