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Laugh   Listen
verb
Laugh  v. i.  (past & past part. laughed; pres. part. laughing)  
1.
To show mirth, satisfaction, or derision, by peculiar movement of the muscles of the face, particularly of the mouth, causing a lighting up of the face and eyes, and usually accompanied by the emission of explosive or chuckling sounds from the chest and throat; to indulge in laughter. "Queen Hecuba laughed that her eyes ran o'er." "He laugheth that winneth."
2.
Fig.: To be or appear gay, cheerful, pleasant, mirthful, lively, or brilliant; to sparkle; to sport. "Then laughs the childish year, with flowerets crowned." "In Folly's cup still laughs the bubble Joy."
To laugh at, to make an object of laughter or ridicule; to make fun of; to deride. "No wit to flatter left of all his store, No fool to laugh at, which he valued more."
To laugh in the sleeve, To laugh up one's sleeve, to laugh secretly, or so as not to be observed, especially while apparently preserving a grave or serious demeanor toward the person or persons laughed at.
To laugh out, to laugh in spite of some restraining influence; to laugh aloud.
To laugh out of the other corner of the mouth or To laugh out of the other side of the mouth, to weep or cry; to feel regret, vexation, or disappointment after hilarity or exaltation. (Slang)






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Laugh" Quotes from Famous Books



... sarcastic. He tried to laugh. But it was no use. Lady Blore's arrow had penetrated ...
— Prisoners - Fast Bound In Misery And Iron • Mary Cholmondeley

... sweet buds every one, When rocked to rest on their mother's breast, As she dances about the sun. I wield the flail of the lashing hail, And whiten the green plains under, And then again I dissolve it in rain, And laugh as I ...
— The Hundred Best English Poems • Various

... the grimly-ludicrous moved me to a fretful laugh, as I replied, "I have looked over it. In Heaven's name, ...
— Great Expectations • Charles Dickens

... head. Beyond all doubt the young master was in danger. But Miss Iris ought to have known his nature better than to suppose that he would beat a retreat, if all the land-leaguers in Ireland threatened him together. No! It was his bold way to laugh at danger. He had left his farm to visit a friend in the next county; and it was shrewdly guessed that a young lady who was staying in the house was the attraction which had kept him so long away. "Anyhow, he means to come back ...
— Blind Love • Wilkie Collins

... sometimes believe you did make it. A simple, pompous place, Geoffrey, that is kind to you if you'll not laugh at it. And full of petty, pompous mysteries. Maybe you make the mysteries too, Geoffrey. Damme, it is so. It's perfectly in your manner," he chuckled abundantly. "Come, child, what were you doing on the ...
— The Highwayman • H.C. Bailey

... up the road a hundred yards or so to his cottage set in the pine wood. I stood in the road watching the wheels of the absurd village vehicle, the yellow cut-under, disappear. The old Major called back to me; his voice seemed detached, eerie with the thin laugh in it. ...
— The Sleuth of St. James's Square • Melville Davisson Post

... by sheer will, regained his mental balance. "I am tired and nervous, or I would never imagine such foolish things," he said. "Of course it is as you say, produced by natural causes, and I will likely laugh at my fears as soon as we stumble on the key to the mystery. And now I am going to insist upon your going back inside, Charley. It won't do for us to have you down with the fever again. For our sakes, as well as your own, you ...
— The Boy Chums in the Forest - or Hunting for Plume Birds in the Florida Everglades • Wilmer M. Ely

... hilarious and comforting laugh. He had no intention of enlightening her in such a manner as would lead her at once to behold pictures of him as the possible victim of appalling catastrophes. He liked her ...
— T. Tembarom • Frances Hodgson Burnett

... perfection which had neither guide nor definite plan, which prompted the following vigorous self-appreciation, made by Father Hecker two years before his death. He had been speaking of some of his youthful experiments in this direction, and ended with an amused laugh and ...
— Life of Father Hecker • Walter Elliott

... said he, "don't you make a mountain of a mole-hill. The moment you told me I should be a father I began to get better, and to laugh at Richard Bassett's malice. Of course I was terribly knocked over at first by being captured like a felon and clapped under lock and key; but I am getting over that. My head gets muddled once a day, that is all. They gave me some ...
— A Terrible Temptation - A Story of To-Day • Charles Reade

