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Bet   Listen
verb
Bet  v. t.  (past & past part. bet; pres. part. betting)  To stake or pledge upon the event of a contingent issue; to wager. "John a Gaunt loved him well, and betted much money on his head." "I'll bet you two to one I'll make him do it."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Bet" Quotes from Famous Books



... were almost entirely men, it could be argued by persons sufficiently foolish that indulgence in alcohol was a male vice or delight which really did not concern women at all—if men choose to drink or to smoke or to bet or to play games, what business is that of women? It is an argument which would not appeal to the mind of the primitive law-giver, and can be accepted by no ...
— Woman and Womanhood - A Search for Principles • C. W. Saleeby

... was the matter; the pilot and first steward soon put a stop to the fight. I told my story to the boss, and he took sides with me. He told the officers of the boat that I was the best boy to work that he had; so they discharged the second steward at Cincinnati, and you can bet I was glad. I remained on the Wacousta for some time, and thought myself a good steamboat man. I knew it all, for I had ...
— Forty Years a Gambler on the Mississippi • George H. Devol

... Reynolds ranch were willing to bet on Mose, and every soul determined to be there. Cora said quietly: ...
— The Eagle's Heart • Hamlin Garland

... Ah bet Ah knows just the woman for you-all, ef you-all ain't lookin' for a young gal with a figger like a ...
— Polly of Pebbly Pit • Lillian Elizabeth Roy

... wanter put you wise about me. I ain't no boob, as you seemter think. You can bet your rubbers on that. Maybe you're thinkin' that I'm but a puir laddie. Wal, let me tell you you're guessin' wrong. I'm an author—I do writin' stunts. And if I don't swell around in new pants all afternoon it's only because I have to keep all my ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 150, March 29, 1916 • Various

... may rain again to-morry, but I don't think it will. Some says the crops is ruined, and the corn's drownded out, And propha-sy the wheat will be a failure, without doubt; But the kind Providence that has never failed us yet, Will be on hands onc't more at the 'leventh hour, I bet! ...
— Riley Farm-Rhymes • James Whitcomb Riley

... his cigar away for a surreptitious smoke. "Not on your life. Not against me. You bet she was open ...
— The Air Ship Boys • H.L. Sayler

... sugar, and eggs, and seasoned it with lemon and spice. "Drink, Shaw," said I, "and forget your infirmities. You are not sick, dear fellow; it is only ennui you are feeling. Look at Selim there. Now, I will bet any amount, that he will not die; that I will carry him home safe to his friends! I will carry you home also, ...
— How I Found Livingstone • Sir Henry M. Stanley

... "You bet the girls think so," said Jones. "He gets his pick. For you're a fighter too, ain't y'u?" he added, ...
— Red Men and White • Owen Wister

... said the mate, with a wink. "I'd bet you, if it could only be known, if we'd been suited at first he'd ha' wanted ...
— The Skipper's Wooing, and The Brown Man's Servant • W. W. Jacobs

... muscular power. Family traditions tell of his being attacked by two footpads, and knocking their heads together till they cried for mercy. Another legend asserts that when a friend offered him a pony to carry him home after dinner, he made and won a bet that he would carry the pony. In the year 1752 this young giant was sailing as supercargo of a ship bound from Bordeaux to Scotland, with wine destined, no doubt, to replenish the 'blessed bear of Bradwardine,' and its ...
— The Life of Sir James Fitzjames Stephen, Bart., K.C.S.I. - A Judge of the High Court of Justice • Sir Leslie Stephen

... when he heard of the transaction. "To bet against his own school! I'm like Dick — I don't believe in betting, and yet I am glad Fred took him up. If it is in my power, Baxter shall ...
— The Rover Boys at School • Arthur M. Winfield

... I shouldn't have known you. Your hair and skin are as dry as chips; they didn't wash you with Castile soap, I'll bet." ...
— The Morgesons • Elizabeth Stoddard

... him see that it's his duty to succor the oppressed, and anyhow we'll land her there and leave her. I don't exactly know what it is that they're doing on that island, though I can guess. But whatever it is you may bet your hat they won't let Lord Torrington or the police or any one of that kind within a mile of it. If once we get her there she's safe from her enemies. Every man, woman and child in the neighbourhood will combine ...
— Priscilla's Spies 1912 • George A. Birmingham

... us the slip, she's probably changed that plan too—and set out on foot. It's a safe bet, though, that she didn't go without her precious money. Let's try ...
— A Pagan of the Hills • Charles Neville Buck

... fear; for the red—faced visitor, and Mr Fyall, as if half ashamed, speedily extricated themselves from the chaos of chairs and living creatures, righted the table, replaced the candles, and having sat down, looking as grave as judges on the bench, Aaron Bang exclaimed—"I'll bet a dozen, it is the poor fellow himself returned on our hands, half—dead from the rascally treatment he has met with at the ...
— Tom Cringle's Log • Michael Scott

... Shadbolt says he can run a mile in 4.40. I say he can't do it under 4.50, and we've got a bet of half-a-crown a side upon it. So lend us your watch to time ...
— The Adventures of a Three-Guinea Watch • Talbot Baines Reed

... "You bet you are!" The major's tone carried firm reassurance. Now Kelgarries looked up at Ross as if he knew the other had ...
— The Time Traders • Andre Norton

... sentimental over in that old beast," said Jane. "He's been hanging around since yesterday evening and what's more, I'll bet ...
— Men of Affairs • Roland Pertwee

... attempt anything," rejoined Rob, "but I don't think he's got nerve enough to carry out any of his schemes. Hullo!" he broke off suddenly, "there he is now across the street by the post office, talking to Bill Bender and Sam Redding. I'll bet they are hatching up some sort of mischief. Just look at them looking at us. I'll bet a doughnut they were talking ...
— The Boy Scouts of the Eagle Patrol • Howard Payson

... shouts became alarming; volleys of imprecations were hurled at his head—his limbs—his life. "What!" said one of the rudest of the crew, "can the black brute cut her lifelines? She's a reg'lar-built angel, and as like my Bet as two peas."—"Ay," said a messmate, "it all comes of being jealous, and that's all as one as mad; but you know, if he's as good as his word, he's sure to be hanged,— that's one comfort!" When the ...
— The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction - Vol. 13, Issue 353, January 24, 1829 • Various

