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Colon   /kˈoʊlən/   Listen
Colon

noun
(pl. colons, cola)
1.
The part of the large intestine between the cecum and the rectum; it extracts moisture from food residues before they are excreted.
2.
The basic unit of money in El Salvador; equal to 100 centavos.  Synonym: El Salvadoran colon.
3.
The basic unit of money in Costa Rica; equal to 100 centimos.  Synonym: Costa Rican colon.
4.
A port city at the Caribbean entrance to the Panama Canal.  Synonym: Aspinwall.
5.
A punctuation mark (:) used after a word introducing a series or an example or an explanation (or after the salutation of a business letter).



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"Colon" Quotes from Famous Books



... of acute inflammation of stomach, duodenum, small intestines, colon, and rectum. Stomach may contain dark grumous fluid, and its mucous coat presents the appearance of crimson velvet. Ulceration is rare, and cases of perforation still less common, the patient dying before it occurs. If life has been preserved for some ...
— Aids to Forensic Medicine and Toxicology • W. G. Aitchison Robertson

... "Hobson's choice" as to the way his tub should sink failed. On July 3d, just after Sampson steamed away to see Shafter, the Maria Teresa was seen poking her nose from the Santiago harbor, followed by the Almirante Oquendo, the Vizcaya, and the Christobal Colon. Under peremptory orders from his Government, Admiral Cervera had begun a mad race to destruction. "It is better," said he, "to die fighting than to blow up the ships in the harbor." These ...
— History of the United States, Volume 5 • E. Benjamin Andrews

... Christobal Colon, as he always signed himself after he entered the service of Spain, was born in Genoa about 1456. Little is certainly known of his early life. His father was a humble wool-carder. The youth possessed but a sorry education, spite of his few months at the ...
— History of the United States, Vol. I (of VI) • E. Benjamin Andrews

... the back view of the cecum, the appendix, a part of the ascending colon, and the lower part of the ileum, with the arterial supply ...
— Appendicitis: The Etiology, Hygenic and Dietetic Treatment • John H. Tilden, M.D.

... ye shall ask in My name.' Our translators have wisely put a colon at the end of that clause, in order that we may not hurry over it too quickly in haste to get to the next one. For there is a substantial blessing and privilege wrapped up in it. Our Lord has just been saying the same thing in the previous verses, but He repeats it here in ...
— Expositions of Holy Scripture: St. John Chaps. XV to XXI • Alexander Maclaren

... stroke. Whereupon, turning suddenly about, he gave Tripet a home-thrust, and upon the back of that, whilst he was about to ward his head from a slash, he ran him in at the breast with a hit, which at once cut his stomach, the fifth gut called the colon, and the half of his liver, wherewith he fell to the ground, and in falling gushed forth above four pottles of pottage, and his soul ...
— Gargantua and Pantagruel, Complete. • Francois Rabelais

... dream of heading off Colon, who has kept on the jump right along, while we took things easy. But I always like to be with you, Fred. You're a cheery sort of a feller, you know; and I feel better every time I ...
— Fred Fenton on the Track - or, The Athletes of Riverport School • Allen Chapman

... mappd to mapped (p. 129: mapped out a line for himself); somethink to something (p. 130: with something like a lovelight); had to has (p. 139: But it looks as if he has paid for his indiscretion.); colon to period (p. 147: so many threads in the plot.); undertand to understand (p. 147: I understand that you sent for me.); Satoris to Sartoris (p. 177: Not that he failed to trust Mary Sartoris.); wondred to wondered (p. 203: Whatever were they doing here, ...
— The Slave of Silence • Fred M. White

... of "Period I", the entry for Beaumont and Fletcher contains an apparent typo, which I have corrected (or altered, at least). For those interested, the original entry for these authors contained no colon before the edition name (Canterbury Poets), and italicised the word 'Plays' only, leaving the words ...
— LITERARY TASTE • ARNOLD BENNETT

... "O callidos homines! O rem excogitatam! O ingenia metuenda!" "What admirable schemers! what a curious contrivance! what formidable talents!" Thus far I spoke in colons; and afterwards by commas; and then returned to the colon, in "Testes dare volumus," "We are willing to produce our witnesses." This was succeeded by the following period, consisting of two colons, which is the shortest that can be formed,—"Quem, quaeso, nostrum sesellit ita vos esse ...
— Cicero's Brutus or History of Famous Orators; also His Orator, or Accomplished Speaker. • Marcus Tullius Cicero