... in the middle of Pennsylvania, where all the tribes, like leaning towers, incline toward Germany. To be sure, you'd never dream it from his looks, for he is a perfect Mark Antony in that respect. You needn't laugh. Didn't he have bonnes fortunes as well as Alcibiades? Not that Penhurst had bonnes fortunes, or ever dreamed of such things; but he always had such a proclivity toward any one who would listen to his harangues; and I must say, ...
— Continental Monthly, Vol. III, No IV, April 1863 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... our nights of sensuality I felt "gone" and miserable, but not repentant. By afternoon I was myself again. My relations with G. were purely animal, for I disliked his jealous disposition, his horse-laugh, his features, his form, his withdrawn scrotum and his undersized penis. At home in the evening I often found myself inflamed with a mental picture of active fellatio with him, but I never performed this act, so far as ...
— Studies in the Psychology of Sex, Volume 5 (of 6) • Havelock Ellis

... had," with a laugh. "I fergot all 'bout that—it's Moylan, miss; William Moylan; 'Sutler Bill' they call me mostly, west o' the river. Let's go out an' see 'bout ...
— Molly McDonald - A Tale of the Old Frontier • Randall Parrish

... half extended, but I drew it back hastily, and then was angry with myself, for I heard a mocking laugh that I was sure was intended for me, and for the life of me I could not refrain from glancing quickly in mademoiselle's direction. Her eyes met mine with more of scorn in their dark depths than I could well stand. I gazed steadily into them for as much as half a second with ...
— The Rose of Old St. Louis • Mary Dillon

... understand Carlyle's laugh in this chapter, unless you have learned yourself to laugh in sadness, and ...
— The Crown of Wild Olive • John Ruskin

... the conflict, while the old Dutchman explained. He gave a good deal of dramatic effect to his descriptions, but his accent and intonation cannot be written. He seemed to take interest and pride in his exhibition; yet when the utter and ludicrous miserability thereof made us laugh, he joined in the joke very readily. When the last picture had been shown, he caused a country boor, who stood gaping beside the machine, to put his head within it, and thrust out his tongue. The head becoming gigantic, a singular ...
— Passages From The American Notebooks, Volume 1 • Nathaniel Hawthorne

... given myself before. I would rather you smiled and were kind. But if you wish to laugh ... and call it a bargain ... it ...
— Erik Dorn • Ben Hecht

... strong, and abiding. To be called uncircumcised is one of the greatest reproaches that can be thrown at a Manbo, and it is said that he would stand no chance for marriage unless the operation had been performed; the womenfolk would laugh and jeer at him. So it may be said that the ...
— The Manbos of Mindano - Memoirs of the National Academy of Sciences, Volume XXIII, First Memoir • John M. Garvan

... either of them was knocked down, or even fell by accident, he was considered as vanquished, and the victor expressed his triumph by a variety of gestures, which usually excited, as was intended, a loud laugh among the spectators. He then waited for a second antagonist, and, if again victorious, for a third, till he was at last, in his turn, defeated. A singular rule observed in these combats is, that whilst any two are preparing to fight, a third person may step in, and choose ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Volume 16 • Robert Kerr

... his threescore years, had aimed the pieces on the Magazine bastion on the Bichelberg side, and I often imagined I could see him with his black silk cap and spectacles on, in the act of aiming a twenty-four pounder. Then this would make us both laugh and helped ...
— Waterloo - A sequel to The Conscript of 1813 • Emile Erckmann

... the difference. The native redskin can claim few descendants among the civilized Americans, and the native redskin had no sense of humour. We all remember Cooper's Hawk-eye or Leather Stocking, with his "peculiar silent laugh." He was obliged to laugh silently for fear of attracting the unfavourable notice of the Mingo, who might be hiding in the nearest bush. The red men found it simpler and safer not to laugh at all. No, it is not from the natives that the people of the States get their peculiar fun. As to the German ...
— Lost Leaders • Andrew Lang