... "I'll bet you a horn of brandy," said the first, "that the chap has either a pocketbook or a snug little hoard of small change stowed away amongst his shirts. And if not there, we will find ...
— Twice Told Tales • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... forth in renewed anger; "he did, did he! The putty-faced dandy! I used to see him at Bethune, and you can bet he never bothered his head about me then. No, and he didn't even know me out yonder, until after the sergeant spoke up. What business has that fellow got planning ...
— Bob Hampton of Placer • Randall Parrish

... he said, "I bet you anything that's it. It's want of fresh air. Well, Pansy, I've measured the ledge outside, it's quite wide enough to hold the flower-pot and the saucer, and though it slopes downwards a very little, it's nothing to make it stand unsteady. ...
— The Thirteen Little Black Pigs - and Other Stories • Mrs. (Mary Louisa) Molesworth

... three good things on which I may advance with spirit, and with palmy hopes on the part of Cadell and myself. He thinks he will soon cry victoria on the bet about his hat. He was to get a new one when I had paid off all my debts. I can hardly, now that I am assured all is well again, form an idea to myself that I could think ...
— The Journal of Sir Walter Scott - From the Original Manuscript at Abbotsford • Walter Scott

... bloke sleep of a mornin'!—they don't want yer ter be comfortable, that's what it is. I bet yer me bottom dollar the C.O. don't get up at this time!—'e don't get up afore ten or eleven, you bet yer life. 'E 'as eggs an' bacon for 'is bloody breakfast wi' a batman ter wait on 'im an' put plenty o' bloody sugar in 'is bleed'n' tea! All 'e does is ter shout at us ...
— Combed Out • Fritz August Voigt

... trying to do it, Ted;" answered his tool within, "but you see the place is alive with great big rats. They're all around me in here, and wanting to take a nip out of my legs. Oh! get out of that, hang you! One got me then! I bet he took a piece out of me as big as a baseball. They'll eat ...
— The Banner Boy Scouts on a Tour - The Mystery of Rattlesnake Mountain • George A. Warren

... replied Frank Maberly. "I left my portmanteau there, and the landlord-fellow had the audacity to say in conversation that I couldn't run the four miles in twenty minutes. It's lucky a parson can't bet, or I should have lost my money. But the last mile is very much up-hill, as you ...
— The Recollections of Geoffrey Hamlyn • Henry Kingsley

... said, squaring his shoulders. "Now, let me think. We must outwit these fellows, whoever they are. By George, I remember one of them! That old fellow who bought the horse is with them. That's it! The horse is mixed up in this, I'll bet my head." They sat upon the ground for several minutes, he thinking deeply, she listening with ...
— The Daughter of Anderson Crow • George Barr McCutcheon

... properly, for that grin of his curries favour with the juries; and mark me, that grin of his will enable him to beat the other in the long run. We all know what all barrister coves looks forward to—a seat on the hop sack. Well, I'll bet a bull to fivepence, that the grinner gets upon it, and the snarler doesn't; at any rate, that he gets there first. I calls my cove—for he is my cove—a snarler; because your first-rates at matthew mattocks are called snarlers, and for no other reason; for the chap, ...
— The Romany Rye - A Sequel to 'Lavengro' • George Borrow

... to talk about him, and told me how he had come there to die. 'I was a young chap at that time. It must have been in the year 1835, for my father died in '36, and I think it was a year before him that Raftery died. What did he die of? Of weakness. He had been bet up in Galway with some fit of sickness he had; and then he came to gather a little money about the country, and when he got here he was bet up again. He wasn't an old man—only about seventy years. He was in the bed for about a fortnight. When he got bad, my father said it was best get a priest ...
— Poets and Dreamers - Studies and translations from the Irish • Lady Augusta Gregory and Others

... said," the keeper continued; "and 'e bet me a 'arf sovereign on it. I didn't want to see the dog 'urt, but a bet's a bet, and there weren't no ladies present, so I took ...
— The Boy With the U. S. Fisheries • Francis Rolt-Wheeler

... so!" said Gregory. "A sight o' thinkin' your mother doos, Mary, and good thoughts, every one of 'em, I'll bet my next pay. She's a good woman, your mother; I guess likely you know it without me sayin' so. I call Susan Denison the best woman I know, and I've told my wife so, more times than she says she has any occasion for. I don't say she's an angel, but she's a good woman, and that's as fur ...
— The Green Satin Gown • Laura E. Richards

... "I'll bet my head she's in one of those sleepers," he groaned, as he watched the lights on the rear coach fade away into the night. "It's all off till to-morrow, that's settled. My only hope is that she really stopped in Albany. There's a train through here at three in the ...
— The Purple Parasol • George Barr McCutcheon

... fetid lanes and teeming streets, in dingy offices and dingier places still, the same excitement prevailed; busy men forgot their business awhile; crouching clerks straightened their stooping backs, became for the nonce fabulously rich, and airily bet each other vast sums that Carnaby's "Clasher" would do it in a canter, that Viscount Devenham's "Moonraker" would have it in a walk-over, that the Marquis of Jerningham's "Clinker" would leave the field nowhere, and that Captain Slingsby's "Rascal" ...
— The Amateur Gentleman • Jeffery Farnol et al

... "I'll bet a penny that new house Burge is building on his own bit o' land is for him and Mary to go to," said Mr. Poyser. "He'll be for laying by business soon, I'll warrant, and be wanting you to take to it all and pay him so much ...
— Adam Bede • George Eliot

... to say because what would a monkey have on its back, and how would it sound telling someone about it if it did have something? Just then another voice said, "I bet you're taking your sick grandmother to the doctor's." My father said "Yes" and hurried on. Quite by accident he found out later that he had been talking to ...
— My Father's Dragon • Ruth Stiles Gannett

... I've known her to draw against her salary to lend money to some actor or actress whom she well knew would never repay her. Stella's biggest fault was an overbalancing quality of sympathy. If she ever did get mixed up with anyone you may bet it was because that person played upon ...
— The Film Mystery • Arthur B. Reeve

