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Rede   Listen
verb
Rede  v. t.  
1.
To advise or counsel. (Obs. or Scot.) "I rede that our host here shall begin."
2.
To interpret; to explain. (Obs.) "My sweven (dream) rede aright."






Collaborative International Dictionary of English 0.48








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"Rede" Quotes from Famous Books



... some ungracious pastors do, Show me the steep and thorny way to Heaven, Whilst, like a puffed and reckless libertine, Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads, And recks not his own rede. Hamlet, Act i. ...
— The World's Best Poetry — Volume 10 • Various

... Lochu by name, went to get water, and a great troop of women with her. Cuchulainn thought it was Medb. He threw two stones from Cuince, so that he slew her in her plain(?). Hence is Ath Rede Locha ...
— The Cattle-Raid of Cualnge (Tain Bo Cualnge) • Unknown

... be, spare not to blow; To hold wind, by mine opinion, Will engender colles passion, And make men to greven on her [B]rops, When they have filled her maws and her crops; But toward night, eate some Fennell rede, Annis, Commin, or Coriander-seed, And like as I have power and might, I charge you rise not at midnight, Thogh it be so the Moon shine clere, I will my self be your [C]Orlogere, To morrow early, when I see my time, For we will forth parcel afore prime, Accompanie [D]parde ...
— The Lives of the Most Famous English Poets (1687) • William Winstanley

... of locality, date, and circumstances; but it is generally accepted that the rhyme known for many centuries in Scotland as The Battle of Otterburn, and the English Chevy Chase are versions, from opposite sides, of one event—a skirmish fought in the autumn of 1388 on Rede Water, between a band of Scots, under James, Earl of Douglas, returning home laden with spoil, and a body of English, led by Hotspur, the son of the Earl of Northumberland, in which Douglas was slain and young Harry ...
— The Balladists - Famous Scots Series • John Geddie

... style of which it is a type is indeed inferior in every way to the beautiful specimens which have been rescued from tombs in Durham, Worcester, and elsewhere. They seem hardly to belong to the same period, so weak are the designs and the composition of the groups. Though Mr. Rede Fowke gives the Abbe de la Rue's doubts as to the accepted period of the Bayeux tapestry, which he assigns to the Empress Matilda, he yet leans to other equally good authorities who consider the work as being coeval with the ...
— Needlework As Art • Marian Alford

... heaven sain you," he said "and ferd you for aye, for the braw deed ye hae dreed the day; tak' this wee ring, gudemon, and tak' ye this ane, gudewife, and when ye look on this and on that, I rede ye render up are prayer to him abune for the weal o' ...
— The Mirror Of Literature, Amusement, And Instruction - Vol. X, No. 289., Saturday, December 22, 1827 • Various

... my rede on burnings, Helgi. My scheme is to carry off Liot in his sleep. They will keep no watch. The very dogs will be drunk, and I think it will not be so difficult as it seems. Will you come with me ...
— Vandrad the Viking - The Feud and the Spell • J. Storer Clouston

... To me, or another, thy gold harp lend; This moment boune {f:8} thee, and straight begone! I rede {f:9} thee, do it, my own dear son." Look ...
— Romantic Ballads - translated from the Danish; and Miscellaneous Pieces • George Borrow

... fountain and the rich pavilion there by it. Then King Arthur was ware where sat a knight armed in a chair. "Sir knight," said Arthur, "for what cause abidest thou here, that there may no knight ride this way but he joust with thee? I rede thee leave ...
— Children's Literature - A Textbook of Sources for Teachers and Teacher-Training Classes • Charles Madison Curry

... Twists his mustache and plucks his hoary beard, Answering his nephew neither yea nor nay. The Franks keep silence—all save Ganelon Who rose and stood before the King, and spake Bold words and haughty:—"Put not faith in fools, Nor me nor others; follow your own rede! Since King Marsile makes offer to become Your man, with hands joined; furthermore will hold Spain as a fief from you; yea, will receive Our law as his law, he who counsel gives Such proffer to reject, cares not a whit What death ...
— La Chanson de Roland • Lon Gautier

... Rede ither crews be debonair, But we 've a weird to dree, I wis we maun be bumpit sair By boaties two and three: Sing stretchers of yew for our Toggere, Sith we ...
— Green Bays. Verses and Parodies • Arthur Thomas Quiller-Couch

... words of wariness Spoken by me your father, add this word, That, tried by time, our unknown company Be held for honest: over-swift are tongues To slander strangers, over-light is speech To bring pollution on a stranger's name. Therefore I rede you, bring no shame on me Now when man's eye beholds your maiden prime. Lovely is beauty's ripening harvest-field, But ill to guard; and men and beasts, I wot, And birds and creeping things make prey of it. And when the fruit is ripe ...
— Suppliant Maidens and Other Plays • AEschylus

... of euery smart, in whome vertue and beautie striueth soe that neither yeldes: loe here for you againe Gismondes vnlucky loue, her fault, her woe, and death at last, here fere and father slayen through her missehap. And though ye could not see, yet rede and rue their woefull destinie. So Joue, as your hye vertues doen deserue, geue you such feres as may yo'r vertues serue w'th like vertues: and blissfull Venus send Vnto your happy loue an ...
— A Select Collection of Old English Plays, Vol. VII (4th edition) • Various

... heed! Reck well my rede! Is't done, the deed? Good night, you poor, poor thing! The spoiler's lies, His arts despise, Nor yield your prize, Without ...
— The German Classics of The Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, • Editor-in-Chief: Kuno Francke

... be able to keep as many men at his heels as he, and more too. He may also match in a better house than his; and so that fear is not worth the fearing. But if the father continue, he will be able to break the branches, and pull up the tree, root and all. Lose not your advantage; if you do, I rede your destiny. Yours to the end, W.R. Let the Queen hold Bothwell while she hath him. He will ever be the canker of her estate and safety. Princes are lost by security; and preserved by prevention. I have seen the last of her good days, and all ours, after his liberty.' By Bothwell ...
— Sir Walter Ralegh - A Biography • William Stebbing

... for to here And romans rede in divers manere Of Alexandre the conqueroure, Of Julius Cesar the emperoure, Of Grece and Troy the strong stryf There many a man lost his lyf, Of Brute that baron bold of hond, The first conqueroure of Englond, Of Kyng Artour.... How Kyng Charlis and Rowlond fawght With Sarzyns nold they ...
— A Literary History of the English People - From the Origins to the Renaissance • Jean Jules Jusserand

... the Year Books report Rede, J. as adopting the argument of Fairfax in the last case. In trespass, he says, "the intent cannot be construed; but in felony it shall be. As when a man shoots at butts and kills a man, it is not felony et il ser come ...
— The Common Law • Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr.