... up, is the longest division of the small intestine. Although somewhat thinner in texture than the jejunum, yet the difference is scarcely perceptible. The large intestine is about five feet in length, and is divided into the Caecum, Colon, and Rectum. The Caecum is about three inches in length. Between the large and the small intestine is a valve, which prevents the return of excrementitious matter that has passed into the large intestine. There is attached ...
— The People's Common Sense Medical Adviser in Plain English • R. V. Pierce

... were housed free, but they paid one-third of the taxes. At the time of sowing, the seed was found by the landlord, but the colon returned half of the amount when ...
— Two Summers in Guyenne • Edward Harrison Barker

... with bilious matter, and the lungs weak, it is as easy to take cold as to roll off a log. If, on the contrary, the lungs are well developed, and the respiratory power large, providing abundant oxygen to keep bright the internal fires, the colon clean, the skin daily washed, and the system hardened by the cold bath, taking cold ...
— Alcohol: A Dangerous and Unnecessary Medicine, How and Why - What Medical Writers Say • Martha M. Allen

... ingratitude blackt is one Cornelius Holland, (88) Who, but for the King's house, lackt wherewith to appease his colon; The case is well amended since that time, as I think, When at court gate he tended with a little stick and a short link. Sing hi ho, Cornelius, your zeal cannot delude us; The reason pray now tell ye us why thus you play'd the ...
— Cavalier Songs and Ballads of England from 1642 to 1684 • Charles Mackay

... boiling of water for domestic purposes, I believe that the copper-treated water is more natural and more healthful.... The intestinal bacteria, like colon and typhoid, are completely destroyed by placing clean copper foil ...
— The Home Medical Library, Volume V (of VI) • Various

... immediate instruments of digestion, the human structure closely resembles that of the simiae (monkey race), all of which, in their natural state, are completely herbivorous. Man possesses a tolerably large coecum, and a cellular colon; which I believe are not found in any ...
— Vegetable Diet: As Sanctioned by Medical Men, and by Experience in All Ages • William Andrus Alcott

... too gay, fellows," remarked a tall lad, whose name was Colon, and who had always been a good friend of Fred Fenton, from the day the latter first came to town. "Buck Lemington is a big bag of wind when it comes to bragging about what he's going to do. I think I can see him buying that shell over at Grafton, that Colonel Simms owns. His boy ...
— Fred Fenton on the Crew - or, The Young Oarsmen of Riverport School • Allen Chapman

... Ileo-colon: the anterior portion of the hind-gut, extending from the mid-gut to the rectum, when not distinctly differentiated into ileum ...
— Explanation of Terms Used in Entomology • John. B. Smith

... restos y Imagen del grande Colon; Mil siglos duran guardados en la Urna, Y en remembranca ...
— Equinoctial Regions of America V3 • Alexander von Humboldt

... stop; stopping &c. v.; closure, stoppage, halt; arrival &c. 292. pause, rest, lull, respite, truce, drop; interregnum, abeyance; cloture [U.S. congress]. dead stop, dead stand, dead lock; finis, cerrado[Sp]; blowout, burnout, meltdown, disintegration; comma, colon, semicolon, period, full stop; end &c. 67; death &c. 360. V. cease, discontinue, desist, stay, halt; break off, leave off; hold, stop, pull up, stop short; stick, hang fire; halt; pause, rest; burn out, blow out, melt down. have done with, give over, surcease, shut up shop; give ...
— Roget's Thesaurus

... favor the giving of injections or enemas unless they are absolutely necessary, we apply them freely in feverish diseases in order to remove from the rectum and lower colon any accumulations of morbid matter, and thus to prevent their reabsorption into the system. In cases of exceptionally stubborn constipation, an injection of a few ounces of warm olive oil may be given. Allow this to remain in the colon about thirty minutes in order to soften the contents of the ...
— Nature Cure • Henry Lindlahr