... went to seek the Dean at his house; and not finding him at home, followed him to a friend's, where he had an interview with him. Upon entering the room, Swift desired to know his commands. "Sir," says he, "I am Sergeant Bet-tes-worth;" in his usual pompous way of pronouncing his name in three distinct syllables. "Of what regiment, pray?" says Swift. "O, Mr. Dean, we know your powers of raillery; you know me well enough, that I am one of his majesty's ...
— Irish Wit and Humor - Anecdote Biography of Swift, Curran, O'Leary and O'Connell • Anonymous

... an' "Chuck him out, the brute!" But it's "Saviour of 'is country" when the guns begin to shoot; An' it's Tommy this, an' Tommy that, an' anything you please; An' Tommy ain't a bloomin' fool — you bet that Tommy sees! ...
— Verses 1889-1896 • Rudyard Kipling

... a very owl, sir, And starting out to prowl, sir, You bet he made Rome howl, sir, Until he filled his date; With a massic-laden ditty And a classic maiden pretty He painted up the city, ...
— A Little Book of Western Verse • Eugene Field

... stove, and then went to the table. But the stove was hot: he had not thought of that. Many guests were present—horse dealers, ox-herds, and two Englishmen—and the two Englishmen were so rich that their pockets bulged out with gold coins, and almost burst; and they could bet too, as you ...
— What the Moon Saw: and Other Tales • Hans Christian Andersen

... dore with rage and threats he bet, Yet of those fearfull women none durst rize, The Lyon frayed them, him in to let: 165 He would no longer stay him to advize,[*] But open breakes the dore in furious wize, And entring is; when that disdainfull ...
— Spenser's The Faerie Queene, Book I • Edmund Spenser

... ruddy-headed one, I bet!" Ledyard turned on another electric light. "See here, Dick, do you think that girl could go abroad with Gordon Moffatt's daughter? Moffatt spoke about her. She rather impressed him while he was in St. Albans. She stood up against him. He never forgets that sort; he swears at it, but he trusts it. ...
— The Place Beyond the Winds • Harriet T. Comstock

... think of your comin' away out here to take down what our Jimmy Grayson says, so them fellers in New York can read it! I'll bet he makes Wall Street shake. I wish I was like you, mister, and could be right alongside Jimmy Grayson every day for weeks and weeks, and could hear every word he said while he was poundin' them fellers in Wall Street who are ruinin' our country. He is ...
— The Candidate - A Political Romance • Joseph Alexander Altsheler

... her from Miss Dawkins, I think. She wants you to ride at her side, so that Dawkins mayn't get at her. Now, Mr. Ingram, I'll bet you half-a-crown I'm at the top of ...
— An Unprotected Female at the Pyramids • Anthony Trollope

... Speed is his passion. He races from point to point. In emulation of Leander and Don Juan, he swam, I hear, to the opposite shores the other day, or some world-shaking feat of the sort: himself the Hero whom he went to meet: or, as they who pun say, his Hero was a Bet. A pretty little domestic episode occurred this morning. He finds her abstracted in the fire of his caresses: she turns shy and seeks solitude: green jealousy takes hold of him: he lies in wait, and discovers her with his new rival—a veteran edition of the ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... swell fix I'm in," Mack bemoaned, with the Coach having gone. "Talk about being hoodooed! How should I know that Coach Edward would ever be out after my brother's coaching job? I'll bet you every time Coach sees me he thinks of my brother and that kills my chances. But I was good enough so he had to make me a sub anyhow." Mack's gaze suddenly fell upon Coach Edward's pile of papers. Diagrams of football plays caught his eye. He leaned forward ...
— Interference and Other Football Stories • Harold M. Sherman

... for—for—other things," she added, resolutely closing her lips with a snap. "I aint such a shif'less manager's all that comes to, I do hope! 'T wont take no ten dollars to give a birthday-party in my house, I bet ...
— St. Nicholas Magazine for Boys and Girls, Vol. 5, October 1878, No. 12 • Various

... a passage in Horace, Mr. Pulteney said the honorable gentleman's Latin was as bad as his politics. Sir Robert adhered to his version, and bet his opponent a guinea that he was right, proposing Mr. Harding as arbiter. The bet being accepted, Harding rose, and with ludicrous solemnity gave his decision against his patron. The guinea was thrown across the House; and when Pulteney stooped to pick it up, he observed, that ...
— The Jest Book - The Choicest Anecdotes and Sayings • Mark Lemon

... I. "I'll get a yearly rate from a pressing club to keep the spots off me. I'll bet ...
— The House of Torchy • Sewell Ford

... bet on that," replied Mr Triggs, moving towards the side and looking through the port in the direction of the harbour. "We carries about a hundred rounds of each charge for every gun; or, something like ninety tons for our whole armament. That's what ...
— Crown and Anchor - Under the Pen'ant • John Conroy Hutcheson

... cut down the dry soil ratio a third. Not sure of the exact reaction, but the expansion was too rapid. Explosion followed before the air could be driven from the tube. I'll bet the big cannon was wrecked somewhere overhead. Boy, what ...
— The Copper-Clad World • Harl Vincent

... laughed heartily. "You swaggering dandy!" he replied. "Did you take a bet at the Belvedere to intrude on His Loftiness? And have you a guinea or two on supping a cup of coffee with him? Upon my honour, you must now be nearly at the end of your follies. Mother, ...
— The Maid of Maiden Lane • Amelia E. Barr

... I bet you!" John Fairmeadow agreed, with the air of having concealed in that veritable big basket the sweetest ...
— Christmas Eve at Swamp's End • Norman Duncan

... "Yes. We laid a bet as to whether you would come, Hermia and I. We've been watching the island through the telescope, and saw you embark—so to me—the victor, falls the honor of conducting you ...
— Madcap • George Gibbs

... Lynde, "we will make one more bet double, and then if we don't win that we'll quit." He was already out nearly ...
— The Titan • Theodore Dreiser