... canst hear how they cry and beg, the poor things! Come here, and dip into thy father's head. The poor dog no longer feels it. So! that'll do. For the skull, concern thee no further. In a quarter of an hour, it shall be where it should be. But now, I rede thee, look that thou art presently ready to marry, and neglect not bidding good plenty of guests; but invite especially those that have hitherto tightly toused, mocked, and scorned thee. If thou hast lack of coin, thou wottest where Godfather Stringstriker ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine — Vol. 56, No. 346, August, 1844 • Various

... is no evil fawtor. How can I help but rede [attend to] his sayings? He is one of my fellows. And 'tis but what he hath from his father. Master Calverley is a squire of the Queen's Grace, and one of ...
— The White Rose of Langley - A Story of the Olden Time • Emily Sarah Holt

... him. But Swanhild shall triumph over thy daughter Gudruda, and this man, and the two of them, shall die at her hands, and, for the rest, who can say? But this is true—that the mighty man shall bring all thy race to an end. See now, I have read thy rede." ...
— Eric Brighteyes • H. Rider Haggard

... what is this damsel?" He replied, "Of a truth, I bought her for the sake of the little one on her arm; for know that, when she groweth up, there will not be her like for beauty, either in the land of the Arabs or the Ajams." His wife remarked, "Right was thy rede", and said to the woman "What is thy name?" She replied, "O my lady, my name is Tauflik.[FN3]" "And what is thy daughter's name?" asked she? Answered the slave, "Sa'ad, the happy." Rejoined her mistress; "Thou sayst ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 4 • Richard F. Burton

... rest, O my beauty, my brightest, But a barrier lies ever between us. So fierce are the fates and so mighty —I feel it—that rule to their rede. Ah, nearer I would be, and nigher, Till nought should be left to dispart us, —The wielder of Skofnung the wonder, And the wearer of ...
— The Life and Death of Cormac the Skald • Unknown

... father's untimely end; To me, or another, thy gold harp lend; This moment boune thee, and straight begone! I rede thee, do it, my own dear son." Look ...
— George Borrow - The Man and His Books • Edward Thomas

... should really be spelled, Aelfred, [Footnote: That is, the rede or councel of the elves. A great many Old-English names are called after the elves or fairies.] was the youngest son of King Aethelwulf, and was born at Wantage in Berkshire in 849. His mother was Osburh daughter of Oslac the King's cup-bearer, who came of ...
— Heroes Every Child Should Know • Hamilton Wright Mabie

... Like enough. Rede me no redes and riddles. Never yet I have loved thee more, and yet I have loved thee well, Than now that loving-kindness borne toward love Makes thee so gracious, pleading ...
— Rosamund, Queen of the Lombards • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... and brither Scots, Frae Maidenkirk to Johnny Groat's, If there's a hole in a' your coats, I rede ye tent it; A chiel's amang you takin' notes, An' ...
— The Heart of Mid-Lothian, Complete, Illustrated • Sir Walter Scott

... other than sleepy, finish for us thy tale that we may cut short the watching of this our latter night!" She replied, "With love and good will!" It hath reached me, O auspicious King, the director, the right-guiding, lord of the rede which is benefiting and of deeds fair-seeming and worthy celebrating, that the Prince went forward to the Palace gate and purposed to enter, but they forbade him nor availed he to go in; so he returned to his tents and there spent the night till dawn. Then ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 5 • Richard F. Burton

... thou rede, All underneath a green hill's side, How it with Thorelil shall speed?" In such peril ...
— The Dalby Bear - and Other Ballads • Anonymous

... rewards and treason.—Thou in the meane time, except thou take heede, art like to die: Farewel." This was the aunciente order amonges the Romaines, that neuer were pleased by the cowardly ouerthrow of other, to winne fame and glorye. And because I rede an other excellente historie of the same Fabritius, I haue thought good to adde the same to this Nouell. When peace was concluded, betwene the Romaines and the Samnites, the Ambassadours of the Samnites repaired vppon a time to this Fabritius, who after ...
— The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1 • William Painter

... omdannelse. Vi str her foran det strste skel, der forekommer i heltedigtningens levnedslb: overgangen fra den lse skare af smsagn, der slutter sig forklarende og udfyldende omkring kvadene, til sagaen, der selvstndig og i lbende sammenhng gr rede for heltenes liv. Netop ved Skjoldungsagnene mtte denne overgang blive afgrende. Nr Halvdans mord var det frste punkt i slgtens historie, kunde man umulig unddrage sig fra klart og alsidig at belyse dets flger. Det var selvflgeligt, at Frode ogs ...
— The Relation of the Hrolfs Saga Kraka and the Bjarkarimur to Beowulf • Oscar Ludvig Olson

... It is well known this priest is but your instrument. I speak very freely; the time is not for courtesies. Even as I speak, so would I be answered. And answer get I none! Ye but put more questions. I rede ye beware, Sir Daniel; for in this way ye will but nourish and ...
— The Works of Robert Louis Stevenson - Swanston Edition Vol. 8 (of 25) • Robert Louis Stevenson

... "I rede thee go with a great rout, For thy foes they ride thick about." "Thou and the devil may keep my foes, Thou redest me this gold to lose." Deus est ...
— Poems By The Way & Love Is Enough • William Morris

... einige Zeit von einer allgemeinen Weltliteratur die Rede und zwar nicht mit Unrecht: denn die saemmtlichen Nationen, in den fuerchterlichsten Kriegen durcheinander geschuettelt, sodann wieder auf sich selbst einzeln zurueckgefuehrt, hatten zu bemerken, dass sie manches Fremde gewahr worden, in sich aufgenommen, bisher unbekannte geistige ...
— The Life of Friedrich Schiller - Comprehending an Examination of His Works • Thomas Carlyle

... ray of sight, Fleeter far than whirlwinds go, Or for service, or delight, Hearts to hearts their meaning show, Sum their long experience, And import intelligence. Single look has drained the breast; Single moment years confessed. The duration of a glance Is the term of convenance, And, though thy rede be church or state, Frugal multiples of that. Speeding Saturn cannot halt; Linger,—thou shalt rue the fault: If Love his moment overstay, ...
— Poems - Household Edition • Ralph Waldo Emerson

... answered soberly: "If I escaped, it was by this, that another woman saved me, and not often shall that befall. Nor wholly was I saved; my body escaped forsooth. But where is my soul? Where is my heart, and my life? Young man, I rede thee, try no such adventure; but go home to thy kindred if thou canst. Moreover, wouldst thou fare alone? The others shall ...
— The Wood Beyond the World • William Morris

... cross," she said; "but how can a man worship a cross and preach it and conquer thereby? I cannot interpret this rede, yet I do not doubt but that it shall all come true, and that you, Olaf, and I are doomed to be joined in the same fate, whatever it may be, and with us some other who has wronged you, Steinar perchance, or Iduna herself. Well, of this at least ...
— The Wanderer's Necklace • H. Rider Haggard

... myrth in measure, is a pleasaunt thyng, To wryte and to rede well, be gyftes of learnyng; Remember this well, all you that be young, Exercise vertue, and rule well your ...
— A Mother's List of Books for Children • Gertrude Weld Arnold

... I refer to read is Ichabod Crane, it is an grate book and I like to rede it. Ichabod Crame was a man and a man wrote a book and it is called Ichabod Crane i like it because the man called it ichabod crane when I read it for it is ...
— How to Teach • George Drayton Strayer and Naomi Norsworthy

... a translacion Of a boke which is called Trophe In Lumbarde tonge, as men may rede and se, And in our vulgar, long or that he deyde, Gave it the name of ...
— Notes & Queries, No. 19, Saturday, March 9, 1850 • Various

... for a panacea for the ills and delusions of life. For, call it what he would—Biblical criticism, scientific inquiry—this was his aim first and last. He was trying to pierce the secret of existence—to rede the riddle that has never been solved.—What am I? Whence have I come? Whither am I going? What meaning has the pain I suffer, the evil that men do? Can evil be included in God's scheme?—And it was well, he told himself, as he pressed forward, that the ...
— Australia Felix • Henry Handel Richardson

... Europe, and all the lands, British and German—Norway's sands, Dutchland and Irish—the hireling bands Bought for butchery—recking no rede, But, flocking like vultures, with felon hands, To fatten the ...
— War Poetry of the South • Various

... In faith, Noe, I had as lief thou had slept, for all thy frankishfare,[28] For I will not do after thy rede.[29] ...
— Everyman and Other Old Religious Plays, with an Introduction • Anonymous