... of my throwing out a cradle with a child in it, I was insulted in the street by a woman whom I had never seen before. Two girls, too, called out at the eviction, 'You've bad pluck; why didn't you tell us you were coming down the day?' and another woman made me laugh by crying after me, 'You've two good-looking daughters, but you're a ...
— Ireland Under Coercion (2nd ed.) (2 of 2) (1888) • William Henry Hurlbert

... there together for five minutes, breathing in the moist air, and at last Lieutenant Fritz said with a laugh: "The ladies will certainly not have fine weather for their drive." Then they separated, each to his duty, while the captain had plenty to do in ...
— Maupassant Original Short Stories (180), Complete • Guy de Maupassant

... the fields are laughing; now the maids Take their pastime; laugh the leafy glades: Now the summer days are blooming, And the flowers their chaliced lamps for love illuming. Fruit-trees blossom; woods grow green again; Winter's rage is past: O ye young men, With the May-bloom shake off sadness! Love is luring you ...
— Wine, Women, and Song - Mediaeval Latin Students' songs; Now first translated into English verse • Various

... the mystic white Capitol Dome— so they go down Pennsylvania Avenue to-day, skeleton men and boys riding skeleton horses, stems of roses in their teeth, rose dark leaves at their white jaw slants— and a horse laugh question nickers and whinnies, moans with a whistle out of horse ...
— American Poetry, 1922 - A Miscellany • Edna St. Vincent Millay

... with a light laugh, "unless you dignify Portchester Creek by that name. The Nettle target-ship lies there, and we must go on board of her, as it is around and in connection with her that the various experiments are to be tried, by means of gunboats, ...
— In the Track of the Troops • R.M. Ballantyne

... the door and throwing her arms about him, "thy tender plant is naught but a sprig of hardy ivy, which hath needed these many months the sturdy oak on which to cling." Then, with a little shiver, and a laugh, as her warm body rested against the cold steel of his breastplate, "thou dost give thy ivy but a chilly ...
— The Fifth of November - A Romance of the Stuarts • Charles S. Bentley

... dishes, and that they had all gone through the same miserable landing at the Fort, and some of them had even suffered considerably by falling down in the mud; so, as we draw comfort out of other men's misfortunes, and it is better to laugh than weep, our newly-arrived emigrants began to think the place was not so bad after all. They were, at any rate, great travellers, and were determined to make light of troubles and inconveniences, as all travellers do. They saw that the gentlemen ...
— A Source Book Of Australian History • Compiled by Gwendolen H. Swinburne

... a fine speech all by heart, but I can't remember a word of it. When I see you I can't even think straight. I'm simply beside myself... I can't rest, I can't sleep, I can't do anything. I used to laugh at such ideas, but now I'm frightened at myself. Can't you understand me, Oceana? Oceana... ...
— The Naturewoman • Upton Sinclair

... began to laugh, and assured me that "her post as lady in waiting would be an actual burden, if the King had destined her for it in spite of herself, and there should be no means of ...
— The Memoirs of Madame de Montespan, Complete • Madame La Marquise De Montespan

... trip it! how happy are they Who pass all their moments in frolic and play, Who rove where they list, without sorrows or cares, And laugh at the ...
— The Modern Scottish Minstrel, Volume II. - The Songs of Scotland of the past half century • Various

... much, but what she said was simple and direct. She seemed to be reticent about herself, not by any means from shame, but because her acts and intentions appeared too obvious to be worth rehearsing. Once or twice her laugh, low and musical, showed that she relished a joke. Lady Maria occasionally made jokes. Here was a girl who ...
— Rest Harrow - A Comedy of Resolution • Maurice Hewlett

... that she did not return the conventional "Oh, WOULD you?" Instead, she corrected him with a laugh—"Not a trunk, but my trunk; I've no other—" and then added briskly: "You'd better first see to getting your own things ...
— The Reef • Edith Wharton

... the Tchuktchis, which has to this day baffled the wisest London and Paris physicians. Fortunately we possessed a small silk Union Jack, which was nailed to an old whale rib on the beach (for there was no wood), much to the amusement of the natives. But the laugh was on our side when, the very next morning, a sail appeared on the horizon. Nearer and nearer came the vessel, scudding close-reefed before a gale which had raised a mountainous sea. Would they see our signal? Would the skipper dare ...
— From Paris to New York by Land • Harry de Windt