... arrived. The first was a stout man, past middle age, whose epicurean countenance twinkled with humour. This was Lord Castlefyshe, an Irish peer of great celebrity in the world of luxury and play, keen at a bet, still keener at a dinner. Nobody exactly knew who the other gentleman, Mr. Bland-ford, really was, but he had the reputation of being enormously rich, and was proportionately respected. He had been about town ...
— Henrietta Temple - A Love Story • Benjamin Disraeli

... same way myself. I have traveled by canal-boat, ox-wagon, raft, and by the Ephesus and Smyrna railway; but when it comes down to good solid honest slow motion, I bet my money on the glacier. As a means of passenger transportation, I consider the glacier a failure; but as a vehicle of slow freight, I think she fills the bill. In the matter of putting the fine shades on that line of business, I judge she could ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... something, Polly," he said—my name is Paul. "Bet you it will make the Old Fellow squirm. Let's write a letter to Sylvia Grant—a love letter—and sign the Old Fellow's name to it. She'll give him a fearful snubbing, and ...
— Lucy Maud Montgomery Short Stories, 1907 to 1908 • Lucy Maud Montgomery

... somewhere: 'Give, oh, give me a man who sings at his work!'" growled Athelstane one day, bursting forth from his den to complain of the nuisance, "but I bet the old buffer didn't write that sentiment with a maid-servant howling popular songs in the next room. According to all accounts he loathed noise and couldn't even stand the crowing of a cock. I should call that bit of eloquence ...
— A Popular Schoolgirl • Angela Brazil

... "You bet," I whispered, and was glad the streets were empty. I walked along, trying not to look at the gliding motion of that shrouded ...
— The Door Through Space • Marion Zimmer Bradley

... of it, she must be the same girl to whom those proud upstarts gave the cut direct in Macy's the other day. I thought her face was familiar, and didn't she pull herself together gloriously after it. There's a romance connected with her, I'll bet. She must have been in society, or she could not have known them well enough to salute them as she did. Really, Miss Ruth Richards grows more and ...
— Mona • Mrs. Georgie Sheldon

... pickings for old Andy, though? Gee!" Cal looked around at them, with his wide, baby-blue eyes, and laughed. "Let's kinda jolly him along, boys, till Andy gets back. It sure would be great to watch 'em. I'll bet he can jar the eternal calm outa that Native Son. That's what grinds me worse than his throwin' on so much dog; he's so blamed satisfied with himself! You snub him, and he looks at yuh as if you was his hired man—and then forgets all about yuh. He come outa that 'doby like he'd been ...
— Flying U Ranch • B. M. Bower

... are gentlemen, and never want you to do anything that they wouldn't do theirselves. Glad the Captain was there too, for I don't suppose Mr Archie Maine would have ventured to change my place. But I do know what he would have done. I'd bet anybody sixpence, if there was anybody here to bet with and I'd got one, that he'd have stopped to keep me ...
— Trapped by Malays - A Tale of Bayonet and Kris • George Manville Fenn

... inclinations as his own. The reputation of the friars in the Philippines has been depreciated by the conduct of the native priests. There was a padre named Pastor, an arrant coward, and wholly ignorant and superstitious. Sly old fox, he used to bet his last cent on the cock-fights, hiding up in the back window of Don Julian's. Once, on a drunken spree, he let a layman wear his gown and rosary. The natives, showing more respect for the sacred vestments than the priest had shown, went out to kiss the hand of him who wore the ...
— The Great White Tribe in Filipinia • Paul T. Gilbert

... Sergeant," said Harry. "They've got something new, all right. The kid must ha' come in through the back door, there. And I'd ha' been willin' to bet ma life that no human bein' could ha' walked in here without ma knowin' it before he got within ten feet o' ...
— Unwise Child • Gordon Randall Garrett

... to you, what I'm telling. But it has been in my mind this long while. Why don't you blow up the fire? I bet Miss Honoria has thought of it too: girls are deep. She has a head on her shoulders. I'll warrant she sends half a dozen of my servants packing within a week. As it is, they rob me to a stair. I know it, and I ...
— The Ship of Stars • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... dears,' I'll say to Elly Precious's children! They'll all be my dears. I'll help bring 'em up. Isn't it queer," broke forth Evangeline suddenly, "how when you get to be old you never were bad when you were young? The badnesses have kind of—kind of faded out. I bet there ...
— Miss Theodosia's Heartstrings • Annie Hamilton Donnell

... mind, Christopher,' his wife returned, with a grin. 'I've got the money here in the house; you might hand it over to Miss Esther to-morrow; I'll bet you she'll know what ...
— A Red Wallflower • Susan Warner

... red coals a thick iron pan held a large pone of cornbread, and the tantalizing aroma of coffee drew attention to a steaming coffeepot on a trivet in one corner of the hearth. Nicey's daughter turned the bread over and said, "Missy, I jus' bet you ain't never seed nobody cookin' dis way. Us is got a stove back in de kitchen, but our somepin t'eat seems to taste better fixed dis 'way; it brings back dem old days when us was chillun and all of us was at home wid mammy." Nicey grinned. "Missy," she said, "Annie—dat's ...
— Slave Narratives: A Folk History of Slavery in the United States From Interviews with Former Slaves - Georgia Narratives, Part 3 • Works Projects Administration

... all my trunks and eight thousand dollars' worth of jewelry behind me. And now I dare not claim them, for the police have seized them. Somebody gave me away, but I don't know who. Wouldn't I like to know—just! You bet I'd get even ...
— The Golden Face - A Great 'Crook' Romance • William Le Queux

... Busigny, I will bet you," said Athos, "that my three companions, Messieurs Porthos, Aramis, and d'Artagnan, and myself, will go and breakfast in the bastion St. Gervais, and we will remain there an hour, by the watch, whatever the enemy may do to ...
— The Three Musketeers • Alexandre Dumas, Pere

... exerted or over-exerted himself the afternoon before was unable to do himself justice. Today, contrary to general expectation, both Drake and Thomson had turned out. The knowing ones, however, were prepared to bet anything you liked (except cash), that both would drop out before the first mile was over. Merevale's pinned their hopes on Welch. At that time Welch had not done much long-distance running. He confined ...
— The Pothunters • P. G. Wodehouse