... of the contentious quarrel between the two Irish earls did not make the way to cause these lines to pass my hand, this gibberish should hardly have cumbered your eyes; but warned by my former fault, and dreading worser hap to come, I rede you take good heed that the good subjects lost state be so revenged that I hear not the rest be won to a right bye way to breed more traitor's stocks, and so the goal is gone. Make some difference between tried, just, and false friend. Let the good service of well-deservers be never rewarded with ...
— Memoirs of the Court of Queen Elizabeth • Lucy Aikin

... We rede that in Englande was a king that had a concubyne whose name was Rose, and for hir greate bewtye he cleped hir Rose ['a] mounde (Rosa mundi), that is to say, Rose of the world, for him thought that she passed al wymen in bewtye.—R. Pynson (1493), ...
— Character Sketches of Romance, Fiction and the Drama - A Revised American Edition of the Reader's Handbook, Vol. 3 • E. Cobham Brewer

... France, who thrust him back, saying to his sergeants, "Take me this fellow and his master too." The King of Navarre dissolved in humble protestations and repentant speeches over the assassination of the Constable Charles of Spain. "Go, traitor, go," answered John: "you will need to learn good rede or some infamous trick to escape from me." The young Duke of Normandy had thrown himself at the feet of the king his father, crying, "Ah! my lord, for God's sake have mercy; you do me dishonor; for what ...
— A Popular History of France From The Earliest Times - Volume II. of VI. • Francois Pierre Guillaume Guizot

... it were a cursed dede: To be felawe with an outlawe! Almighty God forbede! Yea, better were, the pore squy re alone to forest yede, Then ye sholde say another day, that by my cursed dede Ye were betrayed: wherefore, good mayde, the best rede that I can, Is, that I to the grene wode ...
— The Deerslayer • James Fenimore Cooper

... dock, when pleader would draw tears, the while He grins. When pious son at funeral pile Mourns, or lone mother sobs for sole lost son, 5 He grins. Whate'er, whene'er, howe'er is done, Of deed he grins. Such be his malady, Nor kind, nor courteous—so beseemeth me— Then take thou good Egnatius, rede of mine! Wert thou corrupt Sabine or a Tiburtine, 10 Stuffed Umbrian or Tuscan overgrown Swarthy Lanuvian with his teeth-rows shown, Transpadan also, that mine own I touch, Or any washing teeth to shine o'er much, ...
— The Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus • Caius Valerius Catullus

... founders of the establishment, brought thither when the monastery was removed from Stanlaw in Cheshire, and upon the brass-covered gravestones of the abbots in the presbytery. There lay Gregory de Northbury, eighth abbot of Stanlaw and first of Whalley, and William Rede, the last abbot; but there was never to lie John Paslew. The slumber of the ancient prelates was soon to be disturbed, and the sacred structure within which they had so often worshipped, up-reared by sacrilegious hands. But all was bright ...
— The Lancashire Witches - A Romance of Pendle Forest • William Harrison Ainsworth

... Cytherea in her heart turned over new-wrought rede, New craft; how, face and fashion changed, her son the very Love For sweet Ascanius should come forth, and, gift-giving, should move The Queen to madness, make her bones the yoke-fellows of flame. 660 Forsooth the doubtful house she dreads, the two-tongued Tyrian name; And bitter Juno ...
— The AEneids of Virgil - Done into English Verse • Virgil

... side, A cavern stretches high and wide; A hundred entries thither lead; A hundred voices thence proceed, Each uttering forth the sibyl's rede. The sacred threshold now they trod: 'Pray for an answer! pray! the god,' She cries, 'the ...
— Michelangelo - A Collection Of Fifteen Pictures And A Portrait Of The - Master, With Introduction And Interpretation • Estelle M. Hurll

... same nation with the Finnas or Laplanders, mentioned in the voyage of Ohthere, so named because using scriden, schreiten, or snowshoes. The Finnas or Laplanders were distinguished by the geographer of Ravenna into Scerde-fenos, and Rede-fenos, the Scride-finnas, and Ter-finnas of Alfred. So late as 1556, Richard Johnson, Hakluyt, ed. 1809. I. 316. mentions the Scrick-finnes as a wild people ...
— A General History and Collection of Voyages and Travels, Vol. 1 • Robert Kerr

... thought O lady venus whom I haue sought So wysse me now what me is best to doo That am distraught wit[h] my self so That I ne wote what way for to torne Sauf by my self soleyn for to morne Hangyng in balance betwix hope and drede Wit[h] oute comfort remedye or rede For hope biddet[h] pursue and assaye And agaynward drede answert[h] naye And now wit[h] hope I am ...
— The Temple of Glass • John Lydgate

... o' Cakes, and brither Scots, Frae Maidenkirk to Johnnie Groats— If there's a hole in a' your coats, I rede you tent it: A chield's amang you, takin' notes, ...
— Robert Burns • Principal Shairp

... side the grandfather, Daniel Read, was born at Rehobeth, Mass., and said to be a lineal descendant and entitled to the coat of arms of Sir Brianus de Rede, A.D. 1075; but he had too much of the sturdy New England spirit to feel any special interest in the pomp and pride of heraldry, and the family tree he prized most was found in the grand old grove which shaded his own dooryard. Susannah Richardson, his wife, was born at Scituate, Mass., ...
— The Life and Work of Susan B. Anthony (Volume 1 of 2) • Ida Husted Harper

... place where was a den (a pleasanter than Bunyan's)—to write the strange things that befell me in the seeming long ago—the dew and freshness of my youth. And though I be reckoned of many a dreamer of dreams, he shall not, I think, go unprofited, who can rightly 'read my rede.' ...
— Continental Monthly , Vol V. Issue III. March, 1864 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... Rede And in his voice Zauberfluss, The magic bliss, Sein Haendedruck, His clasping hand, Und ach! sein ...
— The Continental Monthly, Vol. 2, No. 2, August, 1862 - Devoted to Literature and National Policy • Various

... this condicion That above all the flouris in the mede; Then love I most these flouris white and rede, Soche that men callin daisies in our town. To them have I so great affection, As I said erst, when comin is the Maie, That in my bed there dawith me no daie That I am up and walking in the mede, To see this floure ...
— The Daisy Chain, or Aspirations • Charlotte Yonge

... rare occasions when a strong feeling led every man to the assembly. The local Parliament took its ancient shape of an armed crowd, headed by the noblest Englishmen left in the earldom. There was no vote, no debate; the shout was "Short rede good rede, slay ye the Bishop." And to that cry, Walcher himself and his companions, the murderers of Ligulf among them, were slaughtered by the raging multitude who had ...
— William the Conqueror • E. A. Freeman

... properly, of course we should have been going to the Giant's Causeway and the swinging Bridge at Carrick-a-rede; but propriety is the last thing we aim at in our itineraries. We were within worshipping distance of two rather important shrines in our literary pilgrimage; for we had met a very knowledgeable traveller at the Sorley Boy, and after a little chat ...
— Penelope's Irish Experiences • Kate Douglas Wiggin

... concurred in opinion with Goethe as to the merits of Spinoza, though he was a man excommunicated by the Jews, to whom he belonged, and denounced by the Christians as a man little better than an atheist. "The Great Spirit of the world," says Schleiermacher, in his REDE UBER DIE RELIGION, "penetrated the holy but repudiated Spinoza; the Infinite was his beginning and his end; the universe his only and eternal love. He was filled with religion and religious feeling: and therefore is it that he stands alone unapproachable, the master in his ...
— Character • Samuel Smiles