... the latter, and don't become one of the former," said Dermot with a laugh, rising from his chair, "then you'll have a peaceful life—but you won't get on ...
— The Elephant God • Gordon Casserly

... Canio staggers toward the theatre. He must act the merry fool, though his heart be torn! Why not? What is he? A man? No; a clown! On with the motley! The public must be amused. What though Harlequin steals his Columbine? Laugh, Pagliaccio, though ...
— A Second Book of Operas • Henry Edward Krehbiel

... with a laugh. "Shall I change you into two little Highland sheep scampering over the ...
— Little Folks (Septemeber 1884) - A Magazine for the Young • Various

... peculiar laugh, said, No: he didn't think the major could be of any use; that his own precious health required the most delicate treatment, and that he had best go into the country and stay: that he himself would take care to see ...
— The History of Pendennis, Vol. 2 - His Fortunes and Misfortunes, His Friends and His Greatest Enemy • William Makepeace Thackeray

... move you. You are beginning to see what you were in danger of doing. Death I laugh at; but a fat death—the death of a stout man who has swallowed the shaving-brush through taking too deep a breath before beginning Exercise 3, that is more than I ...
— Once a Week • Alan Alexander Milne

... afternoon meetings, seeing the radiance of her own happiness lighting up dark places, and the power of love and sympathy cheering starved and lonely lives, and was it all to end like this—in a joke for her husband and these two girls? Would Gervase come home, and laugh his tender, happy laugh, and stroke her hair, and call her "Poor little pet!" as if she, and not the missing guests, was the real object ...
— Betty Trevor • Mrs. G. de Horne Vaizey

... queer sound that seemed to come from the man's throat, and for a few moments he feared that his companion was choking. But he soon understood that this was simply an attempt to laugh, and he at once decided that it was a very ...
— Toby Tyler • James Otis

... little to fear from sailing men-of-war, as the weather was calm and fine, so we steamed a few miles from the shore, all day passing several of them, just out of range of their guns. One vessel tried the effect of a long shot, but we could afford to laugh at her. ...
— Sketches From My Life - By The Late Admiral Hobart Pasha • Hobart Pasha

... with an angry 'Are you mad?' held him fast; and his struggles provoked a good-humoured laugh at the little champion, ...
— The Pillars of the House, V1 • Charlotte M. Yonge

... that," replied Frank, with a laugh, "this vessel wouldn't last long. Every cannon on this aide of that gun-boat points straight at us, and if we should turn around, they would blow us out ...
— Frank on the Lower Mississippi • Harry Castlemon

... catch the rascals by scouring the desert with a handful of men. They must have gone into camp close by, or they would never have stocked up. Bet they are new at the business. Must be to make a mistake like that. I'd laugh if they had never left town." And gathering up the reins, he drove on, followed ...
— Tabitha's Vacation • Ruth Alberta Brown

... you'll laugh at me. Theodore always laughs at me when I get on what he calls a high horse. I wonder whether you are as sensible as ...
— The Claverings • Anthony Trollope

... spicy; touch it up with a little humour. That's the way to make journalism attractive. Cover a commonplace incident with the mantle of merriment, and make the world laugh. Lord, how we love ...
— Grey Town - An Australian Story • Gerald Baldwin

... in with a laugh, 'and you fellows all want to get into the House of Commons or the County Council, or some such place. By Jove! in my time a gentleman would not want to ...
— The Dictator • Justin McCarthy

... and laughed the popinjay, A laugh of bitter scorn: "A coortin' done in sic' a way, It ought not to ...
— Phantasmagoria and Other Poems • Lewis Carroll

... and performance, in both of which accomplishments he excelled. The padre was very good humoured, and favoured us with a letter of recommendation to a friend of his, a professor in the university of Pisa. You would laugh to see the hyperbolical terms in which he mentioned your humble servant; but Italy is the ...
— Travels Through France and Italy • Tobias Smollett

... Are well-conducted persons, who Approve a joke as much as you, And laugh at it as such; But if they saw their Bishop land, His leg supported in his hand, The joke they wouldn't understand— 'T would pain ...
— The Bab Ballads • W. S. Gilbert