... chosen quite the right Judge," said an elegant blue crane to a wild duck; "he will make himself heard and respected." Whereat the Cockatoo winked at the Crane, and said, "You bet ...
— Dot and the Kangaroo • Ethel C. Pedley

... bet that Clarence had procured that favor for me —and furnished the language, too. When that formidable lance-point was within a yard and a half of my breast I twitched my horse aside without an effort, and the big knight swept ...
— Innocents abroad • Mark Twain

... wish. I'll try to shut you out of my thoughts and return to my experiments, when I'm not on platforms or in the House. I think I shall get in again—it's a mere matter of money, and thanks to Linda that isn't wanting. I'm not going to withdraw from politics, you bet, however disenchanted I may be. It's because the decent, honest, educated men withdraw that legislation and administration are left to the case-hardened rogues ... and the uneducated ... and the cranks. But don't make things too ...
— Mrs. Warren's Daughter - A Story of the Woman's Movement • Sir Harry Johnston

... had been unable to believe that the offence for so slight a sum might be forgiven if voluntarily confessed, had done the worst thing he could, he had paid the debt with a cheque which had, unfortunately, passed through his hands at the office, trusting in a few days to recover the amount by a bet upon the horse, in full ...
— Modern Broods • Charlotte Mary Yonge

... He is a liar, an egregious liar! No, I bet you a beauty like that isn't going headlong into ...
— Tales of the Wilderness • Boris Pilniak

... higher." Then they took the rooster to the place of the fighting, and Dogidog had him fight the other rooster. But the rooster had been a cat before, and he seized the other rooster in his claws, as a cat does, and killed it. Then the people brought many roosters and bet much money and the rooster of Dogidog, which was a cat before, killed them all, so there were no more roosters in Magsingal, ...
— Traditions of the Tinguian: A Study in Philippine Folk-Lore • Fay-Cooper Cole

... Luke. "You must admit it was funny. Seemed to come to me all of a flash. I'll bet that nothing more amusing has been said in this house since the day it was built. Dot and Dash! Dot ...
— If Winter Don't - A B C D E F Notsomuchinson • Barry Pain

... 'Benvolio' [Lord Grosvenor, 'MS. L'. ('b')] does not bet; but every man who maintains racehorses is a promoter of all the concomitant evils of the turf. Avoiding to bet is a little pharisaical. Is it an exculpation? I think not. I never yet heard a bawd praised for chastity, because 'she herself' did not ...
— Byron's Poetical Works, Vol. 1 • Byron

... new line) Celeste will be seen on the way home, but that La R. spoils every thing in that place. La Planche; that you will never find out. I bet you thirty guineas against M'K.'s shawl. By-the-by, the shawl is ordered on; at this moment, perhaps, on the perilous ocean, and unensured. La Planche, I say, was seen on our way hither. All right and pretty; improved since the last inspection. Great friend of La R.; ...
— Memoirs of Aaron Burr, Complete • Matthew L. Davis

... bones, I suppose," said Tom; "He's always at it. I believe he'd dig a hole in an iron floor if he was chained up on it. Hallo, Pete! stop that! You're making too much dust. Do you hear me, sir? Very well! you'd—a—bet—" When Tom got as far as "bet," pronounced in an awful voice, Pete knew that a stick was forthcoming. He accordingly paused in his digging, his little black nose covered with yellow earth, and his eyes fixed mournfully on the half-finished hole. "Let ...
— The Old Stone House • Anne March

... "I'll bet yer don't find it," pursued Clorinda. "I heerd steps early in de evenin'; I knows I did, though missis called me a foolish cullud pusson once when I told her of hearing 'em. Dar's thieves about, now; member I ...
— A Noble Woman • Ann S. Stephens

... the cities attributed to the tribes of Dan and Judah in Josh. xv. 25, 41; xix. 45. Beth-dagon is now Bet- Dejan; Azuru is Yazur, to the south-east of Joppa; Beni- barak is Ibn-Abrak, to the north-east ...
— History Of Egypt, Chaldaea, Syria, Babylonia, and Assyria, Volume 8 (of 12) • G. Maspero

... image!" I said, "Do you mean Buonaparte?"—She said "Yes, all but the nose."—"And the figure?"—"He was taller."—I could not stand this. So I got up and took it, and gave it her, and after some reluctance, she consented to "keep it for me." What will you bet me that it wasn't all a trick? I'll tell you why I suspect it, besides being fairly out of my wits about her. I had told her mother half an hour before, that I should take this image and leave it at Mrs. B.'s, ...
— Liber Amoris, or, The New Pygmalion • William Hazlitt

... help him now," chuckled Donald maliciously. "I'll bet you're scared to death," he went on, ...
— The Ocean Wireless Boys And The Naval Code • John Henry Goldfrap, AKA Captain Wilbur Lawton

... I'll bet my head Laskowski will plant himself here some day. The young man surely can't make it go in the long run. Why he can't hold on ...
— The German Classics, v. 20 - Masterpieces of German Literature • Various

... interrupted Minott with an impatient glance. "I'm not much on poetry—but you can bet your bottom dollar it's flowing all right." Then seeing the shade of disappointment on Breen's face at the flippant way in which he had returned Peter's courtesies, but without understanding the cause, he added, tightening his arm around his friend's neck, "Brace up, Jack, old man, and ...
— Peter - A Novel of Which He is Not the Hero • F. Hopkinson Smith

... there's old Distie yonder. Where has he been? Bet twopence it was to see the gipsies ...
— The Weathercock - Being the Adventures of a Boy with a Bias • George Manville Fenn

... account at the University Club, and it was long overdue. That remittance from his father had come just in the nick of time. Suddenly he recalled placing the check in his bill-case, and he searched himself diligently, but found nothing. That reminded him that he had won a bet or two on the football game and the money needed collecting. There was the shooting trip to Cape Cod as well. He was due there to-day for a week-end among the geese and brant. What would Benny Glover think when he failed to show up or even telegraph? Benny's sister was coming down from Boston with ...
— The Ne'er-Do-Well • Rex Beach

... you won't,—bet I'll be out to the pump, my face washed, and be at the breakfast table and you won't have your shoes laced up," boasted Ruth, the older ...
— The Upward Path - A Reader For Colored Children • Various