... execution" (Ibid. v. 154). In the Epistle to James VI. prefixed to the Bassandyne Bible, it is said: "The false namit clergie of this realme, abusing the gentle nature of your Hienes maist noble gudschir of worthie memorie, made it an cappital crime to be punishit with the fyre to have or rede the New Testament in the vulgare language." One of the charges on which Sir John Borthwick was condemned, on the 28th of May 1540, was that he possessed a copy of the New Testament in the vernacular ('Register of St Andrews Kirk Session,' Scot. ...
— The Scottish Reformation - Its Epochs, Episodes, Leaders, and Distinctive Characteristics • Alexander F. Mitchell

... and ye mightie work ye old dead Luther did doe by ye grace of God. Then next about poetry, and Master Shaxpur did rede a part of his King Henry IV., ye which, it seemeth unto me, is not of ye value of an arsefull of ashes, yet they praised it ...
— 1601 - Conversation as it was by the Social Fireside in the Time of the Tudors • Mark Twain

... believe, for instance, that Gottfried von Strasburg makes an attack on Wolfram von Eschenbach. And generally the best attitude is that of an editor of the said Gottfried (who himself rather fails to reck his own salutary rede by proceeding to redistribute the ordinary attribution of poems), "Ich bekenne dass ich in diesen Dingen skeptischer ...
— The Flourishing of Romance and the Rise of Allegory - (Periods of European Literature, vol. II) • George Saintsbury

... thus talking they came to the fountain, and the rich pavilion there by it. Then King Arthur was ware where sat a knight armed in a chair. Sir knight, said Arthur, for what cause abidest thou here, that there may no knight ride this way but if he joust with thee? said the king. I rede thee leave that custom, said Arthur. This custom, said the knight, have I used and will use maugre who saith nay, and who is grieved with my custom let him amend it that will. I will amend it, said Arthur. I shall defend thee, said the knight. Anon he took his horse and dressed ...
— Le Morte D'Arthur, Volume I (of II) - King Arthur and of his Noble Knights of the Round Table • Thomas Malory

... angel or saint for Siward son of Beorn," said the old man hastily; "let me not have a cow's death, but a warrior's; die in my mail of proof, axe in hand, and helm on head. And such may be my death, if Edward the King reads my rede and grants my prayer." ...
— Harold, Complete - The Last Of The Saxon Kings • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... gentle George amorous of a worse-featured face than high-nosed Isabel; 'strange to spell or rede,' as I would wager my best destrier to a tailor's hobby, the damozel ...
— The Last Of The Barons, Complete • Edward Bulwer-Lytton

... once for the first time; and it is right and good that we should go, and we mean to do it!" Whereupon Cousin Maud drew back in disgust and amazement, and gazed from one to the other of us with enquiring eyes, and as wondering a face as though she were striving to rede some dark riddle. Then her vast bosom began to heave up and down, and we, who knew her, could not fail to perceive that somewhat great and strange was moving her. And whereas she presently shook ...
— Uarda • Georg Ebers

... lettre therupon, with hangynge seall, to the citee of London, whiche lettre, in the dawnyng of the day was takked upon the newe crosse in Chepe; and manye copies of the same lettre were takked upon wyndous, dores, and othere open places in the citee of London, that alle men myghte rede them that wenten be the weye: and this was done on seynt Denys day, that is to seye the ix day of Octobre.[47] And as the kyng was at his mete, tydynges comen to hym therof: and anoon the kyng, the Spensers bothe the fadir and the sone, the erle of Arundell, and maister Walter Baldok, fledden ...
— A Chronicle of London from 1089 to 1483 • Anonymous

... but one England, crown and head Of all her glories till the sun be dead, Supreme in peace and war, supreme in song, Supreme in freedom, since her rede was read, ...
— A Channel Passage and Other Poems - Taken from The Collected Poetical Works of Algernon Charles - Swinburne—Vol VI • Algernon Charles Swinburne

... seigneurs condemned her. After De Troyes had finished his reading of the opinions and the judgment, Guerold de Boissel read the deliberations of the Faculty of Decrees upon the six points of accusation. 'If this woman,' so ran the rede, 'was in her right mind when she made affirmation of the propositions contained in the twelve articles, one may say in the manner of counsel and of doctrine, and to speak charitably, first, that she is schismatic in separating herself from obedience to ...
— Joan of Arc • Ronald Sutherland Gower

... surnamed the "Unready" or "redeless" from his indifference to the "rede" or council of his advisers, the city would again have fallen into the hands of the Danes, but for the personal courage displayed by its inhabitants and the protection which, by Alfred's foresight, the walls were able to afford them. In 994, Olaf and ...
— London and the Kingdom - Volume I • Reginald R. Sharpe

... untrue, Or feine things, or find words new: He may not spare, altho he were his brother, He mote as well say o word as another. Christ spake himself full broad in holy writ, And well I wote no villany is it. Eke Plato saith, who so can him rede, The words mote[28] been ...
— Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books - with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations • Charles W. Eliot

... Give tongue before his way Goldenly as I say, And each from wide Saturnus to hot Mars He calleth by its name, Lest that its bright feet stray; And thou have lore of all, But to thine own Sun's call Thy path disorbed hast never wit to tame; It profits not withal, And my rede ...
— New Poems • Francis Thompson

... Asnam hearkened to his mother's rede and going out forthright to the Divan, committed the manage of the realm into the hands of certain old men of understanding and experience; save that he did this only after Bassora had been ruined, inasmuch as he turned not from his folly till he had spent and squandered all ...
— Alaeddin and the Enchanted Lamp • John Payne

... hearken thy word," said Gunnar, "and I know in very deed That long-lived and happy are most men that hearken Hogni's rede. Hear thou, O Eastland War-god, and bear this answer aback, That nought may the earth of my people King Giuki's children lack, And that here in the land am I biding till the Norns my life shall change; Howbeit, if here were Atli, his face ...
— The Story of Sigurd the Volsung and the Fall of the Niblungs • William Morris

... as this, for he is not worthy that thy Highness give his daughter to a fellow whom none knoweth what he may be." "By what means," enquired the Sultan, "shall we put off the man when I pledged my promise; and the word of the Kings is their bond?" Replied the Wazir, "O my lord, my rede is that thou demand of him forty platters made of pure sand-gold[FN154] and full of gems (such as the woman brought thee aforetime), with forty white slave-girls to carry the platters and forty black eunuch-slaves." The King ...
— Supplemental Nights, Volume 3 • Richard F. Burton

... the maid, viewing Sir Pertinax smilingly askance, "why doth poor soldier go bedight in fine linen 'neath rusty hauberk? Why doth poor soldier wear knightly chain about his neck and swear by knightly oath? Good mother, wise mother, rede me this." ...
— The Geste of Duke Jocelyn • Jeffery Farnol

... forme of kynde[7]. Haveth your mynde a lycheynge[8] of a mynde? 5 Woulde it kenne everich thynge, as it mote[9] bee? Woulde ytte here phrase of the vulgar from the hynde, Withoute wiseegger[10] wordes and knowlache[11] free? Gyf soe, rede thys, whyche Iche dysporteynge[12] pende; Gif nete besyde, yttes rhyme ...
— The Rowley Poems • Thomas Chatterton

... Your heart can ne'er be wanting! May prudence, fortitude, and truth Erect your brow undaunting. In ploughman phrase, God send you speed Still daily to grow wiser; And may ye better reck the rede [heed the advice] Than ever did ...
— Robert Burns - How To Know Him • William Allan Neilson

... man-riddle: she was unable to rede or read him. Her will could not turn him; nor her tongue combat; nor was it granted her to pique the mailed veteran. Every poor innocent little bit of an art had been exhausted. Her title was Lady Ormont her condition actually slave. A luxuriously established slave, consorting with a ...
— The Shaving of Shagpat • George Meredith