... folks behave! It makes one laugh really to see them! If they weren't my own, I could laugh till I split. They don't know the way to do anything properly. Can't even take leave with decorum. A lucky thing it is for them that they have elder folk, who will keep their house together as long as they're living. ...
— The Storm • Aleksandr Nicolaevich Ostrovsky

... who will our Dragon slay, Shall Siegfried's strength be given; Hurrah! how joyfully your nurse Will laugh ...
— The New York Times Current History of the European War, Vol. 1, January 9, 1915 - What Americans Say to Europe • Various

... lip, and his teeth were yellow, strong, and overlapping. Add to this that he seldom wore collar or necktie, that his throat was the colour and texture of the bark of a Scotch fir, and that he had a voice and especially a laugh like a bull's bellow. Then you have some idea (if you can piece all these items in your mind) of the outward ...
— The Stark Munro Letters • J. Stark Munro

... quite a handsome young man, Wallie!" she observed suddenly, with a frank laugh. "I shouldn't have thought you would, somehow. ...
— The Chestermarke Instinct • J. S. Fletcher

... a moment before my eyes, after the flashlight, could discern anything in the darkness. Mac was pointing forward. When I could see, Mac was ready to laugh at himself. ...
— The After House • Mary Roberts Rinehart

... to the common good, and letting private griefs and troubles find their compensation in public blessings, he should maintain the dignity of his character and station, much more than actors who represent the persons of kings and tyrants, who, we see, when they either laugh or weep on the stage, follow, not their own private inclinations, but the course consistent with the subject and with their position. And if, moreover, when our neighbor is in misfortune, it is not our duty to forbear offering any consolation, but rather ...
— Plutarch's Lives • A.H. Clough

... one second a shade, though not by any means a dark one, on the landlady's open brow. But it passed off instantly, in a laugh that came ...
— Life And Adventures Of Martin Chuzzlewit • Charles Dickens

... know what Monsieur Colleville and Monsieur de la Peyrade can be saying to each other to make them laugh like that," said Madame Thuillier, foolishly, looking out ...
— The Lesser Bourgeoisie • Honore de Balzac

... know where ever so many of the society people live," Bertie went on in a low tone, which implored him not to repeat, and above all not to laugh. "I saw a book once with all their addresses, and I marked the places on ...
— With the Procession • Henry B. Fuller

... gave an idea that he was a good swimmer, and I believe if ever the captain was frightened, it was when he saw the struggles in the water: but his self-possession and activity did not forsake him, and no one enjoyed the laugh against himself more than he did when the danger ...
— The Life of Admiral Viscount Exmouth • Edward Osler

... either of those insipid young persons? Neither is Midwinter one to take hold on like or dislike; and Miss Gwilt is interesting only as the capable but helpless spider out of which the plot of the story is spun. Pathos there is not in the book, and the humor is altogether too serious to laugh at. ...
— The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 18, No. 107, September, 1866 • Various

... Araucanians, indignant at the idea of sparing the life of their most dangerous enemy, dispatched the prisoner with a blow of his war club, saying that it would be madness to trust the promises of an ambitious enemy, who would laugh at his oaths when once he escaped the present danger. Caupolican was much exasperated at this interference with his supreme authority, and was disposed to have punished it severely; but most of his officers opposed themselves to ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 5 • Robert Kerr

... occasion. At Reading the Marlborough of our tale made one of the safe investments of that day; he bought a "Times" and "Punch"—the latter full of steel-pen thrusts and woodcuts. Valour and beauty deigned to laugh at some inflamed humbug or other punctured by "Punch." Now laughing together thaws our human ice; long before Swindon it was a talking-match; at Swindon who so devoted as Captain Dolignan? He handed them out, he souped them, ...
— Stories by English Authors: England • Various

... a critic in conversation, makes jests, and loves to laugh at them; takes a great deal of pains in his office, and is in a fair way of rising at court.—Swift. This is right enough, but he ...
— The Prose Works of Jonathan Swift, Vol. X. • Jonathan Swift

... could oblige you, but fun is not my strong point. I went from Greenland to the South Seas one day in search of a laugh, but I failed to find it; indeed I came near doing worse, for in getting into the hoop of a native's nose-ring for a swing—just by way of a new sensation—I forgot to make myself invisible, and he caught me, thought ...
— Prince Lazybones and Other Stories • Mrs. W. J. Hays