... given. Suppose a person having made a bet and lost is unable to pay the money and gives his note for the amount. When the note becomes due the holder or owner sues him for the money. He defends, as he is unwilling to pay, by saying there was no legal consideration for ...
— Up To Date Business - Home Study Circle Library Series (Volume II.) • Various

... every floor an' paper on every wall," said Dave Hollister to Molly when he went home after hearing the news. "An' Sheby's a-goin' with him to choose 'em. He says he'll bet fifty dollars she has her notions about things, an' he's a-goin to hev 'em carried out, fer it's all fer her, an' she's the one to ...
— In Connection with the De Willoughby Claim • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... of killing. They set out different ways; Odjibwa, the youngest, had not gone far before he saw a bear, an animal he was not to kill, by the agreement. He followed him close, and drove an arrow through him, which brought him to the ground. Although contrary to the bet, he immediately commenced skinning him, when suddenly something red tinged all the air around him. He rubbed his eyes, thinking he was perhaps deceived, but without effect, for the red hue continued. At length he heard a strange noise at a distance. It ...
— The Myth of Hiawatha, and Other Oral Legends, Mythologic and Allegoric, of the North American Indians • Henry R. Schoolcraft

... "I bet you were," said Dennis, sympathetically. "But what d'you mean by telling me you'd got nothing to worry about? Now that you're just getting things going nicely, and look like doing really well, along comes ...
— The Mystery of the Green Ray • William Le Queux

... these niggers at best. Now, here's a man lost his wife decent and respectable, and there's nothing on earth a nigger likes better than a good funeral, even if it has to be his own wife. Now, how many nigger funerals are there that cost fifteen dollars? I'll bet you if that nigger had it to do over again he'd a heap rather be rid of her and have the fifteen dollars. Look at it! Fine funeral for one wife and something left over to get a bonnet for his new wife. I'll ...
— The Law of the Land • Emerson Hough

... man any more. He had forsworn it: he would never bet again. But he had just, in the course of the day, taken the odds in one little bet; and he had just happened to win. When his wife charged him with the crime, he was about to avow it. "But no," ...
— The International Magazine, Volume 2, No. 2, January, 1851 • Various

... "and it must be a signal. And there go three flags at the fore.—She must, I'll bet a hundred dollars, have taken our tidy little Wave for the Admiral's tender that was ...
— Tom Cringle's Log • Michael Scott

... Timmins and his wife riding line on us. Say, he's an out-and-out devil for cathedrals—it's just one church after another with him—Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Lutheran, takes 'em all in—never overlooks a bet. He's got Addie and the girls out now. My gosh! it's solemn work! Me? I ...
— Ruggles of Red Gap • Harry Leon Wilson

... it would be a hen party till six, anyhow," he muttered, swinging out of his overcoat. "Bet I don't know one girl in twenty down there now—all mamma's friends at this hour, and papa's maiden sisters, and Jo's school-teachers and governesses and music-teachers, and ...
— Moran of the Lady Letty • Frank Norris

... good job, too," Mrs. Fitzgerald armed. "We don't want any of her sort here—not those who've got things of value about them. I bet she didn't leave America ...
— The Tempting of Tavernake • E. Phillips Oppenheim

... said Hervey; "a scout is always—whoa! There's where I nearly dipped the dip. Watch me swing over this branch. I bet you can't hang by ...
— Tom Slade's Double Dare • Percy Keese Fitzhugh

... a little off colour, perhaps; but I shall be all right on the night, you bet!" i.e., "Not going to be dictated to by ...
— Punch, or the London Charivari, Vol. 98, 1890.05.10 • Various

... There are myriads of others in the world with whom, under proper circumstances and environment, he'd have been just as happy—often happier. Choice is a mystery, constancy a gamble, discontent the one best bet. It isn't pleasant; it isn't nice fiction and delightful romance; it isn't poetry or precept as it is popularly inculcated; it's the brutal truth about the average man.... And I'm going to find ...
— The Common Law • Robert W. Chambers

... are often upon his lips, such as 'love' and 'hate,' and vast is the number, range, and variety of people who at one time or another had been in some degree personally related with him, from Bet Flint and his black servant Francis, to the adored Duchess of Devonshire and the King himself. To no one who passed a word with him was he personally indifferent. Even fools received his personal attention. Said one: 'But I don't understand you, Sir.' 'Sir, I have found ...
— Life of Johnson - Abridged and Edited, with an Introduction by Charles Grosvenor Osgood • James Boswell

... half-bred pinafore cyprian, whose disappointments during the night induced her to try at obtaining a morning customer. The Hibernian was relating the ill usage he had been subjected to, and the necessity he had of making a hasty retreat from the quarters he had taken up; while Bet Brill, on her road to Billingsgate, was blowing him up for wearing odd boots, and being a hod man—blowing a cloud sufficient to enliven and revive the ...
— Real Life In London, Volumes I. and II. • Pierce Egan

... Do you know, this evening old Lablache made me mad, and my hand went round to my hip to get a grip on my six-shooter, and I was quite disappointed to feel nothing but smooth silk to my touch. I'm not fit for town life, I guess. I'm a prairie girl; you can bet your life on it, and nothing will civilize me. Billy, do ...
— The Story of the Foss River Ranch • Ridgwell Cullum

... "You bet she uses it," retorted Sam Hupp. "What's more, millions of other women will be using it in the next few years. This woman," he pointed to the name on the label, "has hit upon the real thing in toilette flub-dub. She's made a little fortune already, and if she don't ...
— Personality Plus - Some Experiences of Emma McChesney and Her Son, Jock • Edna Ferber

... and twingle-twang banjoes, and bottles of Bass, my dear boy, Lots of dashing, and splashing, and "mashing" are things every man must enjoy, And the petticoats ain't fur behind 'em, you bet. While top-ropes I can carry, It ain't soap-board slop about "Quiet" will ...
— Punch, or The London Charivari, Vol. 101, August 15, 1891 • Various

... Ohio, and explained to my folks "just how it all happened." My mother said "she couldn't see how I had managed to live so long without a wife." Mr. Keefer said "he'd bet it was the best thing that ...
— Twenty Years of Hus'ling • J. P. Johnston