... Mondviertel in Essig und l, ich zahl's. Die drei setzten sich zu ihm, er stellte sich vor, und bald waren sie im tiefsten Gesprch. Der Assessor war froh, da eine goldene Brcke von ihm zu den Damen hinber geschlagen war, denn er fhlte sich lngst zu irgend einer passenden Rede verpflichtet und hatte nur nicht gewut, wie sie anbringen. Jetzt wurde auch er durch die Studenten vorgestellt, und die Tische rckten zusammen. Man erzhlte sich,[14-5] woher man kam. Das Prchen, ...
— Eingeschneit - Eine Studentengeschichte • Emil Frommel

... saint their rede reject: He bade farewell with due respect, And crossed, attended by the twain, That river rushing to the main. When now the bark was half way o'er, Rama and Lakshman heard the roar, That louder grew and louder yet, Of waves by dashing waters met. Then Rama asked ...
— The Ramayana • VALMIKI

... rede me, rede me, brother dear, Throughout Merry England, Where will I find a messenger, Betwixt us two to ...
— Peveril of the Peak • Sir Walter Scott

... Eternity, child and heir of all the past times, with their good and evil, and parent of all the future with new questions and significance," on the right or wrong understanding of which depend the issues of life or death to us all, the sphinx riddle given to all of us to rede as we would live ...
— The Nuttall Encyclopaedia - Being a Concise and Comprehensive Dictionary of General Knowledge • Edited by Rev. James Wood

... from our prehistoric ancestors who lived by the chase, got their daily food by it, wooed and won by it, and fought their battles by it in that dim dawn of time when might was right and the law of tooth and claw was the only rede. ...
— The Radio Boys with the Revenue Guards • Gerald Breckenridge

... came with discretion. He would not sweep away by force the accumulation of hundreds of years. Judaism needed reforms of some sort, but these could not be brought about by the Russo-German-doctor-rabbis, men who could rede the seven riddles of the world, but whose knowledge of their own people and its spiritual treasures was close to the zero point. "For a rabbi," writes he, "Torah must be the integer, science the cipher. Had Aristotle embraced Judaism, notwithstanding ...
— The Haskalah Movement in Russia • Jacob S. Raisin

... or fals suspycn. Also of ony mouynge to wrath or to vayne heuynes or vayne gladnes. Also serche in thy mynde yf [thou] haue well spended [the] daye & nyght without synne / as yf [thou] haue prayed or rede to lytell with suche other. Also yf [thou] haue past thy bodes in wordes or in etynge or drynkynge / slepynge or laughynge with suche other. Also remembre how [thou] haste kepte the maundementes of thy souerayne / chastyte / pouerte ...
— A Ryght Profytable Treatyse Compendiously Drawen Out Of Many and Dyvers Wrytynges Of Holy Men • Thomas Betson

... saw him in 1852, speaks of him as "den edlen, hochgebildeten, erfahrenen, weisen, und der Rede sehr kundigen Staatsman Wir (i.e., Ritter,) haben wiederholt seinen wuerdenvollen Reden in den ersten Kreisen in ...
— History of Liberia - Johns Hopkins University Studies In Historical And Political Science • J.H.T. McPherson

... is more to be done here to-night than the slaying of a steed, and a greater evil to be stayed than the shameful eating of meat sacrificed to idols. I have seen it in a dream. Here the cross must stand and be our rede." ...
— The First Christmas Tree - A Story of the Forest • Henry Van Dyke

... that can shape remedy Against these falsely proposed things? Who can the craft such craftes to espy But man? whose wit is e'er ready to apply To thing that sowning is into falshede? Woman! beth'ware of false men! I thee rede. ...
— Fifteenth Century Prose and Verse • Various

... honour & how they that were vycious were punysshed & ofte put to shame & rebuke, humbly byseching al noble lordes & ladyes wyth al other estates of what estate or degree they been of, that shal see & rede in this sayd book & werke, that they take the good & honest actes in their remembraunce & to folowe the same. Wherein they shalle fynde many joyous & playsaunt hystoryes & noble & renomed actes of humanyte gentylnesse & chyualryes. For herein may be seen noble chyvalrye, curtosye, humanyte, ...
— The English Novel in the Time of Shakespeare • J. J. Jusserand

... hevene be on this erthe . and ese to any soule, It is in cloistere or in score . be many skilles I fynde; For in cloistre cometh no man . to chide ne to fighte, But alle is buxolllllesse there and bokes . to rede and to lerne." Piers ...
— Old English Libraries, The Making, Collection, and Use of Books • Ernest A. Savage

... and smyte hem on pecys rawe. and frye hem in white grece. take raysouns of Coraunce and fry hem take oynouns parboile hem and hewe hem small and fry hem. take rede wyne suger with powdour of peper. of gynger of canel. salt. and cast erto. and lat it see with a gode quantite of white grece an serue ...
— The Forme of Cury • Samuel Pegge

... seen not, and he spedde nought, Ygerne, the countesse, so much was in his thought, That he nuste none other wit, ne he ne might for shame Tell it but a privy knight, Ulfyn was his name, That he truste most to. And when the knight heard thia, 'Sir,' he said, 'I ne can wit, what rede hereof is, For the castle is so strong, that the lady is in, For I ween all the land ne should it myd strengthe win. For the sea goeth all about, but entry one there n'is, And that is up on harde rocks, and so narrow way it is, ...
— Specimens with Memoirs of the Less-known British Poets, Complete • George Gilfillan

... Douglas, mark my rede! That heart shall pass once more In fiery fight against the foe, As it was ...
— Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 5 • Charles Sylvester

... your novelist rede you from that record, if he had possession of my diary? Something mysterious and momentous, no doubt, and probably connected with buried treasure. Yet it is only the abstract and brief chronicle of a fair average day; a day happy in having no history worth mentioning; merely a drowsy morning, ...
— Such is Life • Joseph Furphy

... matiere, Essampled of these olde wyse So that it myhte in such a wyse, Whan we ben dede and elleswhere, Beleve to the worldes eere 10 In tyme comende after this. Bot for men sein, and soth it is, That who that al of wisdom writ It dulleth ofte a mannes wit To him that schal it aldai rede, For thilke cause, if that ye rede, I wolde go the middel weie And wryte a bok betwen the tweie, Somwhat of lust, somewhat of lore, That of the lasse or of the more 20 Som man mai lyke of that I wryte: And ...
— Confessio Amantis - Tales of the Seven Deadly Sins, 1330-1408 A.D. • John Gower

... in the mede, Than love I most these floures white and rede, Soch that men callen daisies ...
— Familiar Quotations • John Bartlett

... the booke, That he for sorow, whiche he toke Of that he sigh his sonne dede, Of comfort knewe none other rede, But lete do make in remembrance A faire image of his semblance, And set it in the market place: Whiche openly to fore his face Stood euery day, to done hym ease; And thei that than wolden please The Fader, shuld it obeye, Whan that thei ...
— The Travels of Marco Polo, Volume 2 • Marco Polo and Rustichello of Pisa

... all these matters I shall give heed, my Lady; wherefore I will ask leave of thee, and be gone; and to-morrow I will see thee again, and lay some rede before thee. Meantime, be of good cheer, for thou shalt be made as much of as may be, and live in mickle joy if thou wilt. And if any so much as give thee a hard word, it shall be ...
— Child Christopher • William Morris

... heuene be on this erthe . and ese to any soule, It is in cloistere or in scole . by many skilles I fynde; For in cloistre cometh no man . to chide ne to fizte, But alle is buxomnesse there and bokes . to rede and to lerne, In scole there is scorne . but if a clerke wil lerne, And grete loue and lykynge . for ...
— Medieval People • Eileen Edna Power