... did laugh—for you know she was in play, and did not mean to do anything naughty. She skipped up to her ...
— Little Mittens for The Little Darlings - Being the Second Book of the Series • Frances Elizabeth Barrow

... got any for you," said Uncle Fred with a laugh. "I guess none of the six little Bunkers would want to go to live with you, though you may be a good Indian. But where are you from, and what do ...
— Six Little Bunkers at Uncle Fred's • Laura Lee Hope

... could not help but laugh at Perry's frantic capers as he essayed to gain the safety of the lower branches of the trees he now had reached. The stems were bare for a distance of some fifteen feet—at least on those trees which Perry attempted to ascend, for the suggestion of safety carried by the larger of the forest ...
— At the Earth's Core • Edgar Rice Burroughs

... dullards, they'll be always with you, like the poor, down at the bottom like a sediment, sir, and much too heavy to stir up! I can't manage 'em now, and my temper gets the better of me, God forgive me for it, and I say things I'm sorry for and that don't do me or them any good, and they laugh at me. But I've got my parish to look after; it's not a large one, but it acts as an antidote. You're not even in orders, so there's no help for you that way; and the day will come when the strain gets too much for you, and you'll throw the whole ...
— The Giant's Robe • F. Anstey

... "I laugh, like Figaro," said Tricotrin, "that I may not be obliged to weep. When are you going to throw yourself away, my little Lisette? Has my accursed rival induced you to fix ...
— A Chair on The Boulevard • Leonard Merrick

... "A smothered laugh behind me reminded me that so public a place was hardly appropriate for soliloquizing about angels. I turned in some vexation and encountered the laughing glance of a well dressed young man, apparently about twenty-five, who ...
— Graham's Magazine Vol XXXII. No. 3. March 1848 • Various

... sarcastic sneer, and asked me, in Hindustani, what business I had in their country, and where I had intended going, adding, were I a good Mohammedan like themselves, they would not touch me, but being a Christian I should be killed. This ridiculous farce excited my risible faculties, and provoked a laugh, when I replied, Our intentions were simply travelling; we wished to see the country of Ugahden, and pass on to Zanzibar. I was a Christian, and invited them, if it must be so, to despatch their work at once. On the donkey-boy's communicating this to the bystanders, they ...
— What Led To The Discovery of the Source Of The Nile • John Hanning Speke

... Pierino held when my father spake those words of prophecy, namely, that Pierino's children should live to crave succour from his own virtuous sons. Of this perhaps enough is now said; but let none ever laugh at the prognostications of any worthy man whom he has wrongfully insulted; because it is not he who speaks, nay, but the very voice of ...
— The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini • Benvenuto Cellini

... Hector stretch'd his arms Forth to his son, but with a scream, the child Fell back into the bosom of his nurse, 570 His father's aspect dreading, whose bright arms He had attentive mark'd and shaggy crest Playing tremendous o'er his helmet's height. His father and his gentle mother laugh'd,[32] And noble Hector lifting from his head 575 His dazzling helmet, placed it on the ground, Then kiss'd his boy and dandled him, and thus In earnest prayer the heavenly powers implored. Hear all ye Gods! as ye have given to me, So also ...
— The Iliad of Homer - Translated into English Blank Verse • Homer

... may laugh; But there's in all your laughter hardly more Mirth than in my upbraidings. Ah, I grow So weary of this low-horizoned scene, Our generation; I am always drawn In thought toward that great noon of human life When in the streets of Florence walked the powers And princes of the earth—Politian, Pico, ...
— Mr. Faust • Arthur Davison Ficke

... ludicrous element which appears here and there in nature. There are animals, like monkeys and crabs, which seem made to be laughed at; by those at least who possess that most indefinable of faculties, the sense of the ridiculous. As long as man possesses muscles especially formed to enable him to laugh, we have no right to suppose (with some) that laughter is an accident of our fallen nature; or to find (with others) the primary cause of the ridiculous in the perception of unfitness or disharmony. And yet we shrink (whether rightly or wrongly, we can hardly tell) from attributing ...
— Glaucus; or The Wonders of the Shore • Charles Kingsley