... shrieked. "I bet all I've got you don't know where you are, and I can hear waves ...
— Sweetapple Cove • George van Schaick

... English manner. In the allegory appear such personifications as Meed (worldly success), Falsehood, Repentance, Hope, etc. Piers Plowman, first introduced as the type of the poor and simple, becomes gradually transformed into the Christ. Further on appear Do-well, Do-bet, Do-best. In this poem, and its additions, L. was able to express all that he had to say of the abuses of the time, and their remedy. He himself stands out as a sad, earnest, and clear-sighted onlooker in a time of oppression and unrest. It is thought that he may have been the author of a poem, ...
— A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature • John W. Cousin

... ts[/u]'l[^u]['] (Cherokee characters). As the Cherokee language lacks the labial f and has no compound sound equivalent to our x, kw[^a]gis[)i]['] is as near as the Cherokee speaker can come to pronouncing our word fox. In the same way "bet" becomes w[)e]t[)i], and "sheep" is s[/i]kw[)i], while "if he has no dog" appears in the disguise ...
— The Sacred Formulas of the Cherokees • James Mooney

... you are. But this disinterestedness need not prevent you from resuming your dissipations. You must gamble, bet, and lose more money than you ever did before. You must increase your demands, and say that you must have money at all costs. You need not account to me for any money you can extort from her. All you get is your own ...
— File No. 113 • Emile Gaboriau

... anxious to explode, near a strong vessel belonging to somebody else. He says it will blow up anything. DUNIN says nothing can blow up his vessel. A contest between these very positive inventors would be a positive luxury—to those who had nothing to risk. We bet on the torpedo. ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 11, June 11, 1870 • Various

... with any other people who have been making inquiries," said Holmes carelessly. "If you won't tell us the bet is off, that is all. But I'm always ready to back my opinion on a matter of fowls, and I have a fiver on it that the bird I ate ...
— The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

... exploding, is again tranquil, but nobody can tell for how long. They bet two to one here that the Reform Bill is thrown out on the second reading; and what then? The meeting at Ebrington's was flat, nothing agreed on. Hume wanted to pass some violent resolution, but was overruled. Milton made a foolish speech, ...
— The Greville Memoirs - A Journal of the Reigns of King George IV and King William IV, Vol. II • Charles C. F. Greville

... in the middle of the sentence, and brought down his great hand on his knee. "Well, say—observe me the prize idiot! Get the blue ribbon and pin it on your Uncle George. Look here at me overlooking the main bet. Well, say, Henry—here are the specifications of one large juicy plan. Funeral to-morrow—old man Mauling; obliging party to die. Uncle George and the angel choir to officiate with Uncle George doubling in brass as pall-bearer. The new Mrs. Sands, our bell-voiced contralto, is sick: also obliging ...
— In the Heart of a Fool • William Allen White

... of those candidates, I may be permitted to say, that I feel much in the frame of mind of the Irish bricklayer's labourer, who bet another that he could not carry him to the top of the ladder in his hod. The challenged hodman won his wager, but as the stakes were handed over, the challenger wistfully remarked, "I'd great hopes of falling at the third round from the top." And, ...
— Science & Education • Thomas H. Huxley

... "You bet," spoke up Pythagoras. "We only had coffee, peanuts, and beans down in the woods, and father ate the beans and drank all ...
— Our Next-Door Neighbors • Belle Kanaris Maniates

... of them two men walking beside the ass they'd tell you plenty of things they saw me do when they could do nothing themselves. When there wasn't a road to take anywhere I showed them a road, and when there wasn't a bit of food in the world I gave them food, and when they were bet to the last I put shillings in their hands, and that's the reason they ...
— The Crock of Gold • James Stephens

... the heart-strings," said Mr. Bingle, blowing his nose so fiercely that Georgie whimpered again, coming out of a doze. "I'll bet my head, dear, that Uncle Joe would sniffle as much as any of us. I wish—er—I do wish we'd asked him to come in. It would do him a world of good to shed ...
— Mr. Bingle • George Barr McCutcheon

... light. They takes no notice so long as we're ready for 'tention and 'll fight. It's on'y chaps like Tommy Gee as has got his stripes that comes down upon you. Why, I was singing and doing that plantation song on'y yesterday, and Mr Bracy and Cap'en Roberts come along, and they both laughed. Bet sixpence the Colonel would have looked t'other way.—Oh, I say, ain't I hungry! Is it ...
— Fix Bay'nets - The Regiment in the Hills • George Manville Fenn

... "I'll bet you a bottle of blacking, Gig-lamps," said Mr. Bouncer, "that we have here an intending freshman. Let us take a ...
— The Worlds Greatest Books - Vol. II: Fiction • Arthur Mee, J. A. Hammerton, Eds.

... every event which entered into the total of the mystery, seeking for some key which would aid me in assorting the tangled bits that only needed to be arranged properly to bet the solution, much as a jig-saw puzzle is worked out. If I had a proper beginning it would ...
— The Devil's Admiral • Frederick Ferdinand Moore

... organization," Loudons said. "Everybody seems to know what to do, and how to get it done promptly. And look how neat the whole place is. Policed up. I'll bet anything we'll find that they have a military organization, or a military tradition ...
— The Return • H. Beam Piper and John J. McGuire

... Well, we was diggin' one day, in a place where there was a lot o' red Injins—not steam engines, you know, but the sort o' niggers what lives out there. One o' them Injins was named Glutton—he was such an awful eater—and one o' my mates, whose name was Samson, bet a bag o' goold-dust, that he'd make the glutton eat till he bu'sted. I'm afeard that Samson was groggy at the time. Howiver, we took him up, an' invited Glutton to a feast next day. He was a great thin savage, over ...
— The Young Trawler • R.M. Ballantyne

... 'I'll take the bet,' said the late Attorney-General. But as he did so he looked round to see that not even a gamekeeper was near ...
— John Caldigate • Anthony Trollope

... her a little note on my own account," he mused. "Ask her to take off her right shoe and hold it in her left hand, or something of that sort. No, that isn't necessary. I'll bet I could go into a crowd of a thousand women and pick out the one who wrote ...
— Master of the Vineyard • Myrtle Reed