... peculiar doctrines in the "Zeitschrift fuer die gesammte Staatswissenschaft" (quarterly, founded 1844, Tuebingen), and the "Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie" (established at Jena, 1863). Also, see A. Wagner's "Rede ueber die sociale Frage" (1872), H. v. Scheel's "Die Theorie der socialen Frage" (1871), and G. Schmoller's "Ueber einige Grundfrage des Rects und der Volkswirthschaft" (1875). A. E. F. Schaeffle, once Minister of Commerce at Vienna, gained considerable ...
— Principles Of Political Economy • John Stuart Mill

... revolvers and Mexican knives—the garb of 'bouncers' in those days—jumped the second hole of the Britishers, dismantled the windlass, and Godamn'd as fast as the Britishers cursed in the colonial style. The excitement was awful. Commissioner Rede was fetched to settle the dispute. An absurd and unjust regulation was then the law; no party was allowed to have an interest in two claims at one and the same time, which was called 'owning two claims.' The Yankees carried ...
— The Eureka Stockade • Carboni Raffaello

... the literature devoted to the Mysteries stands in no relation whatever (gar keinem Verhaltniss) to the importance in reality attached to them."[7] Later in the same connection, after quoting Clement of Alexandria's dictum "Geheime Dinge wie die Gottheit, werden der Rede anvertraut, nicht der Schrift," he adds, "Schriftliche Fixierung ist schon beinahe Entweihung."[8] A just remark which it would be well if certain critics who make a virtue of refusing to accept as evidence ...
— From Ritual to Romance • Jessie L. Weston

... our house after you, and so was Dirk Brower. Kate is wise, Gerard. Best give ear to her rede, and fly!" ...
— The Cloister and the Hearth • Charles Reade

... I did compile the same, Egloges of youth I did call it by name. And seing some men haue in the same delite, At their great instance I made the same perfite, Adding and bating where I perceyued neede, All them desiring which shall this treatise rede, Not to be grieued with any playne sentence, Rudely conuayed for ...
— The Ship of Fools, Volume 1 • Sebastian Brandt

... I. On the Stratification of Language, delivered before the University of Cambridge, 1868 63 Rede Lecture, Part II. On Curtius' Chronology of the ...
— Chips from a German Workshop - Volume IV - Essays chiefly on the Science of Language • Max Muller

... idea of a law of degeneracy, of a "fatal drift towards the worse," is as obsolete as astrology or the belief in witchcraft. The human race has become hopeful, sanguine—SEELEY, Rede Lecture, 1887. ...
— Lectures on Modern history • Baron John Emerich Edward Dalberg Acton

... doublet, good Henry, or do not speak so loud," reiterated the bailie in the same significant tone. "There are Border men in the town who wear the bloody heart on their shoulder. But all this is no rede. ...
— The Fair Maid of Perth • Sir Walter Scott

... ye, as I, have rest, Among us all I rede[282] we cast To bring this thief to dede.[283] Look that we have what we need too For to hold strait ...
— Everyman and Other Old Religious Plays, with an Introduction • Anonymous

... sonne worthy suche parents, ceasseth not aswell concerninge all other things for hime mete and necessary, as also in lerninge, t'expresse his tendre love and affection towardes hime, serchinge by all meanes possible howe he may moste proffitte, dailie heringe hime to rede sumwhatt in thenglishe tongue, and advertisenge hime of the naturell and true kynde of pronuntiacn therof, expoundinge also and declaringe the etimologie and native signification of suche wordes as we have borowed of the Latines or Frenche ...
— Early English Meals and Manners • Various

... you sprede, ffarewel, Mary, my swete fflowre, ffareweyl, Joseph, and God you rede[22], ffareweyl my chylde and my tresowre, ...
— The Growth of English Drama • Arnold Wynne

... up, I seye, and telle me what she is Anon, that I may gone aboute thi nede: Know iche hire ought? for my love telle me this; Thanne wolde I hopen the rather for to spede.' Tho gan the veyne of Troilus to blede, For he was hit, and wex alle rede for schame; 'Aha!' ...
— A Study of Poetry • Bliss Perry

... and true, and sturdily said he— 'Abide, my lord, and rule your own, and take this rede from me, That woman's faith's a brittle trust. Seven twelve- months didst thou say? I'll pledge me for no lady's truth beyond the seventh day.'" —Ballad ...
— Frank Fairlegh - Scenes From The Life Of A Private Pupil • Frank E. Smedley

... says Mr. Romanes, in his Rede Lecture for 1885, {140a} "argues by way of perfectly logical deduction from this statement, that thought and feeling have nothing to do with determining action; they are merely the bye-products of cerebration, or, as he expresses it, the indices ...
— Luck or Cunning? • Samuel Butler

... opinion called it—was punished, firstly, by Hall's house at Otterburn being burned to the ground, together with all his farm buildings and great part of his farm stock; and, secondly, this grievous loss was followed in the time of harvest by a devastating flood in the Rede, which swept away from the rich, low-lying haughs every particle of the fat crops which already had been cut, and were now merely waiting to ...
— Stories of the Border Marches • John Lang and Jean Lang

... helm of the Scyldings: 'Ask not after good tidings. Sorrow is renewed among the Dane-folk. Dead is AEschere, Yrmenlaf's elder brother, who read me rune and bore me rede; comrade at shoulder when we fended our heads in war and the boar-helms rang. Even so should we each be an atheling passing good, as ...
— On the Art of Writing - Lectures delivered in the University of Cambridge 1913-1914 • Arthur Quiller-Couch

... "Thou bed," quoth she, "that hast received two, Thou shalt answer for two, and not for one; Where is the greater part away y-gone? Alas, what shall I wretched wight become? For though so be no help shall hither come, Home to my country dare I not for dread, I can myselfe in this case not rede." Why should I tell more of her complaining? It is so long it were a heavy thing. In her Epistle Naso telleth all. But shortly to the ende tell I shall. The goddes have her holpen for pity, And in the sign of Taurus men may see The stones of her ...
— Chaucer • Adolphus William Ward

... the second Fusillade, and happily the last: it is found too hideous; even inconvenient. They were Two hundred and nine marched out; one escaped at the end of the Bridge: yet behold, when you count the corpses, they are Two hundred and ten. Rede us this riddle, O Collot? After long guessing, it is called to mind that two individuals, here in the Brotteaux ground, did attempt to leave the rank, protesting with agony that they were not condemned men, that they were Police Commissaries: which two we repulsed, ...
— The French Revolution • Thomas Carlyle

... deflower what we will, and make our souls glad with their grief and anguish, and take aback with us to the cities what we will of the thralls, that their anguish and our joy may endure the longer.' Thus will they say: therefore is it my rede that the strongest and hardiest of you women take horse, a ten of you and one to lead besides, and ride the shallows to the Bearing House, and tell them of our rede; which is to watch diligently the ways of the wood; the outgate to the Mark, and the places where the wood is thin and ...
— The House of the Wolfings - A Tale of the House of the Wolfings and All the Kindreds of the Mark Written in Prose and in Verse • William Morris

... rede you, of wine And praise his desert who for yearning doth pine, Where lavender, myrtle, narcissus entwine, With all sweet-scented herbs, round the juice ...
— Tales from the Arabic Volumes 1-3 • John Payne

... Triebe Gras und Chrueter uf, es stoehn in frischere Gstalte Farbigi Blueemli do, und d' Immli choemmen und suge. 'S Wasserstelzli chunnt, und lueg doch,'s Wuli vo Todtnau! Alles will di bschauen, und Alles will di bigruesse, Und di fruendlig Herz git alle fruendligi Rede: 'Choemmet ihr ordlige Thierli, do hender, esset und trinket! Witers goht mi Weg, Gsegott, ihr ordlige ...
— Atlantic Monthly, Vol. 9, No. 54, April, 1862 • Various