... deal of the monumental character—I have no means of ascertaining. For the gratification of all tasteful bibliomaniacs, an admirable facsimile is here annexed. The Polygraphia of Trithemius was translated into French, and published in 1601, folio. His work De Scriptoribus Ecclesiasticis, Colon, 1546, 4to., with two appendices, contains much valuable matter. The author died in his 55th year, A.D. 1516: according to the inscription upon his tomb in the monastery of the Benedictines at Wirtzburg. His life has been written by Busaeus, a Jesuit. See La Monnoye's note in the ...
— Bibliomania; or Book-Madness - A Bibliographical Romance • Thomas Frognall Dibdin

... 1842. On the knowledge of the earlier navigators of the rotation of the wind, see Churruca, 'Viage at Magellanes', 1793, p. 15; and on a remarkable expression of Columbus, which his son Don Fernando Colon has presented to us in his 'Vida del Almirante', cap. 55, see Humboldt, 'Examen Critique de l'Hist. de ...
— COSMOS: A Sketch of the Physical Description of the Universe, Vol. 1 • Alexander von Humboldt

... very long and greatly coiled ileum (il.). The duodenum and ileum together form the small intestine; and the ileum is dilated at its distal end into a thick-walled sacculus rotundus (s.r.), beyond which point comes the large intestine. The colon (co.) and rectum (r.) continue the main line of the alimentary canal; but, at the beginning of the large intestine, there is also inserted a great side-shunt, the caecum (cae.), ending blindly in ...
— Text Book of Biology, Part 1: Vertebrata • H. G. Wells

... powerful influence of Ovid. His verse is polished and neat to the verge of weakness. Like Ovid, he shows a preference for the dactyl over the spondee, shrinks from elision, and does not understand how to vary his pauses.[506] Too many lines close with a full-stop or colon, and where the line is broken, the same pause often recurs again and again with wearisome monotony. In this respect Valerius, though never monotonously ponderous like Lucan, compares ill with Statius. As a compensation, his individual ...
— Post-Augustan Poetry - From Seneca to Juvenal • H.E. Butler

... same thing is told, in almost the same words, by Las Casas, since both writers followed the same original documents: "Anidian mas, que quien navegase por via derecha la vuelta del poniente, como el Cristobal Colon proferia, no podria despues volver, suponiendo que el mundo era redondo y yendo hacia el occidente iban cuesta abajo, y saliendo del hemisferio que Ptolomeo escribio, a la vuelta erales necesario subir cuesta arriba, lo que los navios ...
— The Discovery of America Vol. 1 (of 2) - with some account of Ancient America and the Spanish Conquest • John Fiske

... darted headlong, all abreast, down out of the town; overriding all that came in their way, and lashing their poor beasts with their sabers till the horses' flanks ran blood. Just as they neared Cecil they had knocked aside and trampled over a worn out old colon, of age too feeble for him to totter in time from their path. Cecil had reined up and shouted to them to pause; they, inflamed with the perilous drink, and senseless with the fury which seems to ...
— Under Two Flags • Ouida [Louise de la Ramee]

... on either side of it as far outwards as the lower asternal ribs, K L, thus ranging the abdominal parietes transversely, percussion discovers the transverse colon, O, P, O*. The small intestines, S S*, covered by the omentum, P*, occupy the ...
— Surgical Anatomy • Joseph Maclise

... said Courtenay. "We passed the evening in the Hotel Colon, and he regards South American hotels as the natural dwelling-place of cats, and other bad characters. Here, he is at home, and he knew that I ...
— The Captain of the Kansas • Louis Tracy

... (Bartoli, Colon. Anton., Tav. 15) a storm of rain is represented by the head of Jupiter Pluvius, who has a vast outspread beard flowing in long tresses. In the Townley collection, in the British Museum, is a Roman ...
— The Stones of Venice, Volume I (of 3) • John Ruskin

... to fight as desperately for their ideas as this brave Italian. But the story of Colombo (or Colon or Columbus, as we call him,) is too well known to bear repeating. The Moors surrendered Granada on the second of January of the year 1492. In the month of April of the same year, Columbus signed a contract with the King and Queen of Spain. On ...
— The Story of Mankind • Hendrik van Loon



Words linked to "Colon" :   Costa Rican monetary unit, punctuation mark, urban center, vena sigmoideus, El Salvadoran monetary unit, centavo, punctuation, metropolis, sigmoid vein, Panama, sigmoid flexure, city, large intestine, Republic of Panama, port, ascending colon, centimo, sigmoid colon



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