... same brush, except one little craft with only four hands in her, and she I chased clean out to sea altogether, givin' 'em a shot close past 'em, as a freshener of their energies, just as I hauled my wind; and if ever they gets back to their own country—wherever 'tis—I'll bet my life they'll never be for coming to this ...
— For Treasure Bound • Harry Collingwood

... bet a pair of gloves, now," said I, "that Miss Fielder thinks herself half ready for translation, because she has bought only six new hats and a tulle bonnet so far in the season. If it were not for her dear bleeding country, she would have had thirty-six, like the Misses Sibthorpe. If we were ...
— Atlantic Monthly,Volume 14, No. 82, August, 1864 - A Magazine Of Literature, Art, And Politics • Various

... Nobody but C——-, who has only good sense, but not the necessary talents nor experience, 'AEre ciere viros martemque accendere cantu'. I never remember, in all my time, to have seen so problematical a state of affairs, and a man would be much puzzled which side to bet on. ...
— The PG Edition of Chesterfield's Letters to His Son • The Earl of Chesterfield

... "I will bet a supper and a dozen of claret," instantly exclaimed the marshal, "that my handsome Englishman will recover the post with half the number of men that the officer commanded ...
— Great Men and Famous Women. Vol. 2 of 8 • Various

... Bob. "Heavier we may be as to tonnage, accordin' to the way tonnage is measured; but she's got double our power. I'll bet my 'lowance of grog for the next month to come that she's got good seven ton or more of lead stowed away under her cabin floor; whilst we've got two, besides the trifle in our keel; and power, as you know well, Harry, is what tells in a breeze. Take us all round, and, in spite ...
— For Treasure Bound • Harry Collingwood

... days ago this intervention would have been a deportable offence; not now, I bet; I would like them to try. A little way back along Mulinuu, Mrs. G. met us with her husband's horse; and he and she and Lloyd and I rode back in a heavenly moonlight. Here ends a chapter in the life of an island politician! Catch me at ...
— Vailima Letters • Robert Louis Stevenson

... take Padre Camorra's place, Senor Sindbad?" inquired Padre Irene. "You can bet diamonds instead ...
— The Reign of Greed - Complete English Version of 'El Filibusterismo' • Jose Rizal

... "I bet you had that rascal in mind when you bought those sweet potatoes from the coon yesterday at Memphis," he declared, shaking his forefinger at ...
— The House Boat Boys • St. George Rathborne

... of a non-airconditioned spacesuit?" Rick murmured. "Bet he couldn't survive the Venus-Mercury ...
— The Scarlet Lake Mystery • Harold Leland Goodwin

... the world serious is over just like I said it would be with the White Sox winner and each one of the boys gets $3600.00 and that would of been my share only I loved my country more than a few dollars and I bet the boys feel kind of ashamed of themself to think I was the only one that passed up all that jack to work for Uncle Sam at $30.00 per mo. but between you and I Al I have got a scheme where I will ...
— Treat 'em Rough - Letters from Jack the Kaiser Killer • Ring W. Lardner

... "You bet you can. I like some one I can talk to; some guy with ideas. You see I run a broker's office down town, an' its pretty blame slow around a dump like ...
— The Case and The Girl • Randall Parrish

... bet on the prose lover. She will show the verses to him, and they will both have ...
— A Mortal Antipathy • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

... derisively. "Sure. I know how fond you are of me, Pete. You're plumb glad to see me again, ain't you? Jes' a-honin' to talk over old times, I'll bet." ...
— The Fighting Edge • William MacLeod Raine

... then." At the door he turned back jauntily. "And, say, Ned, what'll you bet I don't grow fat and young over this thing? What'll you bet I don't get so I can eat ...
— Oh, Money! Money! • Eleanor Hodgman Porter

... had with me to cut the frozen sand with. We dug into the sand and just came on them. The boys were surprised and would have bet anything before we started that I wouldn't find anything whatever, as the snow in winter makes things ...
— A Woman's Way Through Unknown Labrador • Mina Benson Hubbard (Mrs. Leonidas Hubbard, Junior)

... the touch of opposition. Larry rather well bet Richard that there was plenty wrong with her! Penal laws! Persecution! Saxon despots grinding their heels into a down-trodden people! Revolution! Liberation! Larry had a tongue that was hung loosely in his head and was a quick servant to ...
— Mount Music • E. Oe. Somerville and Martin Ross

... a desperate remedy, and we'll go to law—boldly, openly go to law, and get a divorce. We have written evidence, which you know nothing about, and can call testimony which you cannot gag. I am no lawyer, but I'll bet you five hundred to one (quite in a friendly way, my dear Sir!) that we get our case. What follows? We send you back your daughter, without a shred of character left to cover her; and we comfortably wash our hands ...
— Basil • Wilkie Collins

... that critter—I know what Gab came in here to talk about. 'Twas about me and my bein' put on the Exemption Board, of course. That was it, wan't it? Um-hm, I knew 'twas. I was the 'this' in his 'this and that.' And Phin Babbitt was the 'that'; I'll bet ...
— Shavings • Joseph C. Lincoln

... verses in an hour, And think such readiness a proof of power. When like a torrent he bore down, you'd find He left a load of refuse still behind: Fluent, yet indolent, he would rebel Against the toil of writing, writing WELL, Not writing MUCH; for that I grant you. See, Here comes Crispinus, wants to bet with me, And offers odds: "A meeting, if you please: Take we our tablets each, you those, I these: Name place, and time, and umpires: let us try Who can compose the faster, you or I." Thank Heaven, that formed me of unfertile mind, My speech not copious, and my thoughts confined! But ...
— The Satires, Epistles, and Art of Poetry • Horace



Words linked to "Bet" :   game, stakes, bouncing Bet, pot, bank, depend, forebode, exacta, rely, swear, calculate, gage, trust, promise, count, jackpot, Shin Bet, pool, better, bettor, kitty, parimutuel, predict, call, reckon, play, foretell, back, wager, stake, bet on, raise, see, gaming, you bet, ante, parlay, gambling, superfecta, place bet, gamble, daily double, punt, perfecta, anticipate, look, prognosticate



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