... wisest, greatest, best of men, Heard with a natural surprise That mighty midriff improvise. And greater yet the marvel was When from between those massive jaws Fell words to make the views more plain The god was pleased to entertain: "Cheeta Raibama Chunder Sen," So ran the rede in speech of men— "Foremost of mortals in assent To creed of Rational Content, Why come you here to impetrate A blessing on your scurvy pate? Can you not rationally be Content without disturbing me? Can you not take a hint—a wink— Of what of all this rot I think? Is laughter lost upon ...
— Shapes of Clay • Ambrose Bierce

... faultes: I know many seruing men, Seruinge // of good order, and well staide: And againe, I men. // heare saie, there be som seruing men do but ill Terentius. // seruice to their yong masters. Yea, rede Terence Plautus. // and Plaut. aduisedlie ouer, and ye shall finde in those two wise writers, almost in euery commedie, no vn- Serui cor- // thriftie yong man, that is not brought there vnto, ruptel // by the sotle inticement of som lewd seruant. iuuenum. // And euen now in our dayes ...
— The Schoolmaster • Roger Ascham

... I write at once, having an opportunity of sending to Malacca to-morrow. We have been here a week, living in a Chinese house or shed, which reminds me remarkably of my old Rio Negro habitation. I have now for the first time brought my "rede" into use, and ...
— Alfred Russel Wallace: Letters and Reminiscences, Vol. 1 (of 2) • James Marchant

... Prease and dwell with soothfastness, Suffice unto thy good, tho it be small, For horde hath, and climbing tickleness, Prease hath Envy, and wele is blent ore all; Savour no more then thee behove shall, Rede wele thy self that other folk canst rede, And trouth thee shall deliver ...
— Essays on the Stage • Thomas D'Urfey and Bossuet

... did awake of my sweving{1}, The ioyfull birdis merily did syng For myrth of Phebus tendir bem{e}s schene{2}; Swete war the vapouris, soft the morowing{3}, Halesum the vale, depaynt wyth flouris ying{4}; The air attemperit, sobir, and amene{5}; In quhite and rede was all the feld besene{6} Throu Naturis nobil fresch anamalyng{7}, In mirthfull May, of ...
— English Dialects From the Eighth Century to the Present Day • Walter W. Skeat

... bullers (rollers) frae the west like muckle sowthers (soldiers) wi' white plumes. I tauld the captain 'twas a' the faut o' Maxwell. I ne'er cad bide the blellum. Dour an' din he was, wi' ae girn like th' auld hornie. But the captain wadna hark to my rede when I tauld him naught but dool wad cooin ...
— The Crossing • Winston Churchill

... with individuals: Can they rede the riddle of Destiny? This English Nation, will it get to know the meaning of its strange new Today? Is there sense enough extant, discoverable anywhere or anyhow, in our united twenty-seven million heads to discern the same; valour ...
— Past and Present - Thomas Carlyle's Collected Works, Vol. XIII. • Thomas Carlyle

... linn when ye canna wade, I'll kirn the kirn, an' I'll turn the bread; An' the wildest fillie that e'er ran rede I'se tame't,' quoth Aiken-drum! ...
— Spare Hours • John Brown

... certain, that to mynde to shewe wel, how an armie is prepared, to faight a fielde, it should be necessarie to declare, how the Grekes, and the Romaines ordeined the bandes of their armies: Notwithstandyng, you your selves, beeyng able to rede, and to consider these tnynges, by meanes of the auncient writers. I will passe over many particulars: and I will onely bryng in those thynges, whiche I thinke necessarie to imitate, mindyng at this tyme, to give to our exercise of warre, some parte of perfection: The whiche shall make, ...
— Machiavelli, Volume I - The Art of War; and The Prince • Niccolo Machiavelli

... "Cut off his limbs, one a day." Another, "Beat him with a grievous beating every day till he die." A third, "Cut him across the middle." A fourth, "Chop off all his fingers and burn him with fire." A fifth, "Crucify him;" and so on, each speaking according to his rede. Now there was with the Blue King an old Emir, versed in the vicissitudes and experienced in the exchanges of the times, and he said, "O King of the Age, verily I would say to thee somewhat, and thine is the rede whether thou ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 8 • Richard F. Burton

... Rede of the Lord. And the Lord put forth His hand and caused it to touch my mouth, and the Lord said to me, Lo, I have set My Word in ...
— Jeremiah • George Adam Smith

... the fateful offspring shall one day Hurl him from sovereignty to nothingness, And so fulfil the curse old Chronos spake, When from his immemorial throne he fell. And this his doom how to escape not one Of all the gods can rede him saving I. But to me all is known. Then let him sit Triumphant while his thunders roll through heaven, And his hand grasps the flaming thunderbolt; All his artillery shall not save its lord From utter shame and ruin bottomless. Such the ...
— Specimens of Greek Tragedy - Aeschylus and Sophocles • Goldwin Smith

... v: Just above this relation some one has written, "you that rede this underwritten assure yourselfe that yt is a shamfull lye, for Talbot neither studied for any such thinge nor shewed himselfe dishonest in any thinge." Dr. Dee has thus commented upon it:— "This is ...
— The Private Diary of Dr. John Dee - And the Catalog of His Library of Manuscripts • John Dee

... Prebendary of Chiswick, and a rich pastoral staff for the use of the Boy-Bishop. At York Minster were kept a "cope of tissue" for the Boy-Bishop, and ten for his attendants, while an inventory made in 1536 at Lincoln refers to "a coope of rede velvett with rolles and clowdes ordeyned for the barne bisshop with this scripture THE HYE WAY IS BEST." Typical of many other places, the custom was observed at Winchester, Durham, Salisbury, and Exeter Cathedrals; at the Temple Church, London (1307); St. Benet-Fynck; St. ...
— The Customs of Old England • F. J. Snell

... man. Carlyle was fond of his wife, but he was thinking of himself. His "Niagaras of scorn and vituperation" were a vent for his own feelings, a sort of moral gout. The apostle of silence recked not his own rede, nor did he think of the impression which his purely destructive preaching might make upon other people. He himself found in the eternities and immensities some kind of substitute for the Calvinistic Presbyterianism of his childhood. To her it was idle rhetoric and verbiage. ...
— The Life of Froude • Herbert Paul

... burning plague.[FN38] At last folk began to clamour for their money and say, "The merchant Ma'aruf's baggage cometh not. How long will he take people's monies and give them to the poor?" And quoth one of them, "My rede is that we speak to Merchant Ali." So they went to him and said, "O Merchant Ali, Merchant Ma'aruf's baggage cometh not." Said he, "Have patience, it cannot fail to come soon." Then he took Ma'aruf aside and said to him, "O Ma'aruf, what fashion is this? Did I bid thee brown[FN39] ...
— The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night, Volume 10 • Richard F. Burton

... o'er Eargals' plains, Like meteors stars their red eyes gleam; With silver hoofs and broidered reins, They mount the hill and swim the stream; But like the wind through Barnesmore, Or white-maned wave through Carrig-Rede,[87] Or like a sea-bird to the shore, Thus swiftly sweeps ...
— Poems • Denis Florence MacCarthy

... had the honour of delivering the Rede Lecture before the University of Cambridge in June 1894, I attempted a reconstruction of the monastic library, shewing its relationship, through its fittings, to the collegiate libraries of Oxford and Cambridge; and I was also able, following the example set by Dom ...
— The Care of Books • John Willis Clark