... intermittent thunder of a moving train; while, nearer at hand, came the occasional splash of oars in the still water, or their thud in the rowlocks; the strains of a concertina played on the forecastle-head of one of the craft lying at anchor; a gruff hail; a laugh; or the hoarse rattle of chain through a hawse-pipe as one of the drifting vessels came to an anchor. Our own lads were very quiet, the watch below having turned in, while those on deck, with the exception ...
— The Cruise of the "Esmeralda" • Harry Collingwood

... paregoric, and to frighten our natural curls into a state of painful perpendicularity. The mere presentment of such a possibility, carries its refutation, and puts the aggressions of this Sacramento hen in the category of outrages which all society is banded to suppress. If you must laugh, O generation of scoffers, make your jokes and gibes the instrument of protecting the altars of all such feline households as may be ...
— Punchinello, Vol. 1, No. 9, May 28, 1870 • Various

... the Spartan monarch burn'd With generous anguish, and in scorn return'd: "Laugh'st thou not, Jove! from thy superior throne, When mortals boast of prowess not their own? Not thus the lion glories in his might, Nor panther braves his spotted foe in fight, Nor thus the boar (those terrors of the plain;) Man only vaunts his force, and vaunts in vain. But far the vainest of the ...
— The Iliad of Homer • Homer

... my pipe, and strike a light. I laugh at my thoughtlessness, and another match is lighted to look at my watch, which tells me I have been on the road precisely twenty minutes. I mount. Spitfire seems quite composed, perhaps a little astonished at the unusual ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 9, No. 52, February, 1862 • Various

... Socrates in a figure which will appear to him to be a caricature, and yet I do not mean to laugh at him, but only to speak the truth. I say, then, that he is exactly like the masks of Silenus, which may be seen sitting in the statuaries' shops, having pipes and flutes in their mouths; and they are made to open in the middle, and there ...
— The Best of the World's Classics, Restricted to prose. Volume I (of X) - Greece • Various

... a short laugh, as if he were scornfully ready to meet that contingency, but Margaret's look of startled horror ...
— A True Friend - A Novel • Adeline Sergeant

... Miss Bowes had glided from the room, and the voice died away as the door of her private study closed. Sounds suggestive of the carrying upstairs of luggage followed, and a hinnying laugh echoed once down the stairs. The girls looked at one another; there was a shadow in Ulyth's eyes. She did not share in the general smile that passed round the table, and she finished ...
— For the Sake of the School • Angela Brazil

... my revenge on nature for bungling its job. If Richard had genius, my intervention would be superfluous. He has none. He is dull. You must realize it. But since he has known me, has felt my influence, has been subject to my volition, my sorcery, you may call it,—" his laugh was disagreeably conscious,—"he has developed the shadow of a great man. He will seem a great composer. I shall make him think he is one. I shall make the world believe it, also. It is my fashion of squaring a life I hate. But if I chose ...
— Visionaries • James Huneker

... inclined to laugh. And, to Miss Carlyle's exceeding discomposure she, at this juncture, saw the governess emerge from the gray parlor, glance at the hall clock, ...
— East Lynne • Mrs. Henry Wood

... saw—no one could fail to see—the change that day by day came over our reserved companion. The stern line of her lips relaxed. In amazement one day we heard her laugh. Then her laughter began to break forth on all occasions; and we listened to her singing above in her room, and we smiled at each other. That tightness of her brow dissolved in a carefree radiance. At work, she mixed up her ...
— Where the Sabots Clatter Again • Katherine Shortall

... terrors equally in vain; This hour to tremble, and the next to glow; Can Pride, can Sense, can Reason, stoop so low: When Virtue, at an easier price, displays The sacred wreaths of honourable praise; When Wisdom utters her divine decree, To laugh at pompous Folly, ...
— Poetical Works of Akenside - [Edited by George Gilfillan] • Mark Akenside

... permission from government; and desired the "Seor dominante" to appear forthwith before the said justice for contempt of his authority. The spelling of the letter was too amusing. The Indians looked very much alarmed, and when they saw us laugh, still more astonished. C—-n wrote with a pencil in answer to the summons, that he was the Spanish Minister, and wished good day to the alcalde, who plodded up the ...
— Life in Mexico • Frances Calderon de la Barca

... that occasion the worthy man was completely unintelligible. His happiness was choking him. He tried in vain to find the words he wanted, used the wrong ones, and only confused himself by trying to get them right. But nobody had the least desire to laugh when, to conclude his address, he said ...
— In the Field (1914-1915) - The Impressions of an Officer of Light Cavalry • Marcel Dupont

... ran back into the street through bullets thick as hail, caught up her cage, and ran back with her recovered treasures. A petroleuse who had seen her stopped as she was setting fire to some furniture, and cried out, with a mocking laugh, ...
— Harper's Young People, August 31, 1880 - An Illustrated Weekly • Various

... along down's if 't was coming right on to him, and he got on to his knees and begun to say his Ten Commandments fast's he could rattle 'em out. He got 'em mixed up, and when the boys heard his teeth a-chattering, they began to laugh and he up an' cleared. Dunnell's boys had been down the road a piece and was just coming home, an' 't was their old white hoss that had got out of the barn, it bein' such a mild night, an' was wandering off. ...
— A Country Doctor and Selected Stories and Sketches • Sarah Orne Jewett

... come in, while you were lying down there under the seat all the time! Why, it's lovely! The boy's got pluck and manners too. Shake hands, young gentleman, you owe us no apologies. I haven't had such a laugh ...
— Vice Versa - or A Lesson to Fathers • F. Anstey

... Sometimes, when Jack happened to be in a humorous frame, he would seat himself at the bottom of the sea on one of the brain-corals, as if he were seated on a large paddock-stool, and then make faces at me, in order, if possible, to make me laugh under water. At first, when he took me unawares, he nearly succeeded, and I had to shoot to the surface in order to laugh; but afterwards I became aware of his intentions, and being naturally of a grave ...
— The Coral Island - A Tale Of The Pacific Ocean • R. M. Ballantyne

... a laugh, such a laugh of glee as did her father's heart good. Mr. Randolph was standing in the doorway to ...
— Melbourne House • Elizabeth Wetherell

... slowed as it approached, braking nearly to a stop sixty feet from the stalled Packard. There were several people inside it; Garfield heard voices, then a woman's loud laugh. The driver tapped his horn inquiringly twice, moved the car slowly forward. As the headlights went past him, Garfield got to his feet among the bushes, took a step down towards the road, ...
— An Incident on Route 12 • James H. Schmitz

... remembrance of previous victories, an Irish captain contented himself with exclaiming—'Now, my lads, you see those fellows up there. Well, if you don't kill THEM, SHURE they'll kill YOU. That's all!' Struck with the comic originality of this address, the men rushed forward with a laugh and a shout, carrying all ...
— The Gaming Table: Its Votaries and Victims - Volume II (of II) • Andrew Steinmetz

... him if he had a cure for your local fever," said the Bishop with a laugh, "for against it, although I have taken so much that my ears ...
— Smith and the Pharaohs, and Other Tales • Henry Rider Haggard

... Navarrete to hear from the noble artist, how he enjoyed being able to speak German again after so many years, difficult as it was. It seemed as if a crust melted away from his heart, and none of those present had ever seen him so gay, so full of youthful vivacity. Only one person knew that he could laugh and play noisily, and this one was the beautiful woman at the long table, who knew not whether she should die of joy, or sink into ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... made the foolish braggart Salvatierra believe they were cousins, and of the ridiculous bravadoes he uttered, as how he would kill Cortes and all of us in revenge for the loss of his horse; then how he had prevailed on Narvaez to turn out his troops in review, merely to laugh at him; and in all these stories he mimicked Narvaez and Salvatierra most admirably, so that we laughed and enjoyed ourselves as if going to a wedding-feast, though we well knew that on the morrow we must conquer or die, having ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. IV. • Robert Kerr

... "That two of the kitchen maids was seen in their own back yard? You know you can't spring that safety-of-the-realm stuff over here. The police would only give us the laugh. We got to have something definite to tell the sergeant. Let's ...
— Wilt Thou Torchy • Sewell Ford



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