... On every side; some hither, some thither, Considered and thought. Then came many thanes To the people's assembly. The heralds called, 550 The Caesar's criers: "This queen you invites, Men, to the hall, that the council-decisions Ye rightly may tell. Of rede have ye need In the place of assembly, of wisdom of mind." Ready they were, the sad-in-mind 555 People's protectors, when they were summoned Through stern command; to court they went Craft's might to ...
— Elene; Judith; Athelstan, or the Fight at Brunanburh; Byrhtnoth, or the Fight at Maldon; and the Dream of the Rood • Anonymous

... und Naturwissenschaft, Rede zum Antritt des Rectorats der Kaiser-Wilhelms Universitaet Strassburg (Strassburg, 1900). The logical principle outlined by Windelband has been further elaborated by Heinrich Rickert in Die Grenzen der naturwissenschaftlichen Begriffsbildung, eine ...
— Introduction to the Science of Sociology • Robert E. Park

... King said to me at Wusterhausen, when your Royal Highness lay prisoner in the Castle of Custrin, and I wished to take your part: 'Nein Grumkow, denket an diese Stelle, Gott gebe dass ich nicht wahr rede, aber mein Sohn stirht nicht eines naturlichen Todes; und Gott gebe dass er nicht unter Henkers Hande komme. No, Grumkow, think of what I now tell you: God grant it do not come true,—but my Son won't die ...
— History of Friedrich II. of Prussia, Vol. IX. (of XXI.) • Thomas Carlyle

... and yours are the only ones who will say that word to me in all this land. Now take my rede, and do you and your folk begone as soon as maybe, for even I cannot hold back men who are not from our ...
— Wulfric the Weapon Thane • Charles W. Whistler

... pretty maidens mine, Who'll rede me riddles three? And she who answers best of all Shall be my own ladye!" I ween they blush'd as maidens do When such rare words they hear— "Now speak thy riddles, if thou ...
— Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine - Volume 57, No. 352, February 1845 • Various

... and went back to his seat, having said no word, and behind him arose much mocking and jeering; but it angered him little now; for he remembered the rede of the elder and how that he had done according to his bidding, so that he deemed the gain was his. So sprang up talk in the hall betwixt man and man, and folk drank about and were merry, till the chieftain ...
— The Story of the Glittering Plain - or the Land of Living Men • William Morris

... obtained two charters, under the Great Seal, of the King's fortress of Ardcardane, and some lands near Tarbert, in North Kintyre, dated 15th September 1498, and 27th August 1499, in which he is designated "Adam Rede de Sterquhite." The service annexed to the first grant included the maintenance of six archers sufficiently provided with bows and arrows, upon occasion of the King's curbing the inhabitants of the Isles, who had long set the royal authority at defiance: "Neenon sustentando sex homines ...
— The Works of John Knox, Vol. 1 (of 6) • John Knox

... spurred his ardent steed And, launching forward with a bound, "Who for thy drowsy priestlike rede Would leave the jovial ...
— Hero Tales and Legends of the Rhine • Lewis Spence

... Philemon found the rede was good, And, turning on the poor hen, He clapt his hands, and stamped, and shooed, Hunting the exile tow'rd the wood, To house with ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of James Russell Lowell • James Lowell

... bataylles that had bene wne in the lande; and other bokes of gestes he them wryte, that were of greate wisdome, and of good learnynge, thrugh whych bokes many a man may him amende, that well them rede, and upon them loke. And thys kynge ...
— Bibliomania in the Middle Ages • Frederick Somner Merryweather

... before Thrasfordham, I will arise indeed and bring with me flame and steel from out the wild-wood. When he shall see the night sky aflame, then shall he know I am at work, and when by day he heareth of death sudden and swift, then shall he know I am not idle. Bid him rede me this riddle: That bringing from chaos order, so from order will I bring chaos, that order peradventure shall remain. Haste you into Bourne, Roger, and so—fare ...
— Beltane The Smith • Jeffery Farnol

... withouten drede, they bene so double in her falshede: For they in heart can think ene thing, and fain another in her speaking: and what was sweet and apparent, is smaterlich, and eke yshent. and when of service you have nede, pardie he will not rein nor rede. but when the Symnel it is eten, ...
— A Learned Dissertation on Dumpling (1726) • Anonymous

... We rede also that there are in Inde men with one eye and no mo. And certein so notably eared that thei hange downe to their hieles with suche a largenesse that they may lye in either of them as vpon a pallet: and ...
— The Principal Navigations, Voyages, Traffiques, and Discoveries - Vol. II • Richard Hakluyt

... roll in wrath behind, And tightening the soul's laxest nerves to steel; True mountain Liberty alone may heal 5 The pain which Custom's obduracies bring, And he who dares in fancy even to steal One draught from Snowdon's ever sacred spring Blots out the unholiest rede ...
— The Complete Poetical Works of Percy Bysshe Shelley Volume I • Percy Bysshe Shelley

... the loud a castel he seighe, Rich and reale and wonder heighe; Al the utmast wal Was cler and schine of cristal; An hundred tours ther were about, Degiselich and bataild stout; The butrass come out of the diche, Of rede gold y-arched riche; The bousour was anowed al, Of ich maner deuers animal; Within ther wer wide wones Al of precious stones, The werss piler onto biholde, Was al of burnist gold: Al that loud was ever ...
— Minstrelsy of the Scottish Border, Vol. II (of 3) • Walter Scott

... yestreen; I saw thee lie under the hollins green, And through thine heart an arrow keen; And out of thy body a smoke did rise, Which smirched the sunshine out of the skies: So if thou God's anointed be I rede thee unto thy soul thou see. For mitre and pall thou hast y-sold, False knight to Christ, for gain and gold; And for this thy forest were digged down all, Steading and hamlet and churches tall; And Christes ...
— Andromeda and Other Poems • Charles Kingsley

... him away Alone o'er the billows, and he but a youngling. Moreover they set him up there a sign golden High up overhead, and let the holm bear him, Gave all to the Spearman. Sad mind they had in them, And mourning their mood was. Now never knew men, 50 For sooth how to say it, rede-masters in hall, Or heroes 'neath heaven, to whose ...
— The Tale of Beowulf - Sometime King of the Folk of the Weder Geats • Anonymous

... of the baby, Sir Walter Scott revived the story in one of his most popular ballads. But of all the versions of the tradition that have come under this writer's notice, the one that departs most widely from Aubrey's statement is given in Mr. G.L. Rede's ...
— A Book About Lawyers • John Cordy Jeaffreson

... combatants are these of the British Navy who refuse to read our war-books? The Kaiser's Heligoland speech! They never read a word of it. The Furchtbarkeit-Proklamation of August,—they never looked at it. The Reichstags-Rede with the printed picture of the Kaiser shaking hands with everybody,—they used it to wrap up sandwiches! What are they, then, Jellicoe and his men? They sit there in their ships and they read nothing! How can we get at them if they refuse to read? How can we frighten them away if they haven't culture ...
— Moonbeams From the Larger Lunacy • Stephen Leacock

... brother, Do not as some ungracious pastors do, Show me the steep and thorny way to heaven, Whilst like a puffed and reckless libertine, Himself the primrose path of dalliance treads, And recks not his own rede.—Shakspeare. ...
— The Golden Censer - The duties of to-day, the hopes of the future • John McGovern



Words linked to "Rede" :   advise, propound, tip, explain, discuss, annotate, misinterpret, tip off, misadvise, consult, counsel, exhort, admonish, commentate, explicate, gloss, dissuade, moralise, talk over, warn, discourage, comment, urge